You are on page 1of 85

India: Country Growth Analysis 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
India: Country Growth Analysis 
 
               
Subir Gokarn & Gunjan Gulati 
 
 
 
 
October 2006 

[0] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

CONTENTS  
 

Introduction ......................................................................................................................................................................1 

I.   Growth Performance...............................................................................................................................................3 
International Comparisons  5 

II.   Role of Reforms........................................................................................................................................................7 

III.  Agricultural Growth .............................................................................................................................................11 
Agricultural Diversification  14 
Recommendations  17 

IV.  Industrial Growth..................................................................................................................................................20 
Investment Scenario  21 

V.   Services Growth.....................................................................................................................................................26 
Growth patterns in the Indian service sectors  28 
Drivers of Service Sector Growth: Some Hypotheses  29 
Macro drivers  30 
Can services emerge as an engine of growth?  35 

VI. Growth in Employment ........................................................................................................................................37 
Emergence of Non‐Farm Rural Sector  42 
Determinants of access to non‐farm employment  44 

VII. Investment ..............................................................................................................................................................49 
Public‐ Private Investment  54 

VIII. Regional Pattern OF Growth ............................................................................................................................58 
Growth Performance  58 
Social Infrastructure  63 
Investment  65 
Employment  66 
Infrastructure  68 

IX. Recommendations for Strategy............................................................................................................................76 
The Employment Trap  77 
Regional Inequities – Vicious Circles  78 
A Concluding Comment  79 

Bibliography...................................................................................................................................................................80 
 

List of Figures 
 
Figure 1: Sectoral Growth Volatility..............................................................................................................................4 
Figure 2: Sectoral Composition ......................................................................................................................................4 
Figure 3: Agricultural Volatility...................................................................................................................................11 
Figure 4: Investment in Agriculture (Per cent Share)...............................................................................................13 
Figure 5: Yield Performance .........................................................................................................................................15 
Figure 6: Sectoral Growth .............................................................................................................................................20 
Figure 7: Share in GVA (2002‐03).................................................................................................................................21 
Figure 8: Sectoral Growth Volatility............................................................................................................................26 

[0] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Figure 9: Sectoral Growth .............................................................................................................................................29 
Figure 10: Employment Share......................................................................................................................................31 
Figure 11: Share of Organised Sector in Employment of Each Sector ..................................................................31 
Figure 12: Relative Tax Burden on Industry & Services..........................................................................................32 
Figure 13: Significance of India’s service exports .....................................................................................................34 
Figure 14: Labour Intensity (Labour‐capital ratio) ...................................................................................................39 
Figure 15: Employment output trade off....................................................................................................................39 
Figure 16: Organised Manufacturing Employment Elasticity (1989/90‐2002/03) ...............................................41 
Figure 17: Jobless growth!.............................................................................................................................................42 
Figure 18: Growth Resilience‐ Production Growth..................................................................................................45 
Figure 19: Growth in Employment and Fixed Investment in SSI units  ..............................................................46 
Figure 20: Debt/ GDP.....................................................................................................................................................51 
Figure 21: Share of foreign investment in infrastructure.........................................................................................55 
Figure 22: Investment in PPI Projects in India, 1990‐2004.......................................................................................56 
Figure 23: Per capita Income at current prices ..........................................................................................................60 
Figure 24: State‐wise Industrial Investment Proposals (August 1991 to December 2005)................................66 
Figure 25: Per Capita Consumption of Electricity (Utility & Non‐utilities).........................................................69 
 

List of Tables 
Table 1: World Share of GDP at purchasing power parity .......................................................................................3 
Table 3: Growth and Development Performance (Per cent).....................................................................................7 
Table 4: Savings Investment Ratio, FD .........................................................................................................................8 
Table 5: International comparison of yield of selected commodities –2002.........................................................12 
Table 6: Growth in Investment in Agriculture (Per cent)........................................................................................13 
Table 7: Investment Growth .........................................................................................................................................13 
Table 8: Target Growth rate of Agricultural Crops..................................................................................................14 
Table 9: Projected Production and Per capita Consumption in Selected Commodities....................................14 
Table 10: Institutional Credit to Agriculture (Rs Crore)..........................................................................................18 
Table 11: Share in Sectoral GDP...................................................................................................................................20 
Table 12: Gross Domestic Capital Formation (as a % of GDP)...............................................................................21 
Table 13: Industrial Investment Proposals.................................................................................................................22 
Table 14: Industry‐wise Investment Proposals‐ Share of Top 15 industries........................................................22 
Table 15: Composition and Growth in Exports ........................................................................................................23 
Table 16: Share of India’s exports of manufactured goods.....................................................................................23 
Table 17: Shares of Service Activities in Aggregate Service Sector GDP (%).......................................................28 
Table 18: Share and Growth of Major Consumption Categories...........................................................................34 
Table 19: Unemployment situation during the first three years of the Tenth Plan ............................................37 
Table 20: Trends in organised sector employment...................................................................................................37 
Table 21: Falling labour costs........................................................................................................................................38 
Table 22: Growth in Organised Manufacturing Employment...............................................................................40 
Table 23: Non‐farm employment ................................................................................................................................43 
Table 24: Income Share in Rural India (1993/94).......................................................................................................43 
Table 25: Non‐farm employment growth vs Labour force and Population Growth  (CAGR – Per cent) .....44 
Table 26: Investment/GDP ............................................................................................................................................49 
Table 27: Industry wise public sector investment (at constant prices)‐ Share.....................................................50 
Table 28: Alternative Scenarios for Eleventh Plan....................................................................................................50 
Table 29: Implications of the Savings Requirement for the Eleventh Plan ..........................................................50 
Table 30: Crowding out of Private Investment due to Increased Public Investment‐Literature Review.......52 
Table 31: Cumulative Investment in 1990‐2004 PPI Projects by Sector, 1990‐2004.............................................56 

[1] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 32: Project Investment by Region/ Country, 2004..........................................................................................56 
Table 33: Annual Average Growth of GSDP    (Per cent)........................................................................................58 
Table 34: Coefficient of Variation in Annual GSDP Growth ..................................................................................60 
Table 35: Average Annual Growth in Per Capita Income ......................................................................................61 
Table 36: Percentage Change in Percentage Share in NSDP (1987‐88 to 1999‐00)..............................................62 
Table 37: Percentage of Population Below Poverty line ..........................................................................................63 
Table 38: Poverty Projection for 2007..........................................................................................................................64 
Table 39: Literacy Rate...................................................................................................................................................65 
Table 40: Growth in Employment (Per cent per annum)........................................................................................67 
Table 41: Change in Percentage Share in employment (1987‐88 to 1999‐00).......................................................68 
Table 42: Road Length ...................................................................................................................................................70 
Table 43: Credit‐Deposit Ratio of Scheduled Commercial Banks (Per cent) .......................................................71 
Table 44: Overall Competitiveness Ranking of the States‐ 2004 ............................................................................74 
 

[2] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

INTRODUCTION 
 

T  his paper attempts to provide a broad‐based description of  the growth performance of 
the  Indian  economy  over  the  past  decade  and  a  half.  The  choice  of  the  period  for 
analysis is, of course, based on the 1991 reforms programme, which many people consider a 
significant  structural  break  in  the  country’s  policy  regime,  whose  ultimate  criterion  of 
success is whether it has taken the economy to a higher growth path, which is sustainable. 
 
Good description is necessary for good prescription. A detailed, factual representation of the 
growth process over this period is essential for understanding the many linkages that exist 
between  economic  policy  and  growth  performance.  At  the  aggregate  level,  it  is  becoming 
increasingly clear that the economy has found a new groove. In the immediate aftermath of 
the 1991 reforms, growth did ratchet up to an unprecedented streak of over seven per cent 
for  three  successive  years  (1994‐97).  This  was  an  early  indication  of  the  potential  dividend 
from reforms, but a variety of factors combined to cut short that streak. As a backdrop to the 
discussion in this paper, three of these deserve mention. 
 
First, inflation accelerated rather sharply quite early in that three‐year period. An aggressive 
anti‐inflationary policy caused interest rates to rise sharply, which possibly contributed to an 
industrial slowdown that set in after 1997 and persisted until 2002, after which the sector has 
showed  gained  enormous  momentum.  Not  surprisingly,  this  recovery  and  expansion  has 
taken  place  in  an  environment  of  sharply  declining  and  then  stabilizing  interest  rates. 
Second,  in  1997,  the  monsoons  failed  after  an  unprecedented  nine‐year  streak  of  normal 
rainfall  across  the  nation.  Stable  agricultural  growth  had  played  an  important  part  in  the 
post‐reform  acceleration  and  the  sharp  decline  in  growth  rates  in  1997  contributed  the 
overall slowdown.  
 
Third, from the external perspective, 1997 was the year of the Asian Crisis, one outcome of 
which  as  a  very  large  depreciation  of  the  currencies  of  many  Asian  countries,  with  whom 
India  competed  in  the  global  marketplace.  Exports  from  India,  particularly  in  the 
manufactured  goods  segment,  which  had  been  growing  rapidly  in  the  years  prior  to  the 
crisis suffered a significant, though eventually short‐lived, setback. 
 
From  1997  until  2003,  the  economy  grew  at  a  relatively  sluggish  pace.  During  this  period, 
the merits of the reform agenda naturally came into question. However, from the analytical 
perspective, there were plausible reasons for the slowdown, which really had nothing to do 
with  the  reforms  themselves.  Agricultural  instability  during  that  period  was  a  significant 
contributor.  On  the  industrial  front,  investment  activity  came  to  a  standstill,  partially  in 
response to the high interest rate regime but also in reaction to the steadily declining trade 
barriers, which intensified competition in domestic markets. Finally, for some time after the 
East  Asian  crisis,  India’s  major  export  competitors  benefited  from  sharply  depreciated 
exchange  rates.  In  short,  all  the  major  drivers  of  the  mid‐1990s  growth  went  into  reverse 
gear during this period. 
 
However,  this  could  not  last  forever.  Continuing  financial  sector  reforms  allowed  interest 
rates  to  fall  dramatically,  moving  them  to  a  permanently  lower  level.  Combined  with  tax 

[1] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

concessions for housing, these led to a boom in demand in this sector. Increased competition 
in the retail finance sector rapidly expanded the number of products and services that could 
be  financed  and  industrial  growth  recovered  as  a  result  of  surging  consumption 
expenditure. As this gained momentum, capacities that had stopped expanding at the end of 
the mid‐1990s boom were stretched. New investment activity began in significant measure 
during  2003  and  has  not  slackened  since.  All  this  while,  the  services  sector  continued  to 
maintain  its  very  powerful  momentum,  playing  a  solo  role  as  the  engine  of  growth.  The 
industrial recovery strengthened that momentum. The consumption and investment driven 
recovery has now stretched to a four‐year streak of over 8 per cent growth per year. 
 
While  the  overall  growth  scenario  is  undoubtedly  healthy,  it  is  not  without  imbalances. 
These are significant enough to raise concerns and questions about the sustainability of the 
growth  momentum.  If  these  concerns  are  valid,  any  strategy  to  ensure  sustainability  must 
put priority on addressing these imbalances. As indicated earlier, good prescription must be 
preceded  by  good  description.  This  paper  attempts  to  describe  the  patterns  of  growth 
observed in the Indian economy over the last decade. It first describes the pattern using the 
traditional  agriculture‐industry‐services  disaggregation.  It  then  goes  on  to  look  at  growth 
from  the  perspective  of  speficific  imbalances  –  employment,  infrastructure  and  regional 
inequalities.  These  descriptions  provide  a  basis  for  a  set  of  strategic  recommendations, 
which are rooted in both the perspectives presented in the paper. 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

[2] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

I.   GROWTH PERFORMANCE 
 


uring the last three decades, Indian economy has witnessed a significant shift in its 
position  in  the  world  economy.  The  share  of  Indian  economy  in  the  world  GDP 
stood  at  6  per  cent  of  world  GDP  in  2002.  During  the  eighties,  India  along  with 
China,  contributed  to  the  rising  share  of  Asia  in  world  GDP.  The  last  three  decades  have 
witnessed a shift in the structure of world GDP away from US‐ the single largest economy, 
in favour of emerging economies like India and China. With the robust growth witnessed in 
these economies, the ongoing trend of change in their weights in the world GDP is expected 
to strengthen further. 
 
An  independent  study 1  suggests  that  by  2025,  the  share  of  Indian  economy  in  the  world 
GDP is expected to scale up from 6 per cent in 2002 to 11 per cent in 2025 and further to 14 
per cent in 2035. Thus becoming the third largest contributor to the world GDP after China 
and US, and significantly above Japan and Euro zone economies. 
       
Table 1: World Share of GDP at purchasing power parity 
Current  Projections (2002 prices) 
2002  2015  2025 
  US$ billion  Share  Share  Rank  Share  Rank 
China  586.1  12.1  19.5  1  25.2  1 
US  1030.8  21.3  19.5  2  17.8  2 
India  280.5  5.8  8.2  3  11.2  3 
Japan  342.5  7.1  5.2  4  5.5  4 
Germany  223.8  4.6  3.5  5  3.0  5 
France  150.1  3.3  2.7  6  2.4  6 
UK  154.9  3.2  2.7  7  2.3  7 
Russia  118.8  2.4  2.8  8  2.8  8 
Italy  152.5  3.1  2.5  9  2.0  9 
Brazil  135.5  2.8  2.2  10  1.9  10 
Source: Working Paper, ICRIER 1 
 
The  following  discussion  analyses  India’s  growth  performance  exploring  the  aggregate, 
sectoral and regional issues significant in bringing about the observed growth pattern in the 
economy.  The  discussion  further  highlights  the  key  structural  and  policy  bottlenecks 
governing  each  sector  and  discusses  feasibility  of  sustainability  of  current  growth 
momentum.    
 
The  sentiment  on  the  ongoing  buoyancy  in  Indian  economy  got  further  strengthened  with 
the  expectations  of  higher  than  expected  growth  rate  of  8.1  per  cent  for  the  current  fiscal 
year (2005‐06) on the back of an equally robust growth 7.5 per cent growth during 2004‐05. 
The  current  growth  momentum  is  supported  by  strong  performance  of  the  manufacturing 
and services sector. The performance of agriculture however has been marked by significant 

1 Virmani, Arvind, ‘Economic Performance, Power potential and Global Governance: Towards a New 

International Order,ʹ ICRIER Working Paper No. 150, December 2005 
 

[3] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

volatility. The sector recovered from the drought of 2002‐03 to record a strong growth of 10 
per cent in 2003‐04, growth slowed down again in 2004‐05 to 0.7 per cent.  
 
During  the  last  decade  while  the  industrial  growth  has  been  led  by  the  manufacturing 
sector,  the  services  sector  has  registered  robust  performance  on  account  of  growth 
acceleration  of  sub‐sectors  like  communication,  hotels  and  restaurants  and  banking  and 
insurance.    
 
Figure 1: Sectoral Growth Volatility 

Growth Volatility
15.0 Growth Volatility
15.0

10.0
10.0

5.0
per cent

5.0
per cent

0.0
0.0
1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2005-06AE
2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05
1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2005-06AE
2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05
-5.0
-5.0

-10.0
-10.0
GDP Agriculture Industry Services
GDP Agriculture Industry Services
 
          Source: CSO 
 
While the agricultural growth volatility has remained high, its contribution to the gross state 
domestic product has been continuously declining. Agriculture’s share fell from 42 per cent 
during 1970s to 35 per cent and then to 29 per cent during 1980s and 1990s respectively. The 
share has further reduced to about 21.7 per cent of the total domestic product during 2000‐
05. While the industrial growth has remained strong, its share has remained stable around 
26 per cent. Services sector on the other hand, now accounting for more than half of the GDP 
has exhibited continued and significant growth acceleration.       
 
Figure 2: Sectoral Composition 
Se ctoral Composition
Se ctoral Composition

Agriculture
Agriculture
1970s
1970s
1980s
1980s
Industry 1990s
Industry 1990s
2000-01/05-06
2000-01/05-06
Services
Services

0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 40.0 50.0 60.0


0.0 10.0 20.0 pe r 30.0
ce nt 40.0 50.0 60.0
pe r ce nt  
    Source: CSO 

[4] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

 
International Comparisons 
 
This section compares the structural changes in a small sample of countries. The sample is 
not entirely scientific. It covers three broad groups of countries, all of which have been used 
in  one  context  or  another  when  India’s  economic  structure  and  performance  is  being 
discussed.  The  first  group  is  the  set  of  East  Asian  countries,  which  represent  a  collective 
experience  of  manufacturing  export‐led  growth.  The  second  are  two  Latin  American 
countries,  Brazil  and  Mexico,  which  reflect  a  predominantly  import‐substitution  based 
strategy. The third are India’s neighbours in South Asia, which are included in the sample to 
examine whether there is a “sub‐continental” effect at work in the structural evolution of the 
economy.  Table  2  provides  a  picture  of  the  structural  change  in  these  countries  over  two 
decades,  with  the  five‐year  average  share  of  each  sector  reported  for  each  country.  The 
countries are ranked in ascending order of affluence so that the structural evolution can be 
seen in context of the development process. 
 
Table 2: Structural change across countries 
GDP per 
capita, PPP 
Country 
(constant 1995  Agriculture Share  Industry Share  Services Share 
Name 
international 
$) 
1991‐ 1997‐
   2002  1980‐84 1985‐90 1991‐96 1997‐02 1980‐84 1985‐90 1991‐96 1997‐02 1980‐84 1985‐90 
96  02 
Bangladesh  1,501  31.5 31.5 27.3 25.0 21.1 21.2 23.6 25.6 47.4 47.3 49.1 49.4
Pakistan  1,719  30.0 26.9 25.7 26.0 22.9 23.9 24.6 23.4 47.1 49.2 49.7 50.6
India  2,365  36.8 32.2 30.2 25.7 25.5 26.9 27.0 26.4 37.7 40.9 42.8 47.9
Indonesia  2,857  23.4 22.4 17.7 17.6 40.0 36.8 40.9 44.8 36.7 40.9 41.4 37.6
Sri Lanka  3,160  27.7 26.7 24.4 20.6 27.3 26.6 26.0 27.0 45.0 46.7 49.6 52.4
Philippines  3,694  24.1 23.3 21.4 16.4 38.8 34.8 32.7 31.9 37.1 41.9 45.9 51.7
China  4,054  32.0 26.7 21.2 17.1 45.6 43.3 46.6 50.0 22.4 30.0 32.2 32.8
Thailand  6,208  20.2 15.2 10.3 9.5 30.2 34.4 39.9 41.2 49.7 50.5 49.8 49.2
Brazil  6,878  10.6 9.9 8.4 7.2 44.6 43.6 37.1 26.2 44.8 46.5 54.5 66.6
Mexico  7,947  8.8 8.9 6.3 4.6 34.1 33.0 27.7 27.9 57.1 58.1 66.0 67.5
Malaysia  8,080  21.0 18.8 13.5 10.2 39.3 39.3 41.4 46.9 39.7 41.8 45.1 42.9
Korea, Rep.  15,009  14.1 10.3 6.7 4.7 40.1 42.4 43.4 42.5 45.8 47.2 49.9 52.8
Source: World Development Indicators  
Three significant observations can be made on the patterns presented in the table. First, it is 
quite  clear  that  the  service  sector  is  a  dominant  entity  in  virtually  all  the  countries  in  the 
sample, across the entire range of per capita GDP represented in the sample. In terms of the 
share of services in GDP, only China appears as a negative outlier, with the share of services 
consistently below 40 per cent. One clear message from this comparison is that the absolute 
share  of  service  activity  in  GDP  is  itself  not  much  of  an  indicator  of  structural  differences 
across  economies.  Of  course,  these  are  all  sector  aggregates  and  do  not  reveal  anything 
about  the  relative  importance  of  specific  segments  of  a  sector,  but  the  point  that  a  large 
service sector is compatible with a range of development attainments comes out strongly in 
the comparison. 
 
The  key  comparison  is,  therefore,  not  to  be  found  in  services  share  of  GDP;  it  is  the  split 
between  industry  and  agriculture.  The  second  observation  is  that  there  is  a  clear  divide 

[5] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

amongst  the  countries  belonging  to  different  regions  in  terms  of  how  their  agriculture‐to‐
industry transitions have taken place. Clearly, the East Asian countries as a group have seen 
significant declines in their shares of agriculture in GDP, which are more or less matched by 
the  increases  in  their  shares  of  industry  in  GDP.  The  shares  of  industry  in  GDP  for  this 
group  were  uniformly  and  persistently  higher  than  for  the  other  countries  in  the  sample, 
whether from Latin America or South Asia.   
 
China,  again,  is  something  of  an  outlier,  but  in  the  positive  direction  as  far  as  industry  is 
concerned.  It  always  had  a  relatively  high  share,  which  has  increased  somewhat  over  the 
decades.  This  indicates  that  China’s  transformation  displayed  a  relatively  closer  link 
between  declining  agriculture  and  growing  industry  than  the  others,  but  overall,  the  East 
Asian pattern is strikingly different from the others in terms of the significance of industry, 
even across a fairly wide range of per capita income levels. Korea, the most affluent country 
in the sample, with a per capita income more than thrice that of China’s, still has over 40 per 
cent  of  its  GDP  coming  from  industry,  which  underlines  the  persistence  of  industrial 
competitiveness at relatively high levels of affluence. 
 
The third observation is that there is some validity to the notion of a “South Asia” effect in 
the pattern of structural evolution. Of course, all four South Asian economies rank fairly low 
in the affluence; this might explain the collective weight of the agriculture sector in GDP, but 
the striking pattern is that the share of industry in all four countries has remained at around 
one‐quarter  over  the  two‐decade  period.  Whatever  decline  there  has  been  in  the  share  of 
agriculture  has  been  largely  absorbed  by  services.  This  fits  in  with  the  pattern  that  is 
observed for the two Latin American economies, which, at far higher levels of affluence, also 
have  rather  low  shares  of  industry  in  GDP,  comparable  to  South  Asia.  Of  course,  their 
agriculture  sectors  are  small,  which  is  consistent  with  their  levels  of  affluence,  but  their 
service sectors have taken  up all the slack and have a far higher share than either the East 
Asian or the South Asian countries.   
 

[6] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

II.   ROLE OF REFORMS 
 
During 1980s, India witnessed an average growth rate of 5.9 per cent. The growth, however, 
was  primarily  financed  by  increased  government  borrowings  resulting  in  increased 
accumulation  of  debt,  thus  resulting  in  a  severe  balance  of  payments  crisis  in  1991,  and 
arousing  a  shift  in  policy  framework.  The  reforms  of  1990s  aimed  at  a  systematic  shift 
towards a more open economy with a greater involvement of market forces, change in the 
regulatory  structure,  increased  participation  of  private  sector  and  redefining  the  role  of 
public sector.  
 
Post  reforms  period  saw  the  average  growth  during  the  1992‐93/99‐00  increasing  up  to  6.4 
per cent.  While the average growth during the 90s was slightly better than that during the 
80s,  unlike  the  latter  period  it  was  backed  by  a  stable  external  debt  scenario.  Post  reform 
period also witnessed a sharp reduction in overall poverty in the country. 
 
Table 3: Growth and Development Performance (Per cent) 
   GDP Growth  Debt/ GDP  Poverty 
1980s  5.9   41.7  41.7 
1990s  5.8   48.2  31.0 
1990‐91/94‐95  5.0   48.9  36.0 
1995‐96/99‐00  6.5   47.5  26.1 
2000‐01/05‐06  6.3   59.2  19.3* 
Note:* Based on Planning Commission projections for 2007. 
Source: CSO, Planning Commission, RBI 
 
The following section will discuss the major reforms initiated since 1991 and their impact on 
the overall growth performance. The section will look into the reforms whereby looking at 
the reforms in the five key sectors in the economy – fiscal discipline, industrial and foreign 
investment  and  trade  policy,  agriculture  reforms,  infrastructure  development  and  social 
sector development.   
  
i) Fiscal Discipline 
 
While  fiscal  stabilisation  is  not  just  an  essential  precondition  for  the  success  of  economic 
reforms,  in  India  achieving  it  was  the  urgent  priority,  which  resulted  in  initiation  of  the 
reform process.  
 
Centre’s fiscal deficit during the 80s was at an average of 6.8 per cent of GDP, which further 
shot up to 7.8 per cent of GDP in 1990‐91. Together with states fiscal deficit, the total deficit 
stood  at  a  significant  9.4  per  cent  of  GDP  in  1990‐91.  The  reforms  were  able  to  reduce  the 
centre’s fiscal deficit to 5.6 and 5.4 per cent of GDP in 1991‐92 and 1992‐93 respectively.  
 
The  reduction  in  fiscal  deficit  was  achieved  by  systematically  strengthening  the  fiscal 
situation  by  way  of  abolishing  export  subsidies,  restructuring  fertiliser  subsidy, 
announcement  of  progressive  phasing  out  of  budget  support  in  the  form  of  government 
loans to the loss making public sector units and restricting development expenditure.  

[7] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

 
While  the  reforms  also  aimed  to  improve  public  savings  in  the  economy  to  support 
substantial  investment  in  the  economy.  The  public‐savings  to  GDP  ratio  declined  from  3.0 
per  cent  during  80s  to  1.4  per  cent  during  early  90s,  and  further  worsened  to  0.6  per  cent 
during  the  second  half  of  the  90s.  The  deterioration  in  the  public  savings  ratio  continued 
during the 2000s with the average ratio during 2000‐01 to 2004‐05 falling to –0.2 per cent of 
the GDP.  
 
Table 4: Savings Investment Ratio, FD 
1990‐91/  1995‐96/  
   1970s  1980s  1990s  2000‐01/ 04‐05
 94‐95  99‐00 
GDS/GDP  17.5  19.4  23.3  22.9  23.7  26.3 
GDCF/GDP  17.6  21.2  24.7  24.3  25.1  26.0 
FD/GDP  3.8  6.8  5.9  6.3  5.5  5.3 
Source: National Accounts Statistics 
 
A  scenario  of  high  fiscal  deficit  together  with  low  savings  and  investment  ratio  witnessed 
during the 90s raised concern about sustainability of overall growth and about the efficacy 
of  economic  reforms.  However,  latest  available  national  accounts  data  indicates  a  spurt  in 
the investment and savings activity in the economy. The investment rate peaked up to its all 
time high of 30 per cent of GDP during 2004‐05 with a moderate fiscal deficit of 4.5 per cent. 
 
Tax reforms helped improve the total tax revenues of the centre from 9.1 per cent of GDP in 
1980‐81  to  10.1  per  cent  during  1990‐91  to  1992‐93.  Tax  reforms  involved  lowering  of  tax 
rates,  broadening  the  tax  base  and  reducing  loopholes  in  the  tax  structure.  The  ratio 
however has declined to 9 per cent during 2000‐01 to 2004‐05  
 
Despite a significant improvement achieved in a lot of fronts, further strengthening of fiscal 
discipline  is  called  for  by  way  of  reducing  distortionary  subsidies,  improving  state  fiscal 
finances and reducing borrowings of the government. 
 
ii) Industrial and foreign investment and trade policy  
 
Industrial  and  trade  policies  of  India  were  witness  to  the  most  radical  changes  brought 
about  by  the  reform  process  by  way  of  dismantling  of  most  central  government  controls 
existing  in  the  economy.  Industrial  policy  prior  to  reforms  was  characterised  by  multiple 
controls  over  private  investment,  scale/location  of  operations  –protecting  individual 
industries, thus resulting in an inefficient system. Post reforms, licensing is restricted to few 
industries  primarily  on  account  of  environmental  and  pollution  considerations.  The  list  of 
industries reserved for public sector has been significantly reduced and private participation 
is being encouraged in a lot of critical areas. 
  
One  of  the  most  crucial  changes  incorporated  in  the  trade  policy  post  reform  has  been 
encouraging  foreign  investment  in  a  wide  range  of  activities.  Earlier,  India  adopted  a 
selective foreign investment policy with restricting the maximum amount of investment in 
most of the sector to 40 per cent.      

[8] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

 
Trade policy before reforms was characterised by high tariffs, import restrictions and import 
licences for a significant amount of commodities. The criteria for issue of licences were not 
transparent,  further  characterised  by  delays  and  widespread  corruption.  Post  reforms,  the 
import  control  regime  on  import  of  raw  materials  and  other  inputs  into  production  and 
capital  goods  has  been  almost  dismantled.  Import  licensing  for  capital  goods  and 
intermediate goods was also removed. Quantitative restrictions on imports of capital goods 
and  intermediate  goods  were  undertaken  in  early  90s  with  the  restriction  on  imports  of 
manufactured  consumer  goods  and  agricultural  products  being  removed  in  April  2001. 
Progress  has  also  been  made  on  reducing  the  tariff  rate  existing  in  the  economy  with  the 
weighted import duty rate declined from a high of 72.5 per cent in 1990‐91 to 24 per cent in 
2004‐05.        
 
iii) Agriculture reforms 
 
Agricultural  growth  decelerated  during  the  post  reform  period  from  an  average  of  4.4  per 
cent during the 80s to an average of 3 per cent during the 90s. It has been widely argued that 
the  reforms  in  India  were  primarily  targeted  around  industrial  and  trade  issues,  thus 
neglecting  the  agriculture  sector.  The  sector,  however,  benefited  from  the  policy  changes 
incorporated  in  the  industrial  and  trade  policy  by  way  of  favourable  prices  of  agricultural 
products and spurt in the level of agricultural exports in the economy.    
 
However, post reform period witnessed a sharp decline in the share of public investment in 
the  sector  (Refer  Fig.4  Agricultural  Growth).  The  main  reason  behind  shrinkage  of  public 
investment  has  been  the  worsening  fiscal  condition  of  the  state  governments  along  with 
dominance of politically popular but less efficient policies.  
 
After more than a decade of incorporating the policy changes, it is however time to re‐look 
at the efficacy of the implemented changes. Agricultural policies should be restructured so 
as  to  help  in  the  promotion  and  adoption  of  new  and  better  agriculture  techniques  and 
methods‐ such as agricultural diversification, movement of food stocks etc.      
  
iv) Infrastructure development 
 
A proper and developed infrastructure is crucial for overall economic development. During 
the  pre‐reform  period  basic  services  like  electric  power,  road  and  rail  connectivity, 
telecommunication, air transport and ports were provided by the public sector monopolies. 
However the inability of the public sector to mobilise investment for capacity expansion and 
to  meet  quality  controls  resulted  in  the  opening  up  of  the  sector  for  private  sector 
participation.  
 
The financial sector saw a wide range of reforms in the banking system and capital markets 
and  further  in  the  insurance  sector  as  well.  Major  banking  sector  reforms  included  a) 
measures of liberalisation like dismantling the interest rate control system, eliminating prior 
approval from the central bank for large loans, and reducing the statutory requirements to 
invest  in  government  securities  b)  increasing  financial  soundness  by  way  of  introducing 
capital  adequacy  and  other  prudential  norms  for  banks  and  strengthening  banking 

[9] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

supervision and c) measures for increasing competition like more liberal licensing of private 
banks and freer expansion of foreign banks. The reforms thus resulted in sharp reduction in 
non‐performing assets of the banks along with more than 90 per cent of banks meeting the 
capital adequacy norms.  
 
Stock market reforms were initiated by a stock market scam in 1992. The reforms involved 
establishment  of  statutory  regulator,  promulgation  of  rules  and  regulations  governing 
various  types  of  participants  and  activities  like  insider  trading  and  takeover  bids, 
introduction  of  electronic  trading  to  improve  transparency  in  price  determination  and 
dematerialisation of shares.  
 
The insurance sector was a public sector monopoly before the reforms. By 2000 the law was 
amended  to  allow  private  sector  participation  with  foreign  equity  upto  26  per  cent.  An 
independent Insurance Development and Regulatory Authority (IRDA) has also been set up.  
 
While  privatisation  has  been  a  vital  component  of  economic  reforms  across  countries,  the 
idea  was  not  very  well  received  in  India  until  recently.  Initially,  the  government  adopted 
“disinvestment”  whereby  it  sold  a  minority  stake  in  the  public  sector  while  retaining  the 
management control with the government.  
  
v) Social sector development 
 
India significantly lagged behind emerging and south‐ east Asian economies with respect to 
the key social indicators. Development and creation of a firm social sector infrastructure is 
essential  in  improving  the  welfare  of  the  poor  and  increasing  their  earning  capacity.  The 
central government expenditure on social services and rural development increased from 7.6 
per cent in 1990‐91 to 8 per cent in 2000‐01 and 10 per cent in 2004‐05.  
 
Reforming the reform process -Labour reform, investment, infrastructure to unleash
India’s economic potential
The  continuing  structural  change  in  industrial,  trade  and  financial  sectors  has  been 
continuous  and  has  contributed  significantly  to  higher  productivity  of  the  economy. 
Implementation  of  remaining  reforms  and  re‐ordination  of  government  spending  towards 
high‐priority areas  of education, infrastructure and investment  will  help  attain  a sustained 
robust growth in the economy, going forward. It is thus necessary to move swiftly to carry 
on many of the reforms. Some of the continuing reforms are reduction in protection levels, 
continuing  reforms  in  banking  sector,  product  de‐reservation  in  small‐scale  industry, 
decontrol  of  prices  of  products  like  petroleum,  reform  of  power  sector  etc.  Initiatives  also 
need to be undertaken in bringing about labour reforms, commercialising key infrastructure 
sectors, furthering trade reforms and revitalisation of agriculture. Sustaining higher rates of 
economic growth would require a vigorous pursuit of economic reforms at both central and 
state levels.  
 
A  decade  of  opening  of  economy  during  the  90s  gave  the  economy  a  new  dynamism. 
However, should India be able to address and implement the remaining reforms, it is likely 
to attain and sustain even higher rates of growth.  

[10] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

  III.   AGRICULTURAL GROWTH  
 
Even  though  the  share  of  agriculture  has  sharply  declined  from  more  than  50  per  cent 
during 1960s to a little above 20 per cent during the last few years, it continues to remain the 
predominant sector in the economy. Around 60 per cent of population is still dependent on 
the  sector  for  employment  and  livelihood  opportunities.  Further,  due  to  its  linkages  with 
manufacturing  and  services  sectors,  the  impact  of  bad  agricultural  performance  adversely 
affects  the  demand  for  goods  and  services  provided  by  these  industries.  Due  to  its 
importance in national product and employment and the challenges associated with it, the 
sector has drawn special attention of the policy makers.       
 
Some  of  the  key  challenges  faced  by  the  sector  relate  to  the  issues  of  total  output  growth, 
efficiency,  equity  and  sustainability.  The  biggest  challenge  in  the  sector  remains  that  of 
revival  of  growth  and  reduction  of  rainfall  dependence  in  the  sector.  However,  with  the 
declining agricultural growth, the per capita agricultural income is falling. The sector should 
also  need  to  ensure  sustainable  use  of  natural  resource  in  the  economy  given  the  limited 
resource base in the economy.     
 
Figure 3: Agricultural Volatility 

Growth Volatility
20.0
GDP
15.0
Agriculture
10.0

5.0
per cent

0.0
1994-95
1996-97
1998-99
1970-71
1972-73
1974-75
1976-77
1978-79
1980-81
1982-83
1984-85
1986-87
1988-89
1990-91
1992-93

2000-01
2002-03
2004-05

-5.0

-10.0

-15.0
 
      Source: CSO 
 
Given  the  vast  dependence  on  the  sector  and  nation’s  deficiency  in  foodgrain  production, 
the  period  of  1970s  through  the  spread  of  Green  Revolution  aimed  at  attaining  food  self‐
sufficiency  in  the  economy.  During  the  1980s,  the  focus  shifted  from  self‐sufficiency  to 
generation  of  additional  income  in  rural  areas  to  combat  the  poverty  situation.  However, 
agricultural growth since the 1990s has not been able to pick up. The average growth during 
the Ninth Plan (1997‐2002) period sharply fell down to 2.1 per cent from a moderate 4.7 per 
cent  during  the  Eight  Plan  (1992‐93/1996‐97).  However  continued  dependence  on  the 
domestic factors like monsoons and external factors like depressed agricultural commodity 
prices has resulted in failure in agricultural growth pick up even during the first three years 
of the Tenth Plan period (2002‐03 to 2006‐07).   
 

[11] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

The  table  5  highlights  the  productivity  difference  in  Indian  agriculture.  It  charts  the 
international  comparison  of  yield  of  selected  commodities  with  that  in  India  in  2002, 
indicating  that  low  productivity  has  significantly  afflicted  growth  of  Indian  agriculture. 
Though India accounts for about 22 per cent of world’s paddy/rice production, it records a 
lower yield per hectare than that in Bangladesh and Myanmar. Yield per hectare in India for 
wheat is also significantly lower despite the fact that India contributes to 12 per cent of the 
total  wheat  production  in  the  world.  Targeting  productivity  enhancement  is  thus  essential 
for achieving accelerated agricultural growth and a healthy overall growth in the country. 
 
Table 5: International comparison of yield of selected commodities –2002 
Rice/paddy  Wheat  Maize 
U.S.A  7372  U.K  8043  Italy  9560 
Thailand  2597  France  7449  France  8813 
Pakistan  2882  China  3885  Egypt  7789 
Myanmar  3532  India  2770  China  5022 
Japan  6582  Pakistan  2262  Philippines  1803 
India  2915  Bangladesh  2164  Pakistan  1769 
Egypt  9135  Iran  1905  India  1705 
Bangladesh  3448           
World  3916  World  2720  World  4343 
Sugarcane  Tobacco Leaves  Groundnut 
Egypt  119893  Italy  3333  China  2986 
Colombia  94789  France  2778  U.S.A  2869 
Guatemala  94032  Canada  2600  Argentina  2329 
India  68049  Pakistan  1848  Brazil  2043 
China  66353  India  1353  India  794 
Pakistan  48042  Bangladesh  1233  Uganda  701 
Bangladesh  39890  Indonesia  829  Sudan  630 
World  65802  World  1589  World  1381 
Source: Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperation          
 
The key causes of decline in agricultural growth were inadequate irrigation facilities, on the 
back of irregular monsoons; decreasing public investment and a weakened support system 
due to financial problems of the states thus resulting in a weak credit delivery system. Total 
investment  in  agriculture  has  witnessed  a  sharp  decline  over  the  years.  The  share  of 
investment  in  agriculture  of  the  total  investment  declined  from  14.4  per  cent  during  the 
1970s to 11.6 per cent and 7.7 per cent during the 80s and 90s respectively.  
  

[12] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Figure 4: Investment in Agriculture (Per cent Share) 

30.0
30.0
Public
25.0 Public
per cent of Total Investment
25.0 Private
per cent of Total Investment Private
20.0 T otal
20.0 T otal
15.0
15.0
10.0
10.0

5.0
5.0
0.0
0.0
1970s 1980s 1990s 1990/91- 1995/96- 2000/01-
1970s 1980s 1990s 1990/91- 1995/96- 2000/01-
94/95 99/00 02/03
94/95 99/00 02/03
 
      Source: CSO   
 

While  the  public  investment  in  agriculture  sharply  declined  during  the  80s,  the  initial 
decline  was  off  set  by  increase  in  private  investment.  The  public  investment  in  agriculture 
grew at an average rate of 9.9 per cent during the 70s, however during the 80s the average 
growth slipped to –3.5 per cent. Private investment on the other hand registered an average 
growth of 3.5 and 2.5 per cent during the periods considered.  However, since the mid‐90s 
the  private  investment  in  agriculture  has  stagnated  while  the  public  investment  has  been 
declining.    
  
Table 6: Growth in Investment in Agriculture (Per cent) 
  1970s  1980s  1990s  1990/91‐94/95 1995/96‐99/00 2000/01‐02/03
Total  6.3  ‐0.3  3.9  5.3  2.6  3.5 
Public  9.9  ‐3.5  ‐0.1  2.2  ‐2.3  1.3 
Private  3.5  2.5  6.3  7.7  4.9  4.8 
Source: CSO 
 

A  comparison  of  the  investment  in  agriculture  against  that  observed  in  other  sectors 
suggests that during the 90s, private investment growth took over that in public investment. 
The  second  half  of  90s  saw  a  growth  surge  in  private  investment  in  industry.  Share  of 
private investment in agriculture increased from 5.7 per cent during latter half of 90s to 8.3 
per  cent  during  2000‐01  to  2003‐04.  Share  of  industry  in  total  private  investment  though 
significant, declined from 57 per cent to 46.3 per cent during the corresponding period. 
 

Table 7: Investment Growth 
  1970s  1980s  1990s  1990/91‐94/95 1995/96‐99/00 2000/01‐02/03
   Public Investment 
Agriculture  9.9  ‐3.5  ‐0.1  2.2  ‐2.3  1.3 
Industry  10.2  5.6  0.6  4.6  ‐3.5  ‐2.9 
Services  5.6  4.9  4.9  7.0  2.7  3.1 
   Private Investment 
Agriculture  3.5  2.5  6.3  7.7  4.9  4.8 
Industry  4.5  18.4  5.8  2.3  9.4  ‐0.2 
Services  5.9  7.1  5.2  8.3  2.1  8.5 
Source: CSO 

[13] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Agricultural Diversification 
 

With the persistent deceleration observed in agricultural growth over the years, overall food 
consumption has stagnated. With an average growth of 0.2 per cent during the 70s and 80s, 
the  area  under  food  grain  production  almost  remained  constant.  The  total  food  grain 
production  thus  underwent  a  growth  deceleration  of  –0.3  per  cent  during  the  90s.  The 
average growth in yield increased from 1.2 per cent during the 70s to 4.6 per cent during 80s. 
Growth  in  yield  slowed  down  to  2.4  per  cent  during  the  90s  and  further  to  0.4  per  cent 
during 2000‐04.  
 

Per capita consumption expenditure on food declined from Rs 5856 in 1996‐97 to Rs 5472 in 
2002‐03,  before  recovering  to  Rs  6134  in  2004‐05.  Also,  cereals  consumption  witnessed  a 
larger decline than that in other food. Cereals consumption witnessed an average growth of 
9.3 per cent during 1995‐96/99‐00 against the corresponding growth of 7.3 per cent in food. 
However,  during  2000‐01/04‐05,  per  capita  cereals  consumption  registered  an  average 
growth  of  –5.6  per  cent  against  the  corresponding  growth  of  1.4  per  cent  in  food 
expenditure. Further, decline in cereals consumption is also not being made up by increased 
consumption of other food. This marks a diversification away from agricultural products.    
 
Table 8: Target Growth rate of Agricultural Crops 
  Production 
   IX Plan  X Plan  XI Plan 
Agricultural crop  3.82  4.54  4.27 
Food grains  3.05  3.57  2.73 
Fruits & Vegetables  7.00  8.01  7.89 
Total Agriculture  4.5  5.3  5.1 
Source: Planning Commission 
 

Further, there exists a wide divergence between the expected growth in production and the 
per  capita  consumption  of  agricultural  commodities.  The  Ninth  plan  documents  the 
projected  per  annum  growth  in  production  and  consumption  of  selected  agricultural 
commodities. The expected growth in per capita consumption of food grains at 1.1 per cent 
is significantly lower than the expected production growth of 3.6 per cent.  
 
Table 9: Projected Production and Per capita Consumption in Selected Commodities 
CAGR (2011‐12/ 96‐97) 
   Production  Consumption 
Agricultural Crop  Per cent  Per cent 
Food grain  3.6  1.1 
Rice  3.1  0.7 
Wheat  4.3  1.7 
Coarse Cereal  2.4  0.0 
Pulses  4.9  2.7 
Oilseeds  5.8  3.1 
Sugar Cane  6.2  3.5 
Livestock       
Milk  8.3  5.3 
Fishery  7.0  4.2 
Source: Planning Commission 

[14] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

The decline in level of consumption indicates structural change in the consumption pattern 
of  the  individuals  due  to  changes  in  life  style  and  standard  of  living.  It  also  suggests 
weakening of demand stimuli from industry and services sector for the agricultural sector. 
Further, low employment growth in the agricultural sector (Refer Table 20) has resulted in 
declining or stagnant agricultural incomes, which is a significant contributor of demand for 
food grains, and thus declining consumption levels. 
 
Agricultural  diversification  is  one  of  the  methods  for  accelerating  agricultural  growth  in 
India.  Comparing  the  productivity  of  the  horticulture  crops  against  that  of  food  grains 
brings out a significant difference between the two. Productivity of all horticultural crops in 
India  ranged  from  7.5  MT/million  hectare  in  1991‐92  to  8.9  MT/million  hectare  in  2002‐03, 
with  a  high  of  9.8  MT/million  hectare  in  1999‐00.  On  the  other  hand,  food  grains 
productivity  ranged  from  1.4  MT/  million  hectare  in  1991‐92  to  1.6  MT/million  hectare  in 
2002‐03.  
 
Figure 5: Yield Performance 
Yie ld Pe rformance
12 Yie ld Pe rformance
12
10
10
MT/Million Hec

8
MT/Million Hec

8
6
6
4
4
2
2
0
0
1991-92

1993-94

1995-96

1997-98

1999-00

2001-02

2003-04

2005-06
1991-92

1993-94

1995-96

1997-98

1999-00

2001-02

2003-04

2005-06

Horticulture FoodGrains
Horticulture FoodGrains
 
Note:   *Horticulture crops include fruits, vegetables, potato & tuber crops, mushrooms, flower and plantation 
crops, spices & honey.    
Source:   National Horticulture Board, Department of Agriculture and Cooperation 
 
Structural Rigidities 

However, diversification of agricultural production cannot be adopted across the country, as 
certain structural rigidities across the region need to be addressed for its overall growth.   
• Primarily,  the  shift  from  food  grains  to  horticulture  requires  a  supportive  policy 
framework,  with  greater  emphasis  on  marketing  arrangements,  including  increased 
private sector participation in marketing products, encouragement of downstream food 
processing and research linked to market requirements for diversifying into horticulture.  
• Poor  marketing  arrangements:  There  exists  significant  differential  between  the  price 
received  by  the  farmers  and  that  paid  by  the  final  consumer,  which  reflects  inefficient 
marketing  arrangements  in  the  system.  The  organised  markets  are  also  controlled  by  a 
few traders, which makes the entire process of price fixation highly non‐transparent.  
• Absence  or  poor  condition  of  infrastructure  set‐ups  required  like  cold  storage  etc.  not 
just hampers the process of diversification, it also discourages the farmers from the new 

[15] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

opportunities available. Apart from the policy constraints, the shift to animal husbandry, 
dairy  and  fisheries  is  constrained  by  lack  of  availability  of  green  fodder,  grazing  land 
and  proper  supply  chain  facilities  especially  in  case  of  fruits,  vegetables  and  milk 
products.         
• Need for adequate agricultural research focussing on development of products suitable 
to  varied  regional  conditions,  market  requirements  and  end  requirement  of  domestic 
consumption against that for export promotion or food processing. .    
 
While  the  pursuit  and  development  of  agricultural  diversification  need  to  be  given  high 
priority  in  government’s  agenda,  it  should  be  seen  in  the  light  of  sustained  need  for  food 
security.  However,  diversifying  the  existing  agricultural  structure  will  involve  significant 
increase in investment.  
 
Food Security 

Indiaʹs food security policy holds a laudable objective of ensuring availability of food grains 
to  the  common  people  at  an  affordable  price  and  enabling the  poor to have access to  food 
where none exist. Over the years, the policy has focused essentially on growth in agriculture 
production and on support price for procurement and maintenance of rice and wheat stocks. 
The responsibility of procuring and stocking of foodgrains lies with the Food Corporation of 
India (FCI) and that of distribution is with the public distribution system (PDS). 
 
While the PDS was introduced to address the issue of food security, inefficiencies increased 
over  the  years  due  to  problems  associated  with  the  system.  Mismanagement  leading  to 
increased  operational  costs  and  market  distortion,  neglect  of  rural  sector,  widespread 
corruption and illegal sales, being some of them.  
 
In  the  short  term,  there  needs  to  be  a  recognition  that  food  insecurity  stems  from  lack  of 
opportunity.  There  is  a  need  to  ensure  employment  opportunities  for  at  least  one  able‐
bodied  member  of  a  household.  For  children,  the  midday  meal  scheme  should  be 
implemented in lagging states as soon as possible. 
 
In  the  long  term,  food  security  will  result  from  the  wider  tackling  of  poverty.  This  will 
require improvements in infrastructure and time‐limited targeted policies to improve rural 
farm and non‐farm productivity. 
 
To the extent the government is able to attend to  the problems that the system has inherited 
over the years, adoption of new policy options like diversification will not hinder with the 
food security policy.  
 
Further, reduction in number of people below the poverty line would result in decline in food 
subsidy  burden  and  hence  would  provide  for  enough  scope  for  growth  and  development  in 
the sector.   
 

[16] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Recommendations 
 
Structural Issues 

i) Encouraging  emerging  areas  of  agriculture  like  horticulture,  floriculture,  organic 


farming, genetic engineering, food processing, branding and packaging. 

ii) Introducing contract farming: Contract farming is a system for the production and 
supply  of  agricultural  and  horticultural  produce  under  forward  contracts 
between  buyers  and  growers.  Contract  farming  helps  the  farmers  access  credit, 
quality  inputs,  technical  guidance  and  reduce  risks  of  deficient  market  demand 
and adverse price fluctuations.  

iii) Futures  market and free trade: The present system marked by input subsidies and 


high  Minimum  Support  Price  (MSP)  should  be  phased  out.  To  avoid  wide 
fluctuations  in  prices  and  prevent  distress  selling  by  small  farmers,  futures 
market can be encouraged. Improved communication systems through the use of 
information  technology  may  help  farmers  get  a  better  deal  for  their  produce. 
Crop insurance schemes can be promoted with government meeting a major part 
of the insurance premium to protect the farmers against natural calamities.  
• Restrictions on foodgrains regarding inter‐State movement, stocking, exports and 
institutional credit and trade financing should be renounced. Free trade will help 
make‐up  the  difference  between  production  and  consumption  needs,  reduce 
supply  variability,  increase  efficiency  in  resource‐use  and  permit  production  in 
regions more suited to it. 

iv) Food‐for‐education programme:  To  achieve  full  literacy,  the  food  security  need  can 
be productively linked to increased enrolment in schools. With the phasing out of 
PDS, food coupons may be issued to poor people depending on their entitlement.  

v) Modified  food‐for‐work  scheme/  direct  subsidies:  Attempt  of  rationalisation  of  input 
subsidies and MSP would result in sufficient funds with the central government, 
which  may  be  given  as  grants  to  each  State  depending  on  the  number  of  the  
poor.  

vi) Enhancing  agriculture  productivity:  The  government,  through  investments  in  vital 
agriculture infrastructure, credit linkages and encouraged use of latest techniques 
should motivate each district/ block to achieve local self‐sufficiency in food grain 
production.  However,  instead  of  concentrating  only  on  rice  or  wheat,  the  food 
crop  specific  to  the  regions’  profile  must  be  encouraged.  Creation  of  necessary 
infrastructure  like  irrigation  facilities  will  also  simulate  private  investments  in 
agriculture.  

vii) Enhancing  rural  non‐farm  employment:  Despite  the  declining  share  of  population 
dependent  on  agriculture,  the  sector  has  witnessed  over  dependence  thus 
resulting in significant disguised unemployment. Thus, there should be emphasis 
on  promotion  of  rural  non‐farm  employment  so  as  to  improve  the  earning 
potential of the rural population.  
 

[17] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Policy Recommendations 

i) Improving  competitiveness:  One  of  the  major  challenges  faced  by  the  Indian 
agricultural  sector  is  that  of  improving  the  competitiveness  of  the  sector.  With 
increased  liberalisation,  the  domestic  price  of  several  commodities  has  overshot 
their international counterparts making the imports more attractive and affecting 
the  domestic  exports  adversely.  This  calls  for  improvement  in  productivity, 
marketing, storage, transport facilities etc.  

ii) Improving  the  viability  of  small  size  holdings:  Small  sized  holding  constitute  for 
majority  of  the  farm  holdings  in  India.  Agricultural  policies  thus  should  be  so 
aimed  that  the  small  size  holdings  are  also  able  to  draw  equal  advantage  from 
them.  

iii) Institutional  and  regulatory revival:  There  exists a need  to  change  the  institutional 
mechanisms  and  regulatory  framework  in  concomitance  with  the  changing 
domestic  and  global  scenario  so  to  create  conducive  environment  for  stable 
agricultural  growth.  The  agricultural  sector  also  calls  for  improvement  of  basic 
infrastructure like irrigation facilities, etc for the sector to withstand against any 
environmental vagaries.  
 
Strengthening the demand side 

Apart from increasing profitability in the agriculture sector by reducing costs and improving 
technical efficiency, addressing the demand side is also one of the key factors, which needs 
to be considered for attaining the objective of improved and sustained agricultural growth. 
Increased  focus  needs  to  be  given  to  strengthening  the  demand  side  issues  by  way  of 
improving  the  individual’s  capacity  to  buy‐  especially  the  rural  consumer.  A  focussed 
approach  on  improving  rural  employment  opportunities  and  rural  income  along  with 
increasing  the  flow  of  agricultural  exports  will  support  the  demand  side.  (Refer  Section: 
Rural  non‐farm  employment).  Direct  schemes  such  as  cash  transfer  schemes  and  old‐age 
pension  schemes  can  improve  the  purchasing  power  of  the  rural  consumer  who  spends 
around  70  per  cent  of  his  income  on  food,  thus  generating  demand  for  food,  even  in  local 
markets, and further generating the second round impact of production and employment. 
 
Table 10: Institutional Credit to Agriculture (Rs Crore) 
Agency  2000‐01  2001‐02  2002‐03  2003‐04  2004‐05  2005‐06* 
Cooperative Banks  20,800 23,604 23,716 26,959 31,231 28,947
RRBs  4,220 4,854 6,070 7,581 12,597 11,146
Commercial Banks  27,807 33,587 39,774 52,441 81,481 77,806
Total  52,827 62,045 69,560 86,981 125,309 117,899
Note: * Upto December 31, 2005 
Source: NABARD 
 
The overall flow of institutional credit to agriculture has been increasing significantly over 
the  years  along  with  the  increased  policy  initiatives  undertaken  to  increase  the  limit  of 
institutional  credit  allocated  to  the  sector.  There  still  exist  several  gaps  in  the  system  like 
inadequate provision of credit to small and marginal farmers, paucity of medium and long‐

[18] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

term  lending,  limited  deposit  mobilisation  and  heavy  dependence  on  borrowed  funds  by 
major agricultural credit suppliers.   
 
Time to revive and diversify towards new options 

The  problems  emerging  in  the  agricultural  sector  needs  to  be  urgently  addressed  so  as  to 
ensure  a  sustainable  and  stable  overall  economic  growth.  The  poor  performance  of 
agriculture  during  the  Tenth  Plan  period  is  due  to  poor  performance  of  monsoons  along 
with sluggish implementation of policies.  
 
A  volatile  agricultural  growth  has  been  the  key  factor  holding  Indian  economy’s  ability  to 
consistently achieve a healthy growth rate. While revival in the farm growth is important to 
achieve  sustainable  growth,  due  focus  needs  to  be  given  to  exploiting  the  potential  of 
avenues  like  agricultural  diversification  for  expansion  of  rural  income  along  with 
employment growth.  
 
Thus there exists a need to focus  on  increasing  investment  in  rural  roads,  irrigation,  better 
management  of  existing  natural  resources,  improved  and  efficient  credit  delivery  system, 
new and improved production techniques, better storage and transportation facilities.  
 

[19] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

IV.   INDUSTRIAL GROWTH 
 
Industry contributed to about 22 per cent of all‐India GDP during the 1970s, the contribution 
of  which  increased  and  has  remained  stable  around  26  per  cent  of  the  domestic  product 
since the 90s. Within the sector, registered manufacturing with a share of about 40 per cent, 
remains  the  highest  contributing  sector,  followed  by  construction  and  unregistered 
manufacturing. While the share of industry remains stable, growth in the sector led by the 
manufacturing sector has exhibited significant buoyancy over the years. The average growth 
increased significantly from 4 per cent during the 70s to 6.8 per cent during the 80s. While 
the first half of the fiscal saw the slow down in average growth to 5.3 per cent, the growth 
picked up to 6.3 per cent during 1995‐96 to 1999‐00.    
 

Table 11: Share in Sectoral GDP 
  1970s  1980s  1990s  2000‐01 /04‐05
Registered manufacturing  39.7  39.1  40.0  39.7 
Construction  20.5  19.4  20.2  23.4 
Unregistered manufacturing  28.7  23.8  21.5  18.8 
Mining & quarrying  5.7  10.5  9.1  9.6 
Elect. gas & water supply  5.6  7.2  9.1  8.6 
Source: CSO 
 

Construction  and  registered  manufacturing  witnessed  significant  pick  up  in  the  growth 
during 2000‐05 against that during the 90s. The two sectors together contribute to about 20 
per cent of the total domestic product in the economy.   
 
Figure 6: Sectoral Growth 
S ectoral Growth: Average Growth 1993-94/96-97
S ectoral Growth: Average Growth 1993-94/96-97
1997-98/05-06
1997-98/05-06
14
14
12
12
10
10
per cent

8
per cent

8
6
6
4
4
2
2
0
0
Construction Manufacturing- Registered Unregistered Elect. gas & Mining &
Construction Manufacturing- Registered Unregistered Elect. gas & Mining &
T otal manufacturing manufacturing water supply quarrying
T otal manufacturing manufacturing water supply quarrying
 
           Source: CSO  
 
Within manufacturing, registered manufacturing accounts for about 65 per cent of the total 
gross value added with the balance 35 per cent being accounted for the unregistered sector. 
The latest available data shows that manufacturing of chemicals and chemical products with 
a share of about 18.9 per cent had the highest contribution to the total value added during 
2002‐03. Manufacturing  of basic  metals;  coke,  refined petroleum  products and nuclear  fuel 
followed close behind. Top ten industries contributed to about 79 per cent of the total value 
added during 2002‐03.       

[20] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Figure 7: Share in GVA (2002‐03) 
Share in GVA
Share in GVA
18.9
20.0 18.9
20.0
18.0
18.0
16.0 Share in GVA
16.0
14.0 Share in GVA
11.7
14.0
12.0 11.7 10.2
12.0 10.2 9.3
9.3 7.8
10.0
10.0
8.0 7.8
8.0 4.9 4.8 4.6
6.0 4.9 4.8 4.6 3.5 3.3
6.0
4.0 3.5 3.3
4.0
2.0
2.0
0.0
0.0

Rubber and
Chemicals

vehicles,
Food pdts
metals

plastic pdts
Machinery
petroleum
Basic

machinery
Textiles

Electrical
Other non-
Coke, ref

and equip
Motor

Rubber and
Chemicals

metallic
vehicles,
Food pdts
metals

plastic pdts
Machinery
petroleum
Basic

machinery
Textiles

Electrical
Other non-
Coke, ref

and equip
and
and

Motor

metallic
and
and

 
         Source: Annual Survey of Industries 
 
Investment Scenario 
After  peaking  during  1995‐96  and  1996‐97,  the  rate  of  capital  formation  in  manufacturing 
sector declined thereafter till 2001‐02. While the share started to pick up since 2002‐03, it still 
needs  to  attract  significant  volumes  of  investment.  The  share  of  capital  formation  in  the 
registered  manufacturing  though  higher  than  that  in  the  unregistered  sector,  has  been 
considerably  low  at  around  4  per  cent  during  the  past  few  years  and  unlike  the  overall 
manufacturing sector has not witnessed a sustained pick up since 2002‐03.  
  
Table 12: Gross Domestic Capital Formation (as a % of GDP) 
GDCF at current 
  prices  Manufacturing  Registered  Unregistered 
1994‐95  26.0  8.38  6.12  2.26 
1995‐96  26.9  13.53  9.48  4.04 
1996‐97  24.5  10.19  7.56  2.62 
1997‐98  24.6  9.29  7.22  2.06 
1998‐99  22.6  7.57  5.87  1.70 
1999‐00  25.3  7.75  6.39  1.36 
2000‐01  24.4  6.09  4.27  1.82 
2001‐02  23.1  5.03  3.74  1.28 
2002‐03  24.8  5.55  4.06  1.49 
2003‐04  26.3  6.12  3.92  2.20 
Source: CSO 
 
Industrial investment intentions as captured by the industrial entrepreneur memorandums 
(IEM)  indicate  a  spurt  in  the  number  of  proposals  and  total  investment  together  with  the 
growth in proposed employment opportunities generated due to the investment intentions. 
The average growth in total number of proposals received for IEM’s during 2003‐2005* was 
at  18.1  per  cent  as  compared  to  the  growth  in  proposed  investment  and  proposed 
employment of 53.4 per cent and 47.5 per cent respectively.      

[21] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 13: Industrial Investment Proposals 
IEM  Total (IEM+LOI+DIL) 
Proposed  Proposed  Proposed  Proposed 
No of  Investment   Employment  Investment   Employment 
Year  Proposals  (Rs crore)  (Numbers)  No of Proposals (Rs crore)  (Numbers) 
2000  3058 72332  411266 3261 73374 442114
2001  2981 91234  809120 3098 92552 823191
2002  3172 91291  380209 3261 91940 388441
2003  3875 118612  833282 3991 120007 847194
2004  5118 267069  855914 5218 272334 877304
2005*  5118 280642  1033681 5225 283143 1052506
Total  61423 1703556  10877644 65519 1820399 11758744
Note: *Upto Octʹ05 
Source: Ministry of Commerce & Industry 
 
Industry‐wise  distribution  of  investment  proposals  indicates  preference  towards 
metallurgical industries, chemicals, fuels, electrical equipments, textiles etc. During August 
1991 to October 2005, metallurgical industries received the highest share of 19.5 per cent of 
the total investments. The top fifteen industries together accounted for a share of 92 per cent 
during the period.  
 
Table 14: Industry‐wise Investment Proposals‐ Share of Top 15 industries 
Total Investment  %age Share 
Industry  (Rs.Crore) 
Metallurgical Industries  354585  19.48 
Chemicals (Except Fertilizers)   225099  12.37 
Fuels  191785  10.54 
Electrical Eqipts  188131  10.33 
Textiles  154916  8.51 
Misc.Industry  150232  8.25 
Sugar  90275  4.96 
Cement and Gypsum  84007  4.61 
Paper and Pulp  60248  3.31 
Food Processing Industry  40455  2.22 
Telecommunications  33454  1.84 
Transportation  31576  1.73 
Fertilizers  25374  1.39 
Industrial Machinery  24671  1.36 
Misc.Mechanical & Engg.Ind  23751  1.30 
Total (All Industries)  1820399  100 
Source: Ministry of Commerce & Industry 
 

India: Export hub of manufactured products 
 
The  buoyancy  in  industrial  growth  has  been  translating  into  an  equally  strong  growth  in 
exports of manufactured products. Manufacturing sector accounts for around three‐fourths 
of total exports, thus fuelling the overall export growth. Manufactured product exports have 
sustained their growth momentum during the last three years, with a consistent growth of 

[22] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

about  20  per  cent  each  year.  Engineering  goods,  chemical  and  related  products  and  gems 
and jewellery have registered significant growth during the last three years.      
 

Table 15: Composition and Growth in Exports 
Share (%) of Total Exports  Growth Rate (%)  
Commodity  1990s  2000‐01  01‐02 02‐03 03‐04 04‐05 1990s 2000‐01  01‐02  02‐03  03‐04 04‐05
I.  Primary products  21.7  16.0 16.3 16.5 15.5 15.4 6.3 9.2 0.5 21.5 13.7 23.2
Agriculture and allied 
   A.  products  17.9  13.4 13.5 12.7 11.8 10.1 8.2 6.5 ‐1.2 13.7 12.3 6.3
II.  Manufactured goods  75.6  77.1 76.1 76.3 76.0 73.4 9.8 15.6 ‐2.8 20.6 20.5 20.0
Leather and 
   A.  manufactures  5.8  4.4 4.4 3.5 3.4 2.9 3.7 22.3 ‐1.8 ‐3.2 17.0 5.8
Chemicals and Related 
   B.  products  11.2  13.2 13.8 14.1 14.8 15.0 12.4 25.1 2.8 23.2 26.7 25.7
   C.  Engineering goods  13.7  15.3 15.9 17.1 19.4 20.7 10.6 32.3 2.0 29.8 37.3 32.5
Textile and Textile 
   D.  Products  25.9  25.3 23.3 22.0 20.0 15.9 10.4 14.9 ‐9.6 13.8 10.1 ‐1.4
   E.  Gems and jewellery  16.7  16.6 16.7 17.1 16.6 17.3 9.8 ‐1.6 ‐1.1 23.6 17.1 29.6
Handicrafts (excluding 
   F.  handmade carpets)  1.5  1.5 1.3 1.5 0.8 0.4 11.8 ‐1.1 ‐17.0 43.0 ‐36.4 ‐31.3
Other Manufactured 
   G.  Goods  0.7  0.8 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.1 13.1 30.5 9.1 22.5 29.0 47.1
III.  Petroleum products  1.5  4.2 4.8 4.9 5.6 8.6 ‐13.5 4706.4 13.3 21.6 38.5 90.3
IV.  Others  1.2  2.8 2.7 2.3 2.9 2.6 9.2 125.6 ‐4.5 1.5 57.7 11.1
Total exports  100.0  100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 8.6 21.0 ‐1.6 20.3 21.1 24.1
Source: Reserve Bank of India 
 
The  share  of  manufactured  products  in  total  exports  has  improved  significantly  over  the 
years. India’s share in world exports of manufactured goods increased from 0.52 per cent in 
1990 to 0.88 in 2003 (2004).   
 
Table 16: Share of India’s exports of manufactured goods 
  1995  2001  2002  2003 
Manufactured Goods‐ Total  0.61  0.73  0.79  0.88 
Iron & steel  0.61  0.88  1.50  1.58 
Chemical Products  0.53  0.80  0.88  0.92 
Machinery & transport equipment  0.12  0.15  0.17  0.21 
Automotive products  0.12  0.10  0.12  0.18 
Office and telecom equipment  0.08  0.07  0.07  0.09 
Textiles  2.86  3.66  3.95  4.04 
Clothing  2.60  2.82  2.98  2.93 
Source: International Trade Statistics, WTO 
 
Bottlenecks and Desired Corrective Initiatives   
 

Low levels of industrial growth during the Ninth plan along with robust growth in tertiary 
sector raised the debate of transition of India’s growth momentum from agriculture focussed 
policy  to  a  services  dominant  economy,  ignoring  the  middle  phase  of  industrialisation.  A 
long‐term  sustainable  industrial  growth  needs  to  focus  on  a  number  of  issues.  During  the 
Tenth plan, the industry registered a growth of 8.4 per cent for the first four years of the plan 

[23] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

against  a  significantly  robust  growth  of  9.2  per  cent  in  the  services  sector.  However,  a 
number of issues need to be considered to sustain long‐term growth in the sector.  
 

i) Manufacturing buoyancy: The manufacturing sector has exhibited robust growth of 
8.5  per  cent  during  the  Tenth  Plan  period  against  the  average  growth  of  5  per 
cent during the Ninth Plan. The country has been emerging as the export hub of 
manufactured  products  –especially  labour  intensive  products  like  apparel, 
footwear,  jewellery,  leather  and  textiles.  While  the  export  of  manufactured 
products  remains  high,  India  needs  to  also  tap  its  potential  with  respect  to  the 
skill‐intensive exports such as auto components and pharmaceuticals.  

ii) Improving infrastructure quality especially related to power and transport facilities 
is essential for realising the true potential for industrialisation. India significantly 
lacks in the existing infrastructure as compared to other emerging economies.  
ƒ Steps  to  increase  investment  in  physical  infrastructure  in  the  long‐run  are 
called  for  the  revival  of  existing  infrastructure  base  in  the  economy.  In  the 
short‐term,  strategy  to  develop  special  economic  regions  to  encourage 
establishment of new manufacturing industries should be undertaken.     

iii) Labour  laws:  Rigid  labour  laws  still  remain  as  one  of  the  key  factors  affecting 
competitiveness  of  the  domestic  industry.  Besides  focussing  on  improving  the 
position  of  labour  in  the  organised  sector,  the  laws  should  not  hamper  the 
prospects of new employment in the sector‐ especially in the industries where the 
scope of expanding employment is linked to export possibilities.  

iv) Indirect  taxes  and  import  duties:  There  has  been  a  significant  reduction  in  the 
customs  duties  on  industrial  products  over  the  years.  Even  the  further  lowered 
peak  rate  of  12.5  per  cent  significantly  hampers  the  efficiency  of  the  industrial 
sector. The Kelkar Task force on Indirect Taxes recommends a shift to three‐rate 
structure of 5 per cent, 8 per cent and 10 per cent.        
ƒ While  the  central  government  and  most  of  the  states  have  moved  towards 
state level Value Added Taxation system with two principle rates of 12.5 per 
cent  and  4  per  cent,  rest  of  the  states  should  be  encouraged  to  join  the 
structure so as to gain from the overall efficiencies. Further, since the existing 
VAT  does  not  extend  to  all  indirect  taxes  on  goods,  entry  tax  and  octroi 
continue to exist. 
ƒ The planning commission suggests that along with lowering of customs duty 
and indirect taxes across the goods, immediate attention needs to be focussed 
towards products and tariff lines suffering from inverted duty structure. 

v) Existence  of  entry  and  exit  barriers:  The  ease  of  entry  and  exit  from  business 
activities  significantly  affects  the  investment  climate  in  industry.  The  Indian 
economy however imposes a large number of regulations, and central and state 
level  clearances  required  to  be  taken  before  entering  a  business.  The  resulting 
delays thus result in poor realisation of approved investment proposals. Systems 
like  single‐window  clearances  and  availability  of  information  for  clearances 
should be made available publicly.          

[24] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

vi) The  planning  commission  considers  the  policy  of  reserving  certain  items  for 
manufacture by small‐scale industrial units as one of the major bottleneck on the 
growth  of  overall  industry.  Over  the  years,  with  the  elimination  of  import 
restrictions and falling level of duty protection, the small‐scale units in reserved 
sectors have to compete against foreign manufacturers while being still protected 
from  domestic  local  and  medium  enterprises.  However,  these  units  are  not 
allowed to expand to meet the growing competition.    
 

[25] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

V.   SERVICES GROWTH  
 
Over the last decade and more, the growth of the Indian economy has been propelled by its 
services sector. Agriculture and industry may have contributed their bit in various years, but 
as the above discussion suggests, while the performance of agriculture has been marked by 
significant  volatility,  particularly  since  1997‐98.  Industry  though  registering  a  buoyant 
growth,  has  been  unable  to  increase  its  share  in  the  total domestic  product  over  the  years. 
Only  the  services  sector,  which  now  collectively  accounts  for  more  than  half  of  GDP, 
showed  not  only  remarkable  stability  but  also  significant  acceleration  in  recent  years  from 
an  already  high  base.  The  contribution  of  the  services  sector  to  GDP  growth  during  1980s 
was  47.2  per  cent.  The  contribution  increased  to  56  per  cent  during  the  90s  and  further  to 
62.3 per cent during 2000‐01 to 2004‐05.  
 
Figure 8: Sectoral Growth Volatility 
Se ctoral Growth: Ave rage Growth
Se ctoral Growth: Ave rage Growth
25.0
25.0
20.0
20.0 1993-94/96-97
1993-94/96-97
15.0 1997-98/04-05
per cent

15.0 1997-98/04-05
per cent

10.0
10.0
5.0
5.0
0.0
0.0
Railways

Storage
Trade
Banking &
restaurants

Other services
Communication

estate,ownership
administration &
Insurance

Transport by
other means
Hotels &

Railways

Storage
Trade
Banking &
restaurants

Other services
Communication

estate,ownership
administration &
Insurance

Transport by
other means
Hotels &

Public

Real
Public

Real

 
           Source: CSO 
 
This kind of growth pattern  raises a  number  of analytical  questions  and  policy  issues.  The 
questions  arise  essentially  from  the  fact  that  India’s  experience  is  distinct  from  the 
experience of other emerging economies, which have been through similar (although more 
rapid) sustained growth phases. The typical pattern of growth seen in recent decades (which 
mirrors  that  seen  in  earlier  eras  as  well)  is  that  there  is  a  significant  transfer  of  economic 
activity from agriculture to industry in the early phases of rapid growth. In fact, this is one 
of the characteristics of “modern economic growth” identified by Simon Kuznets. Virtually 
all  of  the  countries,  which  India  is  now  compared  with  in  terms  of  levels  of  affluence, 
economic  structure  and  performance  have  followed  this  pattern.  Industry  has  been  the 
“leading” sector, seeing its share increase to far more than the levels that India has achieved. 
Service  activity  has  increased,  but  usually  as  a  concomitant  to  industry.  This  transition  in 
economic  activity  has  typically  been  accompanied  by  a  shift  of  comparable  magnitude  in 
employment, with a large proportion of agricultural labour moving to industry. 
 

[26] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

If  this  is  a  pattern  that  virtually  all  countries,  which  have  made  the  transition  from  low 
income  to  middle  income  and  beyond  have  followed,  does  the  fact  that  India  seems  to  be 
breaking the mould have any implications for the viability and sustainability of the growth 
pattern?  Have  domestic  and  global  patterns  of  demand  and  supply  changed  enough  to 
allow a services‐led growth pattern to take the place of a historically predominant industry‐
led  model?  Can  India  do  with  services  what  China,  in  recent  years,  has  done  with 
manufacturing? 
 
The policy issues are driven by the quest for sustainability of the pattern of stable growth we 
have  seen  in  services.  What  are  the  key  elements  of  the  policy  and  business  environment 
that  have  supported  this  pattern?  Are  these  unique  to  services  and,  therefore,  do  they 
presage  a  continuing  dependence  on  this  sector  for  accelerating  growth?  What  are  the 
threats to sustaining services sector momentum and are there appropriate policy responses 
available to counter them? And, very importantly, does the experience of a virtuous policy‐
performance  nexus  in  this  sector  bear  lessons  for  the  industrial  sector,  in  terms  of  feasible 
reforms that could strengthen its performance? 
 
What  are  the  implications  of  these  patterns  for  the  basic  questions  being  addressed  in  this 
paper?  Keeping  in  mind  the  limitations  imposed  by  the  sample  selection,  some  inferences 
can be drawn. First, if one compares the experiences of East Asia and Latin America, the role 
of industry as a leading engine of growth does not appear to be a necessary one. Brazil and 
Mexico  have  reached  relatively  high  levels  of  affluence  apparently  on  the  back  of  strong 
service sector performance. Looking back over the two decades, which encompassed at least 
some  part  of  the  import‐substituting  regimes  in  both  Latin  America  and  South  Asia,  this 
pattern  suggests  that  this  policy  environment  considerably  retarded  the  prospects  for 
industry‐led growth when compared to the export‐oriented regimes of East Asia. However, 
this is an issue  that has  been debated  extensively  elsewhere  and  this  is  not  the place  to  go 
any further into it. The relevant point for this discussion is that we do have some evidence of 
countries  reaching  relatively  high  levels  of  affluence  on  the  basis  of  a  transition  from 
agriculture to services, virtually bypassing the industrialization phase that Kuznets pointed 
to as an invariable concomitant to modern economic growth. 
 
The  same  observation,  however,  can  be  used  to  develop  the  argument  in  the  opposite 
direction. In a globalized world, does the outward orientation of the East Asian economies 
provide a more meaningful model? These were countries, which took full advantage of the 
growing  opportunities  for  manufactured  exports  from  developing  to  developed  countries. 
Their  export  focus  drove  their  economic  structure,  which  is  reflected  in  the  growth  and 
persistence of the importance of industry in their economies. Can India (and its South Asian 
neighbours)  take  full  advantage  of  trade  and  investment  opportunities  in  an  increasingly 
integrated  world  without  making  some  effort  to  put  their  share  of  industry  in  GDP  on  an 
upward path? On the basis of historical experience, export‐led (or, more broadly speaking, 
outward‐oriented) growth strategies seem to have gone hand in hand with the dominance of 
industry and the persistence of its share in GDP. However, this experience relates to a world 
trade  environment  in  which  manufactured  products  dominated  international  transactions 
(besides  commodities).  Services  trade  was  not  a  significant  factor  until  the  1990s  the 
developing  world  is  concerned;  it  has  only  picked  up  in  the  last  decade.  From  India’s 

[27] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

perspective,  the  key  question  in  this  evolving  trade  environment  is  whether  services  can 
play the role that manufacturing played in East Asia with the same effect.  
 
Growth patterns in the Indian service sectors 
 
A  recent  paper  by  Gordon  and  Gupta  (2003)  provides  an  analysis  of  growth  trends  in 
services  at  the  maximum  level  of  disaggregation  permitted  by  India’s  National  Accounts 
Statistics. The paper analyses growth in services from a very long‐term perspective. We do 
not  repeat  that  exercise  here;  the  conclusions  of  that  paper  serve  as  a  backdrop  for  this 
section  as  well  as  the  discussion  in  the  next.  We  use  the  exhibits  provided  here  largely  to 
motivate  the  discussions  on  specific  issues  in  the  next  section,  which  develops  hypotheses 
about various macro and micro drivers of services growth. 
 
The  comparative  picture  of  shifts  in  the  shares  of  the  three  major  sectors  was  provided  in 
Table  1.  In  Figure  1,  we  showed  the  relative  growth  rates  of  the  three  sectors  in  India.  In 
Table  17,  we  break  down  service  sector  activity  into  the  sub‐aggregates  provided  by  the 
National Accounts Statistics. The distribution is relatively skewed; trade, which is clearly an 
omnibus category, accounts for slightly over a quarter and has maintained its share over the 
last  three  decades.  Within  the  aggregate  of  real  estate  and  financial  services  (labelled 
banking and insurance here), there has been a significant shift in favour of the latter, but the 
aggregate of the two has remained fairly stable. A similar shift is seen in the transport sector, 
with the railways losing some share to transportation by other means. The “real estate, etc.” 
includes  business  services,  which  in  turn  includes  IT  and  ITES,  which  have  been  growing 
very  rapidly  over  the  past  decade;  however,  their  growth  seems  to  have  displaced  other 
activities rather than propelling the share of this aggregate upwards; They are still, clearly, a 
relatively small part of the overall service sector aggregate. 
 
Given the skew in shares, growth rates could be quite divergent and still lead to stability in 
shares over a long period. In Figure 9, we show the growth rates of each of these categories 
over  the  last  decade or  so,  divided  into two  sub‐periods.  These  can  be seen  in  comparison 
with the sector aggregate in the graph. 
 
Table 17: Shares of Service Activities in Aggregate Service Sector GDP (%) 
2000‐01 / 
   1970s  1980s  1990s  2004‐05 
  Trade  26.1  29.4  28.4  26.9 
  Other services  17.2  16.1  15.4  15.8 
  Real estate, ownership of dwellings & 
15.7 
business services  21.3  16.0  13.3 
  Public administration & defence  14.2  14.3  13.2  12.1 
  Banking & insurance  6.9  8.9  12.7  11.5 
  Transport by other means  7.2  8.2  9.4  9.9 
  Communication  1.7  1.9  2.9  3.3 
  Hotels & restaurants  1.6  1.8  1.9  2.6 
  Railways  3.4  3.1  2.6  2.0 
  Storage  0.2  0.3  0.2  0.1 
Source: National Accounts Statistics 

[28] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Figure 9: Sectoral Growth 
Se ctoral Growth: Ave rage Growth
Se ctoral Growth: Ave rage Growth
25.0
25.0
20.0
20.0 1993-94/96-97
1993-94/96-97
15.0 1997-98/04-05
per cent

15.0 1997-98/04-05
per cent

10.0
10.0
5.0
5.0
0.0
0.0

Railways

Storage
Trade
Banking &
restaurants

Other services
Communication

estate,ownership
administration &
Insurance

Transport by
other means
Hotels &

Railways

Storage
Trade
Banking &
restaurants

Other services
Communication

estate,ownership
administration &
Insurance

Transport by
other means
Hotels &

Public

Real
Public

Real
 
          Source: CSO 
 
Over  the  last  decade,  the  sectors  that  have  shown  an  accelerating  tendency  are 
communications,  other  services  and  real  estate  ownership,  etc  (which  includes  the  IT  and 
ITES sectors). While services as a whole has registered a pick up in growth arte over the two 
periods, this acceleration was obviously offset by decelerations in several sectors, the most 
significant of these in trade, which is also the largest sector. Banking, insurance and financial 
services also saw a deceleration. Some of these patterns are obviously sensitive to the choice 
of the dividing line between periods. Of the ones that are in line with intuitive expectations, 
the boom in communications and housing are clearly reflected in these growth transitions. 
The  decline  in  trade  and  hotels  and  restaurants  does  not  conform  to  anecdotal  evidence 
about the buoyancy in these sectors, but the slowing down in the growth of value added in 
the  face  of  rapid  acceleration  in  the  volume  of  services  delivered  may  well  reflect  the 
increasing  competitive  intensity  in  these  activities,  which  is  consistent  with  intuitive 
expectations.  Other services,  which  include  health  and education also  showed  a  noticeable 
acceleration in the later period. 
 
These patterns suggest that even though there has been an overall buoyancy in the services 
sector, that buoyancy has not impacted all the activities within the aggregate equally. Such a 
pattern is conveniently attributable to a mix of macroeconomic and microeconomic factors.  
 
Drivers of Service Sector Growth: Some Hypotheses 
 
The  patterns  described  in  the  preceding  sections  clearly  do  not  point  in  the  direction  of  a 
single, dominant driver of services growth in India. We have to look for explanations at two 
levels. At the macro level, there is clearly a set of factors that is common to all; these are a 
pointer to the kind of policy and business environment, which provides momentum to the 
sector.  At  the  micro  level,  there  are  clearly  activity‐specific  demand  and  supply  forces, 
which  reinforce  the  macro  drivers  and  have  caused  some  service  sectors  to  outperform 
others.  
 

[29] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Macro drivers 
 
Labour market flexibility 
 
The  key  differentiator  between  the  labour  market  environment  in  industry  and  services  is 
the  degree  of  flexibility  inherent  in  the  latter.  Terms  of  employment  in  the 
industrial/manufacturing  sector  are  governed  by  the  Industrial  Disputes  Act  (IDA).  A 
critical  clause  in  the  act  is  that  government  approval  be  sought  for  the  dismissal  of 
employees  in  any  establishment,  which  employs  over  a  100  people.  Service  establishments 
are  governed  by  the  Shops and Establishments  Act  (SEA),  which,  while  specifying  a  set  of 
conditions  for  employment,  does  not  impose  any  comparable  restriction  on  termination  of 
employment. 
 
There  is  an  argument  to  be  made  that  the  constraints  on  termination  imposed  by  the  IDA 
have  deterred  the  growth  of  employment  in  industry,  particularly  in  the  organized  sector. 
The  basic  reasoning  is  as  follows.  When  an  establishment,  which  is  subject  to  termination 
restrictions, hires a worker, it does so with the realization that it will have to keep him on the 
rolls  even  if  business  conditions do not warrant this.  The  effective  cost  of hiring a  worker, 
therefore,  is  a  multiple  of  the  wage,  the  multiple  being  directly  proportional  to  the 
probability  of  a  business  downturn.  In  an  unemployment  insurance  scenario,  this  is 
tantamount to the employer bearing the entire cost of such insurance. In industrial activities 
that are subject to cycles of uncertain duration and severity, this multiple significantly raises 
the effective cost of labour to industry, thus deterring the hiring of more workers.  
 
On the other hand, in the services sector, as far as private providers are concerned, there is 
no  such  multiple.  The  effective  cost  of  labour  is  the  market  wage  for  the  requisite  set  of 
skills. Faced with a market‐determined relative price of labour, which  will truly reflect the 
abundance  of  this  resource  in  the  economy,  service  activities  are  clearly  extremely 
competitive. This competitiveness can be measured along two dimensions. First, it reduces 
the  relative  price  of  services  to  those  of  manufacturing  goods.  This  should  shift  domestic 
demand for services, in the aggregate, away from manufactured products towards services.   
This shift is clearly reflected in the changing pattern of aggregate consumption expenditures 
over the last several years.  
 
Second,  it  makes  services  provided  in  India  globally  competitive.  One  key  distinction 
between  the  experiences  of  the  countries  discussed  in  Section  II  and  that  of  India  is  the 
dramatic change in the global trading environment that they face(d). All of the comparator 
countries grew in an environment in which international trade in services was relatively low 
and manufacturing overwhelmingly dominated global transactions. That has changed very 
significantly and Indian competitiveness in services, driven largely by its low effective cost 
of labour with a variety of skills, has been able to take full advantage of this change.  
 
The combination of domestic competitiveness relative to industrial goods and international 
competitiveness  based  on  low  relative  labour/human  capital  costs  have  created  a  market 
niche for services that is unprecedented in terms of the experiences of comparable countries. 
While one may legitimately argue that India’s share of industry in GDP is lower than what it 
might  be  with  a  more  level  playing  field  between  industry  and  services,  it  is  also  equally 

[30] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

valid to state that the new consumption and trade environment are consistent with a much 
higher proportion of services in GDP than the experiences of other countries suggest. 
 
This hypothesis is rather difficult to validate on the basis of direct evidence. However, it has 
clear  implications  for  the  pattern  of  employment  associated  with  the  structural  shift  in  the 
economy. We would expect to see the share of industry in employment remain rather static. 
We  would  also  expect  such  employment  as  is  created  to  be  done  within  the  unorganized 
sector, which works in an environment of complete labour market flexibility. Figures 10 and 
11 provide some evidence in support of this. Comparing the change between 1993 and 2000, 
based on the National Sample Survey’s large sample household employment surveys done 
in these two years, we do see some increase in the overall share of industrial employment; 
however, the bulk of the exit from agriculture between the two years was accounted for by 
an  increase  in  service  sector  employment,  which  is  broadly  consistent  with  the  hypothesis 
being postulated.  
 
Figure 10: Employment Share 

Employment Share

80.0 64.8 59.8


per cent

60.0
40.0 19.7 22.7
15.6 17.4
20.0
0.0
Agriculture Industry Services

1993-94 1999-00
 
        Source: Planning Commission Publication 
 
Figure 11: Share of Organised Sector in Employment of Each Sector 

Share
ShareofofOrganised
OrganisedSector
SectorininEmployment
Employmentofof
Each
EachSector
Sector
25.0 22.0
25.0 22.0 18.6
20.0 16.7 18.6
20.0 16.7 14.4
per cent

14.4
per cent

15.0
15.0
10.0
10.0
5.0 0.6 0.6
5.0 0.6 0.6
0.0
0.0
1993-94 1999-00
1993-94 1999-00
Agriculture Industry Services
Agriculture Industry Services
 
    Source: Planning Commission  
 
In  Figure  11,  the  share  of  the  organized  sector  in  each  of  the  three  activities  is  compared 
across  the  two  years  of  the  large  sample  surveys.  Clearly,  there  is  a  decline  in  the 
significance  of  this  sector  in  both  industry  and  services.  Some  of  this  is  attributable  to  the 

[31] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

slowdown  of  employment  growth  in  the  public  sector  as  a  whole,  but  this  pattern  is  also 
consistent with the key implication of the labour market flexibility argument that whatever 
employment increase is seen in industry is likely to be in the unorganized sector. 
 
The skewed fiscal burden 
 
The  above  discussion  emphasized  the  inherent  competitiveness  of  the  service  sector  based 
on its ability to engage labour at its “true” market value. The same argument indicates that 
industry has been discriminated against because its effective cost of labour has been biased 
upwards  by  loading  employers  with  the  entire  burden  of  unemployment  insurance.  A 
similar  kind  of  discrimination  in  favour  of  services  is  to  be  found  in the fiscal  system.  The 
traditional  “golden  goose”  for  the  tax  system  has  been  industry;  both  excise  and  customs 
duties, which are the two largest sources of central revenues, are levied overwhelmingly on 
industry. The service tax, which is the only central indirect tax levied on services, has been 
imposed only for the last few years and, while it is growing at a very rapid rate, its effective 
incidence on service transactions is still far lower than that of taxes levied on industry. While 
not  providing  a  complete  picture  of  relative  tax  incidence,  the  order  of  magnitude  of  the 
differential  central  tax  incidence  across  sectors  suggests  a  strong  bias  against  industry. 
Figure 12 provides a graphic picture of this measure of relative tax incidence. 
 
Figure 12: Relative Tax Burden on Industry & Services 
24.2
25.0 23.3 22.2 24.2 22.9
25.0 23.3 22.2 22.9 21.1 21.1 20.7
21.1 21.1 20.7 20.2
20.2
19.9
19.9
20.0
20.0
per cent

15.0
per cent

15.0
10.0
10.0
5.0 1.3
5.0 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.9
0.3 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.3
0.0
0.0
06 RE
1997-

1998-

1999-

2000-

2001-

2002-

2003-

2004-

2005-
98

99

00

01

02

03

04

05

06 RE
1997-

1998-

1999-

2000-

2001-

2002-

2003-

2004-

2005-
98

99

00

01

02

03

04

05

Excise + Customs/ Industrial GDP Services T ax/ Services GDP


Excise + Customs/ Industrial GDP Services T ax/ Services GDP
 
               Source: Reserve Bank of India 
 
While an accurate measurement of the overall burden of taxation on the two sectors should 
also  account  for  state  and  local  taxes,  which  may  well  be  somewhat  more  balanced  in  the 
net,  it  is  unlikely  that  the  inference  of  a  skewed  tax  burden  will  change  by  bringing  these 
levies into the picture.  
 
The issue of the unorganized sector also plays some role in this discussion. From Figure 11, 
we  saw  that  a  significant  share  of  service  sector  employment  was  also  in  the  unorganized 
sector.  This  is  despite  the  fact  that  organized  private  sector  service  enterprises  do  not  face 
significant  employment‐related  hindrances.  This  pattern  testifies  to  the  fact  that,  besides 
labour market regulations, there are various other barriers to moving from the unorganized 
to  the  organized  sector.  Various  regulations  at  all  levels  and  the  costs  of  legal  compliance 
contribute  to  the  building  up  of  these  barriers.  Service  taxes  will  obviously  add  another 
reason for unorganized providers to stay that way. This is not an argument against service 

[32] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

taxes. Rather, is to suggest that barriers to organization (and, thereby, recognition by the tax 
system) have to be dealt with across the board.  
 
Will  an  evening  out  of  the  tax  burden  significantly  reduce  the  bias  towards  services?  It  is 
difficult  to  provide  an  unqualified  answer  to  this  question.  But,  to  the  extent  that  it  does 
cause a bias, bringing about some parity in the tax burden across sectors, using all available 
fiscal instruments is something the government ought to be considering. Once a more even 
playing  field  is  provided,  it  is  up  to  the  intrinsic  competitiveness  of  the  two  sectors  to 
determine  what  their  shares  of  GDP  will  be.  But,  at  this  point,  it  is  clear  that  there  are 
significant  macro  biases  against  industry,  which  appear  to  be  contributing  to  the  share  of 
services being what it is. 
 
Micro factors 
 
The above argument is not intended to imply that services across the board are doing well 
because  there  is  a  favourable  bias  towards  them.  There  are  clearly  activities  within  the 
services  aggregate  that  have  done  extremely  well  as  a  result  of  favourable  demand  and 
supply  conditions.  Notable  amongst  these  are  IT  and  ITES  (embedded  in  the  business 
services aggregate) and health services (embedded in the other services aggregate). Gordon 
and Gupta identify four categories (we do not have the data at their level of disaggregation 
for  some  of  them)  based  on  their  long‐term  trend  analysis.  These  are  business  services, 
communication  services,  banking  and  community  services  (their  aggregate  includes  hotels 
and restaurants).  
 
In all cases, there is either a predominant role of external demand (reflecting a change in the 
global  trade  environment,  where  far  more  services  are  being  traded  particularly  from 
developing  countries,  than  before)  or  a  shift  in  the  domestic  consumption  pattern  towards 
certain  types  of  services.  Business  services  would  clearly  fall  in  the  former  category,  while 
health and hotels and restaurants would fall in the latter. It is not possible to segregate the 
direct impact of these forces on individual service activities, but there are again a number of 
indirect indicators that provide some plausibility to the hypotheses of external and domestic 
demand drivers. 
 
Figure 13 shows the rapidly increasing share of service exports in India’s total export basket. 
From  an  average  level  of  about  20  per  cent  during  the  decade  of  the  1990s,  they  began  to 
accelerate in the late 1990s and have now reached a significant 65 per cent in 2004‐05. They 
have  more  than  doubled  their  share  over  a  period  of  about  6  years,  reflecting  the  huge 
contribution to the overall growth in exports of the country and the dramatic change in the 
current account of the balance of payments that this has affected. 
 

[33] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Figure 13: Significance of India’s service exports 
70.0
95000 70.0
95000
60.0
80000 60.0
80000 50.0
US$ million 65000 50.0

per cent
US$ million 65000 40.0

per cent
40.0
50000
50000 30.0
30.0
35000 20.0
35000 20.0
20000 10.0
20000 10.0
5000 0.0
5000 0.0
1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04 PR

2004-05 P
1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04 PR

2004-05 P
Non-factor Services receipts
Non-factor Exports
Merchandise Services fob
receipts
Merchandise
Non-factor Exports
Service fob Merchandise Exports
Receipts/
Non-factor Service Receipts/ Merchandise Exports
 
        Source: Reserve Bank of India 
 
On the domestic demand front, an analysis of private final consumption expenditure during 
the 1990s also provides some evidence of a shift in the consumption basket towards services. 
Table 18 shows the changing composition of the consumption basket. 
 
Table 18: Share and Growth of Major Consumption Categories 
Share(%)  Share(%)  CAGR (%)  CAGR (%) 
2000‐01  2004‐05  1999/00‐2004/05 1999/00‐2004/05
Consumption Items  (99‐00 prices) (99‐00 prices) (99‐00 prices)  (Current prices)
food, beverages & tobacco  47.7 42.5 0.07 0.32
clothing & footwear  6.0 5.3 0.51 0.81
gross rent, fuel & power  11.5 10.5 0.28 0.97
furniture, furnishing, appliances & services  3.4 3.5 0.64 0.96
medical care & health services  4.7 6.3 1.31 1.65
transport & communication  14.3 17.5 1.13 1.59
recreation, education & cultural services  3.7 4.3 1.00 1.20
miscellaneous  goods & services  8.6 10.1 1.05 1.46
private final consumption exp. in domestic market 100 100 0.47 0.83
Source: National Accounts Statistics 
 
The combined share of the three categories that are clearly service‐oriented – transport and 
communication,  health  and  medical  and  educational  and  cultural  –  has  increased  from 
slightly  below  22.7  per  cent  in  2000‐01  to  about  28  per  cent  in  2004‐05.  The  miscellaneous 
category, which also includes some services, saw its share rising appreciably as well. At least 
the communication and health components of this basket tie up neatly with the acceleration 
that Gordon and Gupta identify.  
 
An  important  qualification  must  be  offered  here,  though.  One,  some  of  the  shift  towards 
services  reflects  the  deteriorating  availability  and  quality  of  public  services,  which  is 
inducing consumers to spend on private provision. For the same service delivered, private 
providers  would  typically  charge  more,  which  would  show  up  in  a  higher  share  of 
expenditure on the part of the household, assuming that the price elasticity of demand for 

[34] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

many of these services is low. If this is the case, then consumption of services is coming at 
the  cost  of  consumption  of  manufactures  (and  other  services),  which  have  a  high  price 
elasticity of demand. This again reflects a favourable bias towards services growth emerging 
from a shift from public to private provision – not because of any “real” increase but because 
consumers are now paying a price more reflective of cost than before.  
 
This  point  underscores  the  importance  of  identifying  supply‐side  forces.  In  the  case  of 
communications,  the  boost  from  increased  availability,  which  stemmed  from  the  sector 
reforms,  the  huge  entry  of  private  providers  that  this  induced  and  the  consequent  drop  in 
prices clearly reflects a massive structural change in the supply of this service. In the case of 
health,  or  education,  while  people  are  spending  more  and  private  provision  is  growing, 
there  is  a  clear  “growth  dividend”  from  better  measurement.  Clearly,  not  all  the  service 
sector growth can be attributed to more production. 
 
Can services emerge as an engine of growth? 
 
The Changing International Context 
 
In the light of the international comparisons made in Chapter I, it appears that services have 
played the role of the engine of growth in two parts of the developing world – South Asia 
and Latin America. Obviously, the countries in these regions, on the whole, have not had as 
spectacular  a  long‐term  growth  record  as  their  East  Asian  comparators.  But,  they  have  
grown  at  reasonable  average  rates  over  several  decades,  with  services  accounting  for  the 
bulk of the transition in economic activity away from agriculture. The contrasting East Asian 
experience  demonstrates  that  the  higher  rates  of  growth  that  this  group  of  countries 
achieved  was  driven  primarily  by  industry,  which  saw  its  share  of  GDP  increase 
significantly during the high‐growth period.  
 
The  key  message  emerging  from  this  simple  set  of  comparisons  is  that,  at  least  from  a 
historical  perspective,  the  power  of  the  services  sector  has  not  been  able  to  match  that  of 
industry as an engine of growth. The common factor in both Latin America and South Asia 
was  an  entrenched  strategy  of  import‐substituting  industrialization,  which,  in  hindsight, 
stifled industrial growth, prevented the sector from playing the role it might have in a more 
favourable policy regime and, eventually, contributed to a slower average long‐term rate of 
growth. 
 
However, the lessons on economic growth that are drawn from historical experience have to 
be qualified by the argument that structural changes may significantly change the context in 
which various growth drivers operate. From India’s perspective, the key structural change is 
the significant increase in the direct demand for services that was demonstrated in Section 
IV. The East Asian growth phase, over the decades of the 1960s to the 1990s, took place in a 
global trading environment that was heavily focussed on products – primary commodities 
and  manufactured  goods.  For  a  country  whose  relatively  small  domestic  markets  would 
always act as a constraint on growth  performance,  it  was imperative  that  external  markets 
be accessed if growth was to be accelerated.  
 

[35] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

The  North  East  Asian  countries  were  poorly  endowed  with  natural  resources,  so  it  was 
logical  that  they  emphasized  manufacturing  as  their  growth  engine,  based  largely  on 
imported  inputs.  The  South  East  Asian  economies  were  far  better  endowed  with  natural 
resources, but, following the success of their neighbours, they realized that adding value by 
manufacturing  could  be  a  more  effective  strategy  than  simply  exporting  unprocessed 
commodities.   By contrast,  during  this period,  inward‐looking strategies  driven by  notions 
of  self  reliance  saw  the  Latin  American  and  South  Asian  economies  become  primary 
commodity exporters, whose manufacturing sectors, with a few exceptions like textiles and 
garments, simply could not match the global competitiveness of the East Asians.  
 
However, the global trading regime had  already  begun  to  change  by  the  end  of  the  1980s. 
Commodities  would  still  be  important,  but  the  role  of  three  other  categories  –  services, 
capital  and  “knowledge”  –  was  becoming  more  significant  in  transactions  between 
countries. The broad framework of agreements that emerged out of the Uruguay Round of 
global  trade  negotiations,  which  commenced  in  1987  and  ended  in  1994  and  saw  the 
establishment  of  the  World  Trade  Organization  (WTO)  in  1995  as  a  body  to  oversee  the 
various  agreements  covered  these  other  categories  in  specific  agreements.  Of  particular 
relevance to this discussion is the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). 
 

[36] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

VI. GROWTH IN EMPLOYMENT 
 
Despite existence of strong growth over the last three years, trends in employment over the 
period have been quite disturbing leading to concerns of jobless growth in India. Estimates 
of  labour  force,  work  opportunities  and  unemployment  during  the  first  three  years  of  the 
Tenth Plan suggest an improvement in the total employment generated, however along with 
an  increase  in  the  unemployment  rate  (Table  19).  On  the  other  hand,  employment  in  the 
organised sector has decreased from 277.89 lakh in 2000‐01 to 270 laks in 2002‐03. 
 
Table 19: Unemployment situation during the first three years of the Tenth Plan 
  Unit  2001‐02  2002‐03  2003‐04  2004‐05 
Labour Force  Million  378.21  385.02  391.95  399.00 
Employment  Million  344.68  349.89  356.16  362.64 
Unemployment Rate  %  8.87  9.12  9.13  9.11 
No of unemployed  Million  33.53  35.13  35.79  36.36 
Source: Planning Commission 
 
Between  1999  and  2003,  the  organised  sector  for  which  reliable  data  is  available  showed  a 
drop of 4 per cent in total employment. Of this public sector employment fell by 4.3 per cent 
compared to a 3.5 per cent decline in the private sector. The trend is however not uniform 
across sectors. Mining and manufacturing have seen a steep decline in employment both in 
the  public  and  private  sectors  (Table  20).  However,  services  sectors  like  finance,  insurance 
and  real  estate  and  wholesale  and  retail  trade  have  seen  a  simultaneous  increase  in 
production  and  employment.  But  this  clearly  was  not  enough  to  offset  the  quantum  of 
decline  in  employment  in  other  sectors  leading  to  an  overall  decline  in  organised  sector 
employment.  
 

Table 20: Trends in organised sector employment 
Public Sector  Private Sector 
Share in  Share in 
Employment  Growth  Employment  Growth 
   (2003)  2003/1999  (2003)  2003/1999 
Agriculture  2.7  ‐1.7  10.6  2.8 
Mining and Quarrying  4.6  ‐8.5  0.8  ‐24.1 
Manufacturing  6.8  ‐19.7  56.3  ‐8.4 
Electricity, Gas etc  4.9  ‐5.1  0.6  22.0 
Construction  5.1  ‐14.4  0.5  ‐38.0 
Wholesale and retail trade  1.0  11.7  4.3  11.5 
Transport, storage Communication  15.8  ‐4.7  0.9  14.5 
Finance, insurance etc  7.4  6.3  5.1  19.0 
Community and social service  51.7  ‐1.9  20.9  1.9 
Total  100.0  ‐4.3  100.0  ‐3.5 
Source: Ministry of Labour 
 
The  manufacturing  sector  is  one  of  the  key  employers  of  labour  in  the  organised  private 
sector accounting for over 56 per cent of employment in 2003. While on the one hand decline 
in  public  sector  employment  in  manufacturing  is  understandable  as  it  makes  sense  for  the 

[37] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

government to withdraw from manufacturing activity, the declining trend in private sector 
employment is a cause of concern.  
 
Micro picture 
 

The current recovery as shown by the Indian corporate sector engaged in manufacturing is 
based on large improvement in operating efficiency coming from a reduced workforce and 
wage bill. A sample of around 2500 manufacturing companies shows that net sales of these 
companies registered a growth of around 15 and 20 per cent respectively during 2003‐04 and 
2004‐05. The total cost of production increased by 13 and 20 per cent during these two years. 
However,  wages  and  salaries  component  of  total  costs  has  risen  just  by  around  7  per  cent 
during both 2003‐04 and 2004‐05. This clearly suggests that the wage cost as a proportion of 
total  cost  of  production  has  declined  significantly  in  the  last  couple  of  years.  Almost  all 
industries  have  witnessed  a  fall  in  labour  cost  as  a  proportion  of  total  cost  of  production. 
Wages and salaries as a proportion of net sales have also witnessed a similar fall since the 
total  cost  of  production  as  a  proportion  of  net  sales  are  nearly  constant  for  the  period 
considered.  This  implies  that  cost  savings  witnessed  is  primarily  on  account  of  savings  on 
labour.  
 

Table 21: Falling labour costs 
Wages and salaries as proportion of total cost of 
      production 
No. of 
  companies Mar‐00  Mar‐01  Mar‐02 Mar‐03  Mar‐04  Mar‐05
Food Products  305  9.4  8.7  8.2  7.3  6.9  6.8 
Beverages and tobacco products  30  10.4  11.4  11.4  11.6  12.5  11.9 
Textiles  347  7.9  8.0  8.0  8.1  7.6  7.5 
Chemicals  448  8.2  8.1  8.7  9.1  8.7  8.2 
Rubber, plastic and petroleum products  215  2.2  2.3  2.2  1.9  1.8  1.7 
Non‐metallic mineral products  157  8.4  8.1  8.1  8.0  6.6  6.2 
Metals and metal products  272  12.4  11.9  12.3  10.9  9.6  6.5 
Machinery  367  13.9  15.3  14.9  13.8  13.4  11.9 
Transport equipment  161  9.6  9.3  9.5  9.2  8.2  7.2 
Paper and paper products  63  12.5  11.1  12.1  12.1  10.7  10.2 
Leather products  22  17.5  18.0  19.0  17.9  17.5  16.1 
Wood products  11  10.0  9.8  10.2  9.6  8.7  8.4 
Other manufacturing  58  16.0  18.0  16.7  17.9  17.3  16.6 
Diversified  39  11.1  11.4  11.2  10.8  10.2  9.5 
Manufacturing  2495  7.2  6.9  6.9  6.4  6.0  5.4 
Source: Prowess database, CMIE 
 
Macro picture 
 
Considering  the  average  labour  intensity  of  different  industries  during  2000‐01  to  2002‐03, 
measured in terms of number of employees per Rs. Crore of invested capital, industries such 
as  food  products,  textiles,  wood  and  metal  products  emerge  as  relatively  more  labour 
intensive in comparison to chemicals, basic metals and rubber and plastic products.  

[38] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Figure 14: Labour Intensity (Labour‐capital ratio) 

40 36.5 36.5
40 36.5 36.5
33.7
35 33.7
35 29.7
30 29.7 28.4
28.4
30
25 23.0
25 23.0
19.3 18.6
20 19.3 18.0
20 18.6 18.0 16.8
16.8
15 11.3
15 11.3 8.7
10 8.7
10 5.9
5.9
5
5
0
0

Non-metallic

equipment

Chemicals

Metals
Machinery and
Paper
Metal products

Textiles

manufacturing
Wood

plastic, petro
All
products,

Transport
Non-metallic

equipment

Chemicals

Metals
Machinery and
Paper
Metal products

Textiles

manufacturing
Wood

plastic, petro
All
equipment
products,

Transport
mineral
Food

Rubber,
equipment

mineral
Food

Rubber,
Other
Other

 
        Source: Annual Survey of Industries 
 
Relative  capital  or  labour  intensity  can  also  be  discerned  by  considering  the  share  of 
individual  industries  in  gross  value  added  (GVA)  and  total  employment.  In  terms  of 
employment,  textiles  and  food  and  beverages  emerge  as  the  largest  employers  of  factory 
workers. However, their contribution to GVA in manufacturing is much lower. On the other 
hand,  basic  chemicals,  machinery  and  equipment,  basic  metals;  and  rubber,  plastic, 
petroleum and coal products have relatively higher share in total value added as compared 
to  their  share  in  total  employment.  Chemical  has  the  largest  share  in  GVA  manufacturing 
and has also shown substantial growth in the ongoing decade compared to previous one. On 
the  other  hand,  share  of  some  of  the  labour  intensive  industries,  such  as  textiles  and  food 
products  and  beverages  in  aggregate  manufacturing  gross  value  added  is  more  or  less 
stagnant overtime. 
 
Figure 15: Employment output trade off 
Em ploym ent generating
25.0 Em ploym ent generating
25.0
Food & bev
Food & bev
20.0
Share in employment

20.0
Share in employment

Textiles
Textiles
15.0
15.0
Non met
10.0 Non met Machinery
10.0 mineral Machinery
mineral
Metal Chemicals
5.0 Metal Chemicals
5.0 Less em ploym ent
Transport Less em ploym ent
Transport Rubber etc. generating
Rubber etc. generating
0.0
0.0
0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0
0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0
Share in value added
Share in value added
 
         Source: Annual Survey of Industries, Various Issues 
 
To the extent labour‐intensive industries in the economy witness buoyant growth, it would 
result in significant demand for labour and thus employment creation. During 1990s, among 

[39] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

the  major  generators  of  employment  in  organised  manufacturing  sector,  only  some  were 
labour  intensive  (as  defined  above)  and  others  capital  intensive.  Manufacturing  of  rubber, 
plastic,  petroleum  and  coal  products;  and  basic  chemicals  have  seen  huge  growth  in 
employment  in  organised  sector  during  the  decade  of  1990s.  While  the  growth  in 
employment of coal and petroleum sector during the decade of 80’s is clearly an outcome of 
rapid growth witnessed by public enterprises in these sectors, rubber and plastic witnessed 
employment  growth  primarily  driven  by  rapid  technological  advancement  in  these  areas. 
However, there were some other capital‐intensive segments, which did see buoyancy during 
the period but that did not translate into employment generation. Some such segments were 
transport  equipment  and  parts,  machinery  and  equipment  and  basic  metals.  This  implies 
that  these  manufacturing  industries  witnessed  growth  in  output  without  adding  to 
employee numbers.  
 
Table 22: Growth in Organised Manufacturing Employment 
2000s (2000‐01/ 
  1980s  1990s  2002‐03) 
Food products, beverages and tobacco products  ‐0.56  1.57  ‐0.50 
Textiles  ‐0.65  0.73  ‐2.81 
Wood and wood products  ‐0.93  ‐2.86  0.40 
Paper and paper products  ‐0.01  0.22  ‐0.50 
Rubber, plastic, petroleum and coal products  3.48  3.66  1.77 
Basic chemicals  1.62  4.56  ‐2.81 
Non‐metallic mineral products  2.55  0.51  16.04 
Basic metals  0.24  0.14  ‐2.60 
Metal products and parts  1.37  2.47  ‐1.84 
Machinery and equipment  1.46  0.00  ‐2.17 
Transport equipment and parts  ‐0.27  ‐0.03  ‐0.30 
All  0.60  0.01  ‐0.32 
Source: Annual Survey of Industries 
 
Among  the  labour  intensive  industries,  food  products,  beverages  and  tobacco  products, 
metal products and parts; and to some extent textiles have contributed positively to growth 
in employment during the decade of 1990s. During 2000s, almost all the industries, with the 
exception  of  rubber,  plastic,  petroleum  and  coal  products  and  non‐metallic  mineral 
products,  have  seen  a  fall  in  employment.  Although  rubber,  plastic,  petroleum  and  coal 
products were the fastest growing segment in term of output during the first three years of 
the  current  decade,  the  non‐metallic  mineral  products  slowed  down  during  the  period. 
Among labour intensive industries, wood products have seen some growth in employment 
during 2000‐01 to 2002‐03. 
 
The overall employment elasticity as defined by percentage increase in employment due to a 
per  cent  increase  in  GVA,  for  the  total  organised  manufacturing  sector  during  1989‐90  to 
2002‐03  turned  out  to  be  0.22 2.  Indicating  that  for  a  percentage  increase  in  manufacturing 

2 The elasticity for the private organised sector employment was obtained by using log‐log model (employment 

regressed on GVA) for data from 1989/90‐2002/03. To calculate the elasticity we have used the real gross value 
added, by deflating nominal GVA, given by ASI, using commodity level wholesale price indices.  
 

[40] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

GVA  the  employment  went  up  by  0.22  per  cent  in  the  organised  manufacturing  sector 
during the period considered.  
 
To  the  extent  the  significance  of  agriculture  in  income  generation  is  declining  and  only 
certain  share  of  the  surplus  labour  in  the  economy  can  be  absorbed  by  the  services  sector, 
the significance of manufacturing sector in overall employment generation is highly crucial. 
However, the low employment elasticity in the manufacturing sector is a cause of concern. 
This thus suggests that the sector not only needs to consistently register robust growth rates 
but it also calls for increased focus on labour‐intensive strategies for production.    
 
Figure 16: Organised Manufacturing Employment Elasticity (1989/90‐2002/03) 

Machinery and equipment -0.01


Basic metal 0.04
Transport equipment 0.05
Non-met mineral 0.11
Textiles 0.13 0.32 (FY90-FY98)
Paper 0.16
Food, bev 0.18
All 0.22
Rubber etc 0.23
Wood 0.32
Metal products 0.33
Chemicals 0.41
Other manufacturing 0.56

-0.10 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60

 
  Source: Annual Survey of Industries, Various Issues 
 
On  industry  specific  elasticity  estimates  chemicals  and  rubber,  plastic,  petroleum  and  coal 
were  the  two  capital‐intensive  industries  to  have  witnessed  above  average  employment 
elasticity.  On  the  other  hand,  some  of  the  major  labour  intensive  industries  such  as  food 
products  and  beverages  and  textile  have  relatively  lower  employment  elasticity.  Low 
employment  elasticity  of  textiles  though  puzzling  may  be  due  to  huge  presence  of 
unorganised  sector  whereby  output  gets  recorded  in  the  organised  sector  but  not  the 
employment due to distorted production chain.  
 
Current manufacturing recovery‐ contribution of employment elastic segments 

A negative correlation coefficient of –0.48 between employment elasticity and growth in the 
individual  segment  during  July  2002  to  October  2005,  suggests  that  segments  with  lower 
employment elasticity have witnessed higher growth during the ongoing recovery, barring a 
few.  

[41] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Figure 17: Jobless growth! 

15.0

Growth (%) (July 2002 - Oct 2005)


10.0

5.0

0.0
-0.10 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50
-5.0

-10.0
Employment elasticity

 
                  Source: Annual Survey of Industries, Various Issues; CSO 
 
This  negative  correlation  between  growth  and  employment  elasticity  along  with  declining 
share of wage costs as shown by the Indian corporate sector suggests that the buoyancy in 
manufacturing has yet not translated into enough employment generation. 
 
Implications of Jobless Growth 
 
The  emerging  trends  in  organised  sector  manufacturing  are  clearly  a  source  of  worry.  In 
future, India is expected to witness a bloating of population in the working age group. There 
exist clear limitations in absorption of surplus labour by the services sector. On the back of 
the  declining  significance  of  agriculture  in  income  generation  in  the  economy,  the  surplus 
labour from agriculture needs to be gainfully employed.  
 
Emergence of Non‐Farm Rural Sector 
  
Employment  growth  suffered  a  setback  during  the  late  1990s.  As  discussed  above  the 
decline  in  employment  growth  was  also  witnessed  in  the  manufacturing  sector,  primarily 
due to the sluggish growth in the organised manufacturing sector. As a result the Planning 
commission  suggested  that  the  agriculture  and  non‐formal  sector  need  to  be  targeted  to 
meet the growing employment demands in the economy.  
 
Historically,  rural  households  have  been  viewed  to  be  exclusively  associated  with 
agriculture. Mounting evidence however suggests that the rural households have access and 
potential  to  engage  in  varied  and  multiple  sources  of  income.  One  of  the  arguments 
suggesting the emergence of the rural non‐farm sector is that positive externalities from the 
liberalisation measures involving regional and international trade, setting up industries, led 
to  growth  in  industrial  and  service  activities  in  rural  India.  However,  lack  of  productive 
opportunities in the agriculture sector is also believed to have supported the growth of the 
rural non‐farm sector.  
 

[42] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 23: Non‐farm employment 
NFE as % of total workers (P+SS)  
1983 
   Male  Female 
Rural  22.2  12.2 
Urban  89.7  68.0 
1993–94 
Rural  26.0  13.8 
Urban  91.0  75.3 
1999–2000 
Rural  28.6  14.6 
Urban  93.4  82.3 
Source: NSSO 
 
Table 24: Income Share in Rural India (1993/94) 
Non‐farm Sources 
Non‐farm 
Agricultural  Non‐farm  Non‐farm self  Regular 
Cultivation Wage labour   Total  labour  employment  employment  Other Sources
54.9  8.0  34.4  5.9  11.5  17.1  2.7 
Source: NCAER 3 
 
The  share  of  population  dependent  on  the  non‐farm  sector  has  increased  over  the  years. 
Non‐farm employment for rural male increased significantly from 22 per cent in 1983 to 26 
per  cent  in  1993‐94  and  further  to  28.6  per  cent  during  1999‐00.  However,  the  decline 
witnessed  in  total  employment  has  been  accompanied  by  growth  reduction  in  non‐farm 
employment  as  well.  Nevertheless,  growth  in  non‐farm  employment  during  both  the 
periods considered was higher than that in total labour force and population growth (Table 
25).  While  the  observed  growth  during  the  latter  period  has  declined  for  non‐farm 
employment along with a growth slowdown in labour force, the extent of reduction remains 
lower than that in labour force for almost all the categories considered. However, the growth 
slowdown  is  considerably  significant  for  both  rural  and  urban  females  against  their  male 
counterpart.          
 

3  Rural Non‐farm employment in India: Access, Income and Poverty Impact: Peter Lanjouw, Abusaleh Shariff, 

NCAER 

[43] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 25: Non‐farm employment growth vs Labour force and Population Growth  
(CAGR – Per cent) 
Non‐farm employment  Labour Force  Population 
1983 –  1993/4 –  1983 –  1993/4 –  1983 –  1993/4 – 
Categories  1993/4  1999/2000  Difference 993/4  1999/2000  Difference 1993/4  1999/2000  Difference
Rural Males  3.3 2.6  ‐0.8 1.8 0.9 ‐0.9 1.8 1.6 ‐0.1
Rural Females  2.5 1.1  ‐1.4 1.3 0.2 ‐1.2 1.7 1.7 0.0
Rural Persons  3.1 2.2  ‐0.9 1.7 0.7 ‐1.0 1.7 1.7 ‐0.1
Urban Males  3.1 3.1  ‐0.1 3.0 2.6 ‐0.4 2.8 2.7 ‐0.1
Urban Females  4.2 2.4  ‐1.7 3.2 0.9 ‐2.3 3.0 2.8 ‐0.2
Urban Persons  3.3 3.0  ‐0.4 3.1 2.3 ‐0.8 2.9 2.8 ‐0.2
Total Males  3.2 2.8  ‐0.4 2.1 1.4 ‐0.7 2.0 1.9 ‐0.1
Total Females  3.2 1.7  ‐1.5 1.6 0.3 ‐1.3 2.0 2.0 0.0
Total Persons  3.2 2.6  ‐0.6 1.9 1.0 ‐0.9 2.0 2.0 ‐0.1
Source: NSSO 
 
Determinants of access to non‐farm employment 
 
i) Agricultural  development:  Development  of  non‐farm  sector  is  linked  with  that  in 
the  agriculture  sector  from  the  demand  and  supply  side.  Increased  agricultural 
production  enables  growth  of  downstream  activities.  It  also  increases  the  rural 
incomes  and  hence  the  spending  capacity  of  the  individuals  which  can  be 
channelled  to  rural  non‐farm  activities.  The  extent  of  impact  depends  on  the 
strength of inter‐linkages between the two sectors.  
ii) Natural  Resource  Endowments:  Non‐farm  sector’s  development  is  also  dependent 
on the natural resource base of the region.     
iii) Economic  Infrastructure:  The  extent  to  which  the  non‐farm  activities  can  be 
developed  depends  on  the  extent  and  spread  of  available  economic 
infrastructure. Sectors like transport, power, water supply, road connectivity, and 
telecommunication  are  significant  in  developing  the  non‐farm  activities  in  a 
region.  
iv) Presence  of  state  and  spread  of  public  services  is  a  significant  determinant  in 
generating new employment opportunities in the non‐farm segment. 
v) Business environment: To the extent the level of investment and setting up of new 
initiatives  depends  on  the  level  of  entry  barriers,  regulatory  norms,  policy 
framework,  labour  laws,  efficiency  of  judicial  system,  tax  regime  level  of 
corruption,  the  overall  business  environment  of  the  region  plays  a  key  role  in 
non‐farm employment generation.  
vi) Micro/individual  characteristics:  Some  of  the  micro  characteristics  like  the  level  of 
education  and  skill,  access  to  land,  finance,  caste,  gender  also  impact  the 
employment creation.   
 
While  the  non‐farm  sector  contributed  to  more  than  a  third  of  rural  household’s  income 
during 1993/94, the fall in contribution of cultivation over the years is expected to register a 
significantly higher share today. While the sector has its share of benefits, the empirical data 
suggests that the sector provides relatively lower employment opportunities for the females. 

[44] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Also,  it  needs  to  be  kept  in  consideration  that  the  process  of  employment  creation  in  the 
non‐farm  sector  should  be  such  that  it  results  in  growth  income  generation  and  thus 
improvement in living standards and not just growth in employment.     
                                                                                                                                                                                               
Box 1: Small Scale Industry 
 
An  industrial  undertaking  in  which  the  investment  in  fixed  assets  in  plant  and  machinery  whether 
held on ownership terms, on lease or on hire purchase does not exceed Rs 10 million is characterised 
as a Small Scale Industry (SSI). The sector not only includes SSI units but also small scale service and 
business  enterprises  as  well.  The  small‐scale  industries  sector  plays  a  vital  role  in  the  economic 
growth of India contributing to almost 40 per cent of the gross industrial value added in the economy 
and 34 per cent of the exports from the country. The sector has witnessed significant growth over the 
years. The number of SSI units itself has increased from 6.8 million in 1990‐91 to 11.8 million in 2004‐
05.  The  total  production  also  increased  from  Rs  683  billion  to  Rs  2515.1  billion  during  the 
corresponding period growing at a compound rate of 9.8 per cent per annum.     
 
The  small‐scale  sector  has  made  a  significant  contribution  to  the  industrial  development  of  the 
country. The small‐scale industries contribute to a significant 40 per cent of the industrial production 
and 35 per cent of the total manufactured products.   
 
Number  of  SSI  units  has  increased  from  67.87  lakhs  in  1990‐91  to  118.59  lakh  in  2004‐05.  While  the 
number of units grew at 4.1 per cent per annum, the employment registered a growth of 4.3 per cent 
per  annum  during  the  period.  The  value  of  production 4  during  the  period  increased  from  Rs  68295 
crore  to  Rs 251511  crore in  2004‐05  growing at  9.8  per  cent  per annum.  Given  that  the  sector  is  less 
capital  intensive,  it  thus  suits  the  Indian  economic  environment  with  scarce  capital  resources  and 
abundant labour supply.  
 
Figure 18: Growth Resilience‐ Production Growth 

Growth Resilience
16.0
14.0
12.0
10.0
per cent

8.0
6.0
4.0
2.0
0.0
1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

IIP_G IIP_Mfg SSI


 
       Source: Reserve Bank of India, Annual Survey of SSI 
 
Being highly employment intensive, the sector has contributed significantly in employment 
creation. Manufacturing sector employment is largely generated by the small‐scale sector. 

4  At constant prices 

[45] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

 
Figure 19: Growth in Employment and Fixed Investment in SSI units  

10.0
10.0
9.0 Employment
9.0 Employment
8.0 Fixed Investment
8.0 Fixed Investment
7.0
7.0
6.0
per cent

6.0
per cent

5.0
5.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
0.0
0.0
1991-92

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04
1991-92

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04
 
    Source: Annual Survey of SSI 
 
Some of the suggested measures so as to increase employment opportunity in the sector are:‐ 
• Some  of  the  larger  issues  of  reforms  in  infrastructure  development  (especially  power)  and 
reforms in labour laws, are particularly important for the SSI sector, much more so than they are 
for large industry. Progress in these areas will therefore help SSI development and the growth of 
employment in this sector. 
• The  benefits  currently  given  to  the  SSI  sector  in  industry  should  be  extended  to  small‐scale 
enterprises in the non‐industrial sector, including services. 
• Government  should  provide  resources  for  upgrading  infrastructure  for  industry  clusters  where 
there is a sufficient agglomeration of SSI units. 
• State governments must undertake concerted efforts, in close consultation with SSI organizations, 
to reduce the burden of “inspector raj” which is especially heavy on SSI units. 
• The  policy  of  reservation  has  become  an  impediment  to  the  development  of  a  strong  SSI  sector 
capable  of  competing  effectively  in  the  new  more  open  trading  regime.  We  recognize  this  is  a 
sensitive subject but after careful consideration of all factors, we recommend phased abolition of 
reservation over a period of 4 years. This will give existing units time to adjust and will create a 
healthier and more vibrant SSI sector. 
 
Given  the  significant  contribution  of  the  sector  both  to  the  value  added  and  to  the  employment 
opportunities  generated,  the  potential  in  the  small‐scale  sector  needs  to  be  further  tapped.  The 
problems  faced  by  the  sector  relating  to  access  to  timely  and  adequate  credit,  technological 
obsolescence, infrastructure bottlenecks, marketing constraints, size of the enterprise and multiplicity 
of  rules  and  regulations,  needs  to  urgently  addressed.  With  increasing  global  competition  and  an 
increased exposure of the enterprises to the global environment, immediate policy initiatives need to 
taken  to  help  enhance  the  overall  contribution  of  the  sector  to  the  economy,  especially  in  creating 
more employment potential. 
 

[46] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Ensuring employment in future growth? 
 
The  issue  of  employment  needs  to  addressed  in  consonance  with  the  overall  economic 
development.  A  few  of  the  measures  suggested  involve  promotion  of  labour‐intensive 
growth through economic openness, investment in infrastructure and basic services for poor 
people in the area of health and education, expanding economic opportunities for the poor 
by  stimulating  overall  growth  and  building  up  their  assets  and  increasing  the  returns  on 
those assets.  
 
• Accelerating the rate of growth of GDP, with a particular emphasis on sectors likely 
to  ensure  the  spread  of  income  to  the  low‐income  segments  of  the  labour  force. 
Aggregate  employment  problem  in  the  country  cannot  be  solved  except  through  a 
process of accelerated growth which would create additional demand for labour and 
also provide the increase in labour productivity needed to achieve the much needed 
improvement in employment quality. Planning Commission’s 5 report suggests that a 
shift  from  6.5  per  cent  growth  to  8  per  cent  growth  generates  an  additional 
employment of 14.5 million in the terminal year 2012. In contrast, the total volume of 
employment  created  by  all  special  employment  programmes  put  together  is  only 
about  4.4  million  and  this  level  has  actually  declined  over  time.  The  report  further 
asserts  that  because  of  severe  resource  constraints,  it  is  unlikely  that  the  volume  of 
employment  provided  by  special  employment  programme  can  be  increased 
significantly in future. Indeed substantial additional resources may be needed simply 
to  maintain  the  present  level  of  employment  while  improving  the  quality  of 
employment  created.  The  role  of  growth  in  generating  additional  employment  is 
therefore overwhelming. 
• Strategies should be designed appropriately to promote growth and employment in 
the  economy.  Labour  intensive  technology  can  be  fruitfully  employed  in  many 
sectors of production with significant emphasis on agriculture, as it still remains the 
key employer of labour force in the country. 
• Productivity  in  agriculture  needs  to  be  enhanced  through  land  reforms  and 
redistribution  of  land.  Labour  intensive  production  like  handicrafts  should  be 
promoted.  Promotion  of  non‐farm  sector  along  with  agro‐related  and  agro‐based 
industry is important in increasing employment.     
• Fiscal  consolidation  by  the  government  will  help  divert  resources  towards  job 
creating  investments  of  the  government  thus  positively  affecting  the  employment 
growth.  
• An  equal  distribution  of  social  assets  in  rural  India  will  help  generate  employment 
opportunities  for  the  unemployed  and  the  underemployed,  thus  increasing  the 
purchasing power of the population boosting the overall demand. With the demand, 
the market for these goods is expected to develop along with development of small‐
scale industries, thus providing income and further boosting the demand.      
• Proper strategies for small‐scale sector should be set in place. 

5 Report of the Task force on Employment opportunities, Planning Commission, Government of India, July 2001 

[47] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

• Creating employment in sectors like agriculture and construction where employment 
elasticity  is  relatively  high  and  incremental  capital‐output  ratio  is  low  will  help 
improve the employment scenario in the economy. 
• Improving  labour  reforms  will  help  improve  the  employment  situation  in  the 
organised sector.  
 
While  growth  is  highly  important  in  creating  jobs,  it  is  not  the  only  factor  in  raising 
employment  growth  from  the  current  levels.  Government  intervention  in  providing 
appropriate infrastructure and delivery systems, especially in the rural areas, is important 
and essential for higher job growth.       
 

[48] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

VII. INVESTMENT 
 
During  the  post‐independence  period  India  focused  on  improving  economic  growth 
through a stated growth strategy of rapid industrialisation with capital‐intensive industries. 
The development strategy which was centrally planned and under the purview of the public 
sector. Along with investing in traditional areas of public investment, such as infrastructure, 
the  government  was  also  competing  with  the  private  sector  in  commercial  and  industrial 
activities.  
 
Public Investment vs. Private Investment 
The  private  investors  had  to  face  the  complex  regulatory  system  for  decades  involving 
comprehensive licensing for firm’s entry, expansion or diversification plans; high barriers to 
foreign  trade,  and  mandatory  credit  allocation  schemes  imposed  on  the  banking  system. 
While  the  reforms  during  the  1990s  significantly  reduced  the  extent  of  public  sector 
involvement  in  commercial  and  industrial  activities,  public  sector,  however,  remained  an 
important part of the economy.  
 
The  growth  strategy  led  to  steady  increase  of  the  investment/GDP  ratio  and  also  in  the 
overall  economic  growth.  The  aggregate  real  investment/  GDP  ratio  increased  from  17  per 
cent  during  the  70s  to  over  20  per  cent  during  the  80s  and  90s.  The  significance  of  public 
sector is evident from the rising share of the public investment over the 90s, almost reaching 
the levels of private investment (undertaken by the households and corporates).    
 
Table 26: Investment/GDP 
2000/01‐
  1970s  1980s  1990s  1990/91‐94/95 1995/96‐99/00  04/05 
Aggregate Investment  21.3  23.1  25.1  24.2  26.0  25.5 
Public Investment  9.9  11.0  8.3  9.4  7.3  7.0 
Private Investment  11.4  12.1  16.7  14.8  18.7  18.5 
Source: CSO 
 
Table  27  suggests  that  public  sector  investment  was  primarily  targeted  towards  electricity, 
gas  and  water  supply  and  provision  of  transport,  storage  and  communication  services.  A 
large  share  of  investment  was  also  undertaken  in  the  industrial  and  commercial  activities‐ 
usually  undertaken  by  the  private  sector.  Further,  an  increased  share  of  investments  was 
targeted  at  the  non‐infrastructure  sectors.  While  anecdotal  evidence  certainly  supports  the 
argument that infrastructure requirements of the economy are not being met, a comparison 
across  countries  confirms  the  impression  that  India  is  significantly  below  average  with 
respect to the share of investments allocated towards the infrastructure sectors.   
 

[49] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 27: Industry wise public sector investment (at constant prices)‐ Share 
1990/91‐ 1995/96‐ 2000/01‐
  1970s  1980s  1990s  94/95  99/00  02/03 
Agriculture  1.42 1.29 0.56 0.65 0.47 0.25
Mining & Quarrying  0.52 1.21 0.80 0.98 0.61 0.23
Manufacturing  1.82 1.56 1.06 1.24 0.89 0.31
Electricity, gas & water supply  1.81 2.62 2.13 2.45 1.80 0.94
Construction  0.11 0.06 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.09
Trade, hotels & restaurants  0.32 0.05 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.01
Transport, storage & communication  1.51 1.47 1.55 1.71 1.39 0.89
Financing, insurance, real estate  0.22 0.34 0.43 0.44 0.43 0.14
Community, social & personal services  2.18 2.36 1.74 1.84 1.64 1.14
Source: CSO 
 
The  approach  paper  to  the  Eleventh  Five  Year  Plan  (2007‐08  to  2011‐2012)  lays  down 
investment  and  savings  requirements  of  different  target  growth  rates.  Acceleration  from  7 
per cent growth (average of Tenth Plan) to 9 per cent will require investment rate to increase 
from 29.1 per cent to 35.1 per cent. The increased level of investment has to be financed from 
increased  domestic  and  foreign  savings  thus  increasing  the  current  account  deficit  from  2 
per cent of the GDP to 2.8 per cent of GDP. A constrained current account deficit however 
would imply an increase in total domestic savings rate from 27.1 per cent to 32.3 per cent.  
 
Table 28: Alternative Scenarios for Eleventh Plan 
Target GDP Growth rate in 11th Plan  7%  8%  9% 
Average Investment Rate  29.1  32.0  35.1 
Average CAD as a % of GDP  2.0  2.4  2.8 
Domestic Savings Rate: of which  27.1  29.6  32.3 
(a) Households  20.1  20.5  21.0 
(b) Corporate  5.0  5.5  6.1 
(c) PSEs  3.1  3.1  2.8 
(d) Government  ‐1.1  0.5  2.4 
Source: Approach to Eleventh Five‐Year Plan, Planning Commission 
 
The  growth  target  of  9  per  cent  would  require  a  significant  escalation  in  both  public  and 
private rate of investment. The public investment being an important determinant of private 
investment,  especially  when  the  public  investment  is  targeted  towards  infrastructure 
development, has been targeted at a significant level of 11.2 per cent.   
 
Table 29: Implications of the Savings Requirement for the Eleventh Plan 
Target GDP Growth rate in 11th Plan  7%  8%  9% 
Public Investment Rate (as a % of GDP)  8.4  9.8  11.2 
Private Investment Rate (as a % of GDP)  20.7  22.2  23.9 
Government Revenue Balance (% of GDP)  ‐2.9  ‐1.3  0.6 
Government Fiscal Balance (% of GDP)  ‐6.4  ‐6.2  ‐6 
Source: Approach to Eleventh Five‐Year Plan, Planning Commission 
 

[50] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Crowding In/Out? 

Public  investment  undertaken  by  way  of  government  borrowings  reduces  loanable  funds 
available for private investment, driving the interest rates up and thus reducing the level of 
private  investment  in  the  economy.  However,  to  the  extent  public  investment  in 
infrastructure  contributes  to  strengthening  the  productivity  and  profitability  of  private 
production, it has a crowding‐in effect on private investment. However, public investment 
in  industrial  and  commercial  sectors,  whereby  the  public  sector  competes  with  the  private 
sector resulting in competition for similar input and output markets, can crowd‐out private 
investment from the economy.  
 
Figure 20: Debt/ GDP 

70.0 9.0
70.0 9.0
65.0
65.0 8.0
8.0

per cent of GDP


60.0
per cent of GDP

per cent of GDP


60.0 7.0
per cent of GDP

55.0 7.0
55.0
50.0 6.0
50.0 6.0
45.0
45.0 5.0
40.0 5.0
40.0 4.0
35.0 4.0
35.0
30.0 3.0
30.0 3.0
1980-81

1982-83

1984-85

1986-87

1988-89

1990-91

1992-93

1994-95

1996-97

1998-99

2000-01

2002-03

2004-05
1980-81

1982-83

1984-85

1986-87

1988-89

1990-91

1992-93

1994-95

1996-97

1998-99

2000-01

2002-03

Debt GFD 2004-05


Debt GFD
 
               Source: RBI 
 
Thus, impact of public investment on the private sector cannot be considered in aggregate. 
Distinction by way of sector to which the former is targeted along with the time horizon of 
the investment also needs to be taken into account.  
 
The  heterogeneity  of  public  capital  implies  that  different  types  of  public  investment  are 
likely  to  have  opposing  effects  on  private  sector  activity:  public  projects  in  areas  such  as 
basic infrastructure and human capital formation presumably tend to raise the profitability 
of  private  production  and  thereby  encourage  private  investment,  while  public  projects  in 
more conventional activities ‐ where public enterprises basically compete with private firms 
‐‐  might  be  expected  to  have  the  opposite  effect,  by  competing  with  the  private  sector  in 
goods and factor markets activity. Public investment in infrastructure sectors reserved to the 
state contribute to raise the profitability of private production and have a crowding‐in effect 
on  private  investment. By contrast, public  investment  in  industrial  and  commercial  sectors 
open  to  competition  between  private  and  public  firms  might  have  the  opposite  effect:  by 
competing  with  private  firms  for  productive  inputs  and  output  markets  (and  investment 
licenses), crowding‐out private investment. 
 
Luis Serven (1996) 6 highlights the heterogeneous nature of public investment in determining 
private  investment.  Serven  empirically  examines  the  crowding‐out  scenario  by 

6  Does public capital crowd out private capital? Evidence from India, Luis Serven, World Bank  

[51] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

implementing  a  simple  analytical  model  encompassing  two  types  of  public  capital.  The 
empirical results show that in the long run, capital for public infrastructure projects crowds 
in private capital – other types of public capital have the opposite effect. But in the short run, 
both  kinds  of  public  investment  may  crowd  out  private  investment.  A.  Soumya  and  K.  N. 
Murty  (2006),  show  that  sustained  increase  in  public  sector  investment  in  infrastructure, 
financed  through  borrowing  from  commercial  banks,  results  in  substantial  increase  in 
private investment and thereby output in this sector. Further, due to increase in absorption, 
real  output  in the  manufacturing  and  services  sectors  also  seems to increase,  which sets‐in 
motion all other macro economic changes. Pritha Mitra, empirically tests the crowding‐out 
hypothesis in India. The short‐run impact of government investment in India has been less 
positive.  Empirical  evidence  suggests  that  government  investment  has  been  crowding  out 
private  investment.  Lal  ,  Bhide  and  Vasudevan  (2001)  show  that  if  fiscal  deficit  is  entirely 
bond  financed  then  there  will  be  no  shift  in  the  expenditure  (absorption)  line,  the  real 
exchange rate will remain unchanged and the only real effect will be through the crowding 
out of private investment by public borrowing. 
 
Table 30: Crowding out of Private Investment due to Increased Public Investment‐
Literature Review 
Date of 
Paper  Conclusion 
Publication 
Luis Serven‐ Does Public  In the long run capital for public infrastructure projects 
World Bank 
Capital Crowd out  crowds in private capital – other types of public capital 
Policy research 
Private Capital‐ Evidence  have the opposite effect. In the short run, both kinds of 
Group, May 1996 
from India  public investment may crowd out private investment. 
A. Soumya and K. N. 
Substantial increase in private investment and thereby 
Murty ‐Macro Economic 
University of  output.  
Effects of Changes in 
Hyderabad &  A 10% sustained increase in public sector investment in 
Public Investment in 
IGIDR, June 2006  infrastructure, can accelerate the macro economic 
India‐ A Simulation 
growth by nearly 2.5% without causing any inflation.  
Analysis  
Pritha Mitra‐ Has 
A positive impact on the economy in the long‐run.  
Government Investment 
   Empirical evidence suggests that government 
Crowded Out Private 
investment has been crowding out private investment.  
Investment in India? 
Kul B. Luintel and 
Public investment significantly reduces private 
George Mavrotas‐ 
investment and the extent of crowding out effect is 
Examining Private  UN University, 
directly related with the country specific level of real 
Investment  December, 2005 
income. Countries with higher real per capita income 
Hetrogeneity‐ Evidence 
experience more crowding out and vice versa 
from a Dynamic Panel 
Lal, Deepak, S Bhide and 
If fiscal deficit is entirely bond financed then there will 
D Vasudevan: ‘Financial 
be no shift in the expenditure (absorption) line, the real 
Exuberance:Savings 
2001  exchange rate will remain unchanged and the only real 
Deposits, Fiscal Deficits 
effect will be through the crowding out of private 
and Interest Rates in 
investment by public borrowing  
India’ 
Krishnamurty, 2001; IEG‐
DSE, 1999; Rangarajan     Weakening of crowding in of private investment 
and Mohanty, 1997 

[52] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Some  of  the  recent  evidence  by  Krishnamurty 7,  2001;  IEG‐DSE 8,  1999;  Rangarajan  and 
Mohanty 9,  1997suggests  the  weakening  of  crowding  in  phenomenon  in  the  last  decade 
possibly due to resource constraint and the negative price effect of public sector investment 
financed by fiscal deficit. Kulkarni and Erickson (1995) apply a vector autoregression (VAR) 
model  to  Indian  budget  deficits,  interest  rates,  price  level,  and  exchange  rates  and  find  no 
statistically significant evidence of crowding out. 
 
An  across  country  study  by  Luintel  and  Mavrotas  (2005)  suggests  that  public  investment 
significantly  reduces  private  investment  and  the  extent  of  crowding  out  effect  appears 
directly related with the country specific level of real income. Countries with higher real per 
capita income experience more crowding out and vice versa. 

Key challenges for increasing public investment rate 

(a) Crowding Out: As discussed above, government investment, financed by borrowing from 
private sector lowers the amount of funds available thus crowding out private investment in 
the  economy.  If  the  positive  impact  of  increased  government  investment  outweighs  the 
negative  impact  of  reduced  private  investment  then  it  will  improve  the  overall  economic 
growth.  In  the  opposite  scenario,  whereby  the  negative  impact  of  reduced  private 
investment  completely  cancels  the  positive  impact  of  increased  government  investment,  it 
renders economic growth unaffected. 
 
(b)  Increased  Deficit  cost:  The  public  sector  led‐growth  in  India  came  at  the  cost  of  a  large 
budget  deficit  financed  by  domestic  borrowing.  India’s  budget  deficit  grew  from  4.01  per 
cent in 1960 to 9.28 percent in 1986 and back to the range of 5.5 per cent during the current
decade. The persistence of the deficit reflects heavy domestic borrowing by the government 
to finance government investment.
 
During the 70s with the state led development strategy, the public sector was involved in all 
economic activities, with basic infrastructure activities reserved for the state. The reforms of 
90s  have  brought  about  a  significant  change  in  the  system,  with  increased  shift  towards 
market  oriented  development  model.  However,  a  lot  still  needs  to  be  done  by  way  of 
providing  the  private  sector  an  adequate  regulatory  framework  and  policy  structure. 
Further,  as  the  role  of  public  investment  in  infrastructure  is  very  important  as  has  been 
supported  empirically,  public  investment  in  infrastructure  helps  crowding‐in  private 
investment.  Investment  in  infrastructure  projects,  however,  should  not  be  left  for  the 
purview of the public sector alone.  
 

7 Krishnamurty, K. (2001): Macro econometric Models for India; Past, Present and Prospects, Economic and 
Political Weekly, October 19‐25 
8 IEG‐DSE Research Team (1999): Policies for Stability and Growth: Experiments with a Large and 

Comprehensive Structural Model for India, Journal of Quantitative Economics, Special Issue on Policy Modeling, 
Vol. 15, pp. 25‐109 
9 Rangarajan, C. and Mohanty, M.S. (1997): Fiscal Deficit, External balance and Monetary Growth – A Study of 

Indian Economy, Reserve bank of India, Occasional Papers, December 1997 

[53] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Public‐ Private Investment 
 
Infrastructure  sectors  have  to  face  the  long  gestation  period  along  with  a  lack  of  financial 
viability  of  the  projects  relying  solely  on  the  budgetary  support.  The  government  is  thus 
promoting a Public Private Partnership (PPP) in infrastructure development to remove the 
shortcoming  and  to  bring  in  private  sector  resources  and  techno‐managerial  efficiencies  to 
the  sector.  The  government  provides  special  support  to  the  PPP  projects  through  ‘viability 
gap funding’ whereby reducing the cost of capital of the projects by credit enhancement and 
to make them viable and attractive and private investments.     
 
India  initiated  an  ambitious  reform  programme,  involving  a  shift  from  a  controlled  to  an 
open  market  economy  showing  signs  of  overheating  because  of  basic  infrastructure 
constraints,  both  physical  and  human.  So  far,  the  bulk  of  infrastructure  was  in  the  public 
sector.  With  the  government  trying  to  reduce  its  borrowing  over  the  years,  infrastructure 
investment  is  one  area  where  there  is  a  need  for  private  sector  and  foreign  investment  to 
come in. 
 
The  recent  available  data  suggests  that  the  share  of  foreign  investors  in  investment  of 
infrastructure in South Asia declined  from  7.8 per  cent in 1995 to 2.3 per  cent  in 1998. The 
overall  economic  growth  in  India  during  the  corresponding  period  moderated  down  from 
7.3 per cent to 6.5 per cent. The growth momentum of early 90s could not be sustained, thus 
was unable to provide an attractive investment destination for foreign investors. The Indian 
economy has however witnessed a surge in foreign investment inflows during recent years 
supported  by  strong  macro  economic  fundamentals  and  the  existence  of  investment 
opportunities in the country. India experienced an average growth of 8 per cent during the 
last three years starting 2003‐04. Increased investor confidence in the economy was reflected 
in increased share of foreign investment directed towards the economy. The share of foreign 
investment in infrastructure in South Asia increased to a significant 15.4 per cent in 2004.   
   

[54] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Figure 21: Share of foreign investment in infrastructure 
1995 1998

Sub-saharan Africa 2.5


1.6 9.6
East Asia & 2.3
35.1 Paciifc 3.1
38.6 South Asia

Middle East &


12.0
North America
Europe & Central
Asia
16.6 0.2 7.8 Latin America & 70.6
the Carribean

 
2004

7.6

27.1 13.6

15.0

19.5
17.0
 
        Source: World Bank & PPIAF 
 
The  table  below  captures  the  trend  in  investment  in  PPI  projects  in  India  during  1990  to 
2004.  Total  investment in PPI  projects  increased from  a mere US$ 2  million  in  1990  to  US$ 
7785 million in 2004. Last ten years investment trends suggest a significant growth of 30 per 
cent per annum.   
 
The  investment  by  way  of  PPI  projects  during  1990  to  2004  has  been  primarily  focused 
around  energy  and  telecom  sector.  Of  the  cumulative  investment  undertaken  during  the 
period,  telecom  projects  accounted  for  a  significant  share  of  49  per  cent.  Energy  projects 
followed close with a share of 42 per cent.      
 

[55] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Figure 22: Investment in PPI Projects in India, 1990‐2004 

8000

6000

US$ million
4000

2000

0 1990

1992

1994

1996

1998

2000

2002

2004
 
      Source: World Bank 
 
Table 31: Cumulative Investment in 1990‐2004 PPI Projects by Sector, 1990‐2004 
Cumulative Investment  
  (US$ million)  Per cent Share 
Energy  16718  42.2 
Telecom  19395  49.0 
Transport  3235  8.2 
Water & sewage  223  0.6 
Grand Total  39571  100.0 
 
An  international  comparison  of  the  projects  receiving  investment  priority  across  regions 
suggests  that  of  the  total  investment,    Latin  America  &  Carribbean  invested  the  highest 
share of 89 per cent in facilities against the world average of 60 per cent. The share of South 
Asian economies in the facilities in 2004 was around 61 per cent, with the share of India at 66 
per cent. China on the other hand targeted 71 per cent of the investment in facilities.   
 
Table 32: Project Investment by Region/ Country, 2004 

Investment in  Investment in 
  Government Assets facilities  Total Investment
East Asia & Pacific  2107.1  2371  4478.1 
China  558  1341.3  1899.3 
Europe & central Asia  816.1  713.8  1529.9 
Latin America & Caribbean  532.8  4314.2  4847 
Middle East & North Africa  3878  3055  6933 
South Asia  1985.1  3095.8  5080.9 
India  1402.6  2770.8  4173.4 
Sub‐Saharan Africa  99.3  446.4  545.7 
Total  9418.4  13996.2  23414.6 
Note: *The investment figures include private and public contributions 
Source: World Bank 
 
 

[56] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

While the amount of FDI flowing into the economy is improving over the years, there exists 
the need to distribute the benefits  accruing  from  the  same  evenly  across  the  sectors.  There 
exists  a  need  to  establish  a  transparent,  broad  and  effective  policy  environment  for 
investment,  providing  incentives  for  innovation  and  improvement  of  skills  and  contribute 
towards improved competitiveness.  
   
A  sound  legal  and  regulatory  framework  is  required  for  regulation  and  enforcement  of 
infrastructure  project  contracts.  A  delicate  system  of  checks  and  balances  is  required  to 
frame  right  infrastructure  policy.  Policy  initiatives  should  be  framed  so  as  to  give  right 
incentives  to  the  private  sector  to  invest  adequately,  at  the  same  time  preventing  it  from 
extracting monopoly rights.  
 
Given the significant infrastructure investment requirements in the coming years, the task of 
funding  the  infrastructure  projects  and  deploying  them  productively  calls  for  a  close 
partnership  between  the  public  and  private  sectors,  with  a  vital  role  reserved  for  foreign 
capital. The domestic savings rate also needs to be increased to finance the projects.   
 

[57] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

VIII. REGIONAL PATTERN OF GROWTH 
 
While the analysis of national economic performance and the factors governing the overall 
economic growth is critical for sustaining healthy economic growth, the economic progress 
of a large country also deserves a comparative analysis of development of regions within the 
country.  
 
Growth Performance 
 
Table 33 presents  the average growth of  the  16  major  states  during  the  last  two and  a  half 
decades. The growth is estimated for three periods‐ the pre reform period of 1980s, the post 
reform period of 1990s and the last five years (2000‐01 to 2004‐05). The last column captures 
growth performance across the states during 2003‐04 and 2004‐05 so as to capture the impact 
of the current overall economic buoyancy.  
 
Table 33: Annual Average Growth of GSDP    (Per cent) 
State  1980s  1990s  2000‐05  03‐04/04‐05 
Gujarat  6.4  7.0  7.9  15.4 
Rajasthan  7.2  6.7  4.9  11.9 
Madhya Pradesh   4.3  6.3  2.7  10.1 
Kerala  3.3  5.9  6.9  9.8 
Orissa  5.4  2.9  4.5  8.6 
Haryana  6.3  5.3  6.9  8.5 
All‐States  5.3  5.6  4.7  7.9 (a) 
Himachal Pradesh  5.2  5.7  6.4  7.8 
All‐India GDP  5.6  5.8  5.9  7.7 
Andhra Pradesh  6.7  5.3  6.5  7.7 
West Bengal  4.3  6.6  7.0  7.5 
Maharashtra  6.3  6.8  4.0  7.3 
Karnataka  5.6  6.9  6.0  6.2 
Tamil Nadu  5.5  6.4  4.1  6.1 
Punjab  5.7  4.4  4.0  5.8 
J & K  3.2  4.9  4.5  5.2 
Uttar Pradesh  5.0  4.0  3.8  4.7 
Bihar  4.4  3.3  7.1  3.8 
 
Jharkhand  ‐‐  ‐‐  4.4  4.8 
Chattisgarh  ‐‐  ‐‐  7.0  16.8 
Uttaranchal  ‐‐  ‐‐  9.3  10.1 
Note:   States are arranged in the descending order of growth in 2000‐05 at constant (1993‐94) prices 
  (a) Corresponds to growth in 2003‐04 
Source:   CSO 
 
The  growth  rate  of  the  combined  SDP  of  the  16  states  together  has  increased  from  5.3  per 
cent in the pre‐reform period to 5.6 per cent during the 1990s. This acceleration in growth is 
matched by that in the overall economic growth. However, during 2000‐05, while the overall 

[58] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

economic  growth  further  picked  up  to  5.9  per  cent,  the  average  growth  in  the  key  states 
considered, significantly moderated down to 4.7 per cent.  
 
The current buoyancy in the overall economic growth as captured by the national accounts 
data  reflects  an  average  growth  of  7.7  per  cent  during  2003‐04  and  2004‐05.  The  lack  of 
availability  of  data  for  2004‐05  for  all  the  states  restricts  the  comparison  with  the  all‐states 
aggregate. However, during 2003‐04 the all‐states average picked up to a significant 7.9 per 
cent capturing the overall growth exhibited by the national growth of 8.9 per cent.    
 
While  the  growth  for  economy  as a whole picked  up during the  90s,  Bihar, Uttar  Pradesh, 
Punjab, Andhra Pradesh and Orissa experienced slowdown as compared to that during the 
80s.  Haryana  and  Rajasthan  also  experienced  deceleration,  however,  the  slowdown  was 
from a relatively higher level of growth.     
 
One  of  the  interesting  features  of  the  growth  performance  is  with  respect  to  the 
characterisation of the so‐called BIMARU states (Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and UP) 
as a homogeneous group of poor performers‐ grouping originally proposed in the context of 
observed similarities in demographic behaviour. However, the grouping does not appear to 
hold now with respect to the economic performance. While UP continued to perform slowly 
during the three periods considered, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh performed reasonably 
well, especially during 2003‐04 and 04‐05. While Bihar has registered poor average growth 
over the years, the annual growth performance is highly volatile. Bihar registered growth of 
14.3  per  cent  in  2004‐05  on  the  back  of  –6.7  per  cent  growth  in  2003‐04,  thus  pulling  the 
average growth during 2000‐05 to 7.1 per cent.       
 
One  of  the  reasons  behind  faster  acceleration  of  the  overall  GDP  data  is  that  while  the 
national  accounts  data  were  revised  for  the  period  from  1993‐94  (and  further  in  1999‐00), 
similar revision has not yet been done for the state domestic product. Thus there is a need to 
revise  the  methodological  changes  made in the national  accounts at  the  state level  as well. 
As it would significantly revise the assessment of the relative performance of the states.       
 
Growth Disparity 
 
The range of variation has continued to increase over the three periods. During the 80s, J&K 
had  the  lowest  average  growth  of  3.2  per  cent  while  in  the  third  period  the  lowest  annual 
average  growth  further  fell  to  2.7  per  cent  for  MP.  The  gap  during  the  respective  periods 
widened  as  the  highest  growth  increased  from  7.2  per  cent  (Rajasthan)  to  7.9  per  cent 
(Gujarat) during the respective periods.    
 
The  degree  of  variation  across  the  states  can  be  considered  from  table  illustrating  the 
coefficient of variation in the annual GSDP growth rates across the periods considered.  
 

[59] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 34: Coefficient of Variation in Annual GSDP Growth   
State  1980s  1990s  2000‐05  03‐04/04‐05 
Madhya Pradesh  121.5  81.7  420.4  119.6 
Rajasthan  188.6  127.3  230.8  123.1 
Bihar  113.9  322.3  192.0  390.5 
Maharashtra  71.6  66.9  138.0  ‐‐ 
Orissa  177.8  284.4  136.9  95.4 
Tamil Nadu  92.9  44.6  104.4  59.6 
Gujarat  207.8  148.5  91.7  ‐‐ 
Karnataka  65.6  52.2  52.2  ‐‐ 
Kerala  120.7  40.4  50.2  13.4 
Uttar Pradesh  63.9  77.4  49.1  3.4 
All‐States  53.8  25.4  47.6  ‐‐ 
Punjab  42.5  39.2  46.1  10.9 
Andhra Pr.  100.8  82.5  34.8  23.8 
J & K  165.5  16.2  33.1  2.4 
All‐India GDP  41.4  32.2  31.5  14.7 
Haryana  125.1  70.0  24.2  2.0 
Himachal Pr.  125.8  43.3  23.6  5.1 
West Bengal  79.9  21.5  6.6  ‐‐ 
Jharkhand  ‐‐  ‐‐  51.7  15.2 
Chattisgarh  ‐‐  ‐‐  144.8  ‐‐ 
Uttaranchal  ‐‐  ‐‐  24.5  ‐‐ 
Source: CSO 
 
The  performance  across  the  states  is  more  meaningful  while  considering  the  level  of  per 
capita income across the states. The figure below compares the level of per capita income in 
1993‐94 and in 2003‐04. Haryana with a per capita income (at current prices) of Rs 29504 had 
the  highest  amongst  the  states  considered,  closely  followed  by  Maharashtra  at  Rs  29204. 
Punjab, which secured the top position in 1993‐94, moved to third rank at Rs 28607. Bihar, 
Orissa,  UP  and  Jharkhand  remained  at  the  bottom  of  the  series  with  lowest  level  of  per 
capita income.    
 
Figure 23: Per capita Income at current prices 

35000
35000
30000
30000
20989

25000
20989

2003-04
25000 2003-04
20000 1993-94
20000 1993-94
Rs

15000
Rs

15000
10000
10000
5000
5000
0
0
Orissa
Punjab

UP
Tamil Nadu

West Bengal

Rajasthan
Haryana

Chattisgarh
Andhra Pr.
Himachal Pr.

Orissa
Punjab

UP
Tamil Nadu

West Bengal

Rajasthan
Haryana

Chattisgarh
Andhra Pr.
Himachal Pr.

 
         Source: CSO 

[60] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

The difference in performance across states becomes starker if we consider the growth in per 
capita  income.  The  states  recording  highest  per  capita  incomes  are  not  the  ones  which  are 
experiencing  high  growth  as  well.  Gujarat  has  been  able  to  cash‐on  on  the  ongoing 
buoyancy in economy, translating into an average growth of more than 15 per cent in the per 
capita income. During 2000‐05  the range  of  variation  lay at  around  growth  level of 0.5  per 
cent and 6.3 per cent, which was concentrated in the last two years when the range hovered 
around 2 and 15 per cent.    
 
Table 35: Average Annual Growth in Per Capita Income  
State  1980s  1990s  2000‐01/ 04‐05  2003‐04/ 04‐05 
Gujarat  4.4  4.8  6.3  15.4 
West Bengal  1.9  4.8  5.7  6.0 
Andhra Pr.  4.5  3.6  5.5  6.6 
Kerala  1.5  4.9  5.1  7.1 
Bihar  2.4  0.4  5.0  2.0 
Haryana  3.9  2.7  4.9  7.1 
Karnataka  3.5  5.1  4.8  5.0 
All‐India   3.4  3.5  4.3  6.2 
Himachal Pr.  3.3  3.8  4.1  6.8 
All‐States  2.9  3.4  3.2  6.9 
Tamil Nadu  3.9  5.2  2.9  5.0 
Rajasthan  4.8  4.0  2.9  10.7 
Orissa  3.3  1.0  2.9  7.8 
Punjab  3.8  2.3  2.5  4.3 
Maharashtra  3.9  4.5  2.1  5.8 
J & K  ‐0.1  2.0  1.7  2.4 
Uttar Pradesh  2.5  1.4  1.6  2.6 
Madhya Pr.  1.4  3.9  0.5  8.5 
Uttaranchal  ‐‐  ‐‐  6.9  8.4 
Chattisgarh  ‐‐  ‐‐  6.2  15.6 
Jharkhand   ‐‐  ‐‐  2.4  3.4 
Note: States are arranged in descending order of growth during 2000‐05  
Source: CSO 
 
Economic Structure 
 
There  has  been  a  significant  change  in  the  structure  of  the  economy  as  expected  in  the 
structure  of  a  developing  economy.  There  has  been  shift  from  primary  to  secondary  and 
tertiary  sectors.  The  table  highlights  the  change  across  the  states.  From  being  a 
predominantly  agrarian  economy,  the  share  of  agriculture  has  declined  significantly  over 
the  last  decade.  While  the  growth  in  contribution  of  secondary  sector  has  varied  across 
states, tertiary sector has witnessed an increase in the percentage share across states.     
 

[61] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 36: Percentage Change in Percentage Share in NSDP (1987‐88 to 1999‐00) 
Change in Percentage Share 
States  Primary  Secondary  Tertiary 
Andhra Pradesh  ‐12.0  5.0  7.9 
Bihar  ‐23.6  ‐10.4  34.6 
Gujarat  ‐21.7  12.5  4.7 
Haryana  ‐15.2  10.9  9.5 
Himachal Pradesh  ‐25.0  48.2  11.8 
J&K  ‐11.4  ‐17.2  10.4 
Karnataka  ‐25.4  10.5  18.5 
Kerala  ‐28.0  ‐23.2  24.3 
Madhya Pradesh  ‐16.4  21.1  13.4 
Maharashtra  ‐32.5  ‐4.7  18.5 
Orissa  ‐4.9  ‐66.3  22.6 
Punjab  ‐5.0  ‐5.0  7.3 
Rajasthan  ‐18.2  0.9  15.7 
Tamil Nadu  ‐26.2  ‐13.7  18.7 
Uttar Pradesh  ‐10.8  27.1  3.0 
West Bengal  16.7  ‐38.2  3.7 
Source: Planning Commission 
 
Key Observations 

ƒ The state of Gujarat has performed significantly well with respect to the key economic indicators 
and has been able to harness the current buoyancy in the economy better than other states. This 
suggests  that  the  state  was  able  to  provide  an  environment  most  conducive  to  benefiting  from 
new policies.  

ƒ Interestingly  not  all  high‐income  states  have  been  able  to  sustain  high  growth  rates  and  not  all 
low‐income  states  have  continued  with  low  growth  over  the  three  periods,  thus  negating  the 
argument  that  richest  state  got  richer  while  the  poor  states  got  poorer  over  the  decades.  West 
Bengal  and  Bihar  had  lower  than  national  aggregate  per  capita  income  level.  However,  both  of 
them  have  been  the  highest  growing  states  during  2000‐05.  On  the  other  hand,  Tamil  Nadu, 
Punjab and Maharashtra with relatively high levels of per capita income have witnessed a growth 
deceleration as compared to that during the 80s.  

ƒ However,  leaving  apart  Haryana,  Maharashtra,  Gujarat  and  Himachal  Pradesh,  all  other  states 
have widened the per capita income gap with the richest state in 2003‐04 as compared to that in 
1993‐94.    

ƒ The poor states of Bihar, UP, Orissa and Jharkhand accounting for 25 per cent of total population 
registered growth improvement during the 90s. However the average growth was lower than the 
national average for all the periods. The per capita income also grew significantly during the 90s 
and the momentum was maintained during the 2000s.  

ƒ The  southern  states  have  always  been  believed  to  be  the  best  performers.  While  the  states  as  a 
group have performed well, they have not been the only beneficiaries of the growth acceleration. 

ƒ Amongst  the  new  states  ‐  Uttaranchal  and  Chattisgarh  have  remarkably  exhibited  growth 
buoyancy during the last two years, surpassing the growth witnessed in high growth states by a 
significant  margin.  While  they  register  lower  than  national  aggregate  per  capita  income,  the 
average growth in the same has been significantly higher than the national average.   

[62] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

ƒ The  BIMARU  characterisation  does  not  hold  while  looking  at  the  economic  performance  of  the 
states  with  Rajasthan  and  MP  performing  reasonably  better  than  the  Bihar  and  UP  and  several 
other states.  
 
Social Infrastructure 
 
Poverty 
Relative growth performance of the states is expected to have significant implications for the 
poverty  reduction  in  a  particular  state.  With  the  latest  available  data  on  poverty 
corresponding  to  1999‐00,  the  states  with  high  per  capita  income  growth  during  the  1990s 
are expected to have rapid and relatively higher reduction in poverty. States of Karnataka, 
Tamil  Nadu,  Maharashtra,  Kerala,  Gujarat  and  West  Bengal  witnessed  relatively  high  per 
capita income growth during the 90s and registered significant reduction in poverty in 1999‐
00 from that in 1993‐94.     
  
While all the states have registered a decline in overall poverty over the two periods, states 
like Orissa, Bihar and MP still have a sizeable share of population below poverty line.   
 
Table 37: Percentage of Population Below Poverty line 
State  1993‐94  1999‐00 
Total  Total  Rural  Urban 
Orissa  48.6  47.2  48.0  42.8 
Bihar*   55.0  42.6  44.3  32.9 
Madhya Pradesh*  42.5  37.4  37.1  38.4 
Uttar Pradesh*  40.9  31.2  31.2  30.9 
West Bengal  35.7  27.0  31.9  14.9 
All India  36.0  26.1  27.1  23.6 
Maharashtra  36.9  25.0  23.7  26.8 
Tamil Nadu  35.0  21.1  20.6  22.1 
Karnataka  33.2  20.0  17.4  25.3 
Andhra Pradesh  22.2  15.8  11.1  26.6 
Rajasthan  27.4  15.3  13.7  19.9 
Gujarat  24.2  14.1  13.2  15.6 
Kerala  25.4  12.7  9.4  20.3 
Haryana  25.1  8.7  8.3  10.0 
Himachal Pradesh   28.4  7.6  7.9  4.6 
Punjab  11.8  6.2  6.4  5.8 
Jammu and Kashmir  25.2  3.5  4.0  2.0 
Note: * Indicator for Undivided state 
Source:  NSS 1993‐94/ 1999‐00 
 

[63] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 38: Poverty Projection for 2007 
Poverty Projection for 2007 
Rural  Urban  Combined 
State  % of Poor  No. of Poor  % of Poor  No. of Poor  % of Poor  No. of Poor 
Andhra Pradesh  4.6  27.0  19.0  41.8  8.5  68.7 
Bihar  44.8  482.2  32.7  54.7  43.2  536.9 
Gujarat  2.0  6.9  2.0  4.4  2.0  11.3 
Haryana  2.0  3.3  2.0  1.5  2.0  4.8 
Himachal  2.0  1.2  2.0  0.1  2.0  1.3 
J&K  N.A.  N.A.  N.A.  N.A.  N.A.  N.A. 
Karnataka  7.8  28.7  8.0  16.3  7.9  45.0 
Kerala  1.6  4.0  9.3  8.0  3.6  12.0 
Madhya Pradesh  28.7  192.1  31.8  74.5  29.5  266.5 
Maharashtra  17.0  101.6  15.2  72.7  16.2  174.3 
Orissa  41.7  139.1  37.5  23.6  41.0  162.7 
Punjab  2.0  3.4  2.0  2.0  2.0  5.4 
Rajasthan  11.1  54.4  15.4  23.4  12.1  77.9 
Tamil Nadu  3.7  12.5  9.6  31.6  6.6  44.1 
Uttar Pradesh  24.3  373.2  26.2  111.3  24.7  484.4 
West Bengal  22.0  137.5  9.0  22.2  18.3  159.7 
India  21.1  1705.3  15.1  495.7  19.3  2200.9 
Source: Planning Commission 
 
Literacy 
 
The quality of human resource development is critical to growth. Due to lack of availability 
of extensive data on skill set of the labour force in a state, the literacy rate is thus used as a 
proxy for quality of human infrastructure.  
 
The level of literacy has increased for all the states in 2001 as compared to that in 1991. The 
percentage  of  literate  population  in  urban  regions  significantly  exceeds  that  in  the  rural 
areas.    Low  growing  states  of  Bihar,  UP,  Orissa,  Jharkhand  experienced  low  levels  of 
literacy.  This reflects inadequacies in the human resource base of these states, thus affecting 
their  overall  growth  performance.  States  like  Rajasthan,  MP  and  Chattisgarh  experienced 
significantly high growth during the 90s, which was matched by a significant acceleration in 
the level of literacy in the state over the period.               
 

[64] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 39: Literacy Rate 
Area Name  Total  Rural  Urban 
1991  2001  1991  2001  1991  2001 
Kerala  89.8  90.9  88.9  90.0  92.2  93.4 
Maharashtra  64.9  77.3  55.5  70.8  79.2  85.8 
Himachal Pradesh  62.9  75.9  60.8  74.4  84.2  89.6 
Tamil Nadu  62.7  73.5  54.6  66.7  78.0  82.1 
Uttaranchal  57.7  72.3  52.7  68.9  74.0  81.5 
Punjab  58.5  70.0  52.8  65.2  72.1  79.1 
West Bengal  57.7  69.2  50.5  64.1  75.3  81.6 
Haryana  55.8  68.6  49.9  63.8  73.7  79.9 
Karnataka  56.0  67.0  47.7  59.7  74.2  81.0 
Gujarat  58.3  66.4  50.3  58.5  73.2  79.2 
All India  51.5  65.2  44.0  59.2  72.2  80.1 
Chhattisgarh  42.9  65.1  36.7  60.9  71.4  81.1 
Madhya Pradesh  44.7  64.1  35.5  58.1  70.7  79.7 
Orissa  49.1  63.6  45.5  60.4  72.0  81.0 
Andhra Pradesh  44.1  61.1  35.7  55.3  66.3  76.4 
Rajasthan  38.6  61.0  30.4  55.9  65.3  76.9 
Uttar Pradesh  40.7  57.4  35.8  53.7  60.2  70.6 
Jammu & Kashmir  ‐  54.5  ‐  48.2  ‐  72.2 
Jharkhand  41.4  54.1  32.7  46.3  71.7  79.9 
Bihar  37.5  47.5  34.2  44.4  65.2  72.7 
Source: Census 1991, 2001 
 
Further  there  are  gender  disparities  at  all  India  level  and  within  individual  states  as  well. 
The  gap  is  widest  in  Rajasthan  with  male  literacy  rate  of  76.5  per  cent  against  the  female 
literacy rate of 44  per  cent  in 2001.Kerala  had the  lowest gender  gap  of  6.3  per  cent  points 
with a female literacy rate of 87.8 per cent during 2001.    
 
Investment  
 
Investment remains a critical determinant to growth in the development of state economy.  
With  lack  of  firm  data  on  level  of  investment  undertaken  in  a  state,  we  consider  the 
industrial  investment  proposals  attracted  by  the  states  during  August  1991  to  December 
2005.  The  investment  proposals  include  industrial  entrepreneur  memorandums,  letters  of 
intent and direct industrial licences. While the data only captures the investment proposed, 
it  however  is  a  good  proxy  to  compare  the  relative  performance  of  the  states  in  attracting 
investment.     
 
Gujarat and Maharashtra have together attracted a significant share of about 32 per cent of 
the total proposed investment. Tamil Nadu, Chattisgarh, UP and Orissa have each attracted 
a  share  of  around  7  per  cent  of  the  total  investment  proposals.  While  Gujarat  and 
Chattisgarh  have  experienced  high  growth  during  2000‐05,  the  rest  of  the  states  have  not 
observed that level of growth.            
 

[65] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Bihar, Kerala, Uttaranchal and Himachal Pradesh have been able to attract a very marginal 
share  of  total  investment  proposed.  However,  all  of  the  four  states  have  performed 
significantly well during 2000‐05.  
 
Therefore  a  low  level  of  growth  does  not  indicate  low  levels  of  investment  or  investment 
potential in the economy and vice‐versa. However, low levels of investment in high growth 
states  can  be  due  to  low  levels  of  efficiency‐  determined  by  level  of  human  resource 
development,  infrastructure  quality,  economic  policy  environment  and  governance  quality 
in a state.  
 
Figure 24: State‐wise Industrial Investment Proposals (August 1991 to December 2005) 

350000 18.0
350000 18.0
16.0
300000 16.0
300000 14.0
250000 14.0
250000 12.0
12.0
Rs crore

per cent
200000 10.0
Rs crore

per cent
200000 10.0
150000 8.0
150000 8.0
6.0
100000 6.0
100000 4.0
50000 4.0
50000 2.0
2.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
Orissa
Gujarat

J&K
Punjab

Bihar
Kerala
UP

MP
Tamil Nadu

Himachal
West Bengal

Rajasthan
Jharkhand
Haryana
Chhattisgarh

Karnataka
Maharashtra

Uttaranchal
Pradesh
Orissa
Gujarat

J&K
Punjab

Bihar
Kerala
UP

MP
Tamil Nadu

Himachal
West Bengal

Rajasthan
Jharkhand
Haryana
Chhattisgarh

Karnataka
Maharashtra

Uttaranchal
Pradesh

T otal Investment %age share


T otal Investment %age share
 
  Source: Ministry of Commerce & Industry 
 
Employment 
 
The states witnessing high employment growth during 1983 to 1993‐94, witnessed a relative 
slowdown  in  employment  growth  during  the  second  period.  However,  the  states  that  did 
not witness significant employment growth in the first period saw a growth pick up in the 
second period.     
 
Gujarat  was  the  only  state  that  maintained  its  growth  resilience  during  the  two  periods. 
Punjab and Kerala were the only states to have exhibited growth improvement over the two 
periods. 
 

[66] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 40: Growth in Employment (Per cent per annum) 
1983 to 1993‐94  1993‐94 to 1999‐2000 
States  Male  Female  Persons  Male  Female  Persons 
Punjab  1.8  ‐1.4  1.0  1.5  6.1  2.6 
Bihar  1.8  ‐1.7  0.9  2.3  3.0  2.5 
Gujarat  2.4  1.6  2.1  2.1  2.2  2.1 
Madhya Pradesh  2.4  1.7  2.2  1.9  1.5  1.8 
Uttar Pradesh  2.3  1.1  2.0  1.8  1.4  1.7 
Karnataka  2.2  2.4  2.3  2.0  0.8  1.6 
Kerala  2.0  ‐1.2  0.9  1.6  1.4  1.6 
All India  2.2  1.7  2.1  1.9  0.9  1.6 
Rajasthan  2.6  2.4  2.5  2.2  0.5  1.5 
Himachal Pradesh  2.8  3.0  2.9  1.4  1.5  1.4 
Orissa  1.8  2.9  2.1  1.5  1.0  1.3 
Andhra Pradesh  2.1  2.7  2.4  1.6  0.3  1.1 
J&K  1.7  5.9  2.9  2.2  ‐1.2  1.1 
West Bengal  2.4  2.1  2.4  1.6  ‐0.8  1.1 
Maharashtra  2.1  2.3  2.2  1.8  ‐0.2  1.0 
Tamil Nadu  1.6  2.0  1.8  1.4  ‐0.3  0.8 
Haryana  2.5  4.7  3.1  1.9  ‐3.1  0.6 
Note   Growth in employment has been estimated as compound annual growth in the persons employed in the 
age group 15 years and above on the usual principal and subsidiary status. 
Source:   The 38th, 50th and the 55th Rounds of the NSSO on Employment and Unemployment Situation in India. 
 
The  change  in  employment  trends  is  consistent  with  the  structural  trends  in  income  – 
measured  by  the  observed  shift  in  structure  in  the  economy  for  most  of  the  states  except 
West  Bengal.  West  Bengal  witnessed  a  decline  in  growth  in  employment  in  agriculture 
sector despite a positive growth in sectoral income. 
 
Andhra  Pradesh,  Haryana,  Kerala,  Punjab  and  J&K  suffered  significant  deceleration  in 
employment growth in industry. The observed change in the economic structure in favour 
of  services  sector  is  also  supported  by  the  positive  and  significant  shift  in  growth  in 
employment opportunities originating in the tertiary sector.        
 

[67] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 41: Change in Percentage Share in employment (1987‐88 to 1999‐00) 
Change in Percentage Share 
States  Primary  Secondary  Tertiary 
Andhra Pradesh  ‐10.2  ‐9.8  35.3 
Bihar  ‐2.8  9.3  8.7 
Gujarat  ‐6.1  8.5  7.4 
Haryana  ‐23.4  ‐2.0  49.3 
Himachal Pradesh  ‐20.0  4.3  76.7 
J&K  ‐2.8  ‐54.7  24.7 
Karnataka  ‐12.6  ‐4.0  41.9 
Kerala  ‐27.6  ‐1.7  37.3 
Madhya Pradesh  ‐10.9  ‐0.5  54.6 
Maharashtra  ‐20.9  11.8  46.7 
Orissa  ‐1.2  0.0  4.0 
Punjab  ‐16.5  ‐8.3  29.4 
Rajasthan  ‐6.1  4.3  13.8 
Tamil Nadu  ‐18.1  1.0  31.4 
Uttar Pradesh  ‐14.3  29.0  35.7 
West Bengal  ‐9.5  ‐0.8  17.0 
Source: Planning Commission 
 
Infrastructure 
 
It is undisputable that rapid industrial growth critically depends upon the availability and 
quality of infrastructure in the form of efficient system of power, road and rail transport and 
telecommunications. Rural development hinges on the spread and quality of irrigation, land 
development,  extent  of  rural  electrification  and  spread  of  rural  roads.  Good  infrastructure 
raises  productivity  of  existing  resources,  lowers  production  costs  and  helps  in  attracting 
more investment that further boosts the overall growth in the state.  
 
Power 
 
While availability of electricity is a good indicator of the existence of infrastructure set up in 
the state, the per capita consumption of electricity captures the quality of infrastructure by 
way  of  measuring  the  amount  of  demand  actually  met  by  the  state.  Tamil  Nadu,  Andhra 
Pradesh,  Karnataka  and  Himachal  Pradesh  registered  moderate  growth  of  around  6‐8  per 
cent per annum during 1999‐00 to 2003‐04.  While the all India consumption grew at a rate of 
2.4  per  cent  per  annum,  states  like  Punjab,  Bihar,  MP  and  Rajasthan  witnessed  a  growth 
deceleration  during  the  corresponding  period.  Bihar  experienced  a  growth  deceleration  of 
about 25 per cent per annum during the period. One of the key reasons behind the observed 
occurrence is the creation of a new state‐ Jharkhand, which has been the key source of power 
to Bihar.  
 

[68] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Figure 25: Per Capita Consumption of Electricity (Utility & Non‐utilities) 

1000
1000
900
900
800 1999-00
800 1999-00
700
700 2003-04
600 2003-04
600
Kwh

390
500
Kwh

390
500

355
400

355
400
300
300
200
200
100
100
0
0

Orissa
Gujarat

J&K
Punjab

Bihar
All India

Kerala
Andhra

UP
MP
Tamil Nadu

Himachal

West Bengal
Rajasthan
Jharkhand
Haryana

Chhattisgarh
Karnataka
Maharashtra

Uttaranchal
Orissa
Gujarat

J&K
Punjab

Bihar
All India

Kerala
Andhra

UP
MP
Tamil Nadu

Himachal

West Bengal
Rajasthan
Jharkhand
Haryana

Chhattisgarh
Karnataka
Maharashtra

Uttaranchal
 
    Source: Central Electricity Authority, SEB 
 
Roads 
 
Over the past decades road transport has emerged as the major mode of transporting freight 
and  passenger  traffic  in  India.  It  is  the  main  mechanised  means  of  transport  in  hilly  and 
rural areas, not served by railways. 
 
While  the  road  length  has  significantly  improved  over  the  past  few  years,  the  total  road 
length  is  still  very  low.  Further,  the  quality  of  the  existing  road  is  also  a  matter  of  great 
concern  across  the  states.  Punjab  with  about  42  km  per  1000  sq  km  had  the  highest  road 
density  during  2001.  Even  better  performing  states  like  Gujarat  had  relatively  low  road‐
density  of  27  km/1000  sq  km.  Hilly  states  like  Himachal  and  Uttaranchal,  where  railway 
structure  is  not  very  developed  are  highly  dependent  on  the  available  road  infrastructure, 
which itself is not very developed.     
 

[69] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 42: Road Length 
  Route km per lakh of population Route km per 1000 sq km 
   as on March 31, 2001 
Punjab  8.65  41.73 
West Bengal  4.56  41.26 
Bihar  4.15  36.55 
Uttar Pradesh  5.16  35.93 
Haryana  7.34  35.00 
Tamil Nadu  6.74  32.21 
Gujarat  10.50  27.10 
Kerala  3.30  27.02 
Jharkhand  6.68  22.54 
Andhra Pradesh  6.78  18.67 
Maharashtra  5.64  17.74 
Rajasthan  10.49  17.32 
Madhya Pradesh  7.93  15.52 
Karnataka  5.64  15.51 
Orissa  6.29  14.83 
Chhattisgarh  5.68  8.73 
Uttaranchal  4.20  6.37 
Himachal Pradesh  4.42  4.83 
J&K  0.95  0.43 
Total  135.56  700.36 
Source: Planning Commission 
 
Financial Infrastructure 
 
The table reflects the ratio of credit disbursed to deposits received by the states during 2002 
to  2005.  While  the  credit‐deposit  ratio  captures  the  specificities  of  an  individual  state,  the 
ratio  also  highlights  the  inequality  between  different  states  as  banks  absorb  deposits  in 
backward regions and funnel the funds to fund activities in relatively developed regions.  
 
The ratio has improved for most of the states except Haryana, Gujarat, J&K, Uttar Pradesh 
and Himachal Pradesh. While Tamil Nadu registered a significantly high ratio of 98 per cent 
during 2004‐05, the disparity is significantly high with Uttaranchal registering a ratio of 24.7 
per cent. Further, with the inability of the states with low ratios to register a significant pick 
up, the range of disparity has significantly worsened over the years.  
 

[70] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Table 43: Credit‐Deposit Ratio of Scheduled Commercial Banks (Per cent) 
State  2002  2003  2004  2005 
Tamil Nadu  88.5  93.1  96.1  98.4 
Maharashtra  77.5  77.4  66.5  95.2 
Andhra Pradesh  67.7  69.3  70.9  75.1 
Karnataka  68.9  71.1  69.0  74.1 
Rajasthan  55.4  55.3  62.9  69.0 
Orissa  51.4  56.9  58.6  62.2 
Kerala  43.7  43.6  47.8  55.8 
Madhya Pradesh  50.3  51.7  50.1  55.4 
West Bengal  49.2  50.0  53.8  53.6 
Haryana  55.0  58.3  59.6  51.9 
Gujarat  54.7  56.0  54.8  46.7 
Chhatishgarh  54.2  43.8  44.9  45.8 
Punjab  43.9  43.4  45.7  45.7 
J&K  40.9  39.0  41.7  38.6 
Uttar Pradesh  34.3  36.0  38.0  37.0 
Himachal Pradesh  32.5  37.7  42.7  36.0 
Jharkhand  31.0  30.9  26.9  30.6 
Bihar  21.9  23.7  26.9  27.8 
Uttaranchal  26.0  21.4  23.4  24.7 
ALL India  58.4  59.2  58.2  66.0 
Source: Reserve Bank of India 
 
These  regional  inequalities  translate  into  deeper  poverty  in  the  countryʹs  poorest  regions. 
However, they should not be interpreted as the favouring of one region over another; rather, 
they  are  an  indicator  of  distorted  growth  and  the  growing  inequality  between  different 
income groups.  
 
Some  areas  are  exclusive  responsibility  of  the  central  government  like  national  highways, 
rail  transportation,  telecommunications,  airports  and  major  ports.  The  central  government 
has  considerable  flexibility  to  determine  the  regional  distribution  of  central  public  sector 
investment.  The  scale  on  which  the  centre  can  undertake  such  investment,  however,  is 
constrained by the total resource availability.     
 
State  governments also have  a major  role to  play  in developing infrastructure  required  for 
accelerating  growth.  Some  of  the  critical  sectors  are  being  investment  in  social  sectors‐ 
schools  and  health  facilities,  investments  in  economic  infrastructure  such  as  power  system 
(including rural electrification), development of irrigation and water management systems, 
land development, state highways and district and rural roads.  
 
There  is  an urgent need  to increase public  investment  in  critical  areas  across the  states.  As 
growth  observed  even  in  the  better  performing  states  might  not  be  sustained  in  future  if 
corrective  action  vis‐à‐vis  ensuring  adequate  and  efficient  system  of  infrastructure  is 
established.     
 
 
 

[71] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Causes of Regional Inequality 

As is evident from the above discussion, there exists wide growth disparity across the states. 
As the above discussion highlights the performance of states with respect to the key socio‐
economic  attributes,  the  following  discussion  will  summarise  the  role  of  the  major 
characteristics which are instrumental to the existing disparity.   

Social and demographic factors 
The states vary considerably in social indicators, such as infant mortality rates and the level 
of adult literacy. Improved social and demographic factors provide for an enriched human 
resource base in the state. While a superior performance raises the standard of well being of 
the population, improved set of social and demographic indicators needs to be clubbed with 
quality infrastructure, good governance and significant investment opportunities in the state 
for it to translate into discernably higher rates of economic growth. 
 
Human Resources 
The  quality  of  human  resource  development  in  a  state  is  a  critical  determinant  of  growth. 
States  with  superior  availability  of  human  skills  are  expected  to  witness  faster  rate  of 
growth.  Taking  literacy  as  a  proxy  for  human  resource  development  indicate  that  literacy 
levels  in  the  slow  growing  states  are  distinctly  lower  than  the  average  for  all  states.  An 
absolute  improvement  in  skill  set  of  the  existing  human  base  in  the  state  should  help 
improve the productivity of human resources in the state, in turn favourably impacting the 
overall  economic  growth  and  development  in  the  state.  However,  given  that  literacy  rates 
have risen over time in all states, including the slow growing states of Bihar, UP and Orissa, 
the  continuing  relative  gap  means  that  poorer  states  will  continue  to  find  it  difficult  to 
compete  with  the  more  advanced  states  in  attracting  investment  and  hence  closing  the 
growth disparity.  
 
Investment 
Investment  plays  a  significant  role  in  accelerating  economic  growth  and  development  in  a 
state.  While  the  mobility  of  private  corporate  investment  has  increased  in  the  post‐
liberalisation period since decontrol has eliminated the central government’s ability to direct 
investment  to  particular  areas,  competition  has  greatly  increased  the  incentive  for  private 
corporate  investment  to  locate  where  costs  are  minimised.  To  the  extent  private  corporate 
investment  is  likely  to  flow  to  states  having  skilled  labour,  good  infrastructure  and  good 
governance;  the  poorer  performing  states  suffer  from  obvious  handicaps  in  attracting 
private investment.  
 
Quality of Infrastructure 
Rapid industrial growth depends critically upon the availability of infrastructure support in 
the  form  of  electric  power,  road  and  rail  transportation  and  telecommunications.  Further, 
agricultural growth also depends upon rural infrastructure such as the spread and quality of 
irrigation,  land  development,  extent  of  rural  electrification  and  the  spread  of  rural  roads. 
Although  all  states  suffer  from  infrastructural  deficiencies,  the  poorer  performing  states 
definitely lag behind in this area. While private participation in infrastructure is called for, 
state  governments  have  a  crucial  role  to  play  in  developing  infrastructure  needed  for 
accelerating growth.  

[72] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

 
Urbanisation 
Level  of  urbanisation  has  both  a  cause  and  effect  relationship  with  economic  growth.  An 
already  existing  urban  area  would  be  a  preferred  destination  for  new  investments.  The 
degree  of  urbanisation  itself  depends  on  underlying  geographical  factors,  especially  the 
location of the main national ports as well as the productivity of agriculture in the region.  
 
Policy Environment and Governance 
The  overall  policy  environment  and  the  quality  of  governance  are  also  important  factors 
determining  the  growth  potential  of  a  state.  There  are  several  ways  in  which  good 
governance  affects  growth.  First,  it  has  a  direct  impact  on  the  effectiveness  with  which 
developmental programmes are implemented. Poor administration and corruption are now 
widely  recognised  as  major  problems  reducing  the  effectiveness  of  many  government 
programmes.  Second,  the  quality  of  governance  can  help  stimulate  growth  by  making  the 
policy environment more business friendly through deregulation, decontrol and procedural 
simplification. Third, the general conditions for law and order are a reflection of the overall 
level of governance and are particularly important for stimulating private sector investment. 
Finally,  a  neglected  area,  where  state  governments  could  take  an  initiative  to  improve  the 
policy environment for investment, relates to the degree of flexibility allowed with regard to 
labour laws. 
 
Binding State finances 
Acceleration  in  growth  calls  for  higher  levels  of  public  investment  in  critical  social  and 
economic infrastructure sectors by state governments. However a constrained fiscal position 
of the state may result in forced constriction on plan investment. 
 
The literature documenting the reasons for divergence in growth across states cites several 
possible reasons.  Sachs et al 10 list several possible hypotheses for the lack of unconditional 
convergence  among  Indian  states.  Firstly,  significant  geographical  differences  in  India 
(larger  than  that  in  the  US,  Europe  and  Japan).  Secondly,  slow  response  of  population 
movements  in  India  to  income  differentials.  Thirdly,  policies  of  national  or  state 
governments do not facilitate convergence. Lastly economic convergence is slower at lower 
levels of economic development, as is the case in India. He also identifies coastal access and 
climate as factors of convergence.  
 
In  a  related  study,  Bhide  and  Shand 11  (2000)  bring  out  the  stark  differentiation  between 
“progressive”  and  “backward”  states.  While  infrastructure  appears  to  have  a  facilitating 
role, growth appears to be negatively related to the size of public administration. The results 
suggest  that  rather  than  physical  infrastructure  social  infrastructure  as  determined  by 
institutional and political factors is an important determinant of the attractiveness of state as 
an investment destination. 

 Sachs, J.D., N. Bajpai and A. Ramiah (2002), “Geography and Regional Growth” The Hindu, February 25 and 
10

26. 
 

11 Bhide, S. and R. Shand (2000), “Inequalities in Income Growth in India Before and After Reforms”, South Asia 

Economic Journal, Vol. 1, No.1, March, pp. 19‐51. 
 

[73] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

 
Paper  by  Ahluwalia 12  (2000)  analysed  the  growth  performance  of  14  major  Indian  states  in 
the  post  reform  period  1991‐92  to  1998‐99  and  compared  it  with  the  performance  in  the 
previous decade. The paper attempted to analyse the causes of the growth disparities and to 
identify  the  policy  measures  needed  for  the  acceleration  of  future  growth  in  the  slow 
growing  states.  In  regard  to  determinants  of  growth  in  the  post‐reform  period,  private 
investment  rate,  literacy  rate,  teledensity,  proportion  of  villages  electrified  and  per  capita 
energy consumption were found to be individually positively correlated with SDP growth. 
The paper noted that the dispersion of growth rates of states increased considerably in the 
post‐reform period: the coefficient of variation of growth rates increased from 15 per cent in 
the 1980s to 27 per cent in the 1990s. Growth accelerated in the richest states of Gujarat and 
Maharashtra, while it decelerated in the poorest states of Bihar, Uttar Pradesh and Orissa. 
 
Summary  
 
The table below charts the competitiveness of individual states based on study conducted by 
the National Productivity Council. The ranking is based on comprehensive set of indicators 
on  indicators  of  economic  strength,  governance,  business  efficiency,  governance  quality, 
human resource and infrastructure in each individual state.    
 
Table 44: Overall Competitiveness Ranking of the States‐ 2004 
State  STD values  Rank 
Maharashtra  0.54  1 
Punjab  0.52  2 
Gujarat  0.51  3 
Karnataka  0.48  4 
Kerala  0.45  5 
Tamil Nadu  0.44  6 
Andhra Pradesh  0.23  7 
Haryana  0.09  8 
WB  ‐0.02  9 
MP  ‐0.07  10 
Orissa  ‐0.09  11 
Rajasthan  ‐0.09  12 
Bihar  ‐0.10  13 
UP  ‐0.11  14 
Smaller States 
Himachal Pradesh  0.29  3 
Uttaranchal  0.14  5 
Jharkhand  0.11  6 
Chattisgarh  ‐0.01  9 
J&K  ‐0.11  10 
Source: State Competitiveness Report 2004, National Productivity Council 
 

12 Montek S Ahluwalia Economic Performance of States in Post‐reform period. Economic Political Weekly, May 6, 

2000 

[74] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Policy Implications 
 
Different states grow at different rates and this should not be observed as a failure of central 
or state level policy. Some states may grow faster than the other as they may be better placed 
exploit  new  opportunity  that  arises.  However,  growth  differences  might  arise  because  of 
some states being better managed and thus have created a growth conducive environment. 
The quality of economic management will thus result in greater inter‐stare variation.    
   
While  the  objective  of  balanced  regional  development  should  be  pursued,  policies  should 
help  states  realise  their  full  growth  potential.  The  well‐managed  states  should  be 
encouraged  to  reach  their  full  growth  potential.  While  this  is  expected  to  generate  growth 
differences  across  the  states,  the  growth  buoyancy  is  expected  to  have  positive 
demonstration effect. 
 
However,  accepting  growth  differences  should  not  imply  that  the  centre  should  passively 
accept consistent level of low growth rates in the economy. As it would result in aggravation 
of inter state inequality and further more regional concentration of poverty.  
 
While  high  growth  is  a  necessary  condition  for  ensuring  equality  and  poverty  reduction 
across  states,  the  growth  needs  to  ensure  broad  based  expansion  in  income  earning 
opportunities within the state and needs to be supplemented with sustainable reduction in 
poverty by way of targeting specific segments.  
 
While  the  focus  on  level  of  investment  undertaken  in  a  state  needs  to  be  ensured,  the 
efficiency  of  investment  already  undertaken  needs  to  be  improved  as  it  significantly  alters 
the potential investment flow. Efficiency can be improved on by improving factors such as 
level of human resource development, infrastructure quality, economic policy environment 
and governance quality in a state.     
         
The concept of regional disparities needs to go beyond economic indicators and encompass 
social  dimensions  as  well.  Furthermore,  to  an  extent  the  focus  on  inter‐state  disparities 
masked  the  incidence  of  intra‐state  disparities,  a  multi‐pronged  approach  to  provide 
additional  funding  to  backward  regions  in  each  state,  coupled  with  governance  and 
institutional reforms needs to be pursued.  
   

[75] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

IX. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STRATEGY 

Three sets of “core” issues emerge from the descriptions in the paper. These form the basis 
of the recommendations made in this section. They clearly do not encompass the entire set of 
issues addressed in the paper. They are intended to prioritize matches between  the 
requirements for sustained and inclusive growth and the funding approaches of a 
multilateral financial institution. 

The Infrastructure Gap: The pattern of industrial growth observed in recent years has to be 
viewed  in  the  context  of  the  declining  trend  in  public  investment.  The  former  suggests  a 
growing demand for infrastructure, while the latter suggests a plateauing of supply. On the 
face of it, this indicates that industrial growth will decelerate as the supply of infrastructure 
becomes a binding constraint. However, this conclusion needs to be qualified by two factors. 
  
The declining trend in public investment has been visible for some time. It straddles periods 
of  industrial  stagnation  as  well  as  expansion.  In  other  words,  industry  has  been  able  to 
expand  despite  infrastructure  supply  being  a  problem.  The  first  reason  for  this  is  that  the 
existing  infrastructure  capacity  operated  at  such  low  levels  of  efficiency  that  even  limited 
efforts  to  improve  them  paid  off  in  significant  measure.  Hidden  capacity  was  brought  out 
into  the  open,  allowing  the  system  to  meet  demand  growth  without  significant  new 
investments.  
 
The  second  reason  is  that  there  is  substantial  substitution  of  private  investment  for  public 
investment. For example, any new industrial capacity is inevitably accompanied by a captive 
power  source.  Going  beyond manufacturing,  any  new real estate  development in virtually 
all  parts  of  the  country  would  not  be  commercially  viable  without  full  power  back‐up 
facilities.  While  power  supply  is  the  most  significant  example  of  private  solutions  to 
inadequate  public  investment,  there  are  examples  of  this  across  a  whole  range  of  services 
that have traditionally been provided by the state.  
 
Both  these  factors  have  provided  significant  room  for  the  economy  to  sustain  a  relatively 
high  growth  trajectory.  But,  by  their  very  nature,  they  are  self‐limiting.  Efficiency 
improvements  can  only  increase  output  by  so  much  and  cannot  substitute  for  expanded 
capacity.  Private  solutions  are  typically  far  more  expensive  than  public  services  delivered 
with  reasonable  efficiency.  They  raise  the  capital  requirements  for  new  projects  and,  since 
their  services  are  not  directly  revenue‐generating,  reduce  the  return  on  capital  for  most 
projects. In effect, they divert private capital from more efficient to less efficient uses. Both 
the overall level of investment and its efficiency are therefore compromised.  
 
The  point  is  that  the  current  combination  of  improved  efficiency  and  private  solutions 
cannot be expected to continue to meet the demands on the system imposed by the current 
growth trajectory. There is no alternative to new investment in most infrastructure sectors. 
Lessons from other countries as well as our own experiences in a sector like telecom suggest 
that the source of financing – public, private or mixed – is now less critical than developing a 
viable  business  model.  This  means  getting  the  right  policy  and  regulatory  framework  in 

[76] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

place for each sector, enabling investments to be made on the basis of reasonable commercial 
criteria, regardless of how it is financed.  
 
Once this framework is created, commercially viable investment will flow into the sector. If 
it is financed from private sources, it will generate returns to investors without recourse to 
any  subsidies  or  transfers  from  public  resources  that  have  not  been  pre‐committed  to  the 
sector or specific projects within it. If it is financed from public sources, it will meet the spirit 
of  fiscal  responsibility  by  generating  a  positive  return  on  capital  expenditure  by  the 
government.  
 
Substantial  knowledge  combining  theory  and  experience  exists  as  to  the  nature  of  such 
enabling  frameworks  for  different  sectors.  This  needs  to  be  consolidated  and  synthesized 
into  policy  statements  and  regulatory  structures  for  each  sector.  Multilateral  institutions 
have  an  important  role  to  play  in  this  process,  which  they  have  been  doing.  However, 
mechanism design, however important it may be, is only a first step. The actions of several 
government  agencies  at  various  levels  have  to  be  brought  into  alignment  with  the 
mechanism.  This  will  require  both  human  and  financial  capital.  Finding  the  resources  to 
make  investments  required  by  the  mechanism  that  is  designed  for  the  sector  is  a  critical 
challenge. Without these resources being deployed, a viable business model is not likely to 
emerge and investment made on the basis of largely commercial criteria will not take place. 
Once the model is in place though, the mechanism can become self‐sustaining by way of, for 
example, license fees collected by the regulator. In this sense, the initial investment also has 
the potential to generate returns.  
 
Multilaterals are prime candidates for this role. However, they need to develop a reasonably 
simple  and  clear  national  and  sub‐national  roadmap,  which  ensures  consistency  across 
jurisdictions, while  allowing some  flexibility to  sub‐national governments to accommodate 
local constraints.  
 
The Employment Trap 
 
A  striking  feature  of  the  Indian  growth  pattern  is  the  rigidity  of  the  sectoral  employment 
pattern. Agriculture has conceded a substantial portion of its share of GDP to services, but 
has  held  fast  to  its  share  of  the  workforce.  Over  the  1990s,  industry’s  share  of  total 
employment went up by less than two percentage points, while that of services went up by 
about three percentage points. The paper does a relatively detailed analysis of employment 
patterns and elasticities in the manufacturing sector. It points to the inescapable conclusion 
that output growth is simply not translating into employment growth. Admittedly, some of 
the conclusions may emerge from data that does not fully capture the recent buoyancy in a 
whole range of service activities. The fact remains, however, that whatever is happening in 
services does not seem to be happening in industry. The chapter on growth in services in the 
paper  addresses  these  issues  in  some  detail.  The  main  policy  implication  is  that  flexible 
labour  markets,  which  services  enjoy  but  organized  industry  does  not,  are  conducive  to 
employment growth.  
 
The  challenge  is to move from the  current  regime to one in which employers  have greater 
flexibility to lay off workers in times of business downturns while protecting the interests of 

[77] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

individual workers. This implies a social safety net that provides workers a reasonable level 
of  income  for  specified  periods  of  unemployment.  Designing,  financing  and  administering 
such  a  programme  will  require  substantial  resources.  There  are,  clearly,  programmes  that 
have  worked  in  this  area.  A  critical  requirement  for  success  is  that  the  financing  load  be 
distributed  amongst  three  agents  –  the  employee  himself,  the  employer  and  the  state.  At 
some  point,  contributions  from  the  former  two  along  with  budgetary  support  from  the 
government  will  allow  any  such  programme  to  achieve  financial  stability,  but  there  will 
inevitably be a transition period, during which financial support will be required.  
 
Here  again,  substantial  investment  needs  to  be  made  in  designing  the  financial  and 
administrative  components  of  the  scheme.  A  first  step  is  unique  identification  of  all 
individuals, which allows tracking of their employment status. Some beginnings have been 
made  but  the  efforts  have  not  sustained.  Investment  in  creating  a  unique  identification 
system for the country, building on the fragmented databases that now constitute the public 
distribution  and  electoral  identification  systems  is  imperative.  Simultaneously,  work  can 
begin on developing a income security system, which is perhaps predominantly funded by 
the state, but increasingly comes to rely on employer and employee contributions.  
 
If  the  argument  that  inflexibility  in  the  labour  market  is  a  major  deterrent  to  employment 
growth  is  valid,  any  movement  towards  greater  flexibility  should  induce  significant 
numbers of new jobs. This growth provides the basis for a reasonable social security tax with 
matching  contributions  from  employers.  If  the  employment  elasticities  across  most  sectors 
increase significantly as a consequence of these reforms, the path to financial stability should 
not  take  too  long.  Once  the  programme  design  is  finalized,  multilaterals  can  make  time‐
bound  commitments  to  finance  individual  components  based  on  anticipated  cash  inflows 
from  the  new  taxes.  In  any  case,  a  unique  identification  system  has  many  benefits  beyond 
social security. As these benefits begin to be realized, the social rate of return on the initial 
investment  will  increase.  Some  of  these  benefits  will  clearly  be  commercially  exploitable, 
which will provide an additional inflow for debt servicing. 
 
Regional Inequities – Vicious Circles 
 
The  paper  points  out  several  dimensions  along  which  the  performance  of  states  differs 
widely.  The  pattern  is  clearly  reflective  of  vicious  circles  –  weak  resource  endowments  – 
human  and  physical  ‐  resulting  in  poor  growth  performance,  in  turn  weakening  state 
finances and constraining investments in infrastructure and human capital development. In 
order to break out of a vicious circle, the force has to be applied to the weakest link in the 
loop. Since there are at least some common elements to the experience of all states, a generic 
approach can be recommended. However, since state‐level conditions vary, there will have 
to be a strategy tailored to the requirement of each state based on the generic principles. 
 
A  generic  approach  to  regional  development  must  be  based  on  finding  the  closest  match 
between  the  resources  that  the  state  has  and  economically  viable  activities  that  these 
resources  can  carry  out.  The gap between  the  two  is the  result  of  a  combination of human 
capabilities  and  infrastructure,  broadly  speaking,  including  efficient  access  to  markets.  A 
critical  path  presumably  exists  to  bridge  that  gap,  indicating  priorities  on  both  the  human 
capital development and infrastructure investment fronts. Acting on these priorities should 

[78] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

provide  the  quickest  route  from  the  status  quo  to  viable  deployment  of  the  region’s 
resources.  It  is  not  that  such  approaches  have  not  been  attempted  before.  Their  overall 
effectiveness, however, has been limited by issues of efficiency, governance and commercial 
orientation. The underlying principle remains valid but identifying the critical path and the 
priorities that it implies for investments in different activities remains the challenge.  
 
Multilateral  institutions  have  brought  this learning  to bear  in  designing  their  state‐focused 
lending  programmes.  These  were  based  on  the  idea  that  there  were  strong 
complementarities among different sector requirements, so dealing with all of them at once 
would  increase  the  prospects  for  success.  However,  it  is  rather  difficult  to  define  the 
boundaries  of  complementarity.  There  is  always  some  unaddressed  issue  or  sector  that 
proves  to  be  the  weak  link  in  the  effectiveness  of  the  strategy.  That  risk  remains  in  the 
approach being suggested, but there should be some learning from the previous experience 
that indicates the most important unaddressed links in each state, which will be addressed 
by the design of state‐specific strategies.  
 
A Concluding Comment 
 
A  common  theme  runs  through  all  the  recommendations  made  above.  They  all  involve 
detailed  designing  of  programmes  –  at  various  of  government  –  to  address  constraints  to 
sustainable, inclusive and balanced growth. They are also all based on an expectation that a 
well designed and executed programme will not face resource constraints beyond a start‐up 
phase. It is during this period that the need for external finance as well as technical support 
is most critical. And finally, they all require substantial institutional capacity, whether of a 
regulatory  or  a  managerial  nature,  to  be  built  up.  The  essential  point  is  that  all  solutions, 
whether  the  ones  recommended  here  or  other  alternatives,  will  require  reasonable 
investments in all these components.

 
 

[79] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

 BIBLIOGRAPHY 
 

Approach Paper: Eleventh Five‐Year Plan (2007‐08 / 2012‐13), Planning Commission Govt. of 
India 

Approach  Paper:  Tenth  Five‐Year  Plan  (2002‐03/  2006‐07),  Planning  Commission  Govt.  of 
India 

Approach  to  the  Mid‐Term  Appraisal  of  the  Tenth  Five  Year  Plan  (2002‐03/  2006‐07), 
Planning Commission Govt. of India 

Can India sustain its economic growth? November 01, 2005, M Govinda Rao 

Determinants  of  access  to  rural  non‐farm  employment:  Evidence  from  Africa,  South  Asia 
and transition economies, DFID, A study by Tiago Wandschneider (NRI) March 2003 

Does  Public  Capital  In  the  long  run,  capital  for  public  infrastructure  projects  Crowd  Out 
Private  Capital?  Evidence  from  India  Luis  Serven  The  World  Bank  Policy  Research 
Department Macroeconomics and Growth Division May 1996 

Economic  Reforms  and  Jobless  Growth  in  India  in  the  1990s  ‐  B.B.  Bhattacharya  &  S. 
Sakthivel* 

Economic Reforms in India since 1991: Has Gradualism Worked?by Montek S. Ahluwalia* 

Financing Private Infrastructure: Lessons from India Montek S. Ahluwalia 

Food Security & Nutrition: Vision 2020 R. Radhakrishna and K. Venkata Reddy 

Food Security in India Policy challenges and responses Debashis Chakraborty, Rajiv Gandhi 
Institute for Contemporary Studies, New Delhi, February 2005 

Food Security in India: John Farrington and N.C. Saxena 

General Review Study of Small & Medium enterprise (SME) Clusters In India 

Has Government Investment Crowded Out Private Investment in India? Pritha Mitra* 

India’s Agricultural Challenges and their Implications for Growth of It’s Economy, Ramesh
Chand, December , 2005.

Indiaʹs Economic Reforms Montek S Ahluwalia* 

Indiaʹs Economy — The Challenges Ahead, Montek Singh Ahluwalia, April 1994 

Inflation, investment and growth: the role ofmacroeconomic policy in India Ila Patnaik and 
D.K. Joshi1 

[80] 
India: Country Growth Analysis 

Inter-Sectoral Growth Linkages in India: Implications for Policy and Liberalized Reforms,
Seema Bathla Institute of Economic Growth, University of Delhi Enclave

Jobless Growth and Unemployment: A Global Phenomenon ‐ M Victor Louis Anthuvan 

Report  of  the  Special  Group  on  Targeting  Ten  MillionEmployment  Opportunities  per  year 
over  the  Tenth  Plan  Period,  Dr.  S.  P.  Gupta  Member  Planning  Commission  Govt.  of  India 
New Delh May, 2002 

Report  of  the  Task  force  on  Employment  Opportunities,  Government  Of  India,  Planning 
Commission, July 2001 

Rural Non‐Farm Employment in India: Access, Income and Poverty Impact Peter Lanjouw 
Abusaleh Shariff, Working Paper Series No. 81, NCAER ,Feb 2002 

Rural  Non‐farm  Employment:  an  Analysis  of  Rural  Urban  Interdependencies,  Amitabh 
Kundu Niranjan Sarangi Bal Paritosh Dash February 2003 

Tenth Five‐Year Plan Document, Planning Commission Govt. of India 

The Rural Non‐Farm Economy in India: Some Policy Issues N. C. Saxena March 2003 

Vision 2020 — The jobless growth conundrum P. V. Indiresan 

Why India needs a strategic Plan B September 13, 2004 Subir Gokarn

[81]