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Six Sigma Systems

Principles
Module 2.1

Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld
Senior Research Scientist, MIT Sloan School of Management and
Executive Director, MIT Engineering Systems Learning Center

Presentation for:
ESD.60 – Lean/Six Sigma Systems
MIT Leaders for Manufacturing Program (LFM)
Summer 2004

These materials were developed as part of MIT's ESD.60 course on "Lean/Six Sigma Systems." In some cases,
the materials were produced by the lead instructor, Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, and in some cases by student teams
working with LFM alumni/ae. Where the materials were developed by student teams, additional inputs from the
faculty and from the technical instructor, Chris Musso, are reflected in some of the text or in an appendix

2 Part I: Introduction Part II: Concepts Part III: Application Part IV: Disconnects Part V: Conclusion .60 Lean/Six Sigma Systems. Overview ¾ Learning Objectives ¾ Session Design (20-30 ¾ Review core Six Sigma concepts min.” Relevant Measures of Success. MIT 6/9/04 -.) ¾ Part III: Exercises and Activities Based on Field Data and Scenarios that Illustrate the Concepts or Principles (5-7 min.) ¾ Part IV: Common “Disconnects.) © Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld – ESD. LFM.) ¾ Part II: Key Concept or Principle Defined and Explained (5-7 min.) ¾ Explore the relationship between ¾ Part I: Introduction and Learning “lean” and “six sigma” Objectives (1-2 min.) ¾ Part V: Evaluation and Concluding Comments (2-3 min. and Potential Action Assignment(s) to Apply Lessons Learned (3-5 min.

MIT 6/9/04 -.60 Lean/Six Sigma Systems. ¾ Application: ¾ Useful in any enterprise that provides products or services for companies © Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld – ESD. you will: ¾ eliminate defects ¾ reduce production and development costs ¾ reduce cycle times and inventory levels ¾ increase profit margin and improve customer satisfaction ¾ The Vision: Drive industries to design and produce products/services to Six Sigma standards.3 Part I: Introduction Part II: Concepts Part III: Application Part IV: Disconnects Part V: Conclusion . ¾ The Strategy: Use a data-driven structured approach to attack defects to improve the sigma level of your goods and services. As your organization moves toward Six Sigma quality. LFM. Six Sigma ¾ Concept: ¾ The Goal: To produce goods and services at a Six Sigma level.

Core Concept: Stabilize Before You Improve Which player did better in this round? Who will do better in the long run? © Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld – ESD. MIT 6/9/04 -.60 Lean/Six Sigma Systems. LFM.4 Part I: Introduction Part II: Concepts Part III: Application Part IV: Disconnects Part V: Conclusion .

MIT 6/9/04 -.5 Part I: Introduction Part II: Concepts Part III: Application Part IV: Disconnects Part V: Conclusion .60 Lean/Six Sigma Systems. LFM. Core Concept: y = f(x) ¾ How do you determine “y”? ¾ How do you determine the “x”s? ¾ How do you collect the data on the “x”s? ¾ How do you conduct the f(x) analysis? © Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld – ESD.

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© Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld – ESD. Professional Development. Gregory Manuel.60 Lean/Six Sigma Systems. Gina Mile. Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld. Additional training to broaden skill set. as utilized in: MIT’s LAI Lean Implementation Fieldbook. developed by Michael Chapman. Manufacturing Processes Improvement ¾ Project Worked in Parallel to Reinforce Training ¾ Greenbelts ¾ 80 Hours Focusing on Assisting Blackbelts. Running Small Scale Projects ¾ Project Worked in Parallel to Reinforce Training ¾ Leadership (300+) . and David Veech. Engineering. LFM. acquire expertise in ability to train others ¾ Complete a Project with Significant Importance to the Success of the Company ¾ Blackbelts ¾ 240 Hours Focusing on Business.8 Hours of Six Sigma Awareness and Project Support Source: Six Sigma Materials from Qualtec and Aerojet Corp. Six Sigma ¾ Master Blackbelt ¾ Complete Blackbelt Certification ¾ 18 Mo.8 Source Six Sigma Qualtec Part I: Introduction Part II: Concepts Part III: Application Part IV: Disconnects Part V: Conclusion . Mike Packer. Robert Reifenberg. Jeanine Miller. MIT 6/9/04 -.

MIT 6/9/04 -. Gina Mile. Mike Packer. Six Sigma Measure Measure Analyze Analyze Improve Improve Control Control ProcessMaps Process Mapsand andMetrics Metrics Problem Solving Process Causeand Cause andEffect EffectMatrix Matrix GaugeR&R Gauge R&R Design of CapabilityAnalysis Capability Analysis Multi-variableAnalysis Analysis Experiments Multi-variable HypothesisTesting Hypothesis Testing FailureMode Failure Mode&&Effects EffectsAnalysis Analysis Mistake-Proofing/ /Control Mistake-Proofing ControlPlans Plans 4 Phases of Improvement Using 9 Key Tools Source Six Sigma Qualtec Source: Six Sigma Materials from Qualtec and Aerojet Corp. LFM. Gregory Manuel. Robert Reifenberg. and David Veech. © Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld – ESD. Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld.60 Lean/Six Sigma Systems. developed by Michael Chapman. as utilized in: MIT’s LAI Lean Implementation Fieldbook. Jeanine Miller.9 Part I: Introduction Part II: Concepts Part III: Application Part IV: Disconnects Part V: Conclusion .

60 Lean/Six Sigma Systems. predictable processes to improve what the customer sees and feels Design for Six Sigma: Designing to meet customer needs and process capability Our Customers Feel the Variance. LFM.ge.html © Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld – ESD. Not the Mean Source: http://www.com/sixsigma/sixsigstrategy.10 Part I: Introduction Part II: Concepts Part III: Application Part IV: Disconnects Part V: Conclusion . Six Sigma at GE Key Concepts of Six Sigma Critical to Quality: Attributes most important to the customer Defect: Failing to deliver what the customer wants Process Capability: What your process can deliver Variation: What the customer sees and feels Stable Operations: Ensuring consistent. MIT 6/9/04 -.

MIT 6/9/04 -. what can you infer about the relationship between “lean” and “six sigma”? ¾ What do you see as the potential risks and benefits of “lean” and “six sigma”? © Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld – ESD. LFM.60 Lean/Six Sigma Systems. Six Sigma and Lean ¾ Based on the information in the prior slide on Six Sigma at GE.11 Part I: Introduction Part II: Concepts Part III: Application Part IV: Disconnects Part V: Conclusion .