August 17th, 2010

Edublogger Review
A "mash-up" of postings from nine engaging educational and e-learning bloggers.

Published by: philosophyandrew

Ask the Administrator: Ranks
Source: http://suburbdad.blogspot.com/2010/08/ask-administratorranks.html By Dean Dad on August 17th, 2010

‘instructor’ is reserved for full-timers off the tenure track, though in other places I’ve seen those called “visiting” assistant professors. I’ve also seen schemes in which new t-t hires are called ‘instructor’ until tenure, unless they have Ph.D.’s, at which point they’re called “assistant professor” until hire. (For my money, the best line reading of “assistant professor” belongs to Elizabeth Taylor in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? But I digress.) Oddly enough, in some places, ranks are entirely disconnected from tenure status. I’ve never understood that -- it seems to me that if you have a tenure system, then tenure and promotion should be connected somehow -- but it happens. I’ve seen systems in which you could gain tenure, work for decades, and retire still at the rank of assistant professor. It doesn’t make much sense to me, but there it is. The issue isn’t really that different colleges define the terms differently. The issue is that they don’t know it. Since most tenure-line faculty don’t move around much, they often only know the system in which they personally work. When you try to move between systems, you’ll often see assumptions made based on a lack of awareness that different systems use the same words differently. Are ‘instructors’ on the tenure track? Maybe, maybe not. Do assistant professors have doctorates? Maybe, maybe not. (On the administrative side: do deans have tenure? What’s the difference between a director and a coordinator? Are department chairs administration or faculty? The answers to each of these varies by institution.) I hope that the quirkiness of the local naming scheme doesn’t cause any real issues for you. As long as you don’t lie in an official context, I say call yourself whatever is easiest. Wise and worldly readers, have you seen a particularly odd rank/naming scheme? How did it work? Have a question? Ask the Administrator at deandad (at) gmail (dot) com.

A new correspondent writes: Why are ranks at Community Colleges sometimes different from those at 4-year schools? For example, my rank is "Instructor," but I'm full-time tenure track. I only achieve the rank of "Assistant Professor" in five years, after I get tenure. The other ranks are for various levels of promotion. I know it's a minor issue, but frankly it drives me a little nuts having to explain to people that I am, in fact, TT and that I'm not a part-timer. Sometimes I just fudge and say "Assistant Professor," to avoid the confusion. Any idea why the ranks are so often different? How naughty am I to refer to myself as Asst. Prof. if that's not what it's called at my school? This may seem weaselly, but my first response is to ask the context in which you refer to yourself that way. On a cv, in an official document, or in a job interview, it would be fraud. In informal conversation, though, I don’t see the issue. DIfferent systems use different criteria and definitions for names, but the names themselves don’t change much. This leads to no end of confusion. It starts with something as simple as “professor.” Much of the unhappiness in the profession, I think, stems from people having very different ideas of what a “professor” is. Is a “professor” a researcher with graduate assistants who occasionally gives an auditorium lecture, or a teacher who relies on group discussion, or a learning coach who helps students navigate self-paced learning modules? I’ve seen it carry each of those meanings and many more, but if you think it means the first and you get hired somewhere that believes it means the third, I foresee heartache. It’s even worse for administrators, if that helps. Is a “dean” an august leader, a middle manager, or a low-level paper pusher? I’ve seen them all... The instructor-assistant-associate-full ladder is fairly standard across the industry, but each rank carries different meanings in different places. I’ve seen schemes in which

Connected and Crazy
Source: http://www.jarche.com/2010/08/connected-and-crazy/ By Harold Jarche on August 17th, 2010

Tweet Here are some of the things I learned via Twitter this past week. Quote of the Week:@hrheingold “Free, open, multimedia university of tomorrow is here now, technically. Knowing how to self-organize learning with others is another matter” via @nancyrubin Collaboration – If it Were That Easy We Would all Do It – Well
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August 17th, 2010

Published by: philosophyandrew

Five Models of Collaboration: • Communities of Practice/Interest • Content Collaboration • Process Collaboration • Project Collaboration • Goal-based Collaboration @davecormier “next time someone makes fun of twitter … tell them about you guys finding the name of the berry that Posey ate for poison control [baneberry]” we took the kids into the woods, on a little trail on the back of Dave’s ancestral lands. and we spun our heads back, three of us at once to see Posey in her tutu and her grandmother’s fake plastic pearls chomping heartily away on…something. three parental mouths opened in unison to say what’s she eating? and then Dave crossed the three steps between him and her in only one and he pried the berry from her mouth. ew, she said. he grabbed the culprit to ask the internet, once we were back at the house. Photo & The Culprit via @helinur the best goal is no goal : So what does a life without goals look like? In practice, it’s very different than one with goals. You don’t set a goal for the year, nor for the month, nor for the week or day. You don’t obsess about tracking, or actionable steps. You don’t even need a todo list, though it doesn’t hurt to write down reminders if you like. What do you do, then? Lay around on the couch all day, sleeping and watching TV and eating HoHos? No, you simply do. You find something you’re passionate about, and do it. Just because you don’t have goals doesn’t mean you do nothing — you can create, you can produce, you can follow your passion. via @markwfoden Case study on using micro-blogging to support informal learning [PDF] at Pitney Bowes: • Better Employee Learning: Yammer facilitates and augments the highly valuable “casual learning” that happens every day within Pitney Bowes. • Easily Searchable Knowledge Base: Each discussion is archived and accessible to all within the organization for future access. • Better Knowledge Flow: Knowledge isn’t siloed into specific regions or departments. via @elsua Starting another day with this required reading: Am I Crazy? Or Is It The Whole Firm Where I Work? by @stevedenning A century hence, when historians come to write the history of the current age (assuming our species

survives so long), they will, I believe, be puzzled as to why so many people managed—and so many more people allowed themselves to be managed—in ways that were known to be unproductive, crimped the spirits of those doing the work, and frustrated those for whom the work was being done. Why, they will wonder, did this continue for so long on such a wide scale?

Still Kind Of New But Hopkins' President Is Making Changes
Source: http://keptup.typepad.com/academic/2010/08/still-kind-of-newbut-hopkins-president-is-making-changes.html By StevenB on August 17th, 2010

As president of the Johns Hopkins University, Daniels might spend one week in Uganda, learning how his university's researchers spent painstaking years developing methods to slow the spread of HIV. The next, he might hold a chat with undergraduates on the Homewood campus about enriching their college experience. In 16 months presiding over the university, Daniels has made several bold moves. Despite budget shortfalls, he insisted that the university shift its admissions policy so the Class of 2014 could be chosen without regard for students' ability to pay. He threw himself into advising the Hopkins-affiliated East Baltimore Development Inc. and helped shift its focus to building a $40 million community school. Read more at: http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2010-08-14/news/bs-mdhopkins-president-20100813_1_ronald-daniels-pamelaflaherty-culture-change

GLORIAD: Advanced Networking and Cyberinfrastructure for Global Science and Education Collaboration
Source: http://www.educause.edu/node/211584 By drupal on August 17th, 2010

The Global Ring Network for Advanced Applications Development (GLORIAD) is a "ring of rings" fiberoptic network around the northern hemisphere connecting the science and education communities of partner countries (and others) with advanced communications services enabling leading-edge collaborations, from quality audio/videoconferencing to remote control of scientific instrumentation to advanced telemedical applications to highvolume data transfer. The NSF has invested $18.5 million to date, matched by roughly $200 million from international partners. This session will discuss GLORIAD and how it is promoting the use of advanced cyberinfrastructure in supporting the growing globalization of science and education.

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August 17th, 2010

Published by: philosophyandrew

The 2010 Social Networking Map
Source: http://www.downes.ca/cgi-bin/page.cgi?post=53133 August 17th, 2010

Updating the famous XKCD map, this map of social networks has been redrawn for 2010. "The numbers are taken to reflect many new developments in the social networking communities, including Facebook surpassing Myspace as the preeminent online community." I love the depiction of the 'Former Kingdom of Myspace.' Your comments always remain your property, but in posting them here you agree to license under the same terms as this site (Creative Commons). If your comment is offensive it will be deleted. Automated Spam-checking is in effect. If you are a registered user you may submit links and other HTML. Anonymous users cannot post links and will have their content screened - certain words are prohibited and your comment will be analyzed to make sure it makes sense.

A close variation on that is the “role model” adviser. This usually gets applied to students in underrepresented groups. The idea is that people make assumptions about what they can do based in part on who’s doing those things now, so putting some recognizably similar faces in key roles can send a powerful message. I’ve never been entirely comfortable with this line of thought, but there’s some empirical support for it, so I hold my tongue. There’s also a basic tension between those who insist that the faculty should own advisement, and those who believe that it’s reasonable to have full-time advisers. I side with the latter camp, only because the faculty simply aren’t around during the summer and vacations, but students come in year-round. I don’t want to say to a kid who shows up in June “sorry, come back in September and someone will talk to you.” I get the philosophical argument for faculty ownership, and in some tightly-constructed cohort programs (Nursing, music) we go with that by default. But in the fairly popular and loosely-built transfer major, the pragmatic argument for having some folks around whenever seems more persuasive to me. “Intrusive advisement” is all the rage in the national literature now. I think of it as systematic nagging, though that may say as much about me as it does about intrusive advising. The intrusive model -- yes, they actually call it that -- involves deputizing certain staffers to become a variation on truant officers, chasing down students who miss class to ask them what’s up and help them get back on track before they fall so far behind that there’s just no hope. The whole enterprise strikes me as demeaning and vaguely creepy, but the results I’ve seen suggest that for certain populations, it can actually work. Finally, there’s the libertarian line of thought, which I think of as the old computer helpdesk term “RTFM” (for “Read the F-ing Manual”). This school says that learning how to navigate bureaucracies is a life skill, and part of what a college graduate should be able to do. As long as the catalog and related information is available and accurate, it should fall to the student to figure out both what she wants to do with her career and how she should do it. If she can’t be bothered, well, let her learn the consequences of that, too. I’ll admit some philosophical affinity with this view, but pragmatically, it doesn’t work. Part of the reason for that is that the manual itself changes, and I can’t claim with any certainty that it’s flawless. The manual also rests on a series of assumptions about students -- they’re full time, they start in the Fall, they don’t fail anything -- that don’t always hold. (In this setting, they’re actually the exception.) There’s also a perfectly valid argument to the effect that learning how to seek out good help is a useful life skill; a little humility isn’t always a bad thing. Wise and worldly readers, has your campus found a reasonably successful way to handle undergraduate advisement?

Advising
Source: http://suburbdad.blogspot.com/2010/08/advising.html By Dean Dad on August 17th, 2010

In our never-ending quest to help students succeed, we’re taking a fresh look at how we do academic advising on campus. From asking around, it seems like there are several different schools of thought on academic advising, each pretty much talking past the others. First, there’s the “advising is scheduling” school. This group sees advising as a discrete function to be carried out almost entirely in the first week of registration, consisting almost entirely of helping students decipher degree requirements and sequences of prerequisites. I think of this as the sherpa function; the sherpa doesn’t ask why you want to climb this mountain; he just guides you to the top. The appeal of this line of thought is its implied humility: I don’t know why people do the things they do, I just help them realize their revealed preferences. The downside, of course, is that people don’t always know what they want, or they may not understand the difference between, say, “criminal justice” and “prelaw.” If you don’t ask the second question, you’re just helping the student dig herself in deeper. Then there’s the “whole person” school of advisement, which elevates the adviser to something like guru status. This school holds that the adviser is supposed to see past the student’s selfdelusion and suss out what s/he really wants. When it actually works, it’s lovely, but it’s hard to reproduce at scale, and it’s certainly open to charges of arrogance or self-dealing. (My adviser in college was a physics professor who just couldn’t understand why anybody would ever major in anything other than physics. I’m sure he meant well, but he didn’t help me any..)

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August 17th, 2010

Published by: philosophyandrew

IHEs Count On Hotels When They Run Out Of Dorm Rooms
Source: http://keptup.typepad.com/academic/2010/08/ihes-count-onhotels-when-they-run-out-of-dorm-rooms.html By StevenB on August 17th, 2010

Comment Title Your comment: Enter email to receive replies: Your comments always remain your property, but in posting them here you agree to license under the same terms as this site (Creative Commons). If your comment is offensive it will be deleted. Automated Spam-checking is in effect. If you are a registered user you may submit links and other HTML. Anonymous users cannot post links and will have their content screened - certain words are prohibited and your comment will be analyzed to make sure it makes sense.

According to college administrators, most students prefer the predictability and security of campus life. The problem is that securing space in a dormitory can be as challenging as a calculus exam, thanks to burgeoning enrollment and the fixed number of dorm beds. The result at Westchester colleges is an institutional scramble to find more large-scale off-campus housing. The path often leads straight to a nearby hotel. About 800 students applied for on-campus housing at Mercy this year, Mr. Schaefer said, but only 325 dorm beds are available. In response, the college has leased 180 beds at the Marriott Hotel in nearby Tarrytown, providing shuttle service and requiring that students comply with the campus curfew and other rules. The cost to the student at a hotel is the same as at a dorm. Read more at: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/15/ realestate/15wczo.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss

This content has been flagged for review
Source: http://www.educause.edu/node/211521 By Bookworm on August 17th, 2010

Goldman Sachs Behind ForProfit That Has Students Crying Foul
Source: http://keptup.typepad.com/academic/2010/08/goldman-sachsbehind-forprofit-that-has-students-crying-foul.html By StevenB on August 17th, 2010

Unless otherwise noted, EDUCAUSE holds the copyright on all materials published by the association, whether in print or electronic form. In certain cases the work remains the intellectual property of the individual author(s) (see Special Circumstances ). Content from conference speeches, presentations, blogs, wikis and feeds reflect the opinions of the author, and not necessarily those of EDUCAUSE or its members.

Like many investors, Goldman, owner of 38 percent of the Art Institute's parent, Education Management Corp. ( EDMC ), was drawn to for-profit colleges by their rapid growth and soaring stock prices. EDMC also faces complaints from its own graduates and employees. A lawsuit filed in Texas state court by 18 students alleges they were misled about the accreditation status of their program, diminishing their degrees' value and leaving them with debts they can't repay. Read more at: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/10_33/ b4191066612953.htm

Running courses openly – fewer problems and more benefits than expected
Source: http://www.downes.ca/cgi-bin/page.cgi?post=53127 August 17th, 2010

Rethinking e-Learning
Source: http://www.downes.ca/cgi-bin/page.cgi?post=53122 August 17th, 2010

As registrations for PLENK2010 continue to accumulate, it's worth noting that not only is the open course phenomenon is spreading, it seems to be working surprisingly well. "Sounds like a win-win-win situation, if there is such a thing. With little effort the Professor increases the benefits of his or her teaching and gets to work with motivated and engaged learners (win), enrolled students enjoy a richer learning experience (win), and informal learners have access to a learning opportunity that did not exist before (win)." Comments

This sounds right: "This recognition that our processing uses external representations is an important component in looking at ways to support performance. When should we provide tools, whether representational or computational, instead of trying to put all information in the head? We need a richer picture of how we perform, rather than a simplistic and ineffectual model that posits we can know everything we need." And I like what the author calls the seven Cs of 'natural learning': - Choose what we are interested in - Commit to do what is necessary to learn about it - Create expressions of our understanding as application - Crash when our expressions sometimes fail
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August 17th, 2010

Published by: philosophyandrew

- Copy others' performances - Converse with others about the topic - Collaborate to co-create a shared understanding as well as an artifact I'd like to get a 'cooperate' in there somewhere. And maybe a 'cultivate'. And definitely a 'clarify', a 'criticize' and even a 'construct'. Via David Jones. Your comments always remain your property, but in posting them here you agree to license under the same terms as this site (Creative Commons). If your comment is offensive it will be deleted. Automated Spam-checking is in effect. If you are a registered user you may submit links and other HTML. Anonymous users cannot post links and will have their content screened - certain words are prohibited and your comment will be analyzed to make sure it makes sense.

Despite Web Information Students Still Need The Campus Tour
Source: http://keptup.typepad.com/academic/2010/08/despite-webinformation-students-still-need-the-campus-tour.html By StevenB on August 17th, 2010

"I've done a lot of research online about which schools I wanted to visit," said Kilner, a student at Gonzaga College High School in Washington, D.C. "Online information is good, but you can't capture college life in photos or articles on a Web site. You need to get the feel for the college to really know which one is right." Like Kilner, most high school students start their search for the right college experience online -- but visits to campus remain a high priority for CU's prospective students, according to campus admissions officers. Read more at: http://www.dailycamera.com/ci_15712398

Forbes Reveals Its Top IHEs
Source: http://keptup.typepad.com/academic/2010/08/forbes-reveals-itstop-ihes.html By StevenB on August 17th, 2010

New Data Indicates Student Mental Illness Is On The Rise
Source: http://keptup.typepad.com/academic/2010/08/new-dataindicates-student-mental-illness-is-on-the-rise.html By StevenB on August 17th, 2010

The number of college students who are afflicted with a serious mental illness is rising, according to data presented Thursday at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Assn. in San Diego The findings came from an analysis of 3,265 college students who used campus counseling services between September 1997 and August 2009. Several programs are available to assist students with mental illness. Read more at: http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-hebcollege-20100812,0,3226328.story

The best college in America isn't in Cambridge or Princeton, West Point or Annapolis. It's nestled in the Berkshire Mountains. Williams College, a 217-year-old private liberal arts school, tops our third annual ranking of America's Best Colleges. Our list of more than 600 undergraduate institutions is based on the quality of the education they provide, the experiences of the students and how much they achieve. [In addition to the rankings the issue contains feature articles about higher education along with quite a few opinion pieces about the state of higher education]. Read more at: http://www.forbes.com/2010/08/11/best-collegesuniversities-rating-ranking-opinions-bestcolleges-10_land.html?boxes=Homepagelighttop

Motoring enthusiast builds 367mph bus
Source: http://www.downes.ca/cgi-bin/page.cgi?post=53120 August 17th, 2010

The EDUCAUSE Review Open Issue
Source: http://keptup.typepad.com/academic/2010/08/the-educausereview-open-issue.html By StevenB on August 17th, 2010

Your comments always remain your property, but in posting them here you agree to license under the same terms as this site ( Creative Commons ). If your comment is offensive it will be deleted. Automated Spam-checking is in effect. If you are a registered user you may submit links and other HTML. Anonymous users cannot post links and will have their content screened - certain words are prohibited and your comment will be analyzed to make sure it makes sense.

The July/August 2010 issue of EDUCAUSE Review is all about "open" - open content, open courses, open faculty, open technology...anything that's open is up for analysis in this issue. Read more at: http://www.educause.edu/er

UC Berkeley Plan To DNA Test All Students Creating Controversy
Source: http://keptup.typepad.com/academic/2010/08/uc-berkeley-planto-dna-test-all-students-creating-controversy.html

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August 17th, 2010
By StevenB on August 17th, 2010

Published by: philosophyandrew

Two UC Berkeley professors Tuesday defended a controversial plan to perform genetic testing on incoming freshmen during a legislative hearing that also featured testimony from privacy experts and bioethicists blasting the plan. If the state Department of Public Health rules that UC Berkeley's project amounts to medical testing, the university would have to have students' saliva tested in a specially designated laboratory. The university argues that it is performing research – not medical tests – which would allow testing at a greater variety of labs. The exercise is part of an orientation project designed to introduce new students to Berkeley's intellectual rigor. Read more at: http://www.sacbee.com/2010/08/11/2950513/ uc-berkeley-professors-defend.html#ixzz0wOtmsoSD

He Was First To Apply To College Using The Common Form
Source: http://keptup.typepad.com/academic/2010/08/he-was-first-toapply-to-college-using-the-common-form.html By StevenB on August 17th, 2010

Cree Bautista’s application for next year’s freshman class at New York University isn’t due until Jan. 1, but Cree, an incoming high school senior from Pflugerville, Tex., was not taking any chances. Just after 12:01 a.m. on Aug. 1 — when this year’s version of the Common Application was first posted on the Web — Cree sat down at the computer in his parents’ bedroom and began filling out the form. As it turned out, Cree, 17, was the first applicant for the class of 2015, not just at N.Y.U. but to any institution that accepts the Common App, including those of the Ivy League. By Tuesday he had plenty of company: Nearly 1,000 applications had been filed. Read more at: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/11/ education/11application.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss

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