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10:27 AM Downtown Oakland Association
07/23/17
Cash Basis July 2017 Expenses
Curr. Actual Curr.Bud. Curr. Var. Percent YTD Actual YTD Bud. YTD Var. Percent Ann. Budget Variance Explanation
EXPENSES
DISTRICT IDENTITY (DISI)
Marketing 1,666.12 3,750.00 -2,083.88 44% 17,047.62 26,250.00 -9,202.38 64.94% 45,000.00 Favorable TV - strategic projects are pending implementation.

Misc. 0.00 41.67 -41.67 0.0% 0.00 291.65 -291.65 0.0% 500.00
Total DISI Projects 1,666.12 3,791.67 -2,125.55 43.94% 17,047.62 26,541.65 -9,494.03 64.23% 45,500.00
Special Events
Arts & Culture 5,000.00 0.00 5,000.00 100.0% 5,000.00 5,000.00 0.00 100.0% 5,000.00 Art & Soul sponsorship fulfilled.
CBD Sponsored Events 0.00 416.67 -416.67 0% 2,500.00 2,916.65 -416.65 85.72% 5,000.00

Total Special Events 5,000.00 416.67 4,583.33 1,199.99% 7,500.00 7,916.65 -416.65 94.74% 10,000.00
TOTAL DISI 6,666.12 4,208.34 2,457.78 158% 24,547.62 34,458.30 -9,910.68 71.24% 55,500.00
ORGANIZATION
Non-Personnel Expenses
Accounting Expenses 0.00 0.00 0.00 0% 3,250.00 3,000.00 250.00 108.33% 3,000.00 Includes 2016 Tax Filing.
Computer Service & Support 0.00 83.33 -83.33 0% 135.35 583.35 -448.00 23.2% 1,000.00
Consulting & Legal Expenses 0.00 125.00 -125.00 0% 174.92 875.00 -700.08 19.99% 1,500.00
Fees & Permits 0.00 166.67 -166.67 0% 1,751.98 1,166.65 585.33 150.17% 2,000.00 Unfavorable TV - Includes CDA and IDA membership. Within
annual budget.
Insurance -Directors & Officers 0.00 0.00 0.00 0% 1,210.00 1,300.00 -90.00 93.08% 1,300.00 Paid in full.
Insurance -General Liability 0.00 0.00 0.00 0% 5,555.00 6,067.00 -512.00 91.56% 6,067.00 Favorable PV - negotiated lower premium.
Misc. -40.07 125.00 -165.07 -32% 416.43 875.00 -458.57 47.59% 1,500.00
Rent 3,753.50 3,928.50 -175.00 96% 26,202.94 27,499.50 -1,296.56 95.29% 47,142.00 Favorable PV - budgeted rent increase has not yet been
implemented and increase will not be charged retroactively.
Office Furniture & Equipment 157.00 166.67 -9.67 94% 604.62 1,166.65 -562.03 51.83% 2,000.00
Postage, Shipping & Delivery 19.14 41.67 -22.53 46% 83.32 291.65 -208.33 28.57% 500.00
Printing & Copying 26.91 250.00 -223.09 11% 1,740.47 1,750.00 -9.53 99.46% 3,000.00
Supplies 221.80 250.00 -28.20 89% 884.53 1,750.00 -865.47 50.55% 3,000.00
Telephone & Telecommunications 76.91 125.00 -48.09 62% 631.74 875.00 -243.26 72.2% 1,500.00
Total Non-Personnel Expenses 4,215.19 5,261.84 -1,046.65 80% 42,641.30 47,199.80 -4,558.50 90.34% 73,509.00
ORG/Special Projects
Annual Breakfast Meeting 0.00 416.67 -416.67 0% 0.00 2,916.65 -2,916.65 0.0% 5,000.00 Favorable TV - date not yet set for annual event.
Total ORG/Special Projects 0.00 416.67 -416.67 0% 0.00 2,916.65 -2,916.65 0.0% 5,000.00
Personnel & Related
Staff Personnel 15,631.24 17,047.00 -1,415.76 92% 110,283.60 119,329.00 -9,045.40 92.42% 204,564.00 Favorable TV due to percentage of the projected end of year
bonus included in monthly allocation.
Training & Prof. Develop. -387.50 333.33 -720.83 -116% 3,657.42 2,333.35 1,324.07 156.75% 4,000.00 Unfavorable TV - includes costs associated with staff
attendance at WCUDF and IDA. Within annual budget.
Total Personnel & Related 15,243.74 17,380.33 -2,136.59 88% 113,941.02 121,662.35 -7,721.33 93.65% 208,564.00
TOTAL ORGANIZATION 19,458.93 23,058.84 -3,599.91 84% 156,582.32 171,778.80 -15,196.48 91.15% 287,073.00
SOBO
Clean and Safe 57,159.68 56,429.58 730.10 101% 391,993.61 395,007.10 -3,013.49 99.24% 677,155.00
Misc. SOBO Expenses 933.98 750.00 183.98 125% 6,529.85 5,250.00 1,279.85 124.38% 9,000.00 Unfavorable TV - includes unanticipated purchase of uniforms and
paint.
Program Coordinator 2,172.73 2,238.42 -65.69 97% 14,980.32 15,668.90 -688.58 95.61% 26,861.00 Favorable TV due to percentage of the projected end of year
bonus included in monthly allocation.
PROW Maintenance -2,140.42 2,208.33 -4,348.75 -97% 5,619.08 15,458.35 -9,839.27 36.35% 26,500.00 Favorable TV -strategic projects are pending implementation.
Watering 691.90 416.67 275.23 166% 1,649.23 2,916.65 -1,267.42 56.55% 5,000.00 Favorable TV due to weather.
Total SOBO 58,817.87 62,043.00 -3,225.13 95% 420,772.09 434,301.00 -13,528.91 96.89% 744,516.00
TOTAL EXPENSE 84,942.92 89,310.18 -4,367.26 95.11% 601,902.03 640,538.10 -38,636.07 93.97% 1,087,089.00
Downtown Oakland Association
YTD Cash Summary- July 2017

Perm/Temp Variance Comments
Cash Available YTD Actual YTD Budget YTD Variance (For variance amounts of 10% and $10K)
Prior Year Reserve and Assessment Income $980,783.29 $1,048,390.00 ($67,606.71) Unfavorable TV - Dec-16 and April-17 Disbursements
lower than budgeted due to unpaid manually billed
properties tha equal approximately $100K.

Actual reserve has been reduced by $4,625.61 in
payments to P.U.M.A. for renewal services to date.
Actual remaining reserve is $56,602.39
Less Reserve $61,228.00 $61,228.00 $0.00
Total Cash Available $919,555.29 $987,162.00 ($67,606.71) See comment above
Expenses
DISI $24,547.62 $34,458.30 $9,910.68
ORG $156,582.32 $171,778.80 $15,196.48 Favorable PV - budgeted rent increase not yet
implemented. Lower premium negotiated on GL
insurance policy. Favorable TV - Annual Event line item
has not been expended.
SOBO $420,772.09 $434,301.00 $13,528.91

Total Expenses $601,902.03 $640,538.10 $38,636.07 See comments above and expense detail attached.
Cash Remaining $317,653.26 $346,623.90 ($28,970.64)

Current Current
District Profit to
Non-Assessment Funds - Contracted Contract Amount Notes
Date
Services Amount Invoiced
Clorox $181,635.00 $71,317.44 $4,179.40 January and June payments still outstanding.

EBALDC 27,903.65 12,683.41 $12,683.41 Paid through June.
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From: Seal, Zach [mailto:ZSeal@oaklandnet.com]
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 1:11 PM
To: Tori Decker; Steve Snider; Andrew Jones; Savlan Hauser; Jennifer Koidal
Cc: Gallo, Aliza
Subject: Broadway Shuttle update

Hi All –

I want to bring you up to speed on the Alameda County Transportation Commission’s adopted FY
2017/18 and FY 2018/18 allocation plan. Their budget includes significant grant funding for the shuttle but
unfortunately not quite enough to cover all current service hours. Therefore, if we do not eliminate about
$120K of service (10 of the 85 total weekly service hours) by September of this year, we would not be
able to cover our costs.

We’ve tinkered around with a few different options, and the best way to reduce the service while
impacting the least number of passengers is to eliminate the Friday night (10pm-1am) & Saturday night
(6pm-1am) service hours. This would save us the $120K we need to cover costs. As you can see from
the table below, the Friday and Saturday night service has the lowest ridership of all B Shuttle service
hours. By cutting this service and preserving all other service hours, we will continue to serve 95% of B
Shuttle passengers (see table below).

You may remember that we recently extended the weekday service hours from an end time of 7pm to
10pm. This extension will be preserved. After the change, the service hours will be Monday-Friday 7am-
10pm, which will still provide robust free transit service for downtown workers and residents.

Please let us know if you have any questions.

Zach and Aliza

Broadway Shuttle Passenger Trips
Service Days Time Block Passenger Total Annual Percentage of September
Trips per Hour Trips Total Trips 2017
Mon-Fri 7am-10am 198
Mon-Fri 10am-1pm 200
Mon-Fri 1pm-4pm 146 649,908 94.8% Keep
Mon-Fri 4pm-7pm 210
Mon-Fri 7pm-10pm 121
Fri & Sat 10pm-1am 53 35,321 5.2% Eliminate
Sat 6pm-10pm 98
Total 685,229 100%
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Oakland PBID Strategic Plan

Oakland PBIDs Strategic Plan & Renewal | Stakeholder Group Summary Notes
June 20-21 2017 | Prepared by Progressive Urban Management Associates

Stakeholder Groups with a total of 30 participants were held on June 20-21 2017. Groups
were: 1) Retailers 2) Property Owners 3) Developers 4) Restaurant, Bar, and Café Owners 5) Residents, and 6) Arts &
Non-Profits

Highest Rated Improvements by Focus Groups:
Group (participants) Desired Improvements to Downtown (priority votes - 3 votes per person)
RETAILERS (5)  Collaboration with the city to provide greater small business support,
including marketing, rent support, construction mitigation (6)
 Public space maintenance and activation, including empty tree wells and
other neglected areas (2)
 Gaps in downtown; lack of, or no connectivity to Jack London Square (1)
 Parking; open garages on weekends, advertise free parking areas (1)
PROPERTY OWNERS (4)  Reduce homelessness
 Immediate ambassador response to deter crime, deal with graffiti etc.
 District visibility and marketing
 Maintain funding for the free shuttle
 Note: voting tallies unavailable
DEVELOPERS (5)  Reduce homelessness/transients, including nuisance congregation and
behaviors; illegal dumping; safety and security (7)
 Activating/filling gaps (3)
 Importance of a unified voice. Advocacy to mobilize constituencies (3)
 Place making and activation (3)
RESTAURANTEURS (7)  More walkable and active; outdoor seating, parklets, lighting, traffic control,
signage/wayfinding; two-ways vs. one-ways; street/stop lights (7)
 Retain affordability with housing and retail lease rates (4)
 More collaborative approach to marketing Oakland (4)
 Retail presence; fill empty storefronts. City should reconsider ground-level
retail requirement for new developments (4)
 Reduce homelessness; employ innovative solutions (3)
 More festivals and free events
 Utilize technology in marketing downtown
 Cleaning and trimming trees (issues with sea birds). Prevent dumping (1)
RESIDENTS (5)  Reduce homelessness; consider case workers (6)
 Keep the ambassadors!
 Parking; possibly nonprofits could operate parking structure (2)
 Improve safety; street lighting; communication; streamline processes (2)
 Provide public restrooms (2)
 Keep the free shuttle (1)

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9

Oakland PBID Strategic Plan

 More green space downtown; activate public spaces (1)
ARTS & NONPROFIT (4)  Preserve affordability and distinctiveness of place (4)
 Arts/Non-Profit initiatives with the CBDs (2)
 Community Land Trust options (2)
 Innovation with ambassadors e.g., restorative justice training (2)
 Use transportation funds as incentives for community benefits (2)
 Parking: relax standards for new housing developments (1)

Common Themes
Homelessness/Transients
 Compared to San Francisco, there are fewer “obviously homeless” people in downtown Oakland.
However, there is a preponderance of loiterers, panhandlers, drug dealers, and nuisance congregations
that can lead to somewhat aggressive interactions or perceptions of insecurity.
 Homeless encampments adjacent to the districts; along the underpass between Downtown and Jack
London Square, make pedestrian connections between districts problematic.
 Stakeholders are interested in the social service ambassador role, modeled after Sacramento.

Crime & Safety
 While the ambassadors have improved the overall feeling of safety and security, there are still issues
with crime and security that need to be addressed.
 “Smash and grabs” are still prevalent. Most residents feel unsafe leaving cars parked overnight on the
streets.
 Shootings still occur, particularly in areas south of 14th and Broadway, and near the Frank Ogawa Plaza
“hot spot” for criminal activity.

Cleanliness
 Stakeholders have noticed considerable improvements in overall cleanliness since the BIDs were
formed.
 Graffiti removal has improved, but it is still an issue. The most common comment from potential
investors upon visiting Downtown/Uptown is the prevalence of graffiti.

Pedestrian Safety
 Oakland is overall very walkable, transit-accessible.
 Crossing certain streets (such as Harrison St.) can be dangerous.
 Too many drivers run through red lights and otherwise ignore rules that protect pedestrians.
 Lighting improvements could lend to safer pedestrian experience.
 Introducing more parklets could help slow down traffic as well as improve the walking experience.
 Areas of unsafe sidewalks (where cracked and uneven) should be addressed.

Culture, Preservation, and Affordability
 Concerns about potential loss of racial and economic diversity as gentrification increases.
 Rising rents threaten arts and nonprofit organizations.

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10

Oakland PBID Strategic Plan

 Maintain quality of Lake Merritt and the surrounding neighborhoods. There is a sense that Downtown is
farther from Lake Merritt than it really is. Potential to expand BID to Franklin and Webster and focus
revitalization efforts of the 14th St. corridor that leads to the Lake.
 There is a strong sense of community pride among downtown residents, especially within apartment
communities.
 Keep the free shuttle.

Gaps in Retail
 The districts need more retail (already have enough restaurants) to bring more people downtown. Fill in
existing vacant ground floor retail.
 The districts – and Oakland in general – are very “nodal.” There are sections of Downtown and Uptown
with no commercial activation.

Events and Activation
 Entertainment offerings have completely changed in the past 10 or so years. Many evening and weekend
opportunities, such as bars, restaurants, galleries, Fox and Paramount theaters. Sometimes more people
are seen getting off the 19th Street BART than getting on.
 Downtown Oakland still lacks the type of consistent events to keep things busy, compared to other
cities.
 Jack London BID has a more perceivable impact and positive reputation.
 Lack of dog parks/green space in general. Ensure that there’s enough quality green space interspersed
throughout the districts.

City Development and Review Process
 The City does not seem to be very supportive of small businesses. They have very limited resources or
capacity.
 City needs more innovative leaders in all departments.
 Does the BID’s work enable the city to relinquish responsibility for downtown improvement issues?
 The City’s development review process can be difficult.
 Property owners (and businesses and residents) need a stronger voice in city politics. They also want to
see the BID staff feel more empowered to advocate on behalf of downtown interest/issues.

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11

Oakland DOA/LMUDA Strategic Plan

Strategic Plan & Renewal – P.U.M.A. Recap
June 2017

Key Themes

1. Bringing Innovation to Clean & Safe
a. Homelessness and transient issues; introduce new initiatives (reference: Sacramento
programs)
b. Basic/other innovations for clean & safe enhancements

2. Storefront Activation/Business Support
a. Provide marketing/support for local businesses
b. How do we activate storefronts? (P.U.M.A. will research best practices – pop-ups,
incubators)

3. Activate/Empower Residents
a. Create a residents’ council, each representing different apartment buildings
i. Start mobilizing support (i.e., get residents involved in community projects;
P.U.M.A. will research examples)

4. BID Communications
a. Do a better job “telling your story” and letting people know what the BID does
b. Improve advocacy, connections/influence with the city