000000 000000 000000 000000 In his article “Recreational Morphing,” Brian Libby discusses the evolution of the University

of Cincinnati campus – from a “commonplace American commuter school riddled with surface parking lots, the campus severed by a busy thoroughfare,” to the highest class facility, with world famous architects taking part in the design and construction of the new buildings. Master planned by George Hargreaves, the campus now develops the Main Street complex that consists of three projects and six buildings. The author of the article focuses his attention on the latest addition to the complex – the Campus Recreation Center by Morphosis. As Libby describes it, “the building's signature image comes in the form of a curving roofscape that mimics the oval-shaped football stadium next door.” The curving roof also serves as an effective shading device for the lower levels that are concave in plan just below the convex upper levels. The building itself is shaped in plan almost like a grand piano. And grand it is – for this building is really several buildings in one. It includes athletic facilities, housing units, and a café. Some of the materials that have been used in this building are custom designed steel trusses, each different structurally and sculpturally, that unify the interior space with a common rhythm; and enormous amount of glass both in the exterior and interior that CRC, level 3 creates a feeling of light and open public spaces. I like that the Campus Recreation Center is a building that responds to the site – an excellent example of an issue-driven design. It is a good neighbor for the stadium and with a pedestrian bridge it solves the traffic problem that was created by the stadium. I am very impressed by the way that Morphosis integrated the CRC into the Main Street complex. It is unique and yet it adds to the harmony of the environment instead of creating disbalance by drawing all the attention to itself. I like that the building is multifunctional. The design is so flexible that it allows for CRC, level 1 several distinct functions in one building. I like how the design addresses the human scale problem, even though the structure is huge. I do not quite approve the style of the design – from what I can observe on photographs. It seems to me a bit too industrial and yet it goes well with the rest of the work of Morphosis. It is also very “disassembled” and seems to lack unity – but at the same time, this communicates the different functions of the different parts of the building and helps to create a human scale experience instead of overwhelming visitors and users with monumentality.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.