You are on page 1of 171

EBC Climate Change Program Series, Part Five:

Adaptation and Resiliency Programs


in the Private Sector
Changes Coming for Developers from Boston
Planning & Development Agency

Ruth Silman
Chair, EBC Climate Change & Air Committee
Partner, Nixon Peabody LLP

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
CHANGES COMING
FOR DEVELOPERS
FROM BPDA
RUTH H. SILMAN
PARTNER
SEPTEMBER 14, 2017
CURRENT BPDA CLIMATE CHANGE RESILIENCY AND
PREPAREDNESS POLICY
Current Policy (enacted in 2013) through Article 37
- Applies to Article 80B Large Projects, PDAs and IMPs
- Requires Checklist
- Consider future climate conditions in project impact analysis
- Ensure appropriate measures to avoid, eliminate or mitigate
impacts
- Must update Checklist at Building Permit issuance and
Certificate of Occupancy issuance
PROPOSED UPDATE TO BPDA CLIMATE CHANGE RESILIENCY
AND PREPAREDNESS POLICY
Changes to Checklist
- More specific requirements for GHG reductions and Net
Zero/Net Positive Carbon Building Performance
- Distinguishes Extreme Heat Events from Extreme
Precipitation
- Requires specific narratives of Adaptation Strategies for
each topic
SEA LEVEL RISE MAP
SEA LEVEL RISE MAP

Projects should first evaluate if the location and site


conditions are vulnerable to flooding
- FEMA SFHA
- 1% annual Flood Area with 36 Sea Level Rise Map
- Map updated August 1, 2017
- Better illustrates anticipated flood conditions
QUESTIONS?

Ruth H. Silman
Partner and Boston Office Managing Partner
Nixon Peabody LLP
100 Summer Street
Boston, MA 02110
rsilman@nixonpeabody.com
www.nixonpeabody.com
Katrina, Irene, Sandy, Harvey and Uncertainty
Climate Science & Consulting Practice Changes for
Planners & Design Professionals

Daniel C. Stapleton
Program Chair & Moderator
Senior Vice President, GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Environmental Business
Proactive By Design.
Our Company Commitment
Council of New England
Part Five - Adaptation and Resiliency Programs
in the Private Sector
A little background

GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc. 11


GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.
GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.
GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.
GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.
GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.
GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.
GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.
1. Financial Impact: Companies

..material financial impacts from climate change for


companies in 72 out of 79 industries, representing $27.5
trillion, or 93% of the U.S. equity market. - Henry M. Paulson
and Robert E. Rubin 74th and 70th Secretaries of the Treasury,
respectively

Source: CLIMATE RISK TECHNICAL BULLETIN TB001-10182016,


October 2016. Copyright 2016 Sustainability Accounting Standards
Board.

GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.


1. Financial Impact: Companies

Financial Impact Channels


Climate Risk Categories

Revenue Impacts
Physical Effects
Cash Flow &
Transition to a Low- Operating Impacts
Carbon, Resilient
Economy
Asset Value Impacts
Climate Regulation
Financing Impacts

Source: CLIMATE RISK TECHNICAL BULLETIN TB001-10182016,


October 2016. Copyright 2016 Sustainability Accounting Standards
Board.

GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.


1. Financial Impact: Companies

Climate Risk Categories

Source: CLIMATE RISK TECHNICAL BULLETIN TB001-10182016,


October 2016. Copyright 2016 Sustainability Accounting Standards
Board.

GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.


1. Financial Impact: Companies

Climate Risk is Diverse:


Health Care
Financials
Technology & Communication
Non-renewable Resources
Transportation
Resource Transformation
Services
Consumption
Renewable Resources
Infrastructure

Source: CLIMATE RISK TECHNICAL BULLETIN TB001-10182016,


October 2016. Copyright 2016 Sustainability Accounting Standards
Board.

GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.


1. Financial Impact: Companies

Climate Financial Impacts are


Diverse

Source: CLIMATE RISK TECHNICAL BULLETIN TB001-10182016,


October 2016. Copyright 2016 Sustainability Accounting Standards
Board.

GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.


Going Behind BARS Small Business Awareness &
Acting on Rising Seas in Coastal Massachusetts

Michael Green
Executive Director
Climate Action Business Association

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Climate Adaptation and Local
Business

Michael Green
Executive Director
Michael.green@cabaus.org
Case Study: Boston Sea-Level Rise Projections

The pace of relative sea level rise is accelerating.

The relative sea level in Boston Harbor has risen over the past century. From 1921 to 2015, the overall trend
in relative sea level rise was about 0.11 inches per year.
Over the entire 20th century, sea levels rose about 9 inches relative to land. Another eight inches of relative sea
level rise may happen by 2030, almost three times faster.
By 2050, the sea level may be over as much as 1.5 feet higher than it was in 2000, and as much as 3 feet higher in
2070.
Emissions Reductions Impact Future Sea Levels
Small Businesses are Vulnerable

25% of small businesses do not reopen


following a major disaster
Concentrated physical assets
Average cost of downtime is $3,000 per day
One in five businesses have to lay off
workers due to extreme weather events
Priority Adaptation Legislation

An Act Establishing a Comprehensive Adaptation Management Plan in Response to Climate


Change (S.472, filed by Senator Pacheco, D-Taunton, and H.2147, filed by Representative
Smizik, D-Brookline)

Establish and commit to sound management practices that take into account existing natural, built, and economic
characteristics.
Compile data on existing and projected sea level rise.
Produce a report documenting the preparedness and vulnerabilities in the Commonwealths emergency response,
energy, transportation, communications, health, and other systems.
Establish an interagency advisory committee supported by technical subcommittees and staff to carry out the plan.
Establish a grant program to provide financial assistance to regional planning agencies
Establish a coastal buyback program to acquire by voluntary purchase properties repeatedly damaged by severe
weather.
Executive Order 569

In September 2016, Governor Baker issued an Executive Order aimed at building resilience
and adaptation strategies for the impacts of climate change.

Requires state to publish Climate Adaptation Plan within 2 years to outline an adaptation strategy
Within 1 year of the Plan, a framework for a full vulnerability and adaptation strategy will be established for each
Executive Office and City and Town in Massachusetts
Seven Days

In seven days an
unnamed storm turned
into one of the largest
super storms in American
recorded history.

How long can we delay?


Partnerships to Advance Climate Adaptation &
City Resilience

Jason S. Hellendrung, ASLA, PLA


Vice President
Planning & Design
Tetra Tech

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Partnerships to Advance Climate
Preparedness:
Climate Ready Boston
Environmental Building Council
September 14, 2017
Jason Hellendrung, ASLA, PLA
Vice President, Planning & Design
jason.Hellendrung@tetratech.com
In a complex world with competing demands for
limited resources, Tetra Tech offers clear solutions
made possible with sound science, understanding,
innovation, and industry-leading approaches.

2
Office locations

With nearly 400 offices worldwide,


we can quickly respond to our clients needs.

Company Overview 3
What we do

Water Environment Infrastructure Resource Energy International


Coastal and Marine Air Quality Airports and Management CCR Waste Development
Resources Aviation Management Agriculture and Economic
Environmental Industrial
Management Growth
Compliance Buildings Conventional
Mining and Architecture and
Drinking Water Generation
Environmental Communications Minerals Engineering
Groundwater Management Renewable Energy
Dams, Reservoirs, Oil and Gas Democracy and
Wastewater Remediation and Levees Energy Efficiency Governance
Treatment International Energy
Waste Management Ports, Harbors, and Offshore Energy
Services
Water and Waterfront
Agriculture Nuclear Environmental and
Transportation Natural Resources
Water Resources Utilities and
Market Analytics Land Tenure and
Wet Weather Property Rights
Infrastructure/CSOs Transmission and
Rule of Law
Distribution
Water Resources and
Infrastructure
Security and Stabilization

Company Overview 4
How we rank

ENVIRONMENTAL RANKINGS DESIGN RANKINGS

5 Top 200 Environmental Firms 5 Top 500 Design Firms


1 Water Treatment/Supply 1 Treatment/Desalination
1 Environmental Management 1 Dams & Reservoirs
3 Environmental Firms in International Markets 1 Hydro Plants
4 Engineering/Design 1 Pipelines
6 Hazardous Waste 3 Sewer & Waste
Source: Engineering News-Record issues: 5/1/17, 6/19/17, 7/3/17, 7/13/17 , and 8/7/17

Company Overview 5
6
7
8
9
NYS DOS Transfer of Development Rights Study

Long Island, NY 10
Living With the Bay, Rebuild by Design

Nassau County, NY 11
Green Stormwater Infrastructure Project

Detroit, MI 12
Partnerships to Advance Climate
Preparedness in Boston

Boston, MA 13
Boston, 1775

Boston, MA 14
Boston

King Tide, October 18, 2016 15


Boston

King Tide, October 18, 2016 16


Boston

King Tide, October 18, 2016 17


Preparing for the Rising Tide, February, 2013

18
Sea Change: Boston

Boston, MA Previous work led by Jason Hellendrung while Principal


19 at Sasaki
Sea Change: Boston

Previous work led by Jason Hellendrung while Principal at Sasaki


Sea Change: Boston

Previous work led by Jason Hellendrung while Principal at Sasaki


Sea Change: Boston

Previous work led by Jason Hellendrung while Principal at Sasaki


Boston Living With Water Competition

Competition Launch & Charrette at ABX, 2014 Jason Hellendrung served as an adviser and juror for the competition
Boston Living With Water Competition

Jason Hellendrung served as an adviser and juror for the competition


CLIMATE
READY
BOSTON

Previous work led by Jason Hellendrung while Principal at Sasaki


CONTENTS
I. Climate Projection Consensus

II. Vulnerability Assessment

III. Resilience Initiatives

IV. Geographic Focus Areas


CLIMATE PROJECTION CONSENSUS

Boston Research Advisory Group


Climate Factors

Sea Level Coastal Storms Extreme Extreme


Rise Precipitation Temperatures

3
RAINFALL FROM STORMS WILL INCREASE

4
THE NUMBER OF VERY HOT DAYS WILL INCREASE

5
SEA LEVELS IN BOSTON WILL RISE
.

Max. Likely

Min. Likely

6
CLIMATE READY BOSTON SEA LEVEL RISE SCENARIOS
COASTAL & RIVERINE FLOODING

Range of likely SLR under


all 3 emissions scenarios

2070s or later

2050s-2100s
2030s-2050s

7
CONTENTS
I. Climate Projection Consensus

II. Vulnerability Assessment

III. Resilience Initiatives

IV. Geographic Focus Areas


VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT PROCESS

Climate Factors

Climate Hazards

Exposure &
Consequence People Property Infrastructure Economy
9
ADVISORY GROUPS

INFRASTRUCTURE SOCIAL VULNERABILITY

Buildings &
Critical Facilities

Environment
Older Adults Children People with Medical
Transportation (65+) (<5) Disabilities Illness

Other
Water & Sewer

Low-to-no- Lack of People of


Income English Color
Energy & Proficiency
Communications
2030s-2050s
FLOOD PROGRESSION
COASTAL & RIVERINE FLOODING

15%
25%*
In the near term, exposure
will be concentrated in
South Boston, East Boston, 15%
Charlestown, and
Downtown, and represents
25%
a significant threat to
these neighborhoods and
the rest of the city.

Average Monthly High Tide


10% Annual Chance Flood
1% Annual Chance Flood
% of Neighborhood Exposed
X%
to 1% Annual Chance Flood 11
* Excludes Logan Airport
2050s-2100s
FLOOD PROGRESSION
COASTAL & RIVERINE FLOODING

35%
50%*
In the second half of the
century, exposure will
increase across waterfront 30%
neighborhoods, and start
to be significant in
50%
Dorchester.

10%

Average Monthly High Tide


10% Annual Chance Flood
1% Annual Chance Flood
% of Neighborhood Exposed
X%
to 1% Annual Chance Flood 12
* Excludes Logan Airport
2070s OR LATER
FLOOD PROGRESSION
COASTAL & RIVERINE FLOODING

55%
60%*
In the late century,
exposure will expand to
10%
vast areas of the city, 45%
including inland 15%
neighborhoods like the 70%
60%
South End and
neighborhoods along the 5%
Charles River.
20%

Average Monthly High Tide


10% Annual Chance Flood
1% Annual Chance Flood
% of Neighborhood Exposed
X%
to 1% Annual Chance Flood 13
* Excludes Logan Airport
FLOOD PROGRESSION
COASTAL & RIVERINE FLOODING

14
PEOPLE AND BUILDINGS EXPOSED TO FLOODING
COASTAL & RIVERINE FLOODING

POPULATION BUILDINGS BUILDING VALUE

Near-term 1%
annual chance
exposure

15
PEOPLE AND BUILDINGS EXPOSED TO FLOODING
COASTAL & RIVERINE FLOODING

In the late century, in a 1% annual chance flood event

15% 12,000 $80


of Bostons
population will
of Bostons existing
buildings will be exposed billion
be exposed to to flooding of building value will be
flooding exposed to flooding

16
ANNUALIZED ECONOMIC LOSSES DUE TO FLOODING
COASTAL & RIVERINE FLOODING

Loss Categories

Building Damages
Adjusting for the probability Building Contents
of different flood events,
Damages
high-probability events will
have the greatest overall Relocation
economic impact.
Lost Productivity

Mental Stress &


Anxiety

17
CHRONIC FLOOD EXPOSURE
STORMWATER FLOODING

Exposure is widespread
and includes regional &
local transportation
infrastructure

20
BUILDINGS EXPOSED TO CHRONIC FLOODING
STORMWATER FLOODING

Exposure grows
steadily over
time and
primarily
includes
residential
buildings
11,000

21
VULNERABLE POPULATIONS & HEAT ISLANDS

CASES OF MEDICAL ILLNESS CHILDREN OLDER ADULTS


22
PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS
EXTREME HEAT

Heat-Related Mortality Rates Will Increase Significantly Other Public Health


Impacts

Higher rates of heart


and lung disease due
to increased air
pollution

Increases in cases of
vector borne disease

23
CONTENTS
I. Climate Projection Consensus

II. Vulnerability Assessment

III. Resilience Initiatives

IV. Geographic Focus Areas


RESILIENCE INITIATIVES PRINCIPLES

SUPPORT MULTIPLE MAKE IMPROVEMENTS AS PART INCORPORATE LOCAL


BENEFITS WITH EACH OF BUILDING CYCLES, AND INVOLVEMENT IN DESIGN
ACTIVITY ADDRESS MARKET FAILURES AND DECISION-MAKING

DEVELOP WORK IN LAYERS FOR


ADAPTIVE AND FLEXIBLE INDEPENDENTLY
STRATEGIES EFFECTIVE SOLUTIONS 25
RESILIENCE INITIATIVES FRAMEWORK

Updated Prepared & Protected Resilient Adapted


Climate Connected Shores Infrastructure Buildings
Projections Communities

26
Layer: Updated Climate Projections

Local projections Local flood maps

27
Layer: Prepared & Connected Communities
Strategy: Expand education & engagement of Bostonians on climate
hazards and action.

28
Credit: Matt Conti
Layer: Protected Shores
Strategy: Develop local
climate resilience plans to
coordinate adaptation efforts.

29
Layer: Protected Shores
Strategy: Create a coastal protection system.

1% Annual Chance Flooding


with 36 SLR (2070s or later)

Potential District-Scale Flood


Protection Locations

30
31
Layer: Resilient Infrastructure
Strategy: Coordinate investments to adapt infrastructure to future climate
conditions.

Infrastructure
Coordination Committee

Establish planning &


design standards
Identify cascading
vulnerabilities &
opportunities for joint
adaptation projects
Develop adaptation
plans
Provide annual progress
reports

33
Credit: Bill Damon
Layer: Resilient Infrastructure
Strategy: Develop district-level energy solutions to increase decentralization
and redundancy.

34
34
Layer: Resilient Infrastructure
Strategy: Expand the use of green infrastructure (GI) and other natural systems to
manage stormwater, mitigate heat, and provide additional benefits.

GI location plan for


public land
GI sustainable funding
and operating model
Design guidelines for
GI on private land
Evaluation of SW fee
Urban canopy action
plan
Wetlands inventory
and wetlands
protection action
plan
Audubon Circle
Credit: Bill Damon
35
35
Layer: Adapted Buildings
Strategy: Update zoning and building regulations to support climate readiness.

ELEVATION
Proposed
Planning Flood Elevation
Boston Zoning Code
Can be used to determine:
DRAFT MA Building Code Max. Building Height
Min. Lowest Floor Elevation* First Floor Ceiling Elevation
+1 Max. Floor Area Calculations
Current MA Building Code
Min. Lowest Floor Elevation*
Today End of Planning Period

36
* In A Zone on FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Maps. Additional elevation may be required in Coastal A or V Zones or for essential facilities
Layer: Adapted Buildings
Strategy: Update zoning and building regulations to support climate readiness.

Potential Revisions
Requiring min. ceiling height for ground
floors to be measured from the Planning
Flood Elevation (PFE).
Measuring max. building height from
PFE (vs. grade) within future floodplains.
Allowing first floors below PFE to be
converted to uses other than human
occupancy, wet floodproofed, &
removed from total floor area.
Allowing subgrade basements to be
filled in & removed from total floor area.
Allowing mechanical systems, cables, &
other wiring equipment to be either
elevated above DLFE & removed from
total floor area or moved outdoors.

Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital 37


Layer: Adapted Buildings
Strategy: Retrofit existing buildings against climate hazards.

Resilience audits for


private buildings

Prioritized municipal
retrofits

Expansion of back-
up power at private
buildings

Toolkit of resilience
financing strategies

38
Layer: Adapted Buildings
Strategy: Insure buildings against flood damage.

Evaluate current flood


insurance landscape

Join NFIP Community


Rating System

Advocate for NFIP


reform

39
Layer: Protected Shores
Strategy: Create a coastal protection system.

Potential Harbor
Barrier Alternatives
Boston, MA 26
Boston, MA 27
Key Lessons Learned
Nature is smart: Live with Water, dont fight it
Build citywide resilience: economic, social, environmental, health, and
governance, not just infrastructure
Community engagement is the foundation for a successful plan to
institutionalize implementation
Designing for multi-benefit solutions: flood protection, economic
development, public gathering spaces, green infrastructure, restored
ecological function, trail connections
Build PARTNERSHIPS: community, city, NGOs, businesses, county, state,
federalthis is a regional issue, not local
Commit to a long-term plan with a vision for the future that can phased,
institutionalized, and implemented
Need for an interdisciplinary approach: planners, engineers, scientists,
designers, and social scientists that bring expertise, collaboration, and
curiosity

Boston, MA 28
Thank you!

Jason Hellendrung, ASLA, PLA


Vice President, Planning & Design
Tetra Tech
jason.Hellendrung@tetratech.com

29
Commercial Real Estate Flood Vulnerability
Assessments and Flood Emergency Response Plans

Patrick OToole, Director, Technical Services, U.S.


Asset Management, John Hancock Real Estate

Samuel J. Bell, Senior Hazard Mitigation


Specialists, GZA GeoEnvironmental, Inc.

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Making Commercial Real Estate More Flood Resilient: Flood
Vulnerability Assessments and Flood Emergency Response Plans

Patrick OToole
Director US Corporate Real Estate
John Hancock
Samuel J Bell
Hazard Mitigation Specialist
GZA
Project Overview

1. Site Background Details


2. Flood Vulnerability Assessments
3. Flood Emergency Response
Planning
Site Background Details
8 Commercial Buildings
22 acres in size
Site is bounded by Rt. 9 on
the southeast, Rt. 128 on
the southwest, woods and
wetlands along the Charles
River to the east, west and
north.
Buildings typical abut
parking lots and lawn areas
Buildings
Building and
Site Amenities
Essential Systems and Equipment
Electrical systems
Mechanical systems
Conveyance systems (elevators and escalators)
Fuel systems (fuel pumps, lines, and tanks)
Data systems (IT servers, networks, and wiring)
Communication systems
Specialized equipment
Life-safety equipment
Essential
Systems and
Equipment
Flood Vulnerability Assessment
Commercial Real Estate: Flood hazard considerations
Characterize current flood (and other relevant) hazards:
Effects on remediation and site closure alternatives
Effects on building construction/renovation
Effects on facility and business operations
Climate change factors/future site conditions (region and site specific)
Regulations:
Building Code Requirements (Federal, state and local flood regulations)
Zoning Requirements (local)
Permit requirements (state and local)
Flood insurance requirements/options
Managing flood risk through emergency response/deployable measures
Flood Vulnerability Assessment Overview
Flood Vulnerability Assessment (Phase 1)
Based on available information (e.g., FEMA
Flood Insurance Rate Maps)
Regulatory Audit identify applicable
regulated risk levels (e.g. 100-year return
period flood) and requirements
Identify Flood Hazards and Characteristics at
site
Assess facilities and critical utilities
vulnerability
Flood Mitigation Recommendations
FEMA Special Flood Hazard Areas(SFHA)
Flood Hazards
FEMA Flood Profiles

Peak Water Surface Elevation


Annual Flood Probability Flood Return Period FEMA FIS 2012
(ft. NAVD88)

10% 10 year 63.5

2% 50 year 64.8

1% 100 year 65.8

0.2% 500 year 67.0

Overall Site Base Flood (BFE) Elevation = 66 ft. NAVD


Flood Hazards
FEMA Flow Rates USGS 01104200 Charles River at Wellesley, MA

Peak Discharge
Annual Flood Flood Return
FEMA FIS 2012
Probability Period
(cfs)

10% 10 year 1965


2% 50 year 2660
1% 100 year 2990
0.2% 500 year 3825

March 2010 Flow Rates


Flood Hazards
Local Intense Precipitation Wellesley, MA

Annual Rainfall Rainfall over Duration in Inches


Rainfall Return
Probability Period 5 minutes 1 hour 24 hours

10% 10 year 0.48 1.45 4.78

2% 50 year 0.65 2.18 7.19

1% 100 year 0.75 2.60 8.58

0.2% 500 year 1.05 3.95 12.95


Buildings Structural Flood Vulnerability

Lowest Occupied Height Above Height Above 500-


Address Floor Elevation1 100-Year Flood Year Flood
(ft) (ft) (ft)

20 William Street 99.2 33.2 32.2


40 William Street 75.2 9.2 8.2
45 William Street 68.1 2.1 1.1
55 William Street 65.7 -0.3 -1.3
60 William Street 64.0 -2.0 -3.0
65 William Street 67.1 1.1 0.1
80 William Street 66.2 0.2 -0.8
100 William Street 68.2 2.2 1.2
Electrical Transformers Flood Vulnerability

Building Transformer Elevation


(ft)
45 William Street 64.6
55 William Street 66.1
60 William Street 69.4
65 William Street 66.4
80 William Street 65.5
100 William Street 68.01
Findings to Address in the Flood Emergency Response Plan
4 of the 8 buildings are within the FEMA Zone AE (45, 55, 65 and 80 William Street)
Flood impacts at the site may last for extended periods of days.
Some Utilities including external electrical transformers have the potential to be
flooded at 45 and 80 William Street.
All fire protection is located in the form of Siamese fire connections above the 500
year flood even elevation.
Flood Response materials on site are sand bags to be used as temporary response
and car jacks.
Address additional planning for support during the 100 year and 500 year flood
event.
No existing contracts are in place to provide flood-fighting support in the event of a
100 year or 500 year flood event.
Flood Emergency Response Planning
Flood Emergency Response Plan Overview
FM Globals Property Loss Prevention Data Sheet 10-2, Emergency Response (Oct 2012)
1. Flood Hazards and Likely Flooding Scenarios
2. Reliable Methods for Obtaining a Flood Warning
3. Emergency Response Team (ERT) and Responsibilities
4. Utilities Shut Down/De-energize Procedure
5. Emergency Response Procedures
6. Recovery Plan
7. Fire Hazard Minimization Plan
8. Fire Protection Systems Restoration Plan
9. Plan Monitoring and Update Procedures
Flood Hazards and Likely Trigger Scenarios

Peak Discharge Peak Water Surface


Annual Flood Flood Return Flood Response Phase
FEMA FIS 2012 Elevation at Site
Probability Period and Trigger Discharge
(cfs) FEMA FIS 2012 (ft)
Level

Situation A -1,600 cfs

10% 10 year 1,965 63.5


Situation B - 2,200 cfs

2% 50 year 2,660 64.8


Situation C - 2,700 cfs

1% 100 year 2,990 65.8

0.2% 500 year 3,825 67.0


Emergency Response Team & Emergency Notification
Chart
Team Member Role
Patrick OToole Contract
Management
Michael Byrne Property
Management
Rick Crimaldi Emergency Support
Emergency Response Procedures
Phase Trigger Event
Situation A USGS Station # 01104200 Charles River at Wellesley, MA flow
approaches 1,600 cfs and is rising.
National River Forecast Center Charles River at Dover website predicts
flows will exceed 1,600 cfs.
More than 4 inches of rain forecast or actually measured in the area in
24 hours or less
Charles River observed to be out of its banks near the Site
Situation B USGS Station # 01104200 Charles River at Wellesley, MA flow
approaches the 50 year peak flow at 2,200 cfs
National River Forecast Center Charles River at Dover website predicts
flows will exceed 2,200 cfs Moderate Flood Stage.
More than 6 inches of rain forecast or actually measured in the area in
24 hours or less
Flooding observed in site parking lots
Situation C USGS Station # 01104200 Charles River at Wellesley, MA flow
approaches the 100 year peak flow at 2,700 cfs.
National River Forecast Center Charles River at Dover website predicts
flows will exceed 2,700 cfs.
More than 8 inches of rain forecast or actually measured in the area in
24 hours or less
Flooding observed at or near site buildings
Emergency Action Priorities
Earliest Actions
45 William St.
55 William St.
80 William St.
60 William St.
65 William St.
100 William St.
Later Actions
Emergency Action Plan Procedures
Thank you for
attending!
Questions? Comments?

Patrick OToole: POToole@jhancock.com


Samuel J. Bell: samuel.bell@gza.com
Clippership Wharf, A Waterfront Residential Development
by Lendlease in East Boston Planning for Future
Climate Conditions

Jamie M. Fay, AICP, CEP

President
Fort Point Associates, Inc.

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Montgomery County Project Overview Resilient
Microgrid Energy as a Service

David A. Reed
Director
Advanced Microgrids
Schneider Electric

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Project Overview -
Montgomery County Microgrid
Public Safety Headquarters (PSHQ)
100 Edison Park Dr., Gaithersburg, MD

Montgomery County Correctional Facility (MCCF)


22880 Whelan Lane, Boyds, Maryland

David Reed
Schneider Electric
David.Reed@Schneider-electric.com
857.600.1120

Confidential Property of Schneider Electric 92


What is a Microgrid?
An integrated energy system consisting of interconnected
loads and distributed energy resources

which as an integrated system can be controlled as a single entity and operate


in parallel with the grid or in an intentional islanded mode.

Confidential Property of Schneider Electric | Page 93 #EcoStruxure #Microgrid


Consumer Expectations in the New Energy Landscape
From Passive to Active and Integrated
Reduce energy Efficiency Supply Innovative Product
consumption and Hedge Structures
Improve and monetize Global Program
flexibility
Energy / Fuel source
kWh $ Real-time-price
forecasting
arbitrage Portfolio Risk
Active Management
Energy
Reduce Greenhouse Service site loads
Management during times of grid
Gasses
Minimize carbon instability
footprint Protect assets against
Improve LEED harmful effects of poor
power quality
Sustainability Resiliency
Confidential Property of Schneider Electric | Page 94 #EcoStruxure #Microgrid
Montgomery County, MD
Case Study
Innovative Approach to Resiliency

Confidential Property of Schneider Electric | Page 95 #EcoStruxure #Microgrid


Who is Montgomery County, MD?
Office of Energy and Sustainability

Approximately 1M people
High-tech, knowledge-based economy
400+ facilities, 9M sq ft of real estate, 3k
vehicles, 9k employees
Leader in Advanced Energy
11 megawatts of solar across 18 sites
One of the largest green power purchasers in the
US, acquiring more than 430,000,000 kWh of clean
energy annually
Procure 100% clean energy for County facilities
Inaugural Partner in the U.S. DOEs Combined
Heat and Power for Resiliency Accelerator
First CHP system installed in 2016

Confidential Property of Schneider Electric | Page 96 #EcoStruxure #Microgrid


Confidential Property of Schneider Electric | Page 97

#EcoStruxure #Microgrid
Project Objectives
Montgomery County, MD

Improve resiliency of county operations


Upgrade existing aging electrical distribution infrastructure
Ability to island operations for >7 days without grid support
Mitigate risk of escalating energy price over 15 years.
Upgrade infrastructure without capex
Reduce greenhouse gas and other emissions
Create replicable models for other facilities and governments

Public Safety Headquarters Correctional Facility

Confidential Property of Schneider Electric | Page 98


Project Challenges
Montgomery County, MD

Capital procurement not an option


Some aspects of the solution can be tied
to a volumetric charge, others cannot.
Competitive Bid Process Required
Multi-Site
Multi DER type
Required assets have varying economic
useful lives
Rebate & Incentives in flux
Relatively small (<$25M)

Confidential Property of Schneider Electric | Page 99 #EcoStruxure #Microgrid


>Project Scope
> Public Safety Headquarters > Montgomery County Correctional Facility
100 Edison Park Dr., Gaithersburg, MD 22880 Whelan Lane, Boyds, MD

> 2MW-AC Solar PV > 220kW CHP


- Canopy and Rooftop - New, packaged CHP system, Recip. Engine
- Indoor installation, on existing equipment pad in generator room
> Reconfigure incoming MV/LV electrical service
- Replace MV and LV main gear > Reconfigure for Island Mode Operation
- Automate generator operation
> 800kW CHP - Paralleling equipment for CHP with generators in island mode
- Packaged CHP system
- Packaged absorption chiller/tower
- Remove 2 existing CAT 1MW gensets
- Install CHP system and absorption chiller system on existing pad
- Install hot water and chilled water heat/chilling recovery system from
CHP and chiller to basement equipment

Confidential Property of Schneider Electric 100


Microgrid-as-a-Service
Owner Partners Value Proposition

No Upfront Capital
CHP Provider
Infrastructure
Improvements

More predictable
energy costs
PPA Partner
Higher reliability

Better sustainability

PPP Business Model

Host Site

Confidential Property of Schneider Electric | Page 101 #EcoStruxure #Microgrid


Microgrid Benefits to MOCO
Produce almost all energy needed on-site 3.6 million kilowatt hours of energy each year,
enough to power more than 200 homes.

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 3,629 metric tons each year, which translates to
removing over 767 cars off the road or planting 94,000 trees.

Allow Montgomery County to avoid $4M in outright, capital expenditures for MV and LV
electrical system upgrades

Lock in known price of energy for 25 years

Interconnect & Net Metering process complete

Deliver $1.3M in state energy grants

Confidential Property of Schneider Electric 102


Q&A
Learn more about microgrid solutions and project examples at
schneider-electric.us/microgrid
Speaker Panel Discussion: The Business Case for Climate
Adaptation & Resiliency What are the Returns on Resilience?
Moderator:
Daniel Stapleton, Program Chair; Senior Vice President, GZA
Panel Members:
Michael Green, Climate Action Business Association
Jason Hellendrung, Tetra Tech
Patrick O'Toole, John Hancock Real Estate
Samuel Bell, GZA
Jamie Fay, Fort Point Associates, Inc.
David Reed, Schneider Electric

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
Closing Remarks

Wayne Cobleigh
Vice President
Client Services
GZA

Environmental Business Council of New England


Energy Environment Economy
EBC Climate Change Program Series, Part Five:

Adaptation and Resiliency Programs


in the Private Sector