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Purpose of calculation:

The equivalent carbon content of a steel alloy refers to method of measuring the
maximum hardness and the weldability of the alloy based on the chemical
composition of the alloy. Higher concentrations of carbon and other alloying elements
such as manganese, chromium, silicon, molybdenum, vanadium, copper, and nickel
tend to increase the hardness and decrease the weldability of the material. Each of
these materials tends to influence the hardness and weldability of the steel to different
magnitudes, however, making a method of comparison necessary to judge the
difference in hardness between two alloys made of different alloying elements. The
resulting equivalent carbon coefficient allows the alloy to be categorized alongside
plain carbon steels, and have their weldability and hardness properties compared with
them.

Calculation Reference
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equivalent_carbon_content

Element S S 355N S 355M Offshore


(%) 355K2G3 according to according Grade
according EN 10113-2 to EN 355
to 10113-3
EN10025
C max 0.2 0.2 0.14 0.12
Mn max 1.6 1.65 1.6 1.6
Si max 0.55 0.5 0.5 0.5
P max 0.035 0.035 0.03 0.015
S max 0.035 0.03 0.025 0.008
Cu max 0.35 0.3
Ni max 0.5 0.3 0.4
Cr max 0.3 0.2
Mo max 0.1 0.2 0.08
V max 0.12 0.1 0.08
Nb max 0.06 0.05 0.04
Ti max 0.03 0.05 0.05
Al 0.20 0.02 0.06
N max min min max
Sb max 0.02 0.02 0.009
Pb max 0.01
Sn max 0.003
B max 0.02
Ca max 0.002
CEV 1) 0.44 0.35 0.39
max

1) Carbon equivalent =
x along length

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