NASA Daily News Summary For Release: Dec.

21, 1999 Media Advisory m99-262 SUMMARY: No News Releases Today. Video: NOTE: DUE TO STS-103 MISSION COVERAGE, THE VIDEO FILE TODAY WILL RUN AT NOON ONLY. ALL TIMES EASTERN Video File for Dec. 21, 1999 ITEM 1 - ACRIMSAT LAUNCH - HQ ITEM 2 - LA NINA CONDITIONS UPDATE - GSFC ITEM 3 - DAZZLING LAVA FOUNTAIN ON IO SEEN BY GALILEO - JPL (replay) ITEM 4 - FUTURE FLIGHT CENTRAL - ARC (replay) ***************************** If NASA issues any news releases later today, we will email summaries and Internet URLs to this list. Index of 1999 NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1999/index.html

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ITEM 1 - ACRIMSAT LAUNCH - HQ ACRIMSAT, the latest in a series of long-term solar monitoring missions, was launched into a Sun-synchronous orbit (altitude of approximately 429 miles) aboard a Taurus rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA, on Dec. 20 at 11:30 p.m., Pacific Time. It will measure Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) during its five-year mission life. The instrument, third in a series of long-term solar-monitoring tools built for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, will continue to extend the database first created by ACRIM I, which was launched in 1980 on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft. ACRIM II followed on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in 1991. The Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) I instrument was the first to clearly demonstrate that the total radiant energy from the sun was not a constant.

ITEM 2 - LA NINA CONDITIONS UPDATE - GSFC La Nina Conditions Persist: 18 Months and Counting Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Deanna Corridon (Phone 301/286-0041). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz (Phone 202/358-1730). http://nsipp.gsfc.nasa.gov/enso/nina/ Synopsis: New satellite images and ocean buoy measurements show that the colder-than-normal ocean temperatures associated with La Nina have intensified. The current La Nina spans most of the equatorial Pacific with the coolest surface temperatures about 4 degrees Fahrenheit colder than the climatological average. Researchers are just beginning to understand how La Nina can influence world weather patterns. ITEM 2a - LA NINA CONDITIONS AS SEEN BY TOPEX This data sequence traces the evolution and demise of warm El Nino conditions in 1997 and early 1998. The cooler waters associated with La Nina began to emerge in the spring of 1998, peaked in the

winter of 1998, and became much less organized in the spring of 1999. During the past four months, the cool La Nina waters have resurfaced and intensified. Sea height data is from NASA's TOPEX/Poseidon radar altimeter. Blue colors indicate lower-thannormal sea heights (and temperatures). Red indicates higher-thannormal sea heights (and temperatures). ITEM 2b - SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES This data sequence traces the evolution and demise of warm El Nino conditions in 1997 and early 1998. The cooler waters associated with La Nina began to emerge in the spring of 1998, peaked in the winter of 1998, and became much less organized in the spring of 1999. During the past four months, the cool La Nina waters have resurfaced and intensified. Sea temperature data is from NOAA's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Blue colors indicate lower-than-normal sea temperatures and red indicates warmer-than-normal sea temperatures. ITEM 2c - A 3-D LA NINA Scientists combine sea height data from NASA's TOPEX/Poseidon with sea surface temperature data from NOAA's AVHRR to better understand the correlation between sea height and temperature. The cool waters of La Nina (shown in blue) can be seen as a depressed region along the equatorial Pacific. La Nina replaced warm El Nino waters in June of 1998 that have persisted through 1999. ITEM 2d - 3-D LA NINA - ADD THE WINDS Scientists add wind data (black arrows) to the sea surface temperatures and sea surface height to understand the complex interaction between the ocean and atmosphere. The arrows indicate stronger-than-normal wind patterns. Note that winds tend to converge on the equatorial Pacific during El Nino while diverging from the equator during La Nina. ITEM 2e - THE WINDS OF LA NINA Stronger-than-normal low-level equatorial winds have helped bring

the cooler-than-normal waters to the ocean surface. ITEM 2f - LA NINA RESURFACES - SATELLITE / BUOY COMPOSITE By combining data from satellites and ocean buoys, scientists can better understand what is happening beneath the surface of the ocean. This data sequence traces the evolution and demise of El Nino in 1997 and early 1998. La Nina conditions began to emerge in the spring of 1998 and have intensified during the winters of 1998 and 1999. Red indicates warmer-than-normal temperatures, and blue indicates cooler-than-normal temperatures. Sea height data is from NASA TOPEX/Poseidon. Subsurface temperature data is from NOAA's TOGA TAO. Sea surface temperature data is from NOAA's AVHRR. ITEM 2g - THE HURRICANE CONNECTION Animation compares the effects of La Nina and El Nino on the formation of Atlantic Hurricanes. El Nino tends to suppress the formation of hurricanes by steering the subtropical jet stream into the hurricanes' path. During La Nina, the jet stream moves north, and tends to allow the hurricanes to more easily move up the U.S. coast. ITEM 2h - WORLDWIDE CLIMATE CHANGES Animation illustrates how El Nino and La Nina drive global climate changes. As warm water in the tropical pacific shifts its location one-third of the way around the globe, this major heat source to the atmosphere changes the position of atmospheric high and low pressure centers. This causes changes in the position of the jet streams hitting North America and associated temperature and rainfall patterns. The jet stream location is critical for steering storms into the continental United States. During El Nino, the subtropical jet is displaced southward and storms are steered by the subtropical jet into southern California. During La Nina, the subtropical and polar jet streams combine to steer storms toward the northwest United States. ITEM 2i - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS

David Adamec, Research Oceanographer, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.

ITEM 3 - DAZZLING LAVA FOUNTAIN ON IO SEEN BY GALILEO - JPL (replay) A fiery lava fountain shooting more than a mile above the surface of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io has been captured by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft during a recent close flyby. The images, showing a curtain of lava erupting within a giant volcanic crater, will be unveiled today during the American Geophysical Union's fall meeting in San Francisco. Galileo took the pictures on Thanksgiving night, November 25. The new Io images are available at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/io Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Jane Platt (Phone 818/354-5011). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Doug Isbell (Phone 202/358-1753).

ITEM 4 - FUTURE FLIGHT CENTRAL - ARC (replay) Contact at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA: Michael Mewhinney (Phone 650/604-3937). Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Michael Braukus (Phone 202/358-1979). ITEM 4a - FUTUREFLIGHT CENTRAL - ANIMATION----------------TRT :29 NASA¹s FutureFlight Facility, opening Dec. 13, 1999, is the world¹s first full-scale virtual airport control tower. Located at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, the facility will provide the airline industry with robust test and research capabilities within a safe, real-time, simulated environment. ITEM 4b - FUTUREFLIGHT CENTRAL - ANIMATION----------------TRT 1:38 Simulations from the control tower of NASA¹s new FutureFlight

Facility, depicting San Fransisco International airport and its virtual air traffic. ITEM 4c - FUTUREFLIGHT CENTRAL B-ROLL---------------------TRT 2:33 Testing of the systems in the new FutureFlight Central facility, showing both the control tower and the downstairs pseudo-pilot areas. ITEM 4d - AIRPLANE B-ROLL---------------------------------TRT 1:34 Montage of commercial aircraft at various U.S. airports engaging in ground transportation maneuvers as well as footage inside an air traffic control tower. ITEM 4e - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT 1:52 Paul Kutler, Deputy Director, Information Sciences & Technology Directorate, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA. ITEM 4f - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS------------------------------TRT 1:37 Nancy Dorighi, Facility Manager, FutureFlight Central, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA. ITEM 4g - INTERVIEW EXCERPTS-----------------------------TRT 1:24 Jim McClenahen, Air Traffic Control Analyst, FutureFlight Central, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA.

----------------------------Unless otherwise noted, ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN. ANY CHANGES TO THE LINE-UP WILL APPEAR ON THE NASA VIDEO FILE ADVISORY ON

THE WEB AT ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/tv-advisory/nasa-tv.txt WE UPDATE THE ADVISORY THROUGHOUT THE DAY. The NASA Video File normally airs at noon, 3 p.m., 6 p.m., 9 p.m. and midnight Eastern Time. NASA Television is available on GE-2, transponder 9C at 85 degrees West longitude, with vertical polarization. Frequency is on 3880.0 megahertz, with audio on 6.8 megahertz. Refer general questions about the video file to NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Ray Castillo, 202/358-4555, or Elvia Thompson, 202/358-1696, elvia.thompson@hq.nasa.gov During Space Shuttle missions, the full NASA TV schedule will continue to be posted at: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/nasatv/schedule.html For general information about NASA TV see: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv/ ***************************** Contract Awards Contract awards are posted to the NASA Acquisition information Service Web site: http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/award.html ***************************** The NASA Daily News Summary is issued each business day at approximately 2 p.m. Eastern time. Members of the media who wish to subscribe or unsubscribe from this list, please send e-mail message to: Brian.Dunbar@hq.nasa.gov ***************************** end of daily news summary