NASA Daily News Summary For Release: Oct.

14, 1999 Media Advisory m99-212 Summary: No News Releases Today. ITEM 1 - NO WATER ICE DETECTED FROM LUNAR PROSPECTOR IMPACT (FILE FOOTAGE - replay) ITEM 2 - NASA'S ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AIRCRAFT AND SENSOR TECHNOLOGY (ERAST) PROJECT AIRCRAFT - B-ROLL (replay) ITEM 3 - HURRICANE IRENE SATELLITE IMAGES ---------If NASA issues additional news releases later today, we will email summaries and Internet URLs to this list. Index of 1999 NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1999/index.html ***************************** Video File for Oct. 13, 1999 ITEM 1 - NO WATER ICE DETECTED FROM LUNAR PROSPECTOR IMPACT (FILE FOOTAGE - replay) The controlled crash of NASA's Lunar Prospector spacecraft into a crater near the south pole of the Moon on July 31 produced no observable signature of water, according to scientists digging through data from Earth-based observatories and spacecraft such as the Hubble Space Telescope. This lack of physical evidence leaves open the question of whether ancient cometary impacts delivered ice that remains buried in permanently shadowed regions of the Moon, as suggested by the large amounts of hydrogen measured indirectly from lunar orbit by Lunar Prospector during its main

mapping mission. Contact at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA: Laura Lewis 650/604-2162. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Doug Isbell 202/358-1753. Item 1a - NO ICE FOUND BY LUNAR PROSPECTOR TRT - 1:14

The Lunar Prospector completed its mission at the end of July. Its final task was to crash into the surface of the Moon. Scientists hoped the impact would reveal more about possible water ice on the Moon. The unique experiment did not detect any signs of ice, leaving open the question of whether it exists or not. Animation shows the Lunar Prospector over the Moon, descent to the surface, and impact. Item 1b - PROSPECTOR VIEWS TOWARDS IMPACT Animation sequence shows two events (with dip to black in between): 1 - Lunar Prospector crashing into Moon. 2 - Deorbit burn of the Lunar Prospector (view of Earth in background). Item 1c - METEOR IMPACT ON MOON TRT - :33 TRT - :46

Animation sequence shows meteors and a comet striking the Moon, followed by a map depicting where a concentration of water ice may be located. Item 1d - LUNAR DATA TRT - 1:28

During its 18 month mission, Lunar Prospector searched the lunar crust and atmosphere for a wide variety of potential resources. This sequence begins with the Moon in its natural state from data collected by the Clementine satellite. It dissolves into a falsecolor image of the Moon indicating amounts of hydrogen detected by the Lunar Prospector. The red shows the highest amounts of hydrogen and therefore the most probable place for water to exist.

Item 1e - IMPACT SITE

TRT - :18

A true depiction of the Moon from Clementine data followed by a tilt to show the south pole, the planned crash site for the Lunar Prospector. Note that the crash site shows the strongest red, indicative of the most probable place for water to exist. Item 1f - OBSERVING SATELLITES - ANIMATION TRT - :41

Numerous ground and space-based observatories assisted NASA in a search for water in material hurled upward from the planned impact. Instruments onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (cut 1) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (cut 2) monitored the impact site for the signature of water. Item 1g - LUNAR PROSPECTOR MISSION TEAM TRT - :34

Footage shows Lunar Prospector mission control at NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, CA. Alan Binder and mission control team execute engine burn to adjust the Lunar Prospector's orbit. Item 1h - OBSERVATORY B-ROLL TRT - :45

Footage shows the McDonald Observatory and telescope, Texas; Ed Barker controlling the telescope with joystick; and Moon surface observed through the McDonald telescope. The McDonald Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Keck Observatory are all scheduled to observe the impact.

ITEM 2 - NASA'S ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AIRCRAFT AND SENSOR TECHNOLOGY (ERAST) PROJECT AIRCRAFT - B-ROLL (replay) Slow-Flying Planes Present Commercial Possibilities: A conferece being held at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, CA, today is focusing on the capabilities of several slow-flying aircraft developed during the last five years to perform a variety of high-altitude, long-endurance Earth science and commercial missions. The aircraft, developed as part of NASA's Environmental

Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project are the first NASA has helped develop for commercial purposes. The conference will examine the use of these aircraft in the commercial and scientific arenas, especially focussing on remote imaging to assist in precision farming on coffee plantations, the potential for information gathering to mitigate disasters, use of these aircraft in California's statewide planning and resource management and the value the program to the insurance industry for risk assessment. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Michael Braukus 202/358-1979. Contact at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA: Jenny Breedhart 661/258-3689. Item 2a - ERAST CONFERENCE SET TRT - 5:09

The capabilities and commercial possibilities for several slowflying aircraft developed during the last five years under ERAST is the topic of a conference held October 13, 1999 at NASA¹s Dryden Flight Research Center. The aircraft, developed as part of The Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, are the first NASA has developed for commercial purposes. Footage includes b-roll of the five featured aircraft in this order: (1) Proteus, (2) Altus, (3) Pathfinder Plus, (4) Helios, (5) Perseus-B. Item 2b - INTERVIEW TRT - 3:18

John DelFrate, Manager, Solar Powered Aircraft, ERAST Item 2c - INTERVIEW TRT - 1:52

David Bushman, Project Manager, Proteus, Perseus B, Altus aircraft, ERAST Item 2d - INTERVIEW TRT - 2:41

John Sharkey, Project Manager, ERAST program

ITEM 3 - HURRICANE IRENE SATELLITE IMAGES Item 3a - "CAT SCAN" OF HURRICANE IRENE MOVING TOWARD FLORIDA This 3D image shows the precipitation rates and the height of the rain column in Hurricane Irene as it makes its way SW of Havana, towards Western Cuba and Florida. Red color indicates rain rates in excess of 2 inches per hour. This TRMM animation sequence of Hurricane Irene was captured between 6:00-7:00 AM EDT on Oct. 14, 1999. TRMM is a joint U.S.-Japanese mission. The images were enhanced and rendered at the Scientific and Visualization Studio (SVS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Wade Sisler 301/286-6256. Item 3a - HURRICANE IRENE GOES ANIMATION SEQUENCE Animation shows Hurricane Irene moving towards Florida. The images were captured on Oct. 14, 1999, by the NOAA/National Weather Services Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8. The video was enhanced and rendered at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for Atmospheres. Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Deanna Corridon 301/286-0041. ********** Unless otherwise noted, ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN. ANY CHANGES TO THE LINE-UP WILL APPEAR ON THE NASA VIDEO FILE ADVISORY ON THE WEB AT ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/tv-advisory/nasa-tv.txt WE UPDATE THE ADVISORY THROUGHOUT THE DAY. The NASA Video File normally airs at noon, 3 p.m., 6 p.m., 9 p.m. and midnight Eastern Time. NASA Television is available on GE-2, transponder 9C at 85 degrees

West longitude, with vertical polarization. Frequency is on 3880.0 megahertz, with audio on 6.8 megahertz. Refer general questions about the video file to NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Ray Castillo, 202/358-4555, or Elvia Thompson, 202/358-1696, elvia.thompson@hq.nasa.gov During Space Shuttle missions, the full NASA TV schedule will continue to be posted at: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/nasatv/schedule.html For general information about NASA TV see: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv/ ********** Contract Awards Contract awards are posted to the NASA Acquisition information Service Web site: http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/award.html ********** The NASA Daily News Summary is issued each business day at approximately 2 p.m. Eastern time. Members of the media who wish to subscribe or unsubscribe from this list, please send e-mail message to: Brian.Dunbar@hq.nasa.gov ********** end of daily news summary