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NASA Daily News Summary For Release: Dec.

16, 1999 Media Advisory m99-259 SUMMARY: No Press Releases Today. Video: Today's video file runs approximately 1 hour, 35 minutes. The news conference on the delay of STS-103 will replay immediately following the 3:00 p.m. video file and will repeat in that sequence throughout the day. Video file will run at 3:00 p.m., 6:00 p.m., 9:00 p.m., and midnight. Video File for Dec. 16, 1999 ITEM 1 - TERRA MISSION PRE-LAUNCH HIGHLIGHTS - GSFC (replay from Nov. 23, 1999) ITEM 2 - SCIENCE STORIES FROM LANDSAT - GSFC ITEM 3 - SOLAR MAX - MSFC (REPLAY) ITEM 4 - CHANDRA X-RAY TELESCOPE VIEWS SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION (REPLAY) ITEM 5 - HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SERVICING MISSION VIDEO STS-103 (replay) Live Television Events This Week: December 16, Thursday *2:00 pm - (immediately following Terra launch coverage) - STS-103 Shuttle Lauch Delay Briefing - KSC (Questions from KSC only) December 17, Friday *3:30 pm - Live Commentary and Launch Coverage of the Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission - STS-103 - KSC

*8:47 pm - Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission Launch - STS103 - KSC ---------------------Subject: Live Shots on NASA Virtual Airport Tower Dec. 21, 1999 To: Assignment Editors and Morning News Producers

From: Laura Lewis 650/604-2162, pager 650/317-0551 NASA Ames Research Center Airline passengers will soon benefit from NASA FutureFlight Central, the world¹s first full-scale virtual airport-control tower located at NASA Ames Research Center. Opened for business on Dec. 13, 1999, NASA FutureFlight Central is a world-class research facility dedicated to addressing the future needs of the nation¹s airports. It is designed to test-under realistic airport conditions and configurations--ways to solve potential air and ground traffic problems at commercial airports. The new facility will benefit airline passengers by providing safer air travel with fewer airport delays and greater cost efficiencies. NASA FutureFlight Central uses supercomputers and twelve rearprojections video screens to provide a seamless, 360-degree highresolution view of an airport from the control tower. The facility can be configured to provide realistic views of any airport in the world--either existing or under construction--under all weather and seasonal conditions. Real people interact during live-action simulations to test new technologies, fine-tune airport operations, and evaluate airport improvements under riskfree conditions. For more information about how this exciting new NASA technology will benefit your viewers, interview Yuri Gawdiak, NASA Systems Manager, or Nancy Dorighi, NASA FutureFlight Central facility manager. Yuri will be available from 5:00 - 8:00 a.m. EST (2:00 5:00 a.m. PST) and Nancy will be available from 8:00 - 10:00 a.m. EST (5:00 - 7:00 a.m. PST) on Tuesday, Dec. 21. Interviews will be live from NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA

Ask Yuri or Nancy: * What is NASA FutureFlight Central? * How will the new facility benefit air travelers? * In what ways can airports and airlines benefit from the new facility? * What are the other uses for the facility? Contact Laura Lewis at 650/604-2162 to book an interview window on December 21. Further information about the facility can be found at: http://ffc.arc.nasa.gov

***************************** If NASA issues any news releases later today, we will email summaries and Internet URLs to this list. Index of 1999 NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1999/index.html

***************************** Video File for Dec. 16, 1999 ITEM 1 - TERRA MISSION PRE-LAUNCH HIGHLIGHTS-----approx. TRT 31:50 - GSFC (replay from Nov. 23, 1999) Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Allen Kenitzer (Phone 301/286-2806). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). URL: http://terra.nasa.gov ITEM 1a - TERRA, THE EOS FLAGSHIP-------------------------TRT 2:00

NASA will launch and deploy the "flagship" to the Earth Observing System (EOS) series of satellites, part of a precedent setting program designed to provide daily information on the health of the Planet. Terra will be the most comprehensive tool ever launched for scientific studies of our home planet. ITEM 1b - TERRA INSTRUMENT SYNERGY------------------------TRT :40 Terra is uniquely designed to be an Earth-observing laboratory with onboard research instruments that can be used both independently and cooperatively. ITEM 1c - TERRA LOOKS CLOSELY AT EARTH--------------------TRT :43 Montage of instrument swaths and key science objectives for each of the five instruments on Terra. The instruments (in order) are ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer), CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), MODIS (MODerateresolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and MOPITT (Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere). ITEM 1d - TERRA LAUNCH AND DEPLOY ANIMATION---------------TRT 1:23 An Atlas II rocket will hoist the Terra satellite into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA. ITEM 1e - TERRA SCIENCE OBJECTIVES------------------------TRT :52 Terra begins a new generation of Earth science--one that studies the Earth's land, oceans, air, ice and life as a total global system. Terra will help us to understand how the complex coupled Earth system of air, land water and life is linked. ITEM 1f - TERRA SCIENCE OBJECTIVES------------------------TRT :28 Terra will simultaneously study clouds, water vapor aerosol particles, trace gases terrestrial and ocean properties, the interaction between them, and their effect on atmospheric

radiation and climate. Data sets in visualization: Earth as seen by Galileo spacecraft, radiant energy, vegetation anomalies, temperature, fires, aerosols, clouds, methane, water vapor, and global biosphere. ITEM 1g - TERRA SCIENCE OBJECTIVES------------------------TRT :32 Terra will help scientists to examine the Earth as one integrated system by looking closely and examining the major spheres of its environment--the biosphere, aerosols, radiant energy, air pollution, temperature, and water vapor. ITEM 1h - TERRA SCIENCE OBJECTIVES--VEGETATION------------TRT :58 Terra will help monitor biospheric productivity and will detect subtle changes in forest and ocean ecosystems. 1. Global Biosphere 2. Changes in Vegetation Index ITEM 1i - TERRA SCIENCE OBJECTIVES--AEROSOLS--------------TRT 1:01 Terra carries sensors that will measure aerosol amounts over land and ocean, as well as particle size and composition. Aerosols come from dust storms, forest and grassland fires, volcanoes, living vegetation, and sea spray. Human activities, such as the burning of fuels and changing the land's surface cover, also generate aerosols. 1. Aerosols Maps 2. Global Fires ITEM 1j - TERRA SCIENCE OBJECTIVES--HEAT FLOW & CLIMATE---TRT 2:26 The Earth's climate is governed by a balance between sunlight that reaches the Earth and heat that is radiated back into space. Terra will help scientists monitor this delicate balance and better understand the relationship between greenhouse gases, cloud cover and long-term climate change.

1. Radiation Budget 2. Water Vapor 3. Methane 4. Global Temperatures 5. 1997-98 El Nino ITEM 1k - TERRA SATELLITE B-ROLL--------------------------TRT :30 Engineers work on Terra in the clean room at Lockheed-Martin, Valley Forge, PA. ITEM 1l - EARTH SCIENTISTS AT WORK------------------------TRT :35 B-Roll of Earth Scientists ITEM 1m - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT :54 Yoram Kaufman, Terra Project Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. ITEM 1n - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT 1:35 Jon Ransom, Terra Deputy Project Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. ITEM 1o - TERRA INSTRUMENTS--ASTER-----------------------TRT 1:27 ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) will measure snow and ice distribution, vegetation types, rock and soil properties, surface temperatures, and cloud properties. Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Diane Ainsworth (Phone 818/354-5011). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). ITEM 1p - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT :24

Simon Hook, ASTER Project Scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA. Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Diane Ainsworth (Phone 818/354-5011). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). ITEM 1q - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT 1:49 Ann Kahle, ASTER U.S. Science Team Leader, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA. Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Diane Ainsworth (Phone 818/354-5011). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). ITEM 1r - TERRA INSTRUMENTS--CERES-----------------------TRT 1:08 CERES (Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System) will study the radiation balance on Earth; how much heat is absorbed and reflected from the Earth's surface to the top of the atmosphere. By collecting data on how different cloud formations absorb or reflect various amounts of energy, scientists can develop new predictive models about weather systems and how the Earth maintains its delicate balance in temperature. Contact at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA: H. Keith Henry (Phone 757/864-6120/24). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). ITEM 1s - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT :22 Bruce Wielicki, CERES Principal Scientist, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. Contact at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA: H. Keith Henry (Phone 757/864-6120/24). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730).

ITEM 1t - TERRA INSTRUMENTS--MISR-------------------------TRT 1:45 MISR's (Multi-Angled Spectroradiometer) cameras will allow scientists to produce stereoscopic (3-D) images of clouds and aerosol structures. The detailed analysis will help determine how sunlight behaves and how it interacts as it passes through Earth's environment. MISR will also monitor long term trends in pollution, aerosols, cloud heights, and distribution of land surface cover. Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Diane Ainsworth (Phone 818/354-5011). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). ITEM 1u - MISER B-ROLL------------------------------------TRT :33 B-Roll of MISR (Multi-Angled Spectroradiometer). Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Diane Ainsworth (Phone 818/354-5011). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). ITEM 1v - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT :33 David Diner, MISER Principal Investigator, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA. Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Diane Ainsworth (Phone 818/354-5011). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). ITEM 1w - TERRA INSTRUMENTS--MODIS------------------------TRT :53 MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) will measure cloud cover and aerosol concentrations on a global scale so that, with CERES and MISR data, scientists can gauge the effects on the Earth's radiation budget. MODIS will study surface temperatures

(including fire detection), ocean sediment, phytoplankton concentrations, vegetation maps, land cover changes, pollution, and snow cover. Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Allen Kenitzer (Phone 301/286-2806). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). ITEM 1x - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT 1:09 Jim Collatz, Terra Associate Project Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Allen Kenitzer (Phone 301/286-2806). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). ITEM 1y - TERRA INSTRUMENTS--MOPITT-----------------------TRT 1:03 MOPITT (Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere) will measure carbon monoxide and methane levels in the lower atmosphere. By studying where these atmospheric gases are concentrated, how they circulate through the atmosphere, and how they form, scientists hope to gain a more complete picture about how atmosphere pollution interacts and affects our environment. Contact in Canada: Marion Neiman (Phone 613/990-8622). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). ITEM 1z - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT :24 James Drummond, Professor, University of Toronto, Canada Contact in Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Marion Neiman (Phone 613/9908622). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730).

ITEM 2 - SCIENCE STORIES FROM LANDSAT - GSFC Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Wade Sisler (Phone 301/286-6256). SYNOPSIS: The final in a unique series of Earth observing satellites is hard at work cataloguing and analyzing the land surface of the planet it orbits. From an altitude of 438 miles, Landsat 7 is able to see features as small as 15 meters, providing worldwide land resource information for a diverse range of uses. The satellite is part of a global research effort called the Earth Science Enterprise, which seeks to acquire a long term understanding of the changes to our planet. ITEM 2a - CITIES FROM SPACE In the following collection of cities seen from space, notice how clearly Landsat 7's highly sensitive Extended Thematic Mapper Plus is able to resolve features like roads, buildings and natural features. The cities shown are San Francisco, Rome, Paris, and New York. Prior to the San Francisco fly-over, we show you how Landsat's sensors break down light into various bands of sensitivity, and how those bands might be assembled to provide different views of a given area. ITEM 2b - SEDIMENTATION ALONG THE COAST: LANDSAT The devastating floods in North Carolina caused by Hurricanes Floyd, Irene, and a series of heavy rain storms highlight Landsat 7's ability to resolve subtle gradations in surface features. Here the satellite captures the massive flow of sedimentation and waste runoff in areas most affected by flooding. Notice the dark coloration in the engorged waterways, indicating heavy concentrations of organic material that has been washed into the water system. ITEM 2c - BOLIVIAN DEFORESTATION This time lapse series of images comes from Landsat 7's predecessor, Landsat 5. Over a period of ten years, the

satellite's sensors measured the growing patterns of regional clear cutting across wide tracts of South American forest. ITEM 2d - LANDSAT 7 NATIONAL TOUR OF GRAND SPACES Recent visualizations generated from Landsat 7 data depict a number of U.S. national parks and other prominent locations in spectacular detail. The images displayed here are overlaid on terrain maps, showing peaks, valleys, water, and human made structures as viewed from space. A.) Death Valley B.) Mt. St. Helens (two views) C.) Yellowstone D.) Yosemite E.) The Everglades F.) Pacific Peaks (A virtual tour of the Pacific Northwest mountains, ending in Seattle) ITEM 2e - SPACECRAFT ASSEMBLY, LAUNCH, AND ANIMATIONS Landsat 7 is the final in a series of satellites. It roared into orbit aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket, launched on April 15, 1999 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA. Managed and developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, Lockheed Martin constructed Landsat 7 at their facility in Valley Forge, PA. Data is available to researchers through a browsable internet interface, and can be delivered at a relatively low cost to users.

ITEM 3 - SOLAR MAX----------------------------------------TRT 9:47 Contact at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL: Steve Roy (Phone 205/544-0034). ITEM 3a - SOLAR CYCLE TO REACH MAXIMUM IN YEAR 2000-------TRT 4:40 The recent increase in solar flares activity offers a taste of things to come as the Sun approaches the maximum of its 11-year sunspot cycle. Solar flares may have the potential to interfere with satellites and power systems. NASA scientists are studying

the solar maximum cycle and making predictions about the potential effects of our Sun. Items include: (in this order): Solar Cycle animation Sunspot Averages Chart Sunspot Position Chart Solar Magnetic Field Chart Solar Flare Images Solar Data Collecting Domes, MSFC Solar Telescope Dome doors opening Sun shots ITEM 3b - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT 4:10 David Hathaway, NASA Scientist, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL

ITEM 4 - CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATORY-(replay)--------------TRT :20 VIEWS SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION Chandra Observation of Supernova SN1999em--In late October of 1999, a supernova was detected in NGC 1637, a spiral galaxy that is 25 million light years from Earth. Chandra observed the supernova twice soon after the explosion. X rays, shown by contours overlaid on an optical image, were detected from threemillion-degree gas produced by the supernova. An X-ray source in the center of the galaxy was also detected. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: Palomar Observatory Digital Sky Survey Contact at Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA: Dr. Wallace Tucker (Phone 617/496-7998). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Donald Savage (Phone 202/358-1547). http://www1.msfc.nasa.gov/NEWSROOM/news/releases/1999/99-296.html

ITEM 5 - HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SERVICING MISSION VIDEO - STS-103 (replay) ITEM 5a - CREW ARRIVAL------------------------------------TRT 8:00 The crew arrives at the Kennedy Space Center. Commander Curtis L. Brown Pilot Scott J. Kelly Jean-Francois Clervoy Steven L. Smith C. Michael Foale John M. Grunsfeld Claude Nicollier ITEM 5b - CREW TRAINING----------------------------------TRT 13:00 ITEM 5c - MISSION ANIMATION-------------------------------TRT 3:00 5d - REPLACING HUBBLE'S SKIN Contact at NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH: Pam Caswell (Phone 216/433-5795). Cut #1 - Studying Surfaces of Material Retrieved from-----TRT 2:27 Hubble Space Telescope Description B-roll shows NASA Glenn Research Center researcher Kim deGroh examining material retrieved from the second Hubble servicing mission with a scanning electron microscope. Cut #2 - Retrieved Material Brittleness Demonstration ----TRT 2:16 Description B-roll shows NASA Glenn Research Center researcher Joyce Dever bending and crimping multilayer insulation outer layer material. The new, or unexposed, material bends but does not crack. The piece retrieved from the second Hubble servicing mission cracks (shown by the sharp crease).

Cut #3 - Interview Excerpts------------------------------TRT 1:31 Joyce Dever, Materials Engineer, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH Cut #4 - Interview Excerpts------------------------------TRT 2:09 Kim deGroh, Materials Engineer, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH Cut #5 - Multilayer insulation Blanket Repair-------------TRT 1:31 During Hubble Servicing Mission 2 Description B-roll shows repair of large tears in the blanket's outer layer during the on-orbit repair of the Hubble Space Telescope on STS-82 in February 1997. ITEM 5e - MISSION B-ROLL---------------------------------TRT 11:38

----------------------------Unless otherwise noted, ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN. ANY CHANGES TO THE LINE-UP WILL APPEAR ON THE NASA VIDEO FILE ADVISORY ON THE WEB AT ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/tv-advisory/nasa-tv.txt WE UPDATE THE ADVISORY THROUGHOUT THE DAY. The NASA Video File normally airs at noon, 3 p.m., 6 p.m., 9 p.m. and midnight Eastern Time. NASA Television is available on GE-2, transponder 9C at 85 degrees West longitude, with vertical polarization. Frequency is on 3880.0 megahertz, with audio on 6.8 megahertz. Refer general questions about the video file to NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Ray Castillo, 202/358-4555, or Elvia Thompson, 202/358-1696, elvia.thompson@hq.nasa.gov

During Space Shuttle missions, the full NASA TV schedule will continue to be posted at: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/nasatv/schedule.html For general information about NASA TV see: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv/ ***************************** Contract Awards Contract awards are posted to the NASA Acquisition information Service Web site: http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/award.html ***************************** The NASA Daily News Summary is issued each business day at approximately 2 p.m. Eastern time. Members of the media who wish to subscribe or unsubscribe from this list, please send e-mail message to: Brian.Dunbar@hq.nasa.gov ***************************** end of daily news summary