NASA Daily News Summary For Release: Dec.

8, 1999 Media Advisory m99-253 SUMMARY: No News Releases Today. Video File for Dec. 8, 1999 NOTE: ALL TIMES EASTERN ITEM 1 - INSTRUMENTS SELECTED FOR MISSION TO PROVIDE FIRST STEREO VIEWS OF SOLAR ERUPTIONS - GSFC ITEM 2 - STS-103 CREW TRAINING - JSC (replay) ITEM 3 - HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SERVICING MISSION 3 - HQ (replay) ITEM 4 - HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SCIENCE MISSION - (replay) ITEM 5 - STS-103 CREW INTERVIEWS

LIVE TELEVISION EVENTS THIS WEEK: Due to the rescheduling of Space Shuttle Misison STS-103, the third Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission, our television schedule is under review. We will post a revised schedule here when it is available.

***************************** If NASA issues any news releases later today, we will email summaries and Internet URLs to this list. Index of 1999 NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1999/index.html

***************************** Video File for Dec. 8, 1999 ITEM 1 - INSTRUMENTS SELECTED FOR MISSION TO PROVIDE------TRT :58 FIRST STEREO VIEWS OF SOLAR ERUPTIONS - GSFC Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Wade Sisler (Phone 301/286-6256). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Donald Savage (Phone 202/358-1547). The Solar Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) mission, designed to study the origin, evolution and interplanetary consequences of coronal mass ejection (CME), will fly in 2004. Selection of the instruments to be flown on the mission was announced today. STEREO will study CMEs, some of the most massive disturbances in our solar system, by using two identical spacecraft in orbit with the Earth -- one well ahead and one behind the Earth's path. This, along with Earth-based observations, will provide a unique 3-dimensional view of these phenomena. The STEREO mission will consist of an international collaboration involving participants from France, Germany, the United States, and the United Kingdom. It is the third mission selected for NASA's Solar-Terrestrial Probe (STP) Program, under the Agency's Sun-Earth Connections Theme.

ITEM 2 - STS-103 CREW TRAINING - JSC (replay)------------TRT 12:30 Contact at NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX: Kyle Herring (Phone 281/483-5111). The STS-103 crew trains for the next shuttle mission, scheduled for departure from Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 11, 1999. Mission objectives include repair of the Hubble Space Telescope.

ITEM 3 - HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SERVICING MISSION 3 - HQ (replay)

ITEM 3a - STS-61 AND STS-82 FOOTAGE-----------------------TRT 8:48 Description - Mission highlights from STS-61 and STS-82 Hubble Space Telescope repair missions. Item 3b - STS-103 ANIMATION-------------------------------TRT 1:33 Description - Computer animation highlighting STS-103 rendezvous, docking, EVA, and deploy activities.

ITEM 4 - HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SCIENCE MISSION - (replay) Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Wade Sisler (Phone 301/286-6256). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Donald Savage (Phone 202/358-1547). Synopsis: NASA officials decided to move up part of the servicing mission that had been scheduled for June 2000 after three of the telescope's six gyroscopes failed. Having fewer than three working gyroscopes would preclude science observations, although the telescope would remain safely in orbit until a servicing crew arrived. In addition to replacing all six gyroscopes on the STS103 flight, the crew will replace a guidance sensor and the spacecraft's computer. The new computer will reduce the burden of flight software maintenance and significantly lower costs. A voltage/temperature kit will be installed to protect spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the spacecraft goes into safe mode. A new transmitter will replace a failed spare currently aboard the spacecraft, and spare insulation will replace telescope insulation that has degraded. The insulation is necessary to control the internal temperature on the telescope. ITEM 4a - GYROSCOPE ANIMATION-----------------------------TRT 1:01 Astronauts will replace all six of the Telescope's gyroscopes during STS-103. Currently three of Hubble's six gyros are not working, leaving only the minimum number needed to continue its mission. The gyroscopes are needed for pointing the telescope. The pointing system is comprised of reaction wheels that actually move the telescope, gyros that report its position, star trackers

that provide reference points, and the onboard computer that controls the pointing process. Based on nearly one and a half years of intensive chemical, mechanical and electrical investigations, the HST team believes that the thin wires are being corroded by the fluid in which they are immersed and ultimately this corrosion causes them to break. ITEM 4b - THERMAL BLANKET LAYER ANIMATION------------------TRT :33 During the mission astronauts will cover Hubble's electronic bay doors with seven permanent coated-stainless steel foil sheets called the New Outer Blanket Layer (NOBL). The crew will also carry seven rolls of special fabric, called the Shell/Shield Replacement Fabric (SSRF) which will be installed on Hubble's forward shell and light shield if time is available. The NOBL covers and SSRF pieces are designed to protect Hubble's external blankets and prevent its insulation from further degradation. Animation shows how these "thermal blankets" are replaced. Blankets are attached with "bottle-stopper" fasteners and then are unrolled like "wallpaper". This multi-layer insulation protects the Telescope from the severe and rapid temperature changes as it moves through its 90-minute orbit from very hot sun to very cold night. ITEM 4c - TECHNICIANS "QUILT" SSRF B-ROLL------------------TRT :56 B-roll of technicians at the Goddard Space Flight Center "quilting" the Shell/Shield Replacement Fabric (SSRF). The fabric pieces are stored in rolls for their trip to orbit. The fabric is composed of flexible, aluminized Teflon with rip-stop material bonded to the back side. Seven pieces up to 22 feet (7 meters) long will cover 80 percent of the sun-side light shield and forward shell. This special fabric was designed and tested to ensure that it can withstand exposure to charged particles, Xrays, ultraviolet radiation, and thermal cycling for at least ten years. ITEM 4d - STS-103 CLEANROOM B-ROLL------------------------TRT 2:12 Astronauts training for the Hubble Space Telescope Third Servicing Mission in the cleanroom at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

Footage includes astronauts working with gyroscopes and applying thermal blankets to a full-sized mock-up of the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-member crew will rendezvous with the Telescope, capture it with the Space Shuttle Discovery's robotic arm and dock it in the Shuttle bay. Working in teams of two, four astronauts will outfit the Hubble with new equipment, including six gyroscopes, a Fine Guidance Sensor, Solid State Recorder, new Main Computer, New Outer Blanket Layers (NOBL), and a transmitter. The astronauts will take more than 150 crew aids and tools on this service call. ITEM 4e - ACTIVITY IN STOCC---------------------------------TRT:26 Activity in Space Telescope Operations Control Center (STOCC) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, during the mission. Working 24 hours a day, ground controllers command and control the Hubble Space Telescope. Commands are sent to the Telescope to direct the observation of astronomical targets all across the sky. Hubble operators monitor the Telescope's health and safety while they control flight operations and science activities. ITEM 4f - HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ANIMATION------------------TRT:22 (5 glamour shot sequences) ITEM 4g - THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM (animation)----------TRT:15 Animations of the electromagnetic spectrum, the communication path, and the Hubble Telescope. ITEM 4h - HUBBLE TRACKING/SATELLITE RELAY ANIMATIONS Cut 1: Animation of HST Communication--------------------TRT :17 Communications through the Tracking & Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), White Sands, NM, and DOMSAT, to the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Cut 2: TDRSS Animation------------------------------------TRT :22 Animation of the Tracking & Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)

Communications Satellite depicting the data flow from TDRSS to Earth, equivalent to a set of encyclopedias every second. ITEM 4i - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT 2:02 Dr. David Leckrone, Sr. Project Scientist Hubble Space Telescope ITEM 4j - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT 3:38 Dr. John Campbell, Associate Director, Hubble Space Telescope ITEM 5 - STS-103 CREW INTERVIEWS Contact at NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX: Kyle Herring (Phone 281/483-5111).

----------------------------Unless otherwise noted, ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN. ANY CHANGES TO THE LINE-UP WILL APPEAR ON THE NASA VIDEO FILE ADVISORY ON THE WEB AT ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/tv-advisory/nasa-tv.txt WE UPDATE THE ADVISORY THROUGHOUT THE DAY. The NASA Video File normally airs at noon, 3 p.m., 6 p.m., 9 p.m. and midnight Eastern Time. NASA Television is available on GE-2, transponder 9C at 85 degrees West longitude, with vertical polarization. Frequency is on 3880.0 megahertz, with audio on 6.8 megahertz. Refer general questions about the video file to NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Ray Castillo, 202/358-4555, or Elvia Thompson, 202/358-1696, elvia.thompson@hq.nasa.gov During Space Shuttle missions, the full NASA TV schedule will continue to be posted at:

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/nasatv/schedule.html For general information about NASA TV see: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv/ ***************************** Contract Awards Contract awards are posted to the NASA Acquisition information Service Web site: http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/award.html ***************************** The NASA Daily News Summary is issued each business day at approximately 2 p.m. Eastern time. Members of the media who wish to subscribe or unsubscribe from this list, please send e-mail message to: Brian.Dunbar@hq.nasa.gov ***************************** end of daily news summary