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Muotoja Lylyst

Forms from Steam

FORME
X P LO R
AT I O N
F O R M E X P L O R AT I O N

2017
This catalogue has been created to take you behind
the scenes of this collection of sauna stove designs.
We hope you will enjoy reading it.

05 22
WELCOME! MANTLE
An introduction Design Jakub Zho

06 26
SAU NA HABITS SHAN SHUI
Design Marina Baranova Design Yuze Wang

10 30
JAK A A HIL JA A
Design Pierre Blandeau Design Sara Gottschalk

14 34
SAU NA KIT 00 ACK N OWLE DG E M E NTS
Design Mu He

18
BUNDLES
Design Shih-Yu Chen

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 03
FORMS FROM STEAM

C E L E B R AT I N G S U O M I F I N L A N D 1 0 0
WE LCOME!

Forms from Steam represents new intrepretations of


Finnish sauna culture in form of stoves, water buckets and
ladles. The items are designed by international master
students from Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and
Architecture.

These concepts were implemented during the Form


Exploration course as part of the Collaborative and
Industrial Design master studies.
The idea was to give students a deeper understanding
of Finnish sauna culture. The students were challenged
to transform this experience into designs of these sauna
essentials.

These prototypes created by foreign design talents


are open-minded and sophisticated visions of how the
aesthetics of the Finnish sauna ritual could be interpreted. It
challenges our established conception of sauna experience
and manages to emphasize the most important elements in
Finnish sauna; understandability, honesty and simplicity.

SIMO PUINTILA
Lecturer, Industrial Designer
Aalto University

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 05
SAUNA HABITS

wood burning stove

ireproof concrete, elm,


steel, glass

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SAU N A H A B ITS
D E S I G N E D B Y M A R I N A B A R A N O VA

The project Sauna Habits is aiming to achieve a more


sustainable way of taking a sauna without losing the
traditional experience of wood burning stoves.
According to diferent sources, traditional sauna stoves
have one of the highest emission factors among residential
heating appliances. Their eiciency is low and the lue gas
temperature is high. In a typical stove operation, the fuel
gasiication is fast and the supply of air is clearly insuicient,
causing incomplete combustion. In addition to this, the
wood consumption is signiicant due to the constant
feeding during the heating process and the actual sauna
taking.
As a possible solution, I aimed to implement the
construction principles of residential masonry heaters into
the sauna stove. These heaters are known for producing
more heat and less pollution than any other wood or pellet
burning appliances.
I created an inner structure of the stove, which reminds of
the airlow principles of big masonry heaters but is compact
enough to it into a sauna stove. The structure makes
the airlow circulate inside, which provides a better heat
exchange to reduce the waste of heat, and helps to burn
combustible gases and particulates before they can exit the
chimney. The properties of ireproof concrete to accumulate
and radiate the heat for longer time also mean the reduction
of wood consumption.

What inspired you?


One of the most interesting aspects for me is the
genuinity of experience and the cultural meaning of Finnish
sauna. The name SAUNA HABITS means the approach to
look into peoples culture and habits, slow living, rituals,
social life, and also into the mindfulness inside sauna.

What is your material choice based on?


The core of the stove is made out of ireproof concrete.
The material choice was based on its capability to reach
temperatures high enough to achieve almost total
combustion of wood. The properties of the concrete to
accumulate and radiate the heat for longer time also mean

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 07
08 FORMS FROM STEAM
the reduction of wood consumption.
I AIMED TO ACHIEVE For the bucket I chose aluminium for its low weight and
good corrosion resistance.
A MORE SUSTAINABLE
What type of sauna did you have in mind when designing
WAY OF TAKING SAUNA your stove and bucket?
From the beginning, I kept in mind the traditional sauna
WITHOUT LOOSING type with the wood burning stove as its heart, which gives
pure, satisfying and genuine experience and atmosphere.
THE TRADITIONAL The quality of heat is good, more steam can be produced,
also because higher temperatures are achieved. Soft heat,
EXPERIENCE OF WOOD lush hiss of steam and relaxing crackle of a wood fuelled
ire, smells, a ritual of preparing the wood and iring the
BURNING STOVES. stove make the experience holistic and rich.

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 09
JAK A A
DESIG NE D BY PIE RRE B L ANDE AU

Jakaa is a stove for a tent sauna. It is a central element of


the layout in the sauna. People are sitting around this stove
in a way similar to a campire. This comparison with the
campire is important because it is one of the best places
for socialising. Jakaa allows to create a very pleasant social
atmosphere. The materials emphasize the contrast between
diferent elements. Its conical shape is a very clear reference
to the baptismal font. The association to spirituality is easy
to ind.
The water bucket is also the ladle. This allows to remain
focused on the action of pouring water. This element helps
to create social bonds between users. People can rotate the
water bucket so that everyone can easily participate. The
materials of Jakaa are mainly natural. It matches the Finnish
atmosphere which is linked to nature.

What creates the atmosphere?


In my opinion, the atmosphere of a good sauna is
created by the people. I had the experience to be in a sauna
alone and it was totally diferent. When people are around
you, even if you dont talk to them, you can feel the sharing
of the experience. Just with a small act, like pouring water,
you get the chance to say hello.

What are your main sources of inspiration?


When I discovered Finnish Sauna, I didnt know
anything about it. Here, in Finland, sauna is mainly a place of
spirituality and a time for sharing where everyone is equal -
an authentic Finnish cultural tradition. I had an opportunity
to discover the beneit of steam baths. I was especially
surprised by the variety and all the contrasts they ofer: hot-
cold, dark-luminous, wood-snow.

What is your material choice?


I chose four natural materials: copper for the bucket and
the cone for stones; ireproof concrete for the ireplace, and
black steel for the door and the chimney. I used birch for the
handles. The idea was to create a consistent identity. The
concrete can difuse the heat around the tent and is ire-
resistant. The copper allows focus onto the main elements

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JAK A A

wood burning stove for tent


sauna

ireproof concrete, copper,


birch, steel

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 11
12 FORMS FROM STEAM
of the system (stones and water) thanks to its bright color.
The black steel was merely a functional choice.

What type of sauna did you have in mind when designing


your stove?
When I designed this stove, I wanted to create a system
which could encourage people to share something inside
the sauna. This is the main reason why the stove, the bucket,
and the scoop arent separable.

THE ATMOSPHERE
OF A GOOD SAUNA
IS CREATED BY THE
PEOPLE.

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 13
SAU N A K IT 0 0
DESIG NE D BY M U HE

What was your strongest experience in Finnish sauna?


The warm atmosphere. That means not only the
temperature, but also the real attitudes of Finnish people
about life.

Was it too hot in sauna?


For me, yes, it was. But it is just like going to the gym -
once you start, it becomes more and more comfortable. The
heat in sauna is what is the most charming, isnt it?

What were your sources of inspiration?


I got inspirations from my new understanding between
home appliances and users. The relationship between them
needs to be redeined because of new materials. Due to
the trend of smaller living areas, the distance decreases.
All things at home should be touchable and interactive in
the future. Also I got an inspiration from such forms and
semantics of home appliances like air cleaners, carpets etc.
By trying to ind a new relationship, I wanted to develop a
new form and interaction.

What creates the atmosphere?


People sharing sauna with you, the warm steam, warm
colours of wooden interior, the sauna stove.

What is your material choice based on?


I chose relatively soft materials to enhance the feeling
of home, to make you want to touch it. For the outer layer
of the stove I chose silicone rubber that can resist high
temperatures.

What type of sauna did you have in mind when designing


your stove?
I had in mind a new type of sauna with a new
relationship with home users. People can share more time
with it rather than traditional sauna. With the trend of
intelligent appliances in mind, I wanted users to be able to
control the stove with their phones or other mobile devices
to adjust temperature and humidity. It should be soft and
friendly so that it blends into the home environment. From

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SAUNA KIT 00

electric stove

steel, silicone rubber

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 15
my point of view, the stove should be more like a piece of
furniture instead of just a functional appliance.

Was there something special in Finnish sauna?


Yes, for example the huge contrast between how
Finnish people usually behave and how they behave in
sauna. My stereotype of Finnish people was that they are
shy and silent, whereas they are quite conversational when
drinking beer and sharing sauna. I like Finnish people in
sauna.

THE STOVE SHOULD BE SOFT


AND FRIENDLY SO THAT IT BLENDS
INTO THE HOME ENVIRONMENT. IT
SHOULD BE MORE LIKE A PIECE OF
FURNITURE INSTEAD OF JUST A
FUNCTIONAL APPLIANCE.

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MH -1

electric stove

steel, silicone rubber

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 17
BUNDLES

bucket and ladle

steel, birch, hemp ropes

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BUNDLES
D E S I G N E D BY S H I H -Y U C H E N

For me, sauna experience is a totally new thing. Although


I have been to sauna several times before, the experience
of Finnish public sauna gave me a deeper understanding of
Finnish culture. I think that sauna is not about the tools, or
the space itself, but that it is rather a way of living and a part
of the lifestyle.
I learned more about the set up of the sauna space, the
height for the seats, how to make the smooth steam and
diferent functions for diferent objects in sauna.
In sauna, I think people are more focused on their
feelings. When the hot steam is created and temperatures
rise above 85 degree, people stop their conversations
and the room transforms into a transcendent zone. At this
moment, nobody will care about the shape of the bucket
and scoop, if they look nice or not, and also no one will
care about the present condition of the objects. The only
important thing at that moment is the feeling. So I wanted
my designs to be as low-key as possible, to let people pay
less attention to the objects.
In Finnish sauna people use bundles of birch branches
to make the vihta, and use it to hit their body. These
branches are bundled in a natural way with a cord. So I
wanted to use this method as a form language, and for
product identiication.

What creates the atmosphere?


People, steam, temperature, darkness and lightness and
the feeling after taking sauna. In sauna the atmosphere is
usually so peaceful and comfortable, and after sauna you
are so relaxed. You will forget how tired you were today.

What are your choices of materials?


I was using natural materials for the handle and steel for
the rest, because sauna is usually very simple and natural. I
didnt want to use fancy elements in the sauna room.

What type of sauna did you have in mind when designing


your sauna tools?
I had a small, dark sauna room in my mind with old and
simple things in it with one small window, located in the
woods and beside a small lake.

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 19
I THINK THAT SAUNA IS NOT
ABOUT THE TOOLS, OR THE SPACE
ITSELF, BUT THAT IT IS RATHER A
WAY OF LIVING AND A PART OF
THE LIFESTYLE.

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M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 21
MANTLE
DESIG NE D BY JAKU B ZHO

The design approach to the Mantle, a wood burning


stove, is based on the idea of sauna being a temple for the
mind with its humble, but rich rituals.
The primary goal of the design process was to respect
and enhance the experience. To achieve that, the design had
to ofer a diferent option of watering the stones, that would
both add to the experience and preserve the traditional
value. As a result, the design eliminates the very traditional
bucket & scoop watering method and replaces that with
a simple metal sphere suspended above the stones. The
spheres primary function is both to hold and to pour the
water on to the stones, however it also creates an important
visual contrast to the basic angular shape of the stove. This
contrast of basic geometric shapes is a metaphor for the
contrasts that a sauna presents in itself the contrast of
heat & cold and dark & bright.
This visual efect is further explored in the material
selections. The sphere, which is a pure form, is in a clean,
glossy and relective inish to compliment the water it holds.
On the other hand, the stove represents heat, therefore
ofers materials that compliment the conditions within it,
hence the blackened and corroding steel combined with
copper for the face of the stove. Finally, the interactive parts
are made of wood, as tradition and necessity dictate.
The inal attribute designed to highlight the ritual is the
use of light within the stove. The sphere has its own light
installed within it, which shines through the hole. During the
watering of the stones, it illuminates the steam with a ierce
yellow light in celebration of the heat being produced.
In technical regards, the Mantle is a medium to large
stove, suitable for heating larger or even public saunas. The
installation of the stove would be adjacent to a wall, where
the water supply and the chimney would be connected,
therefore allowing for a purer form.

What was the strongest experience in Finnish sauna?


Among the several experiences, the strongest would
have to the concept of going into the sea. The reason for
that is two-fold. First of all, none of the saunas I have visited
prior to that had that option. Second of all, it was a rather

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MANTLE

wood burning stove

steel, copper, willow

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 23
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challenging decision for the mind to make.

What creates the atmosphere in sauna?


As a designer, I am inclined to say that the space itself
with its layout, materials, size and other such attributes,
however there are many important aspects that go far
beyond those I mentioned, such as the location itself, which
has a huge impact on the atmosphere even before the
experience of the sauna itself.

What inspired you?


My inspiration came primarily from the experiences
I have collected in Finnish saunas during the time. Some
inspiration would come from my preferred materials in my
previously completed projects.

What type of sauna did you have in mind when designing


the stove?
I was generally very inluenced by my experience in
Lyly sauna, therefore I had a mindset that was deined by
various elements that give Lyly its values. In terms of fuel,
I never considered anything but a wood burning sauna, as
wood is an essential material to me, when considering a
sauna.

THIS CONTRAST OF BASIC


GEOMETRIC SHAPES IS A
METAPHOR FOR THE CONTRASTS
THAT A SAUNA PRESENTS IN
ITSELF THE CONTRAST OF HEAT
& COLD AND DARK & BRIGHT.

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 25
SHAN SHUI
D E S I G N E D BY Y U Z E WA N G

The idea is to create a peaceful and natural sauna


atmosphere by imitating the scene of mountains and fog,
which is a classic scenary, painted by ink in ancient Chinese
paintings. I wanted to create the feeling of mountains but
not use its actual shape. This was a bit challenging for me
at irst and I tried lots of diferent forms while considering
ways of achieving the structure of the stove.
Finally, I decided to directly sculpt the sauna rocks as
lots of long rock sticks and arrange them in the form of a
mountain. Its a bit abstract for people to recognize that
it is a mountain but when you see it from a certain angle,
together with the steam, you will have a kind of poetic
feeling.
The stove is part of a loating sauna concept. There were
lots of considerations on the light, I added lots of diferent
window functions not only as a decoration but ofering
people diferent visual experiences.
Locating the sauna on the water seems to be reasonable.
This idea is appealing to me because it is a seemingly
contradictory combination of ire with water or heat
with coldness. This harmoniously produces a very relaxing
and peaceful environment of sauna in a way of connecting
people to the nature.

What was the strongest thing you experienced in Finnish


sauna?
The heat. The feeling of sweating and everyone being
open to each other. At irst it was too hot for me, but later,
slowly when I got used to it, it felt comfortable.

What inspired you?


The roughness of sauna, the way of being close to
nature and a contrast between sauna culture and Jiangnan
culture, as well as bamboo raft in China, mountain and
lake sceneries, Jiangnan ancient architecture and peoples
lifestyle.

What material choices did you make?


For the stove I went for concrete, stone and steel.

Was there something special in Finnish sauna?


I think the smoke sauna and those old forms of sauna
are special to me, because when you go there one more
thing you experience is the history and stories behind them.

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SHAN SHUI

wood-burning stove for loating


sauna

ireproof concrete, steel

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 27
I THINK THE SMOKE SAUNA AND
THOSE OLD FORMS OF SAUNA ARE
SPECIAL TO ME, BECAUSE WHEN
YOU GO THERE ONE MORE THING
YOU EXPERIENCE IS THE HISTORY
AND STORIES BEHIND THEM.

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M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 29
HIL JA A

electric stove

steel, copper, birch

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H I L JA A
DESIG NE D BY SAR A GOT TSCHALK

The hiljaa sauna stove, bucket and ladle have been


designed to enhance the sauna experience for city
apartments in Finland. The ritual that comes with sauna
is maybe the most celebrated and famous part of Finnish
culture - a place where everyone comes together as human
beings, naked and honest.
The designed hiljaa sauna stove with its bucket and
ladle should bring more of the original and authentic
wood burning and smoke sauna feeling into peoples small
apartment saunas.
Not in use, the sauna stove looks rather inconspicuous,
but once the ritual starts, people can open the stove door
which then seems to reveal the warm burning heart of
the stove and can remind of the glowing ire inside a wood
burning stove. The bucket can be placed on the open
stove door for easier access to pour water onto the hot
stones, which creates the warm and soft steam called lyly.
The tools all belong together but can still each stand for
themselves.
The use of copper and wood as warm materials combined
with the rough and over-time rusty steel shall relect the
heart of sauna and make room for more authentic sauna
feelings, which are usually only available in public saunas or
private setups outside of town. As water will be thrown onto
and around the stove, the surface of the copper material will
create a certain patina over time and thus be a unique piece
to each owner.
The interplay of predictability and surprise, combined
with simplicity should make this sauna design available for
everyone and allow more honest and special electric sauna
moments, alone or in the company with another.

What was the strongest element you experienced in


Finnish sauna?
The feeling of absolute peace that came upon me by the
end of the sauna visit. This combination of nature, wood, hot
steam and being naked and away from technology allowed
for a kind of quiet that would mesmerize me again and
again.

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 31
32 FORMS FROM STEAM
Was it too hot in sauna?
In general, I dont like heat and thats what has kept
me from going to sauna before. But during dark and cold
Finnish winter, the heat was a blessing and I learned to love
it. Still, some saunas are indeed too hot for me.

What creates the atmosphere?


To me the atmosphere is created by being out in nature
or surrounded by natural materials and by being completely
naked with other human beings, rare and authentic, away
from hectic and digital life. Also, the darkness in the sauna
room and the sound of steam creates an atmosphere that
can hardly be described, but only felt.

What were sources of inspiration?


My biggest sources of inspiration were materials that
made me as a human and sensual being feel like I belonged
to that place. Also, the concept of being lawed and that its
okay, because everyone and everything else is as well, has
created this appreciation for imperfection, which I wanted
to use and implement into the sauna stove and tools design.

Whats special about your choice of materials?


I wanted to use materials which would change over time
and by the inluence of human usage. Especially in sauna,
conditions are rough it is hot and water is thrown at the
stove a lot. The materials should allow this usage and let
humans leave their mark on them.

ONCE THE RITUAL


STARTS, PEOPLE CAN
OPEN THE STOVE DOOR
WHICH THEN SEEMS
TO REVEAL THE WARM
BURNING HEART OF
THE STOVE

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 33
AC K N OW L E D G E M E N T S

A A LT O W O R K S H O P M A S T E R S SAUNA VISITS AND LECTURES

Ville Arkonkoski Sauna Arla with Kimmo Helist


Osse Federley Suomen saunaseura with Ari-Pekka Paavola
Martin Hackenberg Introduction to Finnish sauna with Risto Vuolle-Apiala
Matti Kauppinen Kotiharjun Sauna with Pekko-Oskari Mkinen
Teemu Mntyl Iki Headquarters with Samuli Kerrman
Hannu Paajanen Lyly
Tomi Pelkonen Kultuurisauna with Tuomas Toivonen
Arto Sillanp Lonna sauna with Wille Vnnen

SPECIAL THANKS

Parhaat Lylyt
Sauna stones sponsorship

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ABOUT

C O I D / C O L L A B O R AT I V E A N D I N D U S T R I A L
FORMS FROM STEAM / THE EXHIBITION DESIGN

EXHIBITION DESIGN The Collaborative and Industrial Design Master programme


Simo Puintila focuses on design innovation. Its about in-depth
understanding of designs role in society and in the
CATALOGUE EDITORS emerging ields where design activities can enhance the
Sara Gottschalk quality of environment and peoples life.
Marina Baranova The programme teaches empathic, critical, strategic and
technological skills needed in design innovation processes
GRAPHIC DESIGN and encourages to explore and take over the roles
Tuomas Hmlinen unforeseen in design industry design activities can enhance
the quality of environment and peoples lives.
PHOTOGRAPHY coid.aalto.i
Sara Gottschalk
Marina Baranova
Simo Puintila

PRINT
Aalto Printlab

S T U D E N T C O N TA C T S LECTURER

Marina Baranova Simo Puintila


marina.baranova@aalto.i Industrial Designer
Department of Design
Pierre Blandeau Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture
pierreblandeau1995@gmail.com +358 50 5175036
simo.puintila@aalto.i
Mu He
mu.he@aalto.i

Shih-Yu Chen
bcsiyaua@gmail.com

Jakub Zho
zahor.j@gmail.com

Yuze Wang
yuze.wang@aalto.i

Sara Gottschalk
sara.gottschalk@aalto.i

M U O T O J A L Y LY S T 35