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Expenditure Plan – Analysis of Fence Segments

The Fiscal Year 2008 Omnibus Appropriations Act includes requirements to assess the potential
impact on local communities due to the construction of fencing. DHS and CBP do not view
these as new requirements, as the assessment of effects on local communities and regular
consultation are part of our standard planning process that enables us to make informed decisions
in deploying tactical infrastructure in the most effective and prudent way.

CBP is deploying a comprehensive approach to secure the border, and fencing is one element of
the layered defense plan. Our comprehensive plan includes additional, substantial investments in
technology, infrastructure and enforcement personnel. Fencing and technology are
complementary tools. Technology allows the Border Patrol to identify and track illegal activity.
Fencing gives Border Patrol agents time they need to respond to illegal cross border activity. A
combination of technology and tactical infrastructure best allows the Border Patrol to do their job
safely and effectively. CBP will continue to work to deploy the right mix of technology, tactical
infrastructure, and personnel to secure the border as effectively and efficiently as possible.

In alignment with the appropriations direction, DHS and CBP will construct infrastructure where
it is the most appropriate means to achieve and maintain effective control over the international
border. Four main factors contribute to fence location decisions: (1) the initial Border Patrol
operational assessments; (2) input from stakeholders, including landowners; (3) environmental
assessments; and (4) engineering assessments, which include the cost to construct.

Operational assessments by the local Border Patrol Agents and Chiefs – based on illegal cross-
border activity and the Border Patrol’s extensive field experience – identified multiple locations
where pedestrian or vehicle fencing would most effectively enhance border security. The
deployment of the tactical infrastructure is geared toward disrupting identified routes into the
United States that are utilized by smugglers and potential terrorists. This infrastructure will
strengthen the Border Patrol’s defense in-depth strategy, providing Border Patrol Agents with a
tactical advantage over illegal entrants and enable Agents to push the depth of intrusion as far
south as possible.

Between the Ports of Entry, CBP operates in three primary environments: urban, rural, and
remote. In an urban environment the illegal entrant can be across the border and into the
community in a matter of minutes or seconds, in rural environments in minutes or hours, and in
remote environments it may take hours or days. Interdiction efforts are achieved by multi-tiered
enforcement operations to include pedestrian and vehicle fencing where it is deemed an
operational advantage to deter entrants. If accessible to entry, urban areas require an inordinate
number of enforcement personnel to effectively confront the illegal activity. In this
environment, pedestrian fencing provides a critical deterrent. In a rural area or remote area, the
time it takes for an illegal entrant to mix into the community infrastructure is greater, thereby
giving enforcement personnel the advantage of time to respond, and reducing the need for
fencing. Places where we do not currently have plans for fencing are areas where the border
environment acts as a natural impediment or other options have been deemed more appropriate
than fencing.

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CBP has gone to great lengths to obtain public input throughout our planning efforts regarding
the construction of fence along the Southwest Border. The Border Patrol has engaged in
extensive discussions about the placement of fencing with state and local stakeholders, including
landowners. As part of these outreach efforts, CBP has contacted almost 600 different
landowners and held 13 town hall meetings.

For purposes of providing this information, CBP is classifying consultation efforts as either: (1) a
town hall, (2) an outreach to public group, (3) an outreach to officials, or (4) a meeting with an
individual stakeholder. A town hall is a meeting that was open to the public, for which notice
was provided or advertised in some way, and at which there was the opportunity for dialogue.
Outreach to public group includes meetings with members of the community that was not
advertised. Outreach to officials covers discussions with representatives of the community at
any level of Government, potentially including mayors, city managers, law enforcement,
Congress, etc. Because stakeholder outreach efforts are performed by Border Patrol Sectors and
typically include communities broader than a single segment of fence, stakeholder input is
provided below at a sector level.

Another important part of CBP’s decision-making process is the formal environmental review
process required by the National Environmental Policy Act – known as “NEPA.” The
environmental planning process includes an evaluation of options to mitigate – avoid, minimize,
reduce, or compensate for – the potential impact of the project on affected local communities.
During the preparation of NEPA documents, 14 areas are evaluated including: land use, geology
and soils; biological and water resources; cultural resources; air quality and noise; aesthetics and
visual resources; and socioeconomics.

The environmental review process includes extensive consultation with federal, state, and local
officials, landowners, and the public. Federal agencies, such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service and the International Boundary and Water Commission, are also included in the review
process.

These extensive consultations have allowed CBP to continue to identify areas where we can
make accommodations to meet both operational needs and other elements in the decision-making
process, including local stakeholder input. Examples include: numerous fence alignment
changes to limit the impact on residences, historical sites, educational institutions and bird
watching areas in the Rio Grande Valley; and alignment changes in Del Rio to avoid the need to
relocate residences. CBP is also continuing to consider viable alternatives, including the
possibility of clearing Carrizo cane to enhance visibility in the Laredo Sector and the
combination of security infrastructure and levee improvements in the Rio Grande Valley Sector.
The feasibility of any such proposal can only be assessed, however, after fully considering the
complex operational, financial, environmental, and construction timeline requirements associated
with the project.

The primary objectives of the engineering and construction strategy are to design and construct
high quality, cost-effective pedestrian fence and associated infrastructure (e.g., access roads,

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staging areas, etc.) that meet CBP and U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) fence performance
requirements.

USBP identified and prioritized locations along the southwest border that operationally require
pedestrian fencing. Site visits were conducted to determine the specific fence style(s) to be
installed, agree on the specific lay down location of the proposed fencing and associated
infrastructure, and identify real estate, environmental, engineering and construction challenges to
be addressed.

Utilizing USBP legacy pedestrian fence designs as well as fence designs tested and evaluated by
SBInet’s Fence Lab program, the USACE developed – with input from USBP and SBI – a tool
kit of fence designs to be constructed. All of the fence tool kit designs comply with the majority
of performance requirements stipulated by USBP and can be constructed of readily available and
plentiful materials. In addition, the fence designs will allow for cost-effective and efficient post
construction operations and maintenance.

We recognize the potential impact that fencing may have on landowners and communities along
the border and remain committed to maintaining an open dialogue with these stakeholders.
However, consultation does not mean stakeholders have veto power over CBP’s operational
assessments. Stakeholder input is but one element in the decision-making process. The location
of fence will ultimately be based upon operational needs.

The use of fencing as a means to secure areas along the border is not a new approach. The
Border Patrol, which has long been recognized as the experts on border security, has received
support for erecting and employing fence as an effective border security measure for over two
decades. Only recently has politics, which itself has created a barrier to reasoned discussion,
been applied to the use of fencing. The intrusion of politics in this national security matter
doesn’t change the fact that the use of fencing is still operationally sound and necessary.

Sector and Segment Analysis

San Diego Sector

The San Diego Border Patrol Sector contacted 53 individual landowners. The Sector held a town
hall meeting in East San Diego County and a meeting with officials at Sector Headquarters.

For potential fencing within the San Diego Sector, CBP drafted an Environmental Impact
Statement and an Environmental Assessment to address different potential segments of fence.
The draft documents were released to the public on January 4 and 8, 2008, respectively. Public
open house meetings were held in San Diego and Alpine, California, respectively on January 17
and 16, 2008 respectively.

The following table provides summary Border Patrol operational assessments for each fence
segment within the San Diego Sector:

Project ID: A-1 State: CA Station: BRF Location: Pack Truck Trail Length (mi): 3.58

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This project traverses Zones (b) (7)(E) which are located in the Chula Vista Station and the Brown Field Station areas of
responsibility. The project is located in the central corridor of San Diego Sector and is situated on the south side of Otay
Mountain. Due to the influx of technology and infrastructure in the Tucson Sector, along with the implementation of programs
such as Streamline in Del Rio, Yuma and Laredo, a shift in the flow of illegal aliens has occurred. This shift has had a direct
affect on San Diego Sector which is the only sector to have an increase in traffic for 3 straight years. This area is the most
heavily trafficked corridor in San Diego Sector due to its remoteness and inaccessibility. Currently, there is no infrastructure in
the Otay Mountain Wilderness and there is no access to the project area. This project would also need to address access to Otay
Mountain as there is no current perpetual access to the west side of Otay Mountain.

The lack of infrastructure in the Otay Mountain Wilderness presents serious officer safety risks to agents assigned in the area.
Since 1996, ( agents have died in the line of duty while patrolling in and around this area. Over the past three years, there have
been (b) reported
b agent injuries and since 2000, there have been (b) BSI rescues.
(7) (7)
The operational requirements would be to construct an access road to the west side of Otay Mountain, construct primary
pedestrian fence and an accompanying patrol road on the south side of Otay Mountain which runs east from the area known as
the “puebla tree” to the 250 border monument. It would also encompass the improvement of the existing 250 road. This project
would certainly raise the level of control, assist in the preservation of the Otay Mountain Wilderness and most importantly allow
us to maintain a far greater level of safety for our agents who patrol the area.
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: ECJ Location: Ceti's Hill Length (mi): 0.57
Ceti’s Hill is a large Hill that is privately-owned and bisected by the international border located in Zone (b of the El Cajon
Station’s area of responsibility. Primary pedestrian fence has been installed on either side of the hill, but )not over the top of the
hill, along the border. Access road have been constructed to the top of the hill on the south side of the border, providing illegal
aliens with opportunities to conduct surveillance from an advantage point and provides an avenue for illegal entry by both
pedestrian and vehicular traffic. The operational requirement for this area would be to construct primary pedestrian fence that
would be installed along the border and tie into the primary pedestrian fence on either side of Ceti’s Hill. Construction of this
fence segment is vital in elevating the level of control for this area.
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: ECJ Location: W. Horseshoe Canyon Length (mi): 0.89
Horseshoe Canyon is located in Zone (b and in the El Cajon Station’s area of responsibility and this component is contained
within BLM land. The existing patrol )road veers northward from the border in order to traverse Sacred Canyon and eventually
Horseshoe Canyon. Consequently, no border barriers, except for very short reaches of permanent vehicle barrier have been
installed in this reach and the area has become a high traffic route for both illegal pedestrians and vehicles. The operational
requirement in this area is to construct and install a primary pedestrian/vehicle fence on the southern toe of the road along the
border. Cut and fill activities would be required at some minor drainages to keep the footprint close to the border and to avoid
creating unsafe driving conditions. The total length of the Horseshoe Canyon component would be approximately 0.93 mile.
The western end of the road/fence would begin near the east side of Sacred Canyon and the eastern end of the road/fence would
dead end into a steep rock outcrop on the eastern side of Horseshoe Canyon.
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: ECJ Location: East Bell Valley Length (mi): 0.12
The East Bell Valley component is located at eastern boundary of Zone (b and the western boundary of Zone (b in the El Cajon
Station’s area of responsibility. Currently, shortfalls in the existing infrastructure
) provide a means of illegal entry
) for both
pedestrian and vehicular traffic. This area is highly utilized by vehicles entering illegally carrying loads of narcotics. The
operational requirement would consist of constructing a short (0.18 mile) segment of patrol road and primary pedestrian fence.
There are existing segments of primary pedestrian fence in this reach that need to be connected. The East Bell Valley
requirement would tie all these segments together and extend the patrol road as far east as practicable. The road would need to
be widened to 60 feet in this reach to accommodate an all-weather patrol road, drag road, and associated parallel drainage
ditches.
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: ECJ Location: Ag Loop Length (mi): 1.02
This project is located in Zone (b in the El Cajon Station’s area of responsibility and is located on BLM land. The Ag Loop road
is located east of the Eastern Railroad
) Tunnel which extends into Mexico. This area is used as an advantage point by illegal
aliens and smugglers, who use either the tunnel or existing high ground at the Ag Loop to breach the border when agents are not
present. Patrol roads in this area are located far to the north, due to terrain restrictions, and the area between the border and the
patrol roads provides excellent concealment opportunities. The operational requirement would be to extend existing access roads
south to the border and then install primary pedestrian fence along the border for approximately 0.5 mile. This action would help
to reduce illegal vehicle and pedestrian traffic and allow agents to gain the advantage of the higher grounds for surveillance.
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: CAO Location: Southwest Rim of Smith Canyon Length (mi): 0.17
This project is located in the Zone (b and is in the Campo Station’s area of responsibility. Smith Canyon is a deeply incised
canyon 8 (approximately 500 feet )deep) that trends northwest to southeast. Smith 9 Canyon is within BLM lands. The current
access road to the western rim of the canyon is located approximately 600 to 800 feet north of the border. There is also an 800-

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foot long gap in the primary pedestrian fence that creates opportunity for illegal pedestrians and vehicles to breach the border.
The operational requirement would be to extend the existing patrol road to the western rim of Smith Canyon and install primary
pedestrian fence along the southern toe of the road. The road segment would be approximately 0.25 mile long and up to 60 feet
wide.
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: CAO Location: Rattlesnake Ridge to Larry Pierce Road Length (mi): 1.06
This project is located in Zone (b and is in the Boulevard Station’s area of responsibility. The existing patrol road in the
Rattlesnake Ridge area is located ) approximately 0.5 mile north of the border and is situated on private lands within San Diego
Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E) utility right-of-way. The length of patrol road is approximately 17 miles starting at the
western edge of Rattlesnake Ridge to the border at Larry Pearce Road. This length and the circuitous route requires up to 30
minutes for agents to respond to incursions or emergency actions that occur within this reach. No primary pedestrian fence has
been installed in this area, so it too, is a high traffic area for illegal pedestrian and vehicular traffic. The operational requirement
would be to construct a patrol road and primary pedestrian fence as close to the border as practicable. Construction of this road
would reduce the amount of time required by agents to respond to emergencies by more than 25 minutes Installation of the
primary pedestrian fence would be expected to preclude illegal vehicle traffic and substantially reduce illegal pedestrian traffic.
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: CAO Location: West edge of Boundary Peak Length (mi): 0.09
This project is located in Zone (b and is the Boulevard Station’s area of responsibility. The existing primary pedestrian fence has
a gap that is approximately 425) feet long. The primary pedestrian fence was not installed by previous Joint Task Force Six (JTF-
6) actions due to large boulders and a small drain. The operational requirement at this location is to install primary pedestrian
fence in the gap. This would remove an opportunity for illegal pedestrian and vehicle traffic to breach the border. It would also
provide continuous and parallel access along the border that currently is not available.
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: BLV Location: Willows Access #1 Length (mi): 1.63
This project is located in Zone (b and is in the Boulevard Station’s area of responsibility. Current access from Old Highway 80
to the border is through private)property. Landowners have threatened to prevent use of these access roads. Consequently, USBP
has recently acquired an easement to access the border. The operational requirement would be to develop this easement into an
access road. In addition to the road the existing infrastructure is considered permanent vehicle barrier and is easily breached by
pedestrian and vehicular traffic. To further enhance operational control the existing permanent vehicle barrier would need to be
retro-fitted into primary pedestrian fence that would allow for the natural water table flow that is associated with the area.
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: BLV Location: Willows Access #2 Length (mi): 2.01
This project is located in Zone (b and is in the Boulevard Station’s area of responsibility. The description and operational
requirement for this project is essentially
) the same. The only difference is that this project is east of the Willows Access #1
project near the Jacumba Airport. The operational requirement would be to develop this easement into an access road. In
addition to the road the existing infrastructure is considered permanent vehicle barrier and is easily breached by pedestrian and
vehicular traffic. To further enhance operational control the existing permanent vehicle barrier would need to be retro-fitted into
primary pedestrian fence that would allow for the natural water table flow that is associated with the area.
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: BLV Location: Airport Mesa Length (mi): 0.05
This project is located in Zone (b and is in the Boulevard Station’s area of responsibility. The subject of the project is a mesa
that is very high and towering over
) the Jacumba and O’Neil valley. Access roads have been constructed to the top of the mesa on
the south side of the border, providing illegal aliens with opportunities to conduct surveillance from an advantage point and
provide an avenue for illegal entry by both pedestrian and vehicular traffic. The operational requirement would be to construct a
road access to the top of the mesa and install primary pedestrian fencing along the border. The effect would allow agents to gain
the advantage of the high ground and thereby allowing greater control of Zone (b
Project ID: A-2 State: CA Station: BLV Location: O'Neil Valley ) Length (mi): 1.47
This project is located in Zone (b and is in the Boulevard Station’s area of responsibility. This area is east of Airport Mesa and
the current infrastructure is considered
) permanent vehicle barrier. This is same type of infrastructure that exists within the
Willows Access projects which lends itself to high volume illegal entries by both pedestrian and vehicle traffic. The operational
requirement would be to retro-fit the existing permanent vehicle barrier with primary pedestrian fencing.

El Centro Sector

The El Centro Border Patrol Sector contacted 17 individual landowners, and held 4 meetings
with officials including the Calexico Mayor and Council Members, the Imperial County Board of
Supervisors, and representatives of the State Assembly and State Senate.

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For potential fencing within the El Centro Sector, CBP drafted an Environmental Assessment
that was released to the public on December 26, 2007. A public open house meeting was held in
Imperial, California, on January 9, 2008.

The following table provides summary Border Patrol operational assessments for each fence
segment within the El Centro Sector:

Project ID: B-2 State: CA Station: ELS Location: Mon 224 to ELS West Checks Length (mi): 2.36
This section of border with Mexico has seen substantial illegal cross-border activity. Many illegal aliens have attempted entry in
this area via foot. Illegal vehicle crossings are also common in this area as smugglers attempt to bring in illegal aliens and illicit
narcotic substances. The threat of bringing in terrorists or terrorists’ weapons is also a possibility. California State Highway 98 is
a short distance from the International Border with Mexico in this section, providing a route to major thoroughfares to the interior
of the United States. Additionally, the area identified in Section B-2 is likely to become urban on the Mexican side of the border
in the future. Currently, there are plans to build a “Silicone Valley” type area in Mexico and as a result there have been talks
about opening another port of entry to facilitate commerce. If this occurs, the need for infrastructure in this section will become
of paramount importance. El Centro Sector believes it wise and operationally sound to place infrastructure in this section to curb
the flow of illegal aliens and narcotics before the area becomes completely urban.
Project ID: B-4 State: CA Station: CAX Location: CAX East Checks Length (mi): 8.59
This section of border with Mexico sees a steady flow of illegal cross-border activity with illegal alien smuggling and narcotic
smuggling being two of the most common. Approximately two miles of this section is situated immediately north of the Mexican
city of Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico. Mexicali’s population (1.5 million) is large compared to the cities north of the border
in the Imperial Valley, California (150,000). This equates to an ever present criminal network with established roots in Mexico.
Much of this section is also a short distance to California State Highway 98, again offering a route to the interior of the United
States. Another concern in this area is the potential for border violence due to lack of infrastructure. Criminal elements can
quickly and easily blend into a city of 1.5 million after committing acts of violence upon law enforcement officers or other 3rd
parties due to the lack of infrastructure.
Project ID: B-5A State: CA Station: CAX Location: Length (mi): 19.16
Section B-5A is remote and isolated somewhat. This provides criminals, illegal aliens, and others who would harm the United
States an attractive option to enter our country covertly. This section is notorious for human smuggling and vehicles laden with
illegal aliens or narcotics frequently attempt to enter the United States here. Due to this section’s large patrol area, infrastructure
is helpful and desired to allow law enforcement officials extra time to respond to illegal entries and other crimes against the
United States. California State Highway 98 and U.S. Interstate 8 are accessible to illegal aliens, narcotics smugglers, and
terrorists from this section.
Project ID: B-5B State: CA Station: CAX Location: Length (mi): 2.85
This section runs through the Imperial Sand Dunes Recreational Area and is of course bordered by Mexico to the south. This area
is used primarily by narcotic smugglers, but human smuggling also occurs here. Vehicles crossing the border with large narcotic
loads are common. During the fall and winter months the area sees an explosion of legitimate traffic for recreational off-road use.
This makes it particularly difficult for law enforcement officials to keep track of legitimate traffic and the criminal element
without infrastructure in place. The criminal enterprises that operate here take advantage of the lack of infrastructure and attempt
to blend in with the legitimate traffic. The eastern portion of this section happens to be a seam with the Yuma Border Patrol
Sector. Yuma Sector is proposing building infrastructure up to our seam which makes it prudent to place infrastructure here as
well so the criminal enterprises cannot exploit a gap in the seams.

Yuma Sector

The Yuma Border Patrol Sector contacted 23 individual landowners. In addition, the Border
Patrol met with concerned citizens and members of the Yuma Rod and Gun Club, with members
of the Sheriff’s Department, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, and Arizona Game and Fish in attendance.
Five separate meetings were also held with local officials including public land managers, the
Sheriff’s Department, the Quechan and Cocopah Indian Nations, and the Mayor of San Luis,
Arizona.

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For potential fencing within the Yuma Sector, CBP drafted a Supplemental Environmental
Assessment that was released to the public on January 22, 2008. A public open house meeting
was held in Yuma, Arizona on January 30, 2008.

The following table provides summary Border Patrol operational assessments for each fence
segment within the Yuma Sector:

Project ID: C-1 State: CA Station: Location: Andrade POE: Imperial sand dunes to CA-AZ line Length (mi): 10.28
CAX/YUS
The western end of the proposed alignment is adjacent to Port of Entry Andrade and a populated urban area. Additionally, there
is a large parking lot adjacent to the international boundary which allows relatively quick access to routes of egress. The
remainder of the alignment is fairly remote and not easily accessed by Border Patrol agents. In Fiscal Year 2007, the area
experienced (b) illegal pedestrian entries and (b) illegal vehicle “drive-thru” entries.
(7) State: AZ
Project ID: C-2B Station: YUS (7) Location: From end of PF70 project to County 18 Length (mi): 3.70
The proposed alignment of the fence is adjacent to a populated urban area which allows illegal entrants quick access to several
routes of egress from the Colorado River Corridor. Several National Guard (NG) Entry Identification Teams (EIT) are
temporarily deployed within the area and have curtailed illegal entries significantly. It is anticipated that when NG support is
withdrawn, illegal entries will increase significantly. Prior to deployment of NG support, this area experienced (b) pedestrian
illegal entries and ( illegal vehicle entries in one month period from March 1 to March 31, 2006.
b
Tucson Sector

The Tucson Border Patrol Sector contacted 46 individual landowners. The Sector held town hall
meetings in Huachuca, Arizona and with Tohono O’odham Legislative Council and community
members in Sells, Arizona. The Border Patrol also held five meetings with public groups
including the Nogales Station’s Citizen Advisory Board, members of the San Rafael Valley
Association, Sonoita community stakeholders, the Southern Arizona Association of Realtors, and
members of the Malpai Ranch Community. In addition, eight outreach meetings were held with
officials including leadership from the City of Nogales, law enforcement, public land managers,
members of Congress, and a separate meeting with the Tohono O’odham Legislative Council.

For potential fencing within the Tucson Sector, CBP drafted an Environmental Assessment that
was released to the public on January 18, 2008. A public open house meeting was held in
Tucson, Arizona on January 31, 2008.

The following table provides summary Border Patrol operational assessments for each fence
segment within the Tucson Sector:

Project ID: D-2 State: AZ Station: AJO Location: AJO 2mi east of POE Length (mi): 3.10
In 2001, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) prepared the Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact
Statement (SPEIS) for INS and Joint Task Force 6 (JTF-6) Activities along the U.S.-Mexico Border. Additionally, in December
2003, National Park Service (NPS) issued a Final Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Final EA for the Proposed
Permanent Vehicle Barriers (PVB) across the southern boundary of the Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (OPCNM) in
Pima County, Arizona. The PVBs span approximately 30 miles of the U.S.–Mexico border. The PVBs constructed by NPS have
served effectively and efficiently in deterring and hindering illegal vehicle traffic on the OPCNM. However, due to recent
legislation and shifts in IA traffic, there is a need to construct primary pedestrian fence.

This project is to construct and deploy primary fence on the border with Mexico along both sides of the Lukeville Port Of Entry.
This fence will extend out in both directions. The national strategy, regarding border infrastructure, is the construction of fences
in urban areas, and vehicle barriers in rural areas. This is the only place in Ajo area of responsibility that is considered urban.

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The project corridor for the proposed action extends 2.1 miles to the west and 3.1 miles to the east of the Lukeville Port of Entry
(POE), this encompasses approximately 5.2 miles total.
Project ID: D-2 State: AZ Station: AJO Location: AJO 2mi west of POE Length (mi): 2.10
In 2001, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) prepared the Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact
Statement (SPEIS) for INS and Joint Task Force 6 (JTF-6) Activities along the U.S.-Mexico Border. Additionally, in December
2003, National Park Service (NPS) issued a Final Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Final EA for the Proposed
Permanent Vehicle Barriers (PVB) across the southern boundary of the Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (OPCNM) in
Pima County, Arizona. The PVBs span approximately 30 miles of the U.S.–Mexico border. The PVBs constructed by NPS have
served effectively and efficiently in deterring and hindering illegal vehicle traffic on the OPCNM. However, due to recent
legislation and shifts in IA traffic, there is a need to construct primary pedestrian fence.

This project is to construct and deploy primary fence on the border with Mexico along both sides of the Lukeville Port Of Entry.
This fence will extend out in both directions. The national strategy, regarding border infrastructure, is the construction of fences
in urban areas, and vehicle barriers in rural areas. This is the only place in Ajo area of responsibility that is considered urban.

The project corridor for the proposed action extends 2.1 miles to the west and 3.1 miles to the east of the Lukeville Port of Entry
(POE), this encompasses approximately 5.2 miles total.
Project ID: D-5A State: AZ Station: NGL Location: 1mi W to 3mi W of Mariposa POE Length (mi): 2.00
Construct a 2 mile long primary pedestrian fence along the U.S./Mexico Border in support of the National Strategy. The fence
will start one mile to the west of the Mariposa Port of Entry and run to a ridge known to agents as the “60’s Ridge”. This fence is
designed to prevent illegal aliens and vehicles from entering the United States undetected and unabated. Along the route of the
project are at least two sites that are notoriously used by Narcotics Trafficking Organizations (NTO) that drive vehicles laden
with illegal drugs into the country.

There are also any number of locations along the currently porous barbed wire fence that are used by illegal aliens and human
“mules” who smuggle illegal drugs into this country. Construction of this fence will not only disrupt illicit traffic as it exists, but
will act as a “force multiplier” by allowing more agents who would normally patrol this area to deploy to more remote areas in an
effort to bring them under manageable control.
Project ID: D-5B State: AZ Station: NGL Location: NGL 1mi E to 6mi E of POE Length (mi): 5.16
Construct a 5 mile long primary pedestrian fence along the U.S./Mexico Border in support of the National Strategy. The fence
will start one mile to the east of the DeConcini Port of Entry and run to the Santa Cruz River area. This fence is designed to
prevent illegal aliens and vehicles from entering the United States undetected and unabated. Along the route of the project are
several sites that are notoriously used by NTO that drive vehicle laden with illegal drugs into the country.

There are also any number of locations along the currently porous barbed wire fence that are used by illegal aliens and human
“mules” who smuggle illegal drugs into this country. Construction of this fence will not only disrupt illicit traffic as it exists, but
will act as a “force multiplier” by allowing more agents who would normally patrol this area to deploy to more remote areas in an
effort to bring them under manageable control.
Project ID: D-6 State: AZ Station: NGL Location: E Deconcini POE Length (mi): 2.23
Construct a 2.6 mile long primary pedestrian fence along the U.S./Mexico Border in support of the National Strategy. The fence
will start near the east bank of the Santa Cruz River and run to a section of land bound by the U.S. Forest Service. This fence is
designed to prevent illegal aliens and vehicles from entering the United States undetected and unabated. Along the route of the
project are several sites that are notoriously used by NTO that drive vehicle laden with illegal drugs into the country. This area is
known for shootouts with law enforcement officers and aggressive dangerous maneuvers as they attempt to elude officers.

There are also any number of locations along the currently porous barbed wire fence that are used by illegal aliens and human
“mules” who smuggle illegal drugs into this country. Construction of this fence will not only disrupt illicit traffic as it exists, but
will act as a “force multiplier” by allowing more agents who would normally patrol this area to deploy to more remote areas in an
effort to bring them under manageable control.
Project ID: E-2A State: AZ Station: NCO Location: NCO 17.75mi W to San Pedro River Length (mi): 6.44
Two Elementary Schools and a Middle School in close proximity of the border in this area. There is also a Bible College in this
area and a Catholic Chapel/Shrine. Based on their close proximity to the border any of these educational facilities could be
exploited as a target for terrorist activity.

There are three recreation areas adjoining the border in this area. Coronado National Memorial, the San Pedro Riparian National
Conservation Area, and the Coronado National Forest (Huachuca Mountains). Patrol roads are very limited within these areas
and smuggling organizations capitalize on that fact. Remote Video Surveillance System (RVSS) camera coverage is limited

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within these recreational areas, due to terrain and vegetation, and will continue to be so with SBInet. Vehicle access for the
public in the San Pedro Riparian is currently closed. This area could be re-opened to the public in the future, due to increased
security afforded by effective pedestrian fencing in the area. The amount of alien trash discarded within all three recreation areas
is monumental.

The “funneling effect” of other infrastructure projects is being felt in this area. Several other areas that were utilized by narcotics
smuggling organizations now have completed fencing. Naco Agents are now seeing narcotics smuggling activity daily within the
E2A project area, due to other areas being closed off. This area has already seen more drive-thrus in the first 3.5 months of
FY’08 than in the entire last fiscal year. The “removable vehicle barrier” should be added within the 100 year flood plain of the
San Pedro River to slow the upward trend in drive-thru narcotics traffic.

The population immediately north of the E-2A project area is booming. What was once mostly ranch land is now mostly rural
housing. A large upscale housing area is under development right now.

This project area is a major narcotics smuggling corridor and always has been. The Big Sandy drive thru area is within this fence
project area. Recent housing constructed allows rapid concealment of both narcotics and illegal aliens once an entry has been
made. Within close proximity to State Route 92, NTO vehicles have a variety of residential roads that they can utilize to access
the highway from the border.

The Huachuca Mountains have become a major smuggling corridor for narcotics mules and large groups of other-than-Mexican
aliens.

This area also has a significant National Security issue, the US Army’s Fort Huachuca is a few miles north of this project area.
Based on the close proximity to the border this military facility could be exploited as a target for terrorist activity.
Project ID: E-2B State: AZ Station: NCO Location: Monument 97 to 4.75mi W of POE Length (mi): 6.94
An area heavily used by drive-thru organizations in past years. The area consists of mostly ranchland with a few residences. Most
alien traffic funnels toward the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area after entry and as it progresses north from the
immediate border. All drainages west of Naco, Arizona lead to the San Pedro, and the alien traffic normally follows the
drainages. Due to the necessary clearing and grubbing of the land in preparation of fence construction and constructed low water
crossings, Naco Agents now have better vehicle access to the border in this area than ever before.

So far this year, due to the fence being nearly complete, there have been no drive-thrus in this area.
Project ID: E-3 State: AZ Station: NCO Location: NCO 3.4mi E to 12.4mi E of POE Length (mi): 5.07
This area is a major alien smuggling route and a major drive-through area. Roads are in close proximity to the border within this
project area. A county road adjoins the border easement for approximately two miles; this provides an easy access to State Route
92 and 80. Very few accessible roads north in this area makes apprehending foot traffic close to the border a necessity.
Mountainous terrain makes patrolling/detecting/apprehending north of the immediate border very difficult. There are no RVSS
cameras in this area. Alien deaths regularly occur in this area due to the steep, high desert terrain. There is a major gas pipeline
that crosses the border in this area. This area is the seam between the Naco and Douglas Station AORs.
Project ID: F-1 State: AZ Station: NCO Location: From existing fence to Kings Ranch Length (mi): 0.97
Construct a 1 mile long Pedestrian/Bollard fence along the U.S./Mexico Border to include all necessary road improvements and
redesign to accommodate the amount of water flow that occurs in the area in question. The fence will start at Plantation road and
the International Boundary (approximately 4 miles west of the Douglas Arizona Port of Entry) and continue westbound for
approximately 1 mile where it will join the 10-46 Fence at Kings Highway and the International Boundary. This fence is
designed to prevent illegal aliens and vehicles from entering the United States while providing a means for water to continue its
natural course.

Construction of this fence will complete the Douglas AOR on the west side with regards to primary fence and will act as a “force
multiplier” by allowing more agents who would normally patrol this area to deploy to more remote areas in an effort to bring
them under manageable control. If constructed the Douglas Station Westside AOR would no longer have open areas where a
smuggler could simply drive or walk across the border.

El Paso Sector

The El Paso Border Patrol Sector contacted 49 individual landowners. The Border Patrol held
town hall meetings in Animas, Sunland Park, and Deming, New Mexico and Fort Hancock,
Texas. In addition, the Sector met with public groups in Deming and Alamogordo, New Mexico.

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Also, 19 outreach events were held with local officials, including city councils and
representatives of utilities, Tribes, universities, and law enforcement.

For potential fencing within the El Paso Sector, CBP is in the process of drafting a Supplemental
Environmental Assessment. A separate Supplemental Environmental Assessment specifically
for potential fencing in the area of Deming, New Mexico was released to the public on January
18, 2007. A public open house meeting has not yet been scheduled.

The following table provides summary Border Patrol operational assessments for each fence
segment within the El Paso Sector:

Project ID: H-2A State: NM Station: DNM Location: 17 miles West of COL POE beginning 3 miles West Length (mi): 14.11
of COL POE
The Deming Station has historically been one of the busiest Stations in El Paso Sector. This is largely due to the terrain features
on either side of the Columbus, New Mexico (NM) Port of Entry (POE). The town of Palomas, Chihuahua, Mexico is also major
transportation hub with several Mexican bus lines. The Alien Smuggling Organizations (ASOs) as well as the Drug Smuggling
Organizations (DSO’s) both have a well developed foot-hold in the immediate area.

PF-225 Projects H-2A, I-1A, and I-1B are all located within the eastern half of Deming’s AOR. This area is geographically the
easiest area to affect an illegal entry due to the relatively flat terrain and the availability of U.S. roads that help with the quick
egress. During the last year, 60+% of all walking entries and 98% of all drive-thrus occurred within this 27 mile stretch. These 3
projects, combined with the technology package to follow, will effectively raise the levels of control within the Deming Station
Area Of Responsibility (AOR).

The Border Community of Las Palomas, Chihuahua, Mexico, directly influences the high percentage of illegal cross border
activity as it is the largest town on the Mexico/New Mexico border. It is a natural hub for illegal activity attempting to enter the
U.S. There are also two small farming communities west of Las Palomas, Las Palmas and Las Chepas, that contribute to the
smuggling infrastructure.

Las Palomas, Chihuahua, Mexico has a large population base with an infrastructure of roads, highways and businesses conducive
to support of large-scale alien smuggling operations between Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico (south of El Paso, Texas) and Agua
Prieta, Sonora, Mexico (south of Douglas, Arizona). Trucks, buses, taxis and other conveyances transport people into Las
Palomas on a daily basis. These people come to Palomas with the intention of being smuggled into the U.S.

Although, entry attempts and apprehensions are down in the Deming AOR, assaults are up by over 400% due to the frustration of
alien and narcotic smugglers.
Project ID: I-1A State: NM Station: DNM Location: DNM 1.5mi E to 3mi E of POE Length (mi): 2.56
The Deming Station has historically been one of the busiest Stations in El Paso Sector. This is largely due to the terrain features
on either side of the Columbus, New Mexico (NM) Port of Entry (POE). The town of Palomas, Chihuahua, Mexico is also major
transportation hub with several Mexican bus lines. The Alien Smuggling Organizations (ASOs) as well as the Drug Smuggling
Organizations (DSO’s) both have a well developed foot-hold in the immediate area.

PF-225 Projects H-2A, I-1A, and I-1B are all located within the eastern half of Deming’s AOR. This area is geographically the
easiest area to affect an illegal entry due to the relatively flat terrain and the availability of U.S. roads that help with the quick
egress. During the last year, 60+% of all walking entries and 98% of all drive-thrus occurred within this 27 mile stretch. These 3
projects, combined with the technology package to follow, will effectively raise the levels of control within the Deming Station
Area Of Responsibility (AOR).

The Border Community of Las Palomas, Chihuahua, Mexico, directly influences the high percentage of illegal cross border
activity as it is the largest town on the Mexico/New Mexico border. It is a natural hub for illegal activity attempting to enter the
U.S. There are also two small farming communities west of Las Palomas, Las Palmas and Las Chepas, that contribute to the
smuggling infrastructure.

Las Palomas, Chihuahua, Mexico has a large population base with an infrastructure of roads, highways and businesses conducive
to support of large-scale alien smuggling operations between Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico (south of El Paso, Texas) and Agua
Prieta, Sonora, Mexico (south of Douglas, Arizona). Trucks, buses, taxis and other conveyances transport people into Las
Palomas on a daily basis. These people come to Palomas with the intention of being smuggled into the U.S.

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Although, entry attempts and apprehensions are down in the Deming AOR, assaults are up by over 400% due to the frustration of
alien and narcotic smugglers.
Project ID: I-1B State: NM Station: Location: 3mi E of POE to Luna County Line Length (mi): 9.89
DNM/STN
The Deming Station has historically been one of the busiest Stations in El Paso Sector. This is largely due to the terrain features
on either side of the Columbus, New Mexico (NM) Port of Entry (POE). The town of Palomas, Chihuahua, Mexico is also major
transportation hub with several Mexican bus lines. The Alien Smuggling Organizations (ASOs) as well as the Drug Smuggling
Organizations (DSO’s) both have a well developed foot-hold in the immediate area.

PF-225 Projects H-2A, I-1A, and I-1B are all located within the eastern half of Deming’s AOR. This area is geographically the
easiest area to affect an illegal entry due to the relatively flat terrain and the availability of U.S. roads that help with the quick
egress. During the last year, 60+% of all walking entries and 98% of all drive-thrus occurred within this 27 mile stretch. These 3
projects, combined with the technology package to follow, will effectively raise the levels of control within the Deming Station
Area Of Responsibility (AOR).

The Border Community of Las Palomas, Chihuahua, Mexico, directly influences the high percentage of illegal cross border
activity as it is the largest town on the Mexico/New Mexico border. It is a natural hub for illegal activity attempting to enter the
U.S. There are also two small farming communities west of Las Palomas, Las Palmas and Las Chepas, that contribute to the
smuggling infrastructure.

Las Palomas, Chihuahua, Mexico has a large population base with an infrastructure of roads, highways and businesses conducive
to support of large-scale alien smuggling operations between Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico (south of El Paso, Texas) and Agua
Prieta, Sonora, Mexico (south of Douglas, Arizona). Trucks, buses, taxis and other conveyances transport people into Las
Palomas on a daily basis. These people come to Palomas with the intention of being smuggled into the U.S.

Although, entry attempts and apprehensions are down in the Deming AOR, assaults are up by over 400% due to the frustration of
alien and narcotic smugglers.
Project ID: J-1 State: NM Station: STN Location: STN 1mi W of POE Length (mi): 1.15
Colonia Rancho Anapra, Chihuahua, Mexico is a rural residential suburb of Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico with
approximately 60,000 inhabitants. Approximately 19,000 residents inhabit the City of Sunland Park, NM.

Recent intelligence supports information that human traffickers and aliens are opting to illegally enter the United States in the
Santa Teresa AOR due to an entrenched network of organized smugglers in the area. Intelligence further indicates that alien
smuggling organizations are utilizing the Union Pacific railway system and domestic/civilian automobiles to traverse through the
Santa Teresa AOR. These rail lines are literally feet from the border in some areas.

All fencing project areas in the Santa Teresa AOR consist of sandy flat desert giving pedestrians or vehicles the ability to easily
cross the border.

Areas immediately north of the Santa Teresa POE consist of several rural communities that provide the infrastructure to harbor
and transport aliens. NM State Route 9 gives smugglers an avenue of transit out of El Paso. This route also circumvents
established Border Patrol Checkpoints on IH-10. The planned development of a housing project directly north of the POE will
increase infrastructure necessary to harbor and transport both aliens and narcotics. This improved urban area will greatly reduce
the depth to tolerance ratio.
Project ID: J-1 State: NM Station: STN Location: STN 1mi E of POE Length (mi): 1.15
Colonia Rancho Anapra, Chihuahua, Mexico is a rural residential suburb of Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico with
approximately 60,000 inhabitants. Approximately 19,000 residents inhabit the City of Sunland Park, NM.

Recent intelligence supports information that human traffickers and aliens are opting to illegally enter the United States in the
Santa Teresa AOR due to an entrenched network of organized smugglers in the area. Intelligence further indicates that alien
smuggling organizations are utilizing the Union Pacific railway system and domestic/civilian automobiles to traverse through the
Santa Teresa AOR. These rail lines are literally feet from the border in some areas.

All fencing project areas in the Santa Teresa AOR consist of sandy flat desert giving pedestrians or vehicles the ability to easily
cross the border.

Areas immediately north of the Santa Teresa POE consist of several rural communities that provide the infrastructure to harbor
and transport aliens. NM State Route 9 gives smugglers an avenue of transit out of El Paso. This route also circumvents

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established Border Patrol Checkpoints on IH-10. The planned development of a housing project directly north of the POE will
increase infrastructure necessary to harbor and transport both aliens and narcotics. This improved urban area will greatly reduce
the depth to tolerance ratio.
Project ID: J2 State: NM Station: STN Location: West side of Blackie’s gate to west side of the cattle Length (mi): 3.49
pens
Colonia Rancho Anapra, Chihuahua, Mexico is a rural residential suburb of Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico with
approximately 60,000 inhabitants. Approximately 19,000 residents inhabit the City of Sunland Park, NM.

Recent intelligence supports information that human traffickers and aliens are opting to illegally enter the United States in the
Santa Teresa AOR due to an entrenched network of organized smugglers in the area. Intelligence further indicates that alien
smuggling organizations are utilizing the Union Pacific railway system and domestic/civilian automobiles to traverse through the
Santa Teresa AOR. These rail lines are literally feet from the border in some areas.

All fencing project areas in the Santa Teresa AOR consist of sandy flat desert giving pedestrians or vehicles the ability to easily
cross the border.

The terrain is generally level, consisting of scrub brush and loose arid sand. The sand base can vary from 2 feet to 10 feet deep
and maintaining drag roads are a huge challenge. This isolated location has no tactical infrastructure, no stadium style lights and
limited access roads. Directly south of the international border an unimproved access dirt road parallels the border. This road
provides primary staging areas for illegal cross border activity. The 4 strand barbed wire fence in the area is the only marker to
signify the international boundary; it offers absolutely no deterrent effect. This area was also the site of a Mexican military
incursion. Ground sensors are the only technology currently deployed in this area.
Project ID: J-3 State: NM Station: STN Location: STN Blackie's Gate to W end Sunland Length (mi): 1.08
Colonia Rancho Anapra, Chihuahua, Mexico is a rural residential suburb of Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico with
approximately 60,000 inhabitants. Approximately 19,000 residents inhabit the City of Sunland Park, NM.

Recent intelligence supports information that human traffickers and aliens are opting to illegally enter the United States in the
Santa Teresa AOR due to an entrenched network of organized smugglers in the area. Intelligence further indicates that alien
smuggling organizations are utilizing the Union Pacific railway system and domestic/civilian automobiles to traverse through the
Santa Teresa AOR. These rail lines are literally feet from the border in some areas.

All fencing project areas in the Santa Teresa AOR consist of sandy flat desert giving pedestrians or vehicles the ability to easily
cross the border.

This area consists of a deep sand base with a natural valley that provides immediate access from Mexico into the United States.
No tactical infrastructure is present in this location and deploying ground sensors is very difficult. This area is adjacent to the
New Mexico Landfill and heavy equipment vehicles are consistently working and driving through the area. Aliens routinely
attempt to illegally enter the U.S. by crossing through the landfill creating a dangerous situation for themselves, agents and
workers.

Approximately a quarter mile of this area is located near the small border Colonia Rancho Anapra, Chihuahua, Mexico. The
closest town in the United States is located about a quarter of a mile north. Aliens entering this area can reach various
transportation hubs (buses, taxis, shuttle vans) in approximately 5 minutes. The deployment of pedestrian/vehicle fence in this
area will dramatically decrease cross border traffic. It will also give agents additional time to adequately respond to illegal
entries.

Apprehensions in the Santa Teresa AOR are up 37% from the previous year due to the shift in alien traffic patterns.
Project ID: K-1 State: TX Station: EPS Location: EPS Pumphouse to end of fence at Roadside Park Length (mi): 1.07
The El Paso Station area of operations includes 11.4 miles of river border, within the El Paso corridor, from Monument One to
Midway Crossover. The area is predominately urban and includes residential, commercial and industrial areas. The City of
Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, with a population of over 1.7 million, is located directly south of the El Paso Station AOR. The
close proximity of these two large cities enables smuggling organizations to take advantage of vast infrastructure.

Paisano Drive parallels this area mere feet from the international border. The area is commonly used to smuggle narcotics due to
the fact that it offers immediate egress. Smugglers often attempt to reach I-10 or, if the smuggling activity is detected, attempt to
drive back to Mexico creating significant danger for motorists and agents. The area also provides immediate access to downtown
El Paso and the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), a major university.
Project ID: K-1 State: TX Station: EPS Location: EPS End of fence at Roadside Park to Headgates Length (mi): 0.65

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The El Paso Station area of operations includes 11.4 miles of river border, within the El Paso corridor, from Monument One to
Midway Crossover. The area is predominately urban and includes residential, commercial and industrial areas. The City of
Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, with a population of over 1.7 million, is located directly south of the El Paso Station AOR. The
close proximity of these two large cities enables smuggling organizations to take advantage of vast infrastructure.

This area has earth banks and flat river vegas on both sides of the river. The river vegas are covered with sparse to dense brush
and the river is generally void of significant water flow. The area offers immediate access to El Paso along with the necessary
concealment to easily affect an illegal entry into the United States. Aliens entering this area frequently enter adjacent rail yards
often times resulting in serious injury and sometimes death. This area of border is almost directly in the middle of downtown El
Paso giving agents only seconds to apprehend attempted illegal entries.
Project ID: K-1 State: TX Station: EPS Location: EPS Headgates to West RR bridge Length (mi): 1.26
The El Paso Station area of operations includes 11.4 miles of river border, within the El Paso corridor, from Monument One to
Midway Crossover. The area is predominately urban and includes residential, commercial and industrial areas. The City of
Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, with a population of over 1.7 million, is located directly south of the El Paso Station AOR. The
close proximity of these two large cities enables smuggling organizations to take advantage of vast infrastructure.

This area has earth banks and flat river vegas on both sides of the river. The river vegas are covered with sparse to dense brush
and the river is generally void of significant water flow. The area offers immediate access to El Paso along with the necessary
concealment to easily affect an illegal entry into the United States. Aliens entering this area frequently enter adjacent rail yards
often times resulting in serious injury and sometimes death. This area of border is almost directly in the middle of downtown El
Paso giving agents only seconds to apprehend attempted illegal entries.
Project ID: K-2A State: TX Station: YST Location: 1mi E of US 54 to Socorro Headgates Length (mi): 9.60
The El Paso Station area of operations includes 11.4 miles of river border, within the El Paso corridor, from Monument One to
Midway Crossover. The area is predominately urban and includes residential, commercial and industrial areas. The City of
Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, with a population of over 1.7 million, is located directly south of the El Paso Station AOR. The
close proximity of these two large cities enables smuggling organizations to take advantage of vast infrastructure.

This river in this area is a dry riverbed throughout most of the year. An irrigation canal with powerful currents parallels this
section of the border. A chain-link fence is the only protection from the canal. This chain-link fence has been vandalized and
breeched for years and currently offers no deterrent effects. Aliens routinely enter this section of the canal creating a life
threatening situation for both the alien and agents. The area north of the immediate border is primarily urban and includes
residential, commercial and industrial areas that provide the infrastructure to harbor and transport aliens and narcotics.

Apprehensions, turn backs and entry attempts in the El Paso AOR are up significantly from the previous year due to the shift in
alien traffic patterns from both east and west sides of the AOR.
Project ID: K- State: TX Station: YST Location: Socorro Headgates to 1 mi W of FAB POE Length (mi): 19.42
2B&C
Ysleta Station ranked as the third busiest station within the El Paso Sector, El Paso Station being second. This activity indicates
that illegal cross-border traffic is shifting from the Fabens Corridor (East) towards the El Paso Corridor (West).

Due to a lack of constant river flow, a majority of the year finds the Rio Grande River with a dry riverbed. The dry riverbed
coupled with the low banks of the Rio Grande near the vicinity of the Ysleta Port of Entry makes this area susceptible to
smuggling activities.

The area is predominately urban and includes residential, commercial and industrial areas. The Ysleta AOR has areas known as
"colonias" situated adjacent to the river border. These "colonias" are a hub for smuggling activities and provide smugglers with
stash houses and transportation.

Along the Rio Grande River, the flood plain is flat with river vegetation. In addition, the American and Riverside Canals parallel
the international boundary approximately 100 yards north of the Rio Grande River. These irrigation canals carry swift water and
may become life threatening to illegal cross-border traffic that underestimates the powerful water currents.

There is currently no tactical infrastructure and very limited technology deployed throughout this area.

Although apprehensions and turn backs are down, assaults are up, due primarily to frustration by smugglers of both aliens and
narcotics.
Project ID: K-3 State: TX Station: FBN Location: FAB 1mi W to 3mi E of POE Length (mi): 9.03
San Ysidro, San Augustin, El Million, Reforma, Caseta, Guadalupe, San Ignacio and Loma Blanca are small towns south of the

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Fabens Station AOR along the international boundary located east of Ciudad. Juarez, Mexico. This infrastructure has historically
supported the alien smuggling organizations with drop-houses and staging points. These smuggling organizations are based in
Juarez, Mexico where prospective crossers are recruited, housed and then transported to these small communities. The Juarez-
Porvenir Highway travels southeast from Ciudad. Juarez, whose population is about 1.7 million, and parallels the international
border providing easy access to these towns.

On the United States side of the border, Texas Highway 20 intersects with O.T. Smith Road, FM 1109 and FM 1110. These roads
are used as transit zones from the border and on to Interstate 10. The area consists of rural farming and residential neighborhoods
adjacent to the U.S. levee of the Rio Grande River. Pecan orchards located throughout the AOR make it very difficult to
successfully deploy technology in this area. The use of personnel and tactical infrastructure are of extreme importance in this
area.

Tornillo is a rural community on the east side of the Fabens AOR. O.T. Smith Road dissects Tornillo and provides quick access
to Interstate 10. Fabens is a rural community in the middle of the Fabens AOR. FM 1109 travels near Fabens and intersects
Interstate 10. Clint is a small town on the far west side of the Fabens AOR, also has the needed infrastructure to support multiple
smuggling organizations. FM 1110 is also used as an alternate transit zone to Horizon City, Texas. All three towns have
adequate infrastructure to support multiple smuggling organizations.

This area is void of any tactical infrastructure or significant technology.


Project ID: K-4 State: TX Station: FBN Location: 3 mi E of Fabens to 1.5mi W of Fort Hancock Length (mi): 13.48
The Fort Hancock Station AOR presently covers 40.4 miles of international border with Mexico. The entire area consists of farm
and ranch land as well as mountainous and desert landscape. Presently the Fort Hancock AOR does not have any type of tactical
infrastructure in place (i.e. Visual Detection Capability Sites (VDCS), Permanent Fencing and Stadium Lighting, Vehicle
Barriers, or River Gates, etc).

The area has earth banks and flat river vegas on both sides of the river. The river vegas are covered with dense brush and the
river is generally void of significant water flow. TX 20 is approximately one half mile from the river and which alien and
narcotic smugglers utilize for quick pick up. I-10 is approximately 2 miles from TX 20 which allows for routes of egress away
from the border area and quick transportation to stash houses located in Fabens and El Paso.
Project ID: K-5 State: TX Station: FHT Location: FHT 1.5mi W to 1.5mi E of POE Length (mi): 5.21
The Fort Hancock Station AOR presently covers 40.4 miles of international border with Mexico. The entire area consists of farm
and ranch land as well as mountainous and desert landscape. Presently the Fort Hancock AOR does not have any type of tactical
infrastructure in place (i.e. Visual Detection Capability Sites (VDCS), Permanent Fencing and Stadium Lighting, Vehicle
Barriers, or River Gates, etc).

The area continues with river vegas that are covered with dense brush and the river is generally void of significant water flow.
The area has numerous irrigation canals throughout the area with dense brush which allows aliens to hide without detection.
Arroyos allow for routes of egress away from the border and lead directly to I-10 and this area is susceptible to smuggling
activities by way of vehicular intrusion.

Apprehensions are down slightly, but the Fort Hancock Station is projecting that apprehensions will increase in FY 08 with an
increase of enforcement operations in the Fabens AOR. Although apprehensions are down, the Fort Hancock Station had an
increase of 33% in narcotics seizures for FY 07.

Marfa Sector

The Marfa Border Patrol Sector contacted 6 individual landowners, and held a meeting with
members of the community at the Sector Headquarters. In addition, Agents met with local
officials including Presidio City and County representatives, and Hudspeth County
representatives.

For potential fencing within the Marfa Border Patrol Sector, CBP drafted an Environmental
Assessment that was released to the public on January 8, 2008. A public open house meeting
was held in Marfa, Texas on January 23, 2008.

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The following table provides summary Border Patrol operational assessments for each fence
segment within the Marfa Sector:

Project ID: L-1 State: TX Station: SBT Location: Neely's Crossing Length (mi): 4.63
Neely’s Crossing, historically, is used primarily for drive through smuggling activities. On average, the water level of the Rio
Grande River is approximately 2-3 feet and can easily be crossed by vehicles. The remoteness of this crossing provides
smugglers time to blend into the local traffic patterns. Once off the levee, smugglers use FM 192 northwest to Texas 20, FM 34,
and Interstate 10. Neely’s Crossing is also utilized by southbound smugglers attempting to evade paying Mexican Customs taxes
at the Ft. Hancock Port of Entry.

Significant loads of narcotics are mostly smuggled in groups of three vehicles at a time. The smugglers are armed with automatic
rifles to protect the loads. They are known to run from and/or shoot at law enforcement officers. Officer Safety is of great
concern in this area of operation due to its remoteness and the fortitude of the smugglers.

This remote area makes a good target for Special Interest Aliens to be smuggled. Neely’s Crossing is approximately an hour’s
drive into the metropolitan area of El Paso, Texas.

In order for Marfa Sector to gain operational control of this area and to provide a safe secure border, the right combination of
personnel, technology, and infrastructure must be employed along this portion of the border. The requested tactical infrastructure
consists of both pedestrian and vehicle fence installed along approximately 4.63 miles at Neely’s Crossing.
Project ID: L-1A State: TX Station: PRS Location: Presidio POE to 3.2mi E of POE Length (mi): 3.28
Marfa Sector has one urban area where enforcement actions must be taken immediately upon entry and within a very short
distance of the border. This area is approximately 3 miles on each side of the Presidio, Texas Port of Entry.

The requested tactical infrastructure in this area incorporates utilizing existing infrastructure, with modification, to deter
pedestrian crossings. It also calls for lighting and sensor technology enhancing our ability to respond to incursions.

Recent border violence incidents, mainly rocking incidents, also help define the necessity for the deployment of tactical
infrastructure.

This tactical infrastructure will be utilized to prevent future illegal crossings as it is believed that this area will be one of the last
urban areas where illegal immigrants will stage along the Southwest border and attempt entry. Pre-planning and the deployment
of this tactical infrastructure will be a proactive step in gaining operational control of this area of operation, providing a safe and
secure border area, reducing crime, and improving the quality of life in this border community.
Project ID: L-1B State: TX Station: PRS Location: Presidio POE to 3.2mi W of POE Length (mi): 2.87
Marfa Sector has one urban area where enforcement actions must be taken immediately upon entry and within a very short
distance of the border. This area is approximately 3 miles on each side of the Presidio, Texas Port of Entry.

The requested tactical infrastructure in this area incorporates utilizing existing infrastructure, with modification, to deter
pedestrian crossings. It also calls for lighting and sensor technology enhancing our ability to respond to incursions.

Recent border violence incidents, mainly rocking incidents, also help define the necessity for the deployment of tactical
infrastructure.

This tactical infrastructure will be utilized to prevent future illegal crossings as it is believed that this area will be one of the last
urban areas where illegal immigrants will stage along the Southwest border and attempt entry. Pre-planning and the deployment
of this tactical infrastructure will be a proactive step in gaining operational control of this area of operation, providing a safe and
secure border area, reducing crime, and improving the quality of life in this border community.

Del Rio Sector

The Del Rio Border Patrol Sector contacted 22 individual landowners. In addition, the Sector
held 11 meetings in the cities of Eagle Pass and Del Rio; 8 to city officials and 3 that involved
the public.

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For potential fencing within the Del Rio Sector, CBP drafted an Environmental Assessment that
was released to the public on January 7, 2008. A public open house meeting was held in Del
Rio, Texas on January 24, 2008.

The following table provides summary Border Patrol operational assessments for each fence
segment within the Del Rio Sector:

Project ID: M-1 State: TX Station: DRS Location: DRS San Felipe & Rio Grande to Cienegas Creek & Length (mi): 2.36
Rio Grande
The area where we plan to put fence is in the area where there is the shortest distance between the City of Del Rio and Ciudad
Acuna.

Agents have a short response time as illegal entrants and smugglers are able to cross the Rio Grande and reach Frontera Road in a
matter of minutes. Pedestrian fencing, if coupled with sufficient personnel for response capability and supporting infrastructure,
will deter some potential illegal entrants from entering. Those who will not be deterred by the fence will be delayed, giving law
enforcement personnel sufficient time to respond.

This is a difficult area to patrol as it is heavily vegetated along the river and on both sides of Frontera Road.

This area is used extensively for narcotics and alien smuggling.

Our fence layout/design is the least intrusive and would not be recognizable as border fence. It is designed as Pedestrian only,
because the Rio Grande River is a natural barrier to vehicle entries. It will look similar to other security fences surrounding a
public park or business.

All landowners within the project area, including the City of Del Rio, have been supportive of negotiating with the Government
on the right to construct fence.
Project ID: M-2A State: TX Station: EGT Location: EGT 2.3mi upstream to 1mi No of POE Length (mi): 0.75
This area traditionally is the busiest for border related illegal activity in the Sector.
A few years ago, prior to Expedited Removal and Operation Streamline, this operational zone had the highest level of OTM
activity in the NATION.
Because of the proximity of the populated areas of Eagle Pass to Piedras Negras, there is a shorter response time than in other
parts of the sector. Several “stash houses” are located immediately south of the Rio Grande River. Illegal entrants and narcotics
smugglers are able to cross the Rio Grande River and arrive into the populated areas of Eagle Pass within minutes. Pedestrian
fencing, if coupled with sufficient personnel for response capability and supporting infrastructure, will deter some potential
illegal entrants from entering.
Those who will not be deterred by the fence will be delayed, giving law enforcement personnel sufficient time to respond.
This area of Eagle Pass is for public use and includes a golf course, Public Park, both bordered by the Rio Grande, carnival and
market areas. Arrests within this zone are often made in close proximity to citizens using the public areas, placing them in
danger in the event of violence or chase.
This area has been used for bandit activity and narcotics smuggling. Smugglers are able to meet their contraband as it crosses the
river because they are able to access the area on paved roads.
The highest numbers of gang member apprehensions in the Sector occur within the area that will be impacted by the fence. We
apprehend members of MS-13, Mexican Mafia and other criminal organizations. We also apprehend a number of aliens with
criminal records. Many of these aliens have been previously deported. There have been assaults on our agents and aliens within
the area. Assaults include shootings, rockings, and physical confrontations. Last year a victim of a homicide was found dumped
in the area.
Our fence layout/design is the least intrusive and would not be recognizable as border fence. It is designed as Pedestrian only,
because the Rio Grande River is a natural barrier to vehicle entries. It will look similar to other security fences surrounding a
public park or business. Because it lies behind the golf course as opposed to in front, it will not negatively impact the aesthetic
value of the Rio Grande River running alongside the golf course.
All landowners within the project area, with the exception of the City of Eagle Pass have been supportive of negotiating with the
Government on the right to construct fence.
Project ID: M-2B State: TX Station: EGT Location: EGT POE to North of POE Length (mi): 1.06
This area traditionally is the busiest for border related illegal activity in the Sector.

A few years ago, prior to Expedited Removal and Operation Streamline, this operational zone had the highest level of OTM

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activity in the NATION.

Because of the proximity of the populated areas of Eagle Pass to Piedras Negras, there is a shorter response time than in other
parts of the sector. Several “stash houses” are located immediately south of the Rio Grande River. Illegal entrants and narcotics
smugglers are able to cross the Rio Grande River and arrive into the populated areas of Eagle Pass within minutes. Pedestrian
fencing, if coupled with sufficient personnel for response capability and supporting infrastructure, will deter some potential
illegal entrants from entering.

Those who will not be deterred by the fence will be delayed, giving law enforcement personnel sufficient time to respond.

This area of Eagle Pass is for public use and includes a golf course, Public Park, both bordered by the Rio Grande, carnival and
market areas. Arrests within this zone are often made in close proximity to citizens using the public areas, placing them in
danger in the event of violence or chase.

This area has been used for bandit activity and narcotics smuggling. Smugglers are able to meet their contraband as it crosses the
river because they are able to access the area on paved roads.

The highest numbers of gang member apprehensions in the Sector occur within the area that will be impacted by the fence. We
apprehend members of MS-13, Mexican Mafia and other criminal organizations. We also apprehend a number of aliens with
criminal records. Many of these aliens have been previously deported. There have been assaults on our agents and aliens within
the area. Assaults include shootings, rockings, and physical confrontations. Last year a victim of a homicide was found dumped
in the area.

Our fence layout/design is the least intrusive and would not be recognizable as border fence. It is designed as Pedestrian only,
because the Rio Grande River is a natural barrier to vehicle entries. It will look similar to other security fences surrounding a
public park or business. Because it lies behind the golf course as opposed to in front, it will not negatively impact the aesthetic
value of the Rio Grande River running alongside the golf course.

All landowners within the project area, with the exception of the City of Eagle Pass have been supportive of negotiating with the
Government on the right to construct fence.

Rio Grande Valley Sector

The Rio Grande Valley Border Patrol Sector contacted 366 individual landowners. In addition,
seven meetings were held with public groups, including landowners in Weslaco, Harlingen, and
Mercedes, Texas; two meetings were held in Brownsville; and a meeting was held at the
McAllen Chamber of Commerce. The Border Patrol also held 14 meetings with officials
including mayors; members of city councils; city managers; Chiefs of Police; representatives
from wildlife refuges; and county commissioners, delegates, and judges.

For potential fencing within the Rio Grande Valley Sector, CBP drafted an Environmental
Impact Statement that was released to the public on November 16, 2007. Public open house
meetings were held in McAllen, Brownsville, and Rio Grande City, Texas, on December 11, 12,
and 13, 2007, respectively.

The following table provides summary Border Patrol operational assessments for each fence
segment within the Rio Grande Valley Sector:

Project ID: O-1 State: TX Station: RGC Location: Near Roma POE Length (mi): 3.76
The terrain throughout the Rio Grande City Area of Responsibility consists of urban, rural and remote areas. The rural areas
consist of both farmlands with wooded areas lining the river’s edge, and rolling hills that are dense in brush and cacti. The urban
areas consist of neighborhoods and businesses within close proximity to the river. Pedestrian fencing would cover several river
miles of urban area in the cities of Roma (project O-1), Rio Grande City, Texas (project O-2) and the rural areas immediately
adjacent to these cities. This pedestrian fencing would cover approximately 3.8 miles of urban and rural area in Roma, Texas. In
Rio Grande City, Texas pedestrian fencing would cover approximately 8.7 miles of urban and rural area.

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The proximity of the Rio Grande River to neighborhoods, the Roma Port of Entry (O-1) and the Rio Grande City Port of Entry
(O-2) have historically provided concealment for illegal entrants facilitating quick passage to vanishing points. Short response
times and traffic congestion make these areas a desirable crossing point for all types of illegal activities to include drug and
human smugglers. The possibility of detection and apprehension is diminished by the ease with which a person can vanish into
the community infrastructure and population within minutes, sometimes only seconds. In these areas, pedestrian fencing will be
significantly beneficial to the operational needs of the Rio Grande City station in that it would funnel illegal activities outside of
urban areas to rural and remote areas where vanishing times are greater; thus increasing the chances of detection and
apprehension.

Vanishing Point: The average time for illegal entrants to travel to vanishing points is from several seconds to a few minutes.
With the placement of the fence, this time will undoubtedly increase. If incursions are forced to cross in areas where there is no
fence, the increase in travel time will allow additional response time for enforcement personnel to interdict illegal entrants.
Project ID: O-2 State: TX Station: RGC Location: Near RGC POE Length (mi): 8.75
The terrain throughout the Rio Grande City Area of Responsibility consists of urban, rural and remote areas. The rural areas
consist of both farmlands with wooded areas lining the river’s edge, and rolling hills that are dense in brush and cacti. The urban
areas consist of neighborhoods and businesses within close proximity to the river. Pedestrian fencing would cover several river
miles of urban area in the cities of Roma (project O-1), Rio Grande City, Texas (project O-2) and the rural areas immediately
adjacent to these cities. This pedestrian fencing would cover approximately 3.8 miles of urban and rural area in Roma, Texas. In
Rio Grande City, Texas pedestrian fencing would cover approximately 8.7 miles of urban and rural area.

The proximity of the Rio Grande River to neighborhoods, the Roma Port of Entry (O-1) and the Rio Grande City Port of Entry
(O-2) have historically provided concealment for illegal entrants facilitating quick passage to vanishing points. Short response
times and traffic congestion make these areas a desirable crossing point for all types of illegal activities to include drug and
human smugglers. The possibility of detection and apprehension is diminished by the ease with which a person can vanish into
the community infrastructure and population within minutes, sometimes only seconds. In these areas, pedestrian fencing will be
significantly beneficial to the operational needs of the Rio Grande City station in that it would funnel illegal activities outside of
urban areas to rural and remote areas where vanishing times are greater; thus increasing the chances of detection and
apprehension.

Vanishing Point: The average time for illegal entrants to travel to vanishing points is from several seconds to a few minutes.
With the placement of the fence, this time will undoubtedly increase. If incursions are forced to cross in areas where there is no
fence, the increase in travel time will allow additional response time for enforcement personnel to interdict illegal entrants.
Project ID: O-3 State: TX Station: MCS Location: Los Ebanos POE Length (mi): 1.85
Fence placement in this location provides additional security for the area surrounding the LSE POE. Due to the proximity of the
City of Los Ebanos, Texas to the Rio Grande River, response time for interdiction is limited. Counter-surveillance activity by
smuggling organizations is commonplace and facilitated by the local community infrastructure. Fencing is needed in these areas
due to heavy illicit smuggling activity and quick passage to vanishing points. The construction of the proposed fence greatly
increases law enforcement response time and will prevent illegal incursions from blending in with the local population and
infrastructure.

Vanishing Point: The average time for illegal entrants to travel through routes of egress to vanishing points is from several
seconds to approximately 10 minutes. With the placement of the fence, this time will undoubtedly increase. If incursions are
forced to cross in areas where there is no fence, the vanishing point should increase by 5 minutes to 20 minutes, allowing
additional time for enforcement personnel to interdict illegal entries.
Project ID: O-4 State: TX Station: MCS Location: From Penitas to Abram Length (mi): 4.35
This area consists of fencing to begin where the U.S. International Boundary and Water Commission levee begins, just west of
Penitas, Texas. The proposed fence will parallel the levee until reaching Abram Extension Road. The areas south of the
proposed fence are primarily Federal refuge property and farmland. This particular area continually experiences significant
illegal trafficking of undocumented immigrants and narcotics due to the ease of concealment that the dense vegetation provides.
Response times are hindered in this area due to the heavy brush in many areas which provides cover and concealment until
reaching the levee. North of the community of Abram, Texas is more native brush land which facilitates passage into the
community of Perezville. A network of trails leads to various routes of egress for smugglers. Counter-surveillance efforts by
smuggling organizations are commonplace and can easily be achieved from within the communities of Penitas and Abram.
Placement of a fence would deter incursions from this area to more remote areas ultimately disrupting established smuggling
routes.

Vanishing Point: The current average time for illegal entrants to travel through routes of egress to vanishing points is from 10
minutes to 30 minutes. Placement of the fence would increase the vanishing time by about 20 minutes to 45 minutes for traffic

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attempting to circumvent the proposed fence.


Project ID: O-5 State: TX Station: MCS Location: Future Anzalduas POE Length (mi): 1.73
This project consists of continuous fence running just south of the Anzalduas Port of Entry which is currently under construction
near Granjeno, Texas. This fencing will provide additional security for the POE as well as for the community of Granjeno,
Texas. The intended impacts of the proposed fence in this area would be to deter any illegal incursions near the city of Granjeno,
Texas and reroute any illegal trafficking into areas where Agents would have the advantage of additional response time. The
proposed fence in this location would prevent illegal entrants from concealing themselves within the city of Granjeno and would
force any illegal routes of travel around the city. This rerouting gives enforcement personnel a significant advantage and should
result in a higher rate of apprehension and ultimately serving in a deterrence effect.

Similar to the Pharr POE, the Anzalduas POE construction design consist of a long bridge spanning across several acres of U.S.
soil before crossing into Mexico. The Pharr POE has historically experienced bridge jumpers utilizing ropes to scale from the
bridge and smugglers utilizing the bridge to cross illegal cargo and dumping it over the bridge without having to negotiate the
actual river itself. The fence placement in this area would limit the success rate of attempts to circumvent the POE facility itself.

Vanishing Point: The average time for illegal entrants to travel through routes of egress to vanishing points is from 5 minutes to
30 minutes. Placement of the fence would increase the vanishing time by 15 to 30 minutes.
Project ID: O-6 State: TX Station: MCS Location: Hidalgo POE Length (mi): 3.86
Placement of the fence in this area is essential due the refuge property along the Rio Grande River near Hidalgo, Texas that
provides concealment and facilitates easy passage of illegal incursions into the Hidalgo, Texas area. The Hidalgo, Texas area has
historically been the focal point of the McAllen Station due to its proximity to the city of Reynosa. Reynosa continues to be a
significant smuggling hub for illegal entrants and narcotics. The area is nationally notorious for the apprehension of
undocumented immigrants originating and/or traveling through “Special Interest Countries” as defined by OBP. This particular
area has experienced a significant amount of reportable border violence incidences, including assaults on Border Patrol Agents.
Placement of the fence in this area enhances our ability to detect possible illegal incursions making it vital for McAllen Border
Patrol Operations.

Vanishing Point: The average time for illegal entrants to travel through routes of egress to vanishing points is currently from
several seconds to about 20 minutes. The addition of a fence would significantly increase the vanishing points providing the
Border Patrol an extended response time. Construction of a fence in this area would greatly improve response time. The fence
would greatly benefit this area due to the fact that it is Federal Refuge property comprises the majority of the land located
between the Rio Grande River and the city of Hidalgo, Texas. In this area, technology and increased personnel would assist in
deterring illegal incursions in and around Hidalgo, Texas but a physical barrier is needed due to the city’s proximity to the river
and adjacent refuge property.
Project ID: O-7 State: TX Station: MER Location: Proposed Donna POE Length (mi): 0.90
The terrain throughout the Weslaco Border Patrol Area of Responsibility consists of 39 river miles of urban and rural areas. The
rural areas consist of both farmlands with wooded areas lining the river’s edge, and the urban areas consist of neighborhoods and
businesses within close proximity to the Rio Grande River. The proposed location of both fence projects will tie into the future
Donna Port of Entry fence on both the east and west sides creating a continuous fence line. The dense brush and remoteness in
these areas in and around the new Donna Port of Entry (O-7) and the Retamal Dam area (O-8) currently require additional
resources. The possibility of detection and apprehension of an illegal entrant is currently diminished because of the dense brush
used as concealment.

Vanishing Point: In these areas, fencing will funnel illegal activities to areas where the time it takes to reach the vanishing point
is expanded, less dense brush, more tactically advantageous locations (where future infrastructure, i.e. cameras, will be located),
increasing the chances of detection and apprehension. Consequently, the fence will act as a force multiplier thus effectively
allowing the redeployment of resources to other areas.
Project ID: O-8 State: TX Station: MER Location: Retamal Dam Length (mi): 3.24
The terrain throughout the Weslaco Border Patrol Area of Responsibility consists of 39 river miles of urban and rural areas. The
rural areas consist of both farmlands with wooded areas lining the river’s edge, and the urban areas consist of neighborhoods and
businesses within close proximity to the Rio Grande River. The proposed location of both fence projects will tie into the future
Donna Port of Entry fence on both the east and west sides creating a continuous fence line. The dense brush and remoteness in
these areas in and around the new Donna Port of Entry (O-7) and the Retamal Dam area (O-8) currently require additional
resources. The possibility of detection and apprehension of an illegal entrant is currently diminished because of the dense brush
used as concealment.

Vanishing Point: In these areas, fencing will funnel illegal activities to areas where the time it takes to reach the vanishing point
is expanded, less dense brush, more tactically advantageous locations (where future infrastructure, i.e. cameras, will be located),

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increasing the chances of detection and apprehension. Consequently, the fence will act as a force multiplier thus effectively
allowing the redeployment of resources to other areas.
Project ID: O-9 State: TX Station: MER Location: Progresso POE Length (mi): 3.86
The terrain throughout the Weslaco Border Patrol Station’s Area of Responsibility consists of 39 river miles of urban and rural
areas. The rural areas consist of both farmlands with wooded areas lining the river’s edge, and the urban areas consisting of
neighborhoods and businesses also within close proximity to the river. The proposed location of pedestrian fencing will cover
urban areas near the city of Progreso Lakes, Texas (project O-9), and near the rural areas of the Progreso Port of Entry (project
O-10). The proposed location of the fence will tie into the Progreso Port of Entry fence thus creating a continuous fence line.

The proximity of the Rio Grande River to neighborhoods, the city of Progreso Lakes, (O-9) and the Progreso Port of Entry (O-
10) provides concealment and facilitates easy passage of illegal incursions into the surrounding communities. Short response
times and highly dense brush make these areas desirable crossing points for all types of illegal activities including drug and
human smuggling. The possibility of detection and apprehension is diminished by the ease with which a person can vanish into
the community’s infrastructure and population within minutes. In these areas, pedestrian fencing will be significantly beneficial
to the operational needs of the Weslaco Station in that it would funnel illegal activities to other more rural and remote areas
where the time it takes to reach the vanishing point is expanded thus increasing the chances of detection and apprehension.

Vanishing Point: In these areas, fencing will funnel illegal activities to areas where the time it takes to reach the vanishing point
is expanded, less dense brush, more tactically advantageous locations (where future infrastructure, i.e. cameras, will be located),
increasing the chances of detection and apprehension. Consequently, the fence will act as a force multiplier thus effectively
allowing the redeployment of resources to other areas.
Project ID: O-10 State: TX Station: MER Location: Progresso POE Length (mi): 2.33
The terrain throughout the Weslaco Border Patrol Station’s Area of Responsibility consists of 39 river miles of urban and rural
areas. The rural areas consist of both farmlands with wooded areas lining the river’s edge, and the urban areas consisting of
neighborhoods and businesses also within close proximity to the river. The proposed location of pedestrian fencing will cover
urban areas near the city of Progreso Lakes, Texas (project O-9), and near the rural areas of the Progreso Port of Entry (project
O-10). The proposed location of the fence will tie into the Progreso Port of Entry fence thus creating a continuous fence line.

The proximity of the Rio Grande River to neighborhoods, the city of Progreso Lakes, (O-9) and the Progreso Port of Entry (O-
10) provides concealment and facilitates easy passage of illegal incursions into the surrounding communities. Short response
times and highly dense brush make these areas desirable crossing points for all types of illegal activities including drug and
human smuggling. The possibility of detection and apprehension is diminished by the ease with which a person can vanish into
the community’s infrastructure and population within minutes. In these areas, pedestrian fencing will be significantly beneficial
to the operational needs of the Weslaco Station in that it would funnel illegal activities to other more rural and remote areas
where the time it takes to reach the vanishing point is expanded thus increasing the chances of detection and apprehension.

Vanishing Point: In these areas, fencing will funnel illegal activities to areas where the time it takes to reach the vanishing point
is expanded, less dense brush, more tactically advantageous locations (where future infrastructure, i.e. cameras, will be located),
increasing the chances of detection and apprehension. Consequently, the fence will act as a force multiplier thus effectively
allowing the redeployment of resources to other areas.
Project ID: O-11 State: TX Station: HRL Location: Joe's Bar-Nemo Road Length (mi): 2.33
The fence starts at the Santa Maria Canal and parallels the levee to Nemo Road in Bluetown, Texas. The areas south of the
proposed fence are primarily Federal and State refuge properties and farmland. This particular area continually experiences
significant illegal trafficking of undocumented immigrants and narcotics due to heavy brush that provides cover and concealment
until reaching the levee. A network of trails leads to various routes of egress utilized by human traffickers and narcotic
smugglers. Placement of a fence would redirect illegal entrants to undesired and unestablished locations providing additional
time for agents to effectively and promptly make arrests.

Vanishing Point: The average time for intruders to reach the vanishing point is from 5 minutes to approximately 20 minutes.
With the placement of the fence, this vulnerability time will undoubtedly increase. If incursions are forced to cross in areas
where there is no fence, the vanishing point should increase from 20 minutes to 45 minutes, allowing additional time for
enforcement personnel to interdict the illegal cross-border activities.
Project ID: O-12 State: TX Station: HRL Location: Weaver's Mountain Length (mi): 0.96
The fence starts at the Yellow Barn Road and runs parallel to the levee to Treviño Road in Los Indios, Texas. The areas south of
the proposed fence are primarily farmland, dense brush and vegetation, while the areas north of the proposed fence have a
number of small sub-divisions. Due to the ability of illegal entrants to blend in with the local community and quick access to
routes of egress, this particular area is conducive to illegal incursions by undocumented immigrants and narcotic smugglers. Law
enforcement efforts are hindered in this area due to the heavy brush, which provides cover and concealment for illegal entrants

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until reaching the levee. The incorporation of a fence in this area will redirect potential cross-border violators away from the
community towards more open and uninhabited areas.

Vanishing Point: The current average time for illegal entrants to reach the vanishing point is from 2 minutes to 10 minutes.
Placement of the fence would increase the vulnerable time from approximately 15 minutes to 30 minutes for traffic attempting to
circumvent the proposed fence. This will allow additional time for agents to interdict the illegal cross-border activities.
Project ID: O-13 State: TX Station: HRL Location: W Los Indios POE Length (mi): 1.59
This fencing will provide additional security for the POE as well as for the community of Los Indios, Texas. The areas south of
the proposed fence are primarily Federal refuge properties and farmland. A network of trails leads to various routes of egress for
illegal entrants. The intended impacts of the proposed fence in this area would be to deter any and all illegal incursions near the
city of Los Indios, Texas and redirect any illegal trafficking into areas where agents would have the advantage of additional
response time. The proposed fence in this location would prevent undocumented immigrants from concealing themselves within
the city of Los Indios and would force the routes of egress around the city. This rerouting gives agents a significant advantage
and should result in a higher rate of apprehension. Law enforcement efforts are hindered in this area due to the heavy brush,
which provides cover and concealment until reaching the levee.

Vanishing Point: The current average time for illegal entrants to reach the vanishing point is from 5 minutes to 20 minutes.
Placement of the fence would increase the vulnerable time from approximately 15 minutes to 30 minutes for traffic attempting to
circumvent the proposed fence. This will allow additional time for agents to interdict the illegal cross-border activities.
Project ID: O-14 State: TX Station: HRL Location: E Los Indios POE Length (mi): 3.59
This fencing will provide additional security for the POE as well as for the community of Los Indios, Texas. The areas south of
the proposed fence are primarily dense brush and farmland providing cover and concealment for illegal entrants. The intended
impacts of the proposed fence in this area would be to deter any illegal incursions near the city of Los Indios, Texas and reroute
any illegal trafficking into areas where agents would have additional response time. The proposed fence in this location would
prevent undocumented immigrants from concealing themselves within the community of Carricitos, (within the Los Indios,
Texas city limits). Additionally, it will also force any illegal routes of egress around the communities. This rerouting gives
agents a significant advantage and should result in a higher rate of apprehension.

Vanishing Point: The current average time for illegal entrants to reach the vanishing point is from 5 minutes to 20 minutes.
Placement of the fence would increase the vulnerable time from approximately 20 minutes to 40 minutes for traffic attempting to
circumvent the proposed fence. This will allow additional time for agents to interdict the illegal cross-border activities.
Project ID: O-15 State: TX Station: HRL Location: Triangle - La Paloma Length (mi): 1.93
The fence starts at Cemetery Road in La Paloma, Texas and runs parallel to the levee to Garza Sandpit Road in El Calaboz,
Texas. The areas south of the proposed fence are primarily farmland, dense brush and vegetation. Fencing is needed in this area
due to heavy illicit smuggling activity in this area. Due to the proximity of the communities of La Paloma and El Calaboz to the
Rio Grande River, response time for interdiction is limited. The construction of the proposed fence greatly increases law
enforcement response time and will ultimately contribute greatly to the success of our mission. The physical barrier would
prevent illegal incursions from blending in with the local population and infrastructure within the time-frame that it currently
takes. Counter-surveillance activities by smuggling organizations are commonplace and facilitated by the local community’s
infrastructure.

Vanishing Point: The current average time for illegal entrants to reach the vanishing point is from seconds to approximately 5
minutes. Placement of the fence would increase the vulnerable time from approximately 10 minutes to 20 minutes for traffic
attempting to circumvent the proposed fence. This will allow additional time for agents to interdict the illegal cross-border
activities.
Project ID: O-16 State: TX Station: HRL Location: Ho Chi Minh - Estero Length (mi): 2.45
The fence starts at Garza Sandpit Road in El Calaboz, Texas and runs parallel to the levee to just east of Estero Road in El
Ranchito, Texas. The areas south of the proposed fence are primarily farmland, dense brush and vegetation. Fencing is needed
due to the proximity of the communities of El Calaboz and El Ranchito to the Rio Grande River, response time for interdiction is
limited in this area. The physical barrier would prevent illegal incursions from blending in with the local population and
infrastructure.

Vanishing Point: The current average time for illegal entrants to reach the vanishing point is from seconds to approximately 5
minutes. Placement of the fence would increase the vulnerable time from approximately 10 minutes to 20 minutes for traffic
attempting to circumvent the proposed fence. This will allow additional time for agents to interdict the illegal cross-border
activities.
Project ID: O-17 State: TX Station: BRP Location: Proposed Carmen Road Freight Train Bridge Length (mi): 1.63

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Fence placement in this location provides additional security for the area surrounding the Riverbend Resort and San Pedro, Texas
community. A proposed future railway port of entry will be located along this alignment. Fencing is needed in this area due to
the close proximity of U.S. Highway 281 and subdivision development near the Rio Grande River, which limiting our response
times. The construction of the proposed fence would prevent illegal entrants from blending in with the local population and
infrastructure within the time-frame that it currently takes. Counter-surveillance activity by smuggling organizations is
commonplace and facilitated by the local community’s infrastructure. Our marked service units can easily been seen while
conducting routine patrol activities in this area, making apprehensions more difficult.

Vanishing Point: The average time for illegal entrants to reach the vanishing points ranges from seconds to approximately 10
minutes. With the placement of the fence, this time will undoubtedly increase. Illegal entrants will be forced to cross through
areas where there is no fence thus increasing travel time to vanishing points from 5 minutes to 20 minutes. This will provide
additional time for enforcement personnel to interdict illegal cross-border activities. Illegal incursions will also be diverted to
locations where Remote Video Surveillance Systems (RVSS) currently exist, facilitating earlier detection and higher probabilities
of apprehension.
Project ID: O-18 State: TX Station: BRP Location: Proposed Flor De Mayo POE to Garden Park Length (mi): 3.58
Some areas north and south of the proposed fence are Federal refuge property and farmland. This particular area continually
experiences significant illegal trafficking of undocumented immigrants and narcotics due to the close proximity of the Rio
Grande River to residential subdivisions and schools. This fencing will provide additional security for the future proposed Flor
De Mayo Port of Entry. Patrol efforts must be maximized due to the heavy brush in many areas which provides cover and
concealment both north and south of the levee. A network of trails leads to various routes of egress for smugglers along this
stretch. Placing a fence in this area will act as a force multiplier by allowing Border Patrol to redeploy resources to more remote
areas and cover a larger area.

Vanishing Point: The current average time for illegal entrants to reach the vanishing points ranges from seconds to 20 minutes.
Placement of the fence would increase travel time to vanishing points by approximately 10 minutes to 30 minutes. Illegal
entrants will be diverted to locations where Remote Video Surveillance Systems (RVSS) exist, facilitating earlier detection with
higher probabilities of apprehension.
Project ID: O-19 State: TX Station: BRP Location: B&M POE to Los Tomates Length (mi): 3.37
This fencing will provide additional security for the urban areas of Brownsville, Texas and the University of Texas at
Brownsville (UTB) campus. The intended impacts of the proposed fence in this area would be to deter any illegal incursions
near the city of Brownsville, Texas and reroute any illegal trafficking into areas where agents would have the advantage of
additional response time. The proposed fence in this location would prevent illegal entrants from concealing themselves by
blending in with the general public within the City of Brownsville. The fence would force current routes of egress to be rerouted
to less populated areas. This rerouting provides enforcement personnel a significant advantage and should result in a higher rate
of apprehension.

The Gateway and Brownsville & Matamoros Ports of Entry within the City of Brownsville have historically experienced bridge
jumpers utilizing ropes to scale down from the bridge without having to negotiate the actual river itself. The fence would limit
the success rate of those attempting to circumvent the river by utilizing the Port of Entry. This particular area has experienced a
significant amount of reportable border violence incidences, including assaults on Border Patrol Agents. Apprehensions in this
area typically yield incursions of returning criminal aliens into the United States due the large influx of previously deported
aliens being repatriated to Mexico by Immigration and Customs Enforcement through the Gateway Port of Entry.

Vanishing Point: The current average time for illegal entrants to reach the vanishing points ranges from seconds to minutes.
Placement of the fence would increase the travel time to these points from 5 to 40 minutes. Illegal incursions will be diverted to
locations where Remote Video Surveillance Systems (RVSS) currently exist and facilitate detection providing a higher
probability of apprehension.
Project ID: O-20 State: TX Station: BRP Location: Tomates Y Length (mi): 0.91
Placement of the fence in this area is essential due to the fact that USFWS Cat Corridor easement runs along the south side of the
USIBWC levee near Brownsville, Texas. This easement provides cover and concealment, which facilitating routes of egress for
illegal entrants into the University of Texas at Brownsville and the Lincoln Park area. The Brownsville, Texas area has
historically been the focal point of the Brownsville Station due to its proximity to the city of Matamoros. Matamoros continues
to be a significant smuggling hub for undocumented immigrants, narcotics, and aliens from countries other than Mexico. This
area is nationally notorious for the apprehension of undocumented immigrants originating and/or traveling through “Special
Interest Countries” as defined by OBP. This particular area has experienced a significant amount of reportable border violence
incidences, including assaults on Border Patrol Agents. In the Brownsville, Texas area, use of detection technology enhances our
ability to identify possible illegal incursions. The presence of physical infrastructure would greatly enhance and compliment our
ability to deter illegal entry in that area.

DRAFT As of January 31, 2008 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY


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Vanishing Point: The current average time for illegal entrants to reach the vanishing points ranges from seconds to minutes.
Placement of the fence would increase the travel time to these points from 5 to 40 minutes. Construction of a fence in this area
would greatly enhance the safety of the residents commuting to and from the University of Texas at Brownsville campus as well
as divert illegal entrants to locations where Remote Video Surveillance Systems (RVSS) exist. This should facilitate detection,
which should provide a higher probability of apprehension.
Project ID: O-21 State: TX Station: FTB Location: International POE to Sea Shell Inn Length (mi): 12.98
The terrain contained within this area is agricultural, urban and marsh in nature. Multiple entry points exist on the south side
throughout project O-21. Several of these entry points border urban environments. The geographic layout of this area dictates
travel to routes of egress leading to vanishing points. These vanishing points leading into these urban environments range from
seconds to minutes. As one moves out further east, the terrain becomes more agricultural, which deprives illegal entrants the
ability to use urban areas for concealment. The fence will allow Border Patrol to concentrate on more specific locations without
illegal entrants circumventing patrols. Eastward towards the end of the fence project, the terrain begins to consist of marsh and
dense vegetation making travel long and tedious. Utilization of the proposed fence will push potential illegal entrants towards
the marsh thus slowing down current travel times from minutes to hours. This will expand Border Patrol’s window of
opportunity for apprehension, which provides a tactical advantage to quickly facilitate apprehension and reach a successful law
enforcement resolution. Combining additional resources will enable Border Patrol to push the station’s northern depth of
intrusion as far south from the IBWC levee as possible.

Vanishing Point: The current average time for illegal entrants to reach the vanishing points ranges from seconds to hours.
Placement of the fence would increase the travel time to these points from several minutes to hours. Pedestrian fencing along
with support infrastructure (improved river roads, lighting, cameras, etc) in the above mentioned urban and rural areas will
significantly act as force multipliers and assist in achieving and maintaining operational control of these areas.

DRAFT As of January 31, 2008 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY