Life Skills Years 7–10

Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

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Published by Board of Studies NSW GPO Box 5300 Sydney NSW 2001 Australia Tel: (02) 9367 8111 Fax: (02) 9367 8484 Internet: www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au First published August 2004 Updated July 2007 ISBN 1 7414 7083 8
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Contents 1 2 Introduction ................................................................................................................. 5 Curriculum options for students with special education needs ...................................... 6 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 3 3.1 3.2 3.3 4 5 Inclusive curriculum ........................................................................................... 6 Collaborative curriculum planning ...................................................................... 7 Curriculum adjustments ...................................................................................... 7 Decision to access Life Skills outcomes and content ........................................... 9 School planning to implement Life Skills outcomes and content ....................... 11 Frequently asked questions on access to Life Skills outcomes and content ........ 11 Assessment of Life Skills outcomes .................................................................. 13 Reporting achievement of Life Skills outcomes................................................. 15 Model of programming from Life Skills outcomes and content ......................... 15

Programming Life Skills outcomes and content.......................................................... 13

Introduction to the sample units of work .................................................................... 17 English....................................................................................................................... 20 5.1 5.2 Viewing and reviewing film.............................................................................. 21 Myself .............................................................................................................. 30 Number............................................................................................................. 36 Fractions ........................................................................................................... 40 Money .............................................................................................................. 42 Time ................................................................................................................. 45 The needs of living things ................................................................................. 50 Energy in everyday life ..................................................................................... 61 History Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Connections with History.......................... 69 Geography Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Australian communities....................... 77 Aboriginal Studies Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Connecting with Aboriginal people and their cultures.................................................................. 87 Commerce Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Informed consumers ............................ 95 Work Education Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: The world of work .................... 107 Technology (Mandatory) Years 7–8 Life Skills unit: What do you make of it?...................................................................................................... 119 Agricultural Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Vegetable production enterprise ...................................................................... 127 Design and Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Storage matters.............. 136

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Mathematics............................................................................................................... 35 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4

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Science ...................................................................................................................... 49 7.1 7.2

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HSIE.......................................................................................................................... 68 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5

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Technological and Applied Studies .......................................................................... 117 9.1 9.2 9.3

9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 10

Food Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Celebrations ............................ 144 Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Stand-out logos ................. 151 Industrial Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Timber utility box ............ 159 Information and Software Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: School events in digital ................................................................................... 167 Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Creating with fabrics .......... 175

Creative Arts............................................................................................................ 181 10.1 Music Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Australian music....................................... 182 10.2 Visual Arts Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: ‘I am’................................................ 190 10.3 Dance Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Let’s dance!.............................................. 197 10.4 Drama Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Roles, characters, action! ......................... 204 10.5 Visual Design Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: ‘My Magazine’............................. 212 10.6 Photographic and Digital Media Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: ‘Shapes and Shadows’ .................................................................................... 218

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Personal Development, Health and Physical Education ............................................ 224 11.1 Facing new challenges .................................................................................... 225 11.2 Personal safety net .......................................................................................... 233

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Languages................................................................................................................ 243 12.1 Languages Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Let’s celebrate together...................... 244 12.2 Aboriginal Languages Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Families, friends and country ..................................................................................................... 252

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

1

Introduction

This support document has been designed to help teachers understand key aspects of the Life Skills outcomes and content that have been developed in conjunction with the new Years 7–10 syllabuses, and to provide guidance for initial implementation. The document should be read in conjunction with the relevant syllabus and support documents already distributed to schools and accessible through the Board of Studies website (www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au). This advice provides information additional to that contained in the relevant syllabus and support documents to assist teachers to: • clarify the process to access Life Skills outcomes and content and identify those students for whom this option may be appropriate • program from Life Skills outcomes and content in the new Years 7–10 syllabuses • design and implement appropriate assessment processes for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content by reflecting on evidence of learning in relation to outcomes. The document contains sample units of work organised in key learning areas (KLAs). In each sample unit, a number of integrated teaching, learning and assessment activities have been prepared to assist teachers to become familiar with the Life Skills outcomes and content in the particular Years 7–10 syllabus. In addition, links to Life Skills outcomes from other syllabuses have been provided to assist teachers in developing integrated units. The sample units provide a basis from which teachers can develop their own programs to cater for the learning needs of the students in their class.

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Curriculum adjustments (see section 2. aim. Decision to access Life Skills outcomes and content (see section 2. that guides K–10 syllabus development.2) All students with special education needs should be encouraged to choose the most appropriate curriculum options in keeping with their interests. The rationale. Providing for students with special education needs: an overview Collaborative curriculum planning (see section 2.5) The school develops a plan to implement Life Skills outcomes and content and assist the student in the learning process. The Stage Statements and the Continuum of Learning in each syllabus can help teachers identify the starting point for instruction for the students in their class. This is best done in the context of collaborative curriculum planning with the student. goals and learning needs. for a small percentage of these students. is that the curriculum must be inclusive of all students in New South Wales. However. accessible and meaningful curriculum option. School planning to implement Life Skills outcomes and content (see section 2. Most students with special education needs will participate fully in learning experiences and assessment activities provided by the regular syllabus outcomes and content. although they may require additional support. the collaborative curriculum planning process may determine that a pattern of study based on Life Skills outcomes and content in one or more of the Years 7–10 syllabuses is appropriate. However. Programming and Assessment 2 2. particularly those with an intellectual disability. 6 .4) For some students with special education needs. strengths.1 Curriculum options for students with special education needs Inclusive curriculum A key principle of the K–10 Curriculum Framework. learning support personnel and community service providers as appropriate).Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.3) Most students with special education needs will participate fully in learning experiences and assessment activities provided by the regular syllabus outcomes and content. parent/carer and other significant individuals in the student’s life (eg teachers. particularly those with an intellectual disability. outcomes and content of each syllabus have been designed to accommodate teaching approaches that support the learning needs of all students. the Life Skills outcomes and content in each syllabus can provide a more relevant. The Board of Studies recognises that all teachers have students in their classrooms with a range of needs and abilities. including adjustments to teaching and learning activities and/or assessment. objectives. they may require additional support and/or adjustments to teaching and learning activities and/or assessment.

simplified texts. Collaborative curriculum planning should focus on designing and implementing an appropriate pattern of study for the student and examining relevant curriculum options that will lead to the award of the School Certificate. 2. (Other forms of adjustment. goals and learning needs • the support and/or adjustments that may be necessary for the student to fully access the curriculum (see section 2.) Adjustments to teaching and learning Some students may require: • adjustments to classroom organisation.3 Curriculum adjustments Curriculum adjustments are measures or actions taken in relation to teaching. eg consideration may need to be given to positioning the student in the classroom to maximise participation and/or access to instruction • adjustments to enable access to teaching and learning activities. adjustments or modifications to equipment or furniture.3) • the transition needs of the student from school to adult life. eg the use of technology. strengths. learning support personnel and community service providers may be involved. These decisions need to involve those who have significant knowledge and understanding of the student. subtitled videos and DVDs. The following information outlines possible curriculum adjustments for students with special education needs. including to the physical access of buildings. learning and assessment that enable a student with special education needs to access syllabus outcomes and content. oral/sign interpreters or readers and scribes. Programming and Assessment 2.2 Collaborative curriculum planning Collaborative curriculum planning is the process by which a team of people meet to discuss and make decisions about curriculum options and adjustments that will enable a student with special education needs to access the curriculum. Refer to the Assessment. When making decisions about curriculum options it is important to consider: • the student’s interests. These adjustments will vary according to the needs of the individual student. disk or Braille. In addition. It might be necessary to provide the student with additional assistance or encouragement to enable them to be actively involved in the process. Consultation with the respective support personnel in schools is important when making decisions about the most appropriate curriculum options for students with special education needs. alternative formats such as large print. A range of curriculum adjustments should be explored before a decision is made to access Life Skills outcomes and content. may also be necessary to promote active participation in all aspects of school life by students with special education needs. the principal.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. subject/classroom teachers. School systems and individual independent schools are responsible for the manner in which this collaborative planning process is managed. and adjustments to enable participation in field trips and excursions 7 . Participants should include the student and parents/carers. Certification and Examination Manual (ACE Manual) for mandatory curriculum requirements.

writing or recording. multimedia presentation or video • following a visual sequence of instructions. Programming and Assessment • • • • adjustments to the amount of content to be covered in a particular lesson or unit of work or the time allocated to complete work additional demonstration of key concepts and skills by the teacher.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. eg the student sequences pictures to tell a story. A student may participate in commenting and discussing by: • oral contribution to class discussion • answering closed questions on a topic • using changes in facial expression. learning and assessment activities. circles a selection of symbols on a page to create a list • using computer software. A student may participate in writing or recording by: • writing short answers to questions • ticking pre-prepared checklists • using photographs. A student may participate in reading activities by: • reading simplified texts • reading transcripts • following a text being read by a peer or adult • following a text from audiotape. Some of these strategies may require additional support from the teacher. uses scanned pictures and/or digital photographs in a multimedia presentation. peer or volunteer tutoring. reading. uses assistive technology to select text or pictures from the screen. pictures or symbols. fewer questions or alternative formats for questions • alternative formats for responses. nod or gesture to respond to a closed question. scaffolded structured responses. short objective questions. and/or other individual assistance. using simplified language. eg the student makes a choice between two photographs to express a preference (like/don’t like) • selecting symbols from a topic board or communication book to express an opinion • using a communication device. Adjustments to assessment Some students may require: • adjustments to the assessment process such as additional time. CD-ROM. multimedia presentations. teacher’s aide or a peer a range of appropriate learning activities with structured opportunities for guided and independent practice and effective feedback additional support through group work. quieter conditions. or the use of a reader and/or scribe or specific technology • adjustments to assessment tasks such as rephrasing questions. rest breaks. eg written point form instead of essays. 8 . combines symbols to convey meaning. eg the student uses a drawing program and pictures to write. eg ‘Are you playing in a sports team at school?’ • selecting photographs. a visual recipe or a visual timetable. They identify alternative ways for students to participate in commenting and discussing. eg the student leads a group discussion with pre-recorded questions or a peer records information on a communication device for the student to present to the class during group work. listening and viewing. teacher’s aide or a peer. The following are more specific examples of adjustments that can be made to teaching. pictures or symbols.

Decisions are made at school level to offer adjustments to students with special education needs in course work and assessment tasks. DVDs • reading summaries/descriptions of the visual input from photographs. multimedia presentation or video • responding to tone of voice in conjunction with facial expressions. slides. the planning team members should: • consider carefully the student’s priorities. The following flow chart outlines a process that might be helpful when considering whether a student should access Life Skills outcomes and content. films/videos/DVDs. Refer to section 7 of the ACE Manual for further information about special provisions in the School Certificate tests. In coming to the decision to access Life Skills outcomes and content. multimedia presentations. Programming and Assessment A student may participate in listening activities by: • listening to a text being read by a peer or adult • listening to a text from audiotape.2) • with consideration to curriculum adjustments (see section 2. 9 . films/videos/DVDs. slides. the application for special provisions in external examinations is a separate process. gestures and/or physical prompts. CD-ROM. facial expressions. competencies and learning needs • establish that the regular outcomes of the particular Years 7–10 syllabus are not appropriate to meet the needs of the student. teaching strategies and assessment practices that are still required in those subjects in which the student undertakes regular syllabus outcomes and content • demonstrate that the student’s pattern of study will meet the requirements for the School Certificate.4 Decision to access Life Skills outcomes and content The decision to access Life Skills outcomes and content in one or more Years 7–10 syllabuses is made: • within the context of collaborative curriculum planning (see section 2. pictures and posters while they ‘view’ the visual media or multimedia together • responding to sensory stimuli.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. A student may participate in viewing activities by: • viewing subtitled videos. eg note the curriculum adjustments that have already been implemented for the student and why these alone are not appropriate to meet the student’s present and future needs • record the adjustments to instruction. pictures and posters • listening to a peer or adult describe the visual input from photographs. 2. gestures or physical prompts in conjunction with tone of voice. However. multimedia presentations.3) • with regard to the student’s pattern of study for the School Certificate (refer to section 5 of the ACE Manual).

then the student should access Life Skills outcomes and content in one or more subjects. Are the student’s interests. then consider Life Skills outcomes and content in the relevant syllabus. What further adjustments are required to assessment? 7. strengths. then the student should follow a regular syllabus program in that subject with appropriate adjustments. 4. goals and present and future learning needs best addressed by Life Skills outcomes and content in one or more subjects? If yes. then consider a range of curriculum adjustments. then the student should follow a regular syllabus program in that subject without adjustments. Programming and Assessment Deciding whether a student should access Life Skills outcomes and content The following questions might be helpful when considering whether a student should access Life Skills outcomes and content in one or more Years 7–10 syllabuses. What are the implications for the student’s future study and transition to adult life? 10 . learning and/or assessment? If no. Can the student access some or all of the regular syllabus outcomes in a particular subject without adjustments? If no. Will the student’s pattern of study meet the requirements for the award of the School Certificate? 8. Can the student access some or all of the regular syllabus outcomes in a particular subject with adjustments to teaching. 3. If yes. In which subjects will the student access Life Skills outcomes and content? 5.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 1. 2. If yes. What further adjustments are required to teaching and learning? 6.

2. Does the student have to undertake Life Skills outcomes and content in all subjects? No. nor is it necessary to submit planning documentation. Refer to section 9 of the ACE Manual for further details of the pattern of study requirements for the School Certificate for students with special education needs. However. When can a decision to access Years 7–10 Life Skills outcomes and content be made? The decision to access Life Skills outcomes and content can be made at any time during the course of Years 7–10. some students may study Life Skills outcomes and content in every subject.6 Frequently asked questions on access to Life Skills outcomes and content Who can access Life Skills outcomes and content? The Board expects that the majority of students who will access Life Skills outcomes and content will have an intellectual disability. 11 . However. Other students may study a combination of Life Skills outcomes and content in some subjects and regular outcomes and content in other subjects. It is important to remember that students with special education needs build on their achievements from K–6 and collaborative curriculum planning enables consideration of curriculum options and adjustments over time. eg school.5 School planning to implement Life Skills outcomes and content When it has been decided that a student should access Life Skills outcomes and content in one or more subjects. Programming and Assessment 2. community or workplace • the time needed for addressing outcomes and content • the resources required to assist the school in meeting the needs of the student • teaching strategies that are appropriate to the age and abilities of the student • curriculum adjustments that may be required to enable the student to access the Life Skills outcomes and content • strategies for monitoring the student’s progress • ongoing collaborative planning to assist the student’s successful transition through school to adult life. it is not necessary to submit documentation or confirmation of a disability to the Board for students to access Life Skills outcomes and content. The appropriate timing of the decision will be determined by the needs of the individual student. Schools do not need to ask permission from the Office of the Board of Studies for students to access Life Skills outcomes and content. it is not possible for students to undertake a combination of regular and Life Skills outcomes within the same subject. school planning to support the student in the learning process should address: • the selection of appropriate personnel to be involved in the design and implementation of the pattern of study for the student • the selection of Life Skills outcomes and content that will form the basis of the student’s program of study in a particular subject • the most appropriate contexts for the student to demonstrate achievement of outcomes.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.

schools may develop integrated programs using Life Skills outcomes and content from selected subjects across the key learning areas. When is it appropriate to access Life Skills outcomes and content as the preferred curriculum option in a particular subject? Before the decision is made to access Life Skills outcomes and content in a particular subject. schools should first explore a range of curriculum adjustments for a student with special education needs and decide whether these will enable the student to access some or all of the regular syllabus outcomes and content. students do not need to complete all of the content to demonstrate achievement of a Life Skills outcome. Content may be selected according to the student’s learning needs. Do students have to complete all of the content to demonstrate achievement of a Life Skills outcome? No.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Can schools develop integrated programs across the key learning areas? Yes. 12 . Each syllabus has content for each outcome – in the form of ‘Students learn about’ and ‘Students learn to’ – which forms the basis of the learning activities for students. students do not need to address or complete all the Life Skills outcomes in a particular subject. Life Skills outcomes should be selected according to the student’s learning needs. Students who are capable of achieving some or all of the regular syllabus outcomes should be encouraged to do so. Links are provided in each of the sample units in sections 5 to 12 to help schools develop integrated programs for students accessing Life Skills outcomes and content from more than one subject. Do students have to complete all the Life Skills outcomes in a particular subject? No.

The Board’s revised Years 7–10 syllabuses advocate assessment for learning principles. teachers should: • determine the evidence of learning that needs to be collected in relation to the outcomes for individual students • determine how the evidence of learning in relation to outcomes will be gathered • plan teaching. learning and assessment activities that address the learning needs of all students in the class • provide appropriate feedback to students in relation to their learning • reflect on the student’s performance in relation to the selected Life Skills outcomes • adjust teaching strategies accordingly. Programming and Assessment 3 3. 13 .Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. After selecting the appropriate Life Skills outcomes. The diagram on the following page emphasises that Life Skills outcomes are central to the teaching and learning cycle. Ongoing assessment provides information about the student’s ability to maintain and generalise their knowledge and skills to a range of contexts. Assessment is a regular part of the teaching and learning cycle for all students including students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content. It informs decisions about the student’s current level of skill development in relation to Life Skills outcomes. The principles of assessment for learning reinforce good teaching practice. Teachers may also design specific assessment tasks to assess achievement at particular points.1 Programming Life Skills outcomes and content Assessment of Life Skills outcomes Assessment for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content involves collecting evidence and reflecting on the student’s performance in relation to the Life Skills outcomes selected in a particular subject. and supports further learning.

Teachers should identify opportunities for maintenance of knowledge and skills and generalisation of achievement of outcomes. Evidence of learning links observable behaviour and student products to achievement in relation to outcomes. The student’s learning needs should determine which Life Skills outcomes and content are addressed. Teachers reflect on student performance in relation to Life Skills outcomes. Identify the Life Skills outcomes that will be addressed in the particular syllabus or unit of work. teaching and learning experiences appropriate to the outcomes. Some strategies for gathering evidence of learning in relation to Life Skills outcomes may include: • observation of a physical response • observation of engagement in the teaching and learning activity • observation of performance in practical activities • observation of participation in group work • written responses such as diary entries. Students do not need to address all the Life Skills outcomes in each syllabus. The selection of Life Skills outcomes for individual students is central to the teaching and learning cycle. learning and assessment cycle will inform any changes that are needed to instruction and teaching strategies. sketching/graphic communication. understanding and skills. Teachers plan the instruction.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 14 . including modifications to equipment. Feedback to students Appropriate feedback during and at the end of activities guides and affirms student behaviour towards achievement of outcomes. This may include oral. visual and/or physical prompts. visual or tangible forms. Teachers should consider the most effective form of feedback for individual students. verbal. It is important that teachers develop whole-of-class programs that can accommodate the learning needs of all students. learning and assessment activities The following diagram demonstrates one method of programming from Life Skills outcomes and content that incorporates ongoing assessment. and physical assistance. Teachers need to become aware of: • the way in which the student communicates • the time required for the student to communicate • support that will be required for the student to demonstrate achievement in relation to outcomes. Content and learning experiences Each syllabus has content for each outcome in the form of ‘Students learn about’ and ‘Students learn to’ that may be selected according to individual student’s learning needs. Students will be assessed in relation to the selected Life Skills outcomes. Programming and Assessment Developing integrated teaching. The content forms the basis of the learning activities for students and also provides opportunities for teachers to make judgements on student achievement. Evidence of learning for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content must be specific to the individual student. Information gathered as part of the teaching. Outcomes need to be revisited and reviewed often to ensure maintenance and generalisation of knowledge. design portfolio • responses using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems • oral reports and presentations • visual displays such as collage. furniture and environment.

15 .Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. It is important to prioritise outcomes in a particular unit or theme so that assessment is manageable over a period of time. Programming from Life Skills outcomes and content Note: The selection of Life Skills outcomes and content is informed by collaborative curriculum planning.au/manuals/pdf_doc/sc_credent_specialneeds. 3. Students do not need to address or complete all the Life Skills outcomes in a particular subject.pdf). The mechanism for regular reporting on a student’s progress to parents/carers should be decided by the school.nsw. The model is a suggested process only and teachers may vary the sequence of the planning steps. Further information about assessment and reporting in relation to Life Skills outcomes for the School Certificate is provided in: • the ACE Manual • School Certificate Credentialling for Students with Special Education Needs in Stage 5 (www. The student’s learning needs should determine the Life Skills outcomes and content selected. Schools will advise the Board of a student’s individual achievement of Life Skills outcomes using Schools Online.3 Model of programming from Life Skills outcomes and content The new Years 7–10 syllabuses encourage a model of programming that begins with outcomes and is explicit about what is being taught and what is being learnt. Step 1 Select the Life Skills outcomes and content that will be addressed in a particular syllabus or unit of work. School Certificate Record of Achievement and the Student Profile make up the portfolio of School Certificate credentials for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content in one or more subjects.boardofstudies. The following steps summarise a process of programming from Life Skills outcomes and content for students in a range of contexts.edu. The School Certificate Testamur. Programming and Assessment 3. Each syllabus has content for each outcome in the form of ‘Students learn about’ and ‘Students learn to’ which forms the basis of the learning activities and also provides opportunities for teachers to make judgements about student achievement of outcomes. The Board will issue a Student Profile that reports on the student’s achievement of Life Skills outcomes based on the information provided by schools.2 Reporting achievement of Life Skills outcomes The reporting of a student’s achievement to the Board of Studies for the School Certificate will be in relation to the Life Skills outcomes selected from the new Years 7–10 syllabus documents. Students do not need to complete all the content associated with an outcome to demonstrate achievement of that outcome.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Step 2

Identify the required evidence of learning that will enable students to demonstrate achievement in relation to outcomes. Evidence of learning for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content must be specific to the individual student. Teachers need to become aware of: • the way in which a student communicates • the time required for the student to communicate • the support that will be required for the student to demonstrate achievement in relation to outcomes, including modifications to equipment, furniture and environment; oral, visual and/or physical prompts; and physical assistance. Evidence of learning links observable behaviour and student products to achievement in relation to outcomes. Some strategies for gathering evidence of learning may include: • observation of a physical response • observation of engagement in the teaching and learning activity • observation of performance in practical activities • observation of participation in group work • written responses such as diary entries, design portfolio • responses using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems • oral reports and presentations • visual displays such as collage, sketching/graphic communication.

Step 3

Plan the instruction, teaching and learning experiences and assessment opportunities appropriate to the outcomes. To cater for the range of needs of students in any given classroom it is important that teachers develop whole-of-class programs that can accommodate the learning needs of all students. It is important when developing teaching and learning activities that teachers consider: • the sequence of the teaching and learning activity • the appropriate placement of the student in that sequence • a range of adjustments to enable individual students to participate effectively • age-appropriate activities and materials • the student’s individual communication system • the provision of opportunities for the student to generalise skills into other contexts. The sample units of work in sections 5 to 12 provide examples of integrated teaching, learning and assessment activities. Teachers should develop their own teaching and learning activities that are appropriate for the students in their class.

Step 4

Ensure that appropriate and meaningful feedback is given to the student throughout the learning experience to guide further learning and encourage participation. Teachers should consider the most effective form of feedback for individual students in relation to their learning.

Step 6

Reflect on student progress towards outcomes, including generalisation across school, community and workplace contexts and maintenance of achievement over time. Outcomes need to be revisited and reviewed often to ensure generalisation and maintenance of knowledge, understanding and skills. Students should be given structured opportunities to generalise knowledge, understanding and skills.

Step 7

Adjust teaching and learning experiences accordingly. Information gathered as part of the teaching, learning and assessment cycle will inform any changes that are needed to teaching strategies.

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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

4

Introduction to the sample units of work

Sample units of work are presented in the following sections to assist teachers in programming Life Skills outcomes and content from the new Years 7–10 syllabuses. These sample units have been organised in KLAs and each section contains units of work that address the particular Years 7–10 syllabuses in the KLA. The units contain ideas that can be used with students with a range of support needs in a variety of contexts. The sample units should be read in conjunction with the following syllabus and support documents that can be accessed through the Board of Studies website (www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au).

Key Learning Area English Mathematics Science Human Society and Its Environment

Syllabus English Years 7–10 Syllabus Mathematics Years 7–10 Syllabus Science Years 7–10 Syllabus History Years 7–10 Syllabus Geography Years 7–10 Syllabus Aboriginal Studies Years 7–10 Syllabus Commerce Years 7–10 Syllabus Work Education Years 7–10 Syllabus

Support documents English Years 7–10 Syllabus: Advice on Programming and Assessment Mathematics Years 7–10 Syllabus: Advice on Programming and Assessment Science Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment History Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Geography Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Aboriginal Studies Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Commerce Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Work Education Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Technology (Mandatory) Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Agricultural Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Design and Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Food Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Graphics Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Industrial Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Information and Software Technology Years 7– 10: Advice on Programming and Assessment

Technological and Applied Studies

Technology (Mandatory) Years 7–10 Syllabus Agricultural Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Design and Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Food Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Industrial Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus Information and Software Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus * Marine and Aquaculture Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus (Content Endorsed Course) Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Syllabus

Textiles Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment

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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Key Learning Area Creative Arts

Syllabus Music Years 7–10 Syllabus Visual Arts Years 7–10 Syllabus Dance Years 7–10 Syllabus Drama Years 7–10 Syllabus *Photographic and Digital Media Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus

Support documents Music Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Visual Arts Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Dance Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment Drama Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment

*Visual Design Years 7–10 Draft Syllabus Personal Personal Development, Health and Development, Health Physical Education Years 7–10 Syllabus and Physical Education *Physical Activity and Sports Studies Years 7–10 Syllabus (Content Endorsed Course) Aboriginal Languages K–10 Syllabus #Arabic K–10 Syllabus #Chinese K–10 Syllabus #Classical Greek K–10 Syllabus #French K–10 Syllabus #German K–10 Syllabus #Hebrew K–10 Syllabus #Indonesian K–10 Syllabus #Italian K–10 Syllabus #Japanese K–10 Syllabus #Korean K–10 Syllabus #Latin K–10 Syllabus #Modern Greek K–10 Syllabus #Russian K–10 Syllabus #Spanish K–10 Syllabus #Turkish K–10 Syllabus #Vietnamese K–10 Syllabus

Personal Development, Health and Physical Education Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment

Languages

Aboriginal Languages: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Arabic: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Chinese: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Classical Greek: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 French: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 German: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Hebrew: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Indonesian: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Italian: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Japanese: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Korean: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Latin: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Modern Greek: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Russian: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Spanish: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 Turkish: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5

Vietnamese: Advice on Programming and Assessment for Stages 4 and 5 * The Life Skills outcomes and content of these syllabuses are not addressed in this support document. # One sample unit Let’s celebrate together (section 12.1 of this support document) has been written generically and may be used for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content from any selected languages syllabus. 18

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

The format of the sample units aligns closely with those in the respective Years 7–10 syllabus support documents. The sample units have a ‘Links’ section to help schools in developing integrated programs for students accessing Life Skills outcomes and content from more than one subject. It may also help teachers to plan additional opportunities for students to demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of contexts and environments. The time allocated to complete activities in the sample units will vary according to the needs of students. Where necessary, teachers should make more time available for students to complete selected activities or demonstrate achievement of outcomes. The number of outcomes that students will be addressing at any one time will vary depending on the unit of work and the capabilities of the student. Teachers should select a manageable number of outcomes per unit informed by the interests, strengths, goals and learning needs of their students. The sample units are intended to be used flexibly and to provide a starting point for teachers in using the Life Skills outcomes and content in the new Years 7–10 syllabuses. Students do not need to address all of the outcomes listed in the following units, as they serve as examples only. The student’s learning needs should determine those Life Skills outcomes that are selected.

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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

5

English

The following sample units of work are provided as examples to clarify the process of programming for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content from the English key learning area. The sample units should be read in conjunction with the English Years 7–10 Syllabus and the support document English Years 7–10 Syllabus: Advice on Programming and Assessment already distributed to schools and available on the Board of Studies website (www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au).

Unit number 5.1

Unit title Viewing and reviewing film

Unit description The unit engages students in the study of four areas: initial responses to, and understanding of, film; promotion of films; posters and reviews; and close study of film. This unit is based on a unit of the same name in the support document English Years 7–10 Syllabus: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 33–41). In the sample unit that follows (pp 21–29), the sections marked (a) contain programming from that support document. The sections marked (b) contain programming based on Life Skills outcomes and content. This programming will align with the classroom activities that are taking place as a result of the section (a) programming.

5.2

Myself

The unit engages students in the study of sharing and engaging with others and composing various texts such as personal diary, email, personal greetings and presenting research information. This unit has been developed from a unit in the support document English Years 7–10 Syllabus: Advice on Programming and Assessment (p 12), as appropriate for students in Year 7.

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6. 6. 4.10. 14.10 9. 4. 2. 11.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.11.6.8 17.1.2.11 11.6.1.1 uses information and software technology to participate in and manage their environment LS. 11.8.7. 14. 13.4. 4.4.8. 14. 10.5.11 12. 17. 4. 2.6.7.5.12 10.1 experiences a variety of drama or theatre performances Life Skills Outcomes A student: LS.5. 9. Programming and Assessment 5. 17.10.2.8. 3.7.5. 6.6. 1.1. 6.1. cultural and historical contexts explores ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated through photographic and digital media works explores ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in visual design artworks.4 Visual Design LS.1 responds to auditory cues in a range of contexts LS.9.2. roles. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Viewing and reviewing film’ in English Years 7–10 Syllabus: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 33–41).4 For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.9.1.17 uses individual and collaborative skills in the learning process. 13. 4.2. 17. Links Drama Graphics Technology Information and Software Technology LS. 6.13 communicates in a range of contexts LS. 17. 13. 14.7.7 experiences music from a variety of social. 2.1.6.3.10 composes increasingly complex written texts LS.9 writes short texts for everyday purposes LS.5 6.6.4. 17.6.3 uses technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences LS.13 5.14 communicates with a range of audiences LS.11 views and responds to a range of visual texts. media and multimedia LS.4 uses spoken language to interact with a range of audiences LS.12 communicates for a variety of purposes LS.1. 11.8. 5.2. 3.5. 17.1.7.2 undertakes graphical presentations to communicate ideas LS.7.5. 12.12 A student: LS.7 13.4.3.3.8 14.12. 6. 12.8. 6. situations and actions through drama activities LS.10.1 Viewing and reviewing film Content ‘Learn to’ and ‘Learn about’ paragraphs (see the English Years 7–10 Syllabus (pp 45–54) for details of content) 1. Music Photographic and Digital Media LS.5 recognises visual texts in a range of contexts LS. 2.7. 10. 17.5. 11. 11.6 uses visual texts in a range of contexts LS. 21 .1 explores characters.2. 12.7. 14. 12. 6. 13.5 2. 12. 2. 13. 17.2. 12. 14.1.10 3.7 4. 4.9.2 listens for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts LS.

and their knowledge effects. Storyboards displayed and peer commentary.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. of film (or genres) do they know? What films have they seen in the last 12 months? What made them see these films? • discuss the popularity of home videos/DVDs and how they account for the continuing popularity of the cinema • identify and discuss with the class a ‘memorable’ Storyboard demonstrates scene from a film they have seen and what made it students’ representation memorable (eg film techniques. 22 . and journal entries show They could consider such things as the following: students’ prior knowledge What do they know about film? What is their and understanding of film favourite film and why? What types of films do and ‘where they are at’ as they enjoy watching and why? What other types they begin the unit. mood. and understanding of. Teacher’s oral feedback and questioning during discussion and while students are composing their storyboards. class discussion and journal writing. storyboard a scene and film-making techniques display for peer comment and discussion. action) and critical analysis of • individually or in pairs. film Integrated learning experiences. instruction and Evidence of learning assessment Students • brainstorm films and film-making through Oral responses. Feedback Teacher’s oral feedback and questioning during discussion. Programming and Assessment Stage 5 sample unit of work: Viewing and reviewing film Programming from regular outcomes and content (a) Focus: Initial responses to. discussion questioning. used to engage the audience. sound or special skills.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. – similarities with and differences between this and other films they have seen – ways in which the film could have been improved • describe the events depicted in a short sequence of The description may a film storyboard. • an additional or alternative activity could include A response to the pictures collecting. Responses constitute responding to may be prompted by direct questioning and/or auditory cues in a range of visual supports. – selecting images from an array provided – locating and selecting images from sources provided – locating sources and selecting images from print and electronic media – contacting and organising the supply of posters and other images from distributors Feedback Oral. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher: • to encourage and guide consideration during the discussion of features of films • to encourage response to visual texts and media • to support the selection of appropriate pictures. It may include: indicate using spoken – the main theme or plot of the film language to interact with a – whether they enjoyed the film range of audiences. Activities may include: constitute listening for a – indicating agreement or disagreement with the variety of purposes a range teacher’s description of the events of contexts. instruction and Evidence of learning assessment (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Students • participate in class discussion and brainstorming Participation may about a film that they have watched. Programming and Assessment Viewing and reviewing film Programming from Life Skills outcomes and content (b) Focus: Initial responses to. and understanding of. and/or using alternatives to accompany each frame technology and aids to – creating captions to accompany each frame of communicate with a range the storyboard of audiences. Individual student contexts and the selection participation may include: of pictures may indicate – acknowledging individual images when they using visual texts in a are presented range of contexts. may indicate recognising advertising material and other images related to visual texts in a range of their favourite film/s. media and storyboard multimedia. continued 23 . Information identified may environments. and/or – reasons why they did or did not enjoy the film using technology and aids – favourite and least favourite characters and to communicate with a reasons for liking/disliking them range of audiences. in writing or by indicate recognising visual using augmentative and alternative texts a range of contexts communication systems and viewing and – suggesting a number of alternative responding to a range of interpretations of the events depicted in the visual texts. It may – recounting the events verbally. film Integrated learning experiences. It may indicate – participating in directed role-play using spoken language to – sequencing captions to accompany each frame interact with a range of – choosing captions from a number of audiences. displaying and describing film posters.

• respond to the presentations of other members of the class by making comments. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher: • to facilitate appropriate display of the images • to encourage interpretation of visual text and affirm the response participate in the audience for the presentation Appropriate listening behaviours may indicate listening for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts. applauding. eg suspense scenes. It may indicate using spoken language to interact. It may indicate – arranging pictures in sequential order with or recognising and/or using without a commentary visual texts in a range of – arranging pictures according to genre contexts. to support and affirm the skills used in the presentation. in a range of contexts and with a range of audiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. discussing with peers. and/or using technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences. instruction and Evidence of learning assessment (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) • the display of posters and other images may The display may involve involve: using technology and aids – positioning a picture in a prominent place in to communicate. using alternative and augmentative media and multimedia. These responses may be prompted by the teacher and/or by peers. gesturing and/or using augmentative and alternative communication systems. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher: • to direct and affirm appropriate listening behaviours and to emphasise information • to encourage both responding to and interaction with peers. Programming and Assessment (b) Focus: Initial responses to. – arranging pictures around a theme. A response may constitute listening for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts. asking questions. and/or the classroom using spoken language to – mounting a selection of appropriate pictures on interact with a range of a poster audiences. using facial expressions. film (cont) Integrated learning experiences. indicate using spoken Activities may include: language to interact. – indicating agreement or disagreement with the and/or using technology teacher’s description and aids to communicate – participating in directed role-play with a range of audiences. • Peer feedback in the form of interaction. in writing or by responding to visual texts. Feedback in the form of peer response at the end of the presentation. communication systems – relating how the events depicted in the images relate to events in the film • present the descriptions of the storyboard or the A presentation may poster/images to the teacher and peers indicate communicating for a variety of purposes and/or communicating with a range of audiences. those involving a favourite actor – describing the theme or genre and relevance of each picture to the theme or genre • describe what is happening in a selection of The description may posters or images related to their favourite film/s. It may indicate communicating for a variety of purposes. – sequencing captions to accompany each image It may indicate recognising – creating captions from a number of alternatives visual texts in a range of to accompany each frame contexts and viewing and – recounting the events verbally. • Feedback Oral. 24 . Oral. and understanding of.

Notes in workbooks demonstrate listening skills and identification of pertinent points for analysis. character or genre of the film? What are the specific layout and design features of the poster that support the focus for promoting the film? Resources: Film posters. director. Teacher observation and oral feedback.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Teacher observation of notes taken by students and what they deemed to be pertinent. Resources: Selected film posters for student analysis. 25 . Oral report-backs to class identify what students have learnt from previous discussion and are able to utilise in their own analysis. Teacher observation and oral feedback during group work and after report-backs. Peers listen and take notes on its features in their workbooks. Students • in pairs. instruction and assessment Students • discuss how we learn about upcoming films • consider promotional material and reviews • examine posters as representations of films. Evidence of learning Feedback Oral responses and discussion demonstrate their level of understanding of how meaning is shaped in visual texts. Teacher • gives instruction on how to analyse a poster (if required) • directs questions such as what is the relationship between a poster and the film it promotes? What does the poster suggest about the film? How is each film promoted? Is the focus on the lead actor. examine a poster and present an analysis or evaluation of the effectiveness of its visual and written elements to the class. Programming and Assessment Stage 5 sample unit of work: Viewing and reviewing film Programming from regular outcomes and content (a) Focus: Promotion of films. posters and reviews Integrated learning experiences.

posters and reviews Integrated learning experiences. Oral. media and multimedia. Identification of information contained in print media may involve reading and responding to short written texts. • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback Responses to information contained in the poster may indicate recognising visual texts in a range of contexts. main characters. This may involve: – gesturing to aspects of the poster nominated by the teacher – identifying text in the poster – interpreting text in the poster – predicting the theme or genre of the film – predicting whether they would enjoy the film identify information contained in the print media regarding film listings and film session times. Relevant information may include: – film titles – session times – censorship classification – cinema contact details – information telephone numbers – telephone call cost – access provisions for people with disabilities • access other sources of information regarding the promotion of films through activities such as: – telephoning information lines regarding film sessions and following the recorded prompts – telephoning cinemas to enquire about information such as session times and ticket prices – using the internet to locate information about film sessions – using the internet to locate information about electronic purchasing of tickets. It may indicate viewing and responding to a range of visual texts. Programming and Assessment Viewing and reviewing film Programming from Life Skills outcomes and content (b) Focus: Promotion of films. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher: • to guide responses using relevant information • to encourage a response and to support the identification of appropriate information Obtaining information from sources other than print media may involve using spoken language to interact with a range of audiences and/or may involve using technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences. session information and censorship classifications from the print media • uses guided questions and prompts to assist students to identify information in posters and film listings. 26 . • to guide the identification of relevant sources of information and use of appropriate communication skills in seeking information.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. leading actors and location • explicitly teaches skills in identifying and evaluating information contained in posters and film listings and session information • provides students with copies of film listings. It may involve the student reading and responding to short written texts. Students • respond to film posters. It may involve listening for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides a selection of appropriate film posters from which students are able to gain information about a film such as theme.

possible perspectives and different readings of the film. • read initial journal entry on the film and write subsequent response to film after studying it. Journal entries that explore students’ understanding of their own learning. instruction and assessment Students • undertake the close study of a selected film (this could be a popular feature film. Teacher observation of students in class and any note-taking in students’ workbooks. Oral feedback at appropriate stages as they complete the close study of the film. or artist. relevant research.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Stage 5 sample unit of work: Viewing and reviewing film Programming from regular outcomes and content (a) Focus: Close study of film Integrated learning experiences. short film or documentary film) • write their initial responses to the film in their journals and then discuss them with a partner or in a small group • from own experience and teacher-directed questions discuss film narrative elements. journalist. Teacher assesses posters and explanations and provides written feedback. a social commentary and expression of cultural values and assumptions. film techniques and elements that shape meaning. Teacher reads students’ self-evaluations and reflections in journal and revises program of study where necessary. Students’ poster design and explanation. planning and drafting and explanation of poster design indicate students’ interpretation of the film and ability to represent this visually. psychological or Marxist reading. Students include reflection on what they feel they have learnt from their close study of the film. eg as a film director. a gendered. textual integrity and possible readings. Resources: Film on video/DVD. 27 . Students • design a poster for the film that emphasises a particular perspective or reading of the film • submit their design with an explanation of its layout and design features and its relationship to a particular reading of the film Evidence of learning Feedback Written responses and contributions to class discussion indicate level of knowledge and understanding of filmmaking techniques. Notes from discussion.

• to develop appropriate advertising material. music. media and multimedia. poster or multimedia presentation. Participation may constitute responding to auditory cues in a range of environments. It may indicate using spoken language to interact. It may indicate using spoken language to interact. instruction and assessment Teacher • presents a film poster or DVD cover and guides discussion and student responses • shows the feature film corresponding to the poster or DVD cover • guides discussion and provides prompts to aid comprehension of the narrative and film techniques • provides opportunities for the advertising and screening of a film to a wider audience. multimedia presentation. eg other films the actors have been in – predicting the theme/genre of the film • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback A response may constitute responding to auditory cues in the environment. continued 28 . visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher: • to encourage and guide responses and to affirm participation in the activity view a film and participate in class. Responses may include: – acknowledging the presentation of the poster or cover – identifying elements of the poster or cover – describing the elements of the poster or cover – relating information provided by the poster or cover to previous knowledge. and/or using technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. small group or pair discussion about aspects of the film such as: – actors – character – storyline – specific incidents – film-making techniques. Peer responses to the materials. A variety of techniques including desktop publishing software. in a range of contexts and with a range of audiences. and/or using technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences. magazine clippings and drawings may be used Participation in the creation of a poster or multimedia presentation may indicate using visual texts in a range of contexts and/or communicating for a variety of purposes. Programming and Assessment Viewing and reviewing film Programming from Life Skills outcomes and content (b) Focus: Close study of film Integrated learning experiences. illustrations and verbal comments. eg special effects. supported role-plays. gestures. Students • respond to guided questioning and prompts regarding a film poster or DVD cover. Oral. • to encourage and guide responses in identifying relevant features of a film • advertise a screening of a film to a wider audience by creating a handbill. It may involve composing increasingly complex written texts. It may constitute viewing and responding to a range of visual texts. It may indicate recognising visual texts in a range of contexts. camera techniques Responses may be prompted by the teacher and may include use of augmentative and alternative communication systems.

Writing of programs and other materials may constitute writing short texts for everyday purposes. Oral. in a range of contexts and with a range of audiences. eg start the video. Responses may indicate using individual and collaborative skills in the learning process. Responses may include: – gesture and/or facial expressions – indicating symbols to express emotion – using augmentative and alternative communication systems – responding yes/no to questions about whether they enjoyed the experience – oral and/or written recounts – suggestions as to how the activity could be improved for future film screenings – writing thank you notes to school personnel and peers who assisted in the activity. • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Participation in the activity may indicate using technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences and/or using spoken language to interact with a range of audiences. instruction and assessment • screen a film for an audience at school. Audience reactions also provide feedback on the success of the communication skills involved.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. It may involve writing short texts for everyday purposes and/or responding to increasingly complex written texts. computer and appropriate software. 29 . materials for making posters. Resources: Film and video/DVD. Participation may indicate communicating for a variety of purposes. Activities may include: – liaising with school personnel to organise equipment and venue – informing peers as to screening details verbally or by using augmentative and alternative communication systems – gesturing to direct the audience – operating switches and other equipment. Programming and Assessment Focus: Close study of film (cont) (b) Integrated learning experiences. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide the fulfilment of roles. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to elicit and guide a response that is descriptive of feelings. It may involve using individual and collaborative skills in the learning process. replay sections – directing the organisation of the furniture – welcoming the audience and introducing the film – designing and producing programmes reflect on the experience of advertising and screening the film in response to teacher questioning and prompts and visual supports. increase/decrease volume. video/DVD player. Feedback Oral.

8. 4.1. 1.10 3.3.5. 14.1.8. 7.2.3 reads and interprets time in a variety of situations LS.4. 4.8. 14.1. 12. 12. 6. 5. 9. 12.11 views and responds to a range of visual texts.9.1.12 10.8.6. 11.11. Health and Physical Education 30 .10. 10.2. 13.12 communicates for a variety of purposes LS.6 2.2 explores ways in which meaning is conveyed by nonverbal communication MLS. 10. 12.2 Myself Content ‘Learn to’ and ‘Learn about’ paragraphs (see the English Years 7–10 syllabus (pp 45–54) for details of content) Life Skills Outcomes A student: LS. 8.5. 3. 3. 10.5 6.2.6.6.1.10 composes increasingly complex written texts LS. 13. 14.4.6.7 14. 7. 10. 10.4.5.12 12. 6.1. 8.1. 8.8 responds to increasingly complex written texts LS.7. 11.10.4 uses spoken language to interact with a range of audiences LS.14 communicates with a range of audiences. 1. 7.3.7. Personal Development. 13. 10. 10.1.2.3. 4. 11.10. 2.4. 14.3.7. 9. Links History Languages Mathematics 1.13 communicates in a range of contexts LS.1 recognises the personal characteristics and needs that make them similar to others yet unique.8. 1.5. Programming and Assessment 5. 10. 9. 14.2.1 responds to auditory cues in a range of contexts LS. 9. 13.5.6. 5. 7.1.9.5. 6.2.7 4. 4.6 uses visual texts in a range of contexts LS. 9.11.10.2.2.3.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.5. 10.9 7. 11.7 13.4.9 writes short texts for everyday purposes LS.2. 14.2. 2.3. media and multimedia LS.4.7.3 uses technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences LS. 8. 4.7. 2. 12.12.5. 7.2 listens for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts LS.2 recognises and uses the language of time MLS.7. 1.4. 2. 3.8 9.9. 6.1. 14. 3. 9.3.5 recognises visual texts in a range of contexts LS.2 explores personal connections to history MLC.6.4.11 11.14 5.7 reads and responds to short written texts LS. 4. 6. 6.2.8 A student: LS. 10.12 8.

interests. hobbies. continued 31 . visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher: • to encourage participation in the activities and to guide and encourage identification and use of their own names and those of peers Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • identify and/or describe personal characteristics such as likes. magazines and newspapers. Individual student participation may include: – selecting images from photo albums. toss-a-name. bands. Programming and Assessment Focus: Myself – sharing and engaging with others Integrated learning experiences. This may be in response to guided questions and prompts by the teacher and peers • to assist and encourage students in identifying and reflecting on their own characteristics and those of peers • construct a collage for classroom display to represent themselves. Constructing the collage may involve recognising and using visual texts in a range of contexts. pets. origins • prompts students to bring materials to be used in a collage and scrapbook about themselves. hobbies. It may involve communicating for a variety of purposes and with a range of audiences. It may involve recognising visual texts in a range of contexts. It may involve using spoken language to interact with a range of audiences and viewing and responding to a range of visual texts. media and multimedia. name/card match-up. food. eg likes/dislikes. colours. etc – arranging chosen images under appropriate headings – describing aspects of the collage to peers in response to questions and prompts – creating a written description of themselves to accompany and explain the collage – making comparisons and noting similarities between their interests and those of peers. • to assist and affirm students in selecting appropriate visual texts to represent their own characteristics and those of peers and to guide and encourage reflection on these. Identification and/or description of personal characteristics may involve using technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences and/or spoken language to interact with a range of audiences. instruction and assessment Teacher • engages students in playing a variety of name games • prompts student responses about themselves: likes/dislikes. It may involve using technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences and/or using spoken language to interact with a range of audiences and may involve recognising visual texts in a range of contexts. food. matching names to photographs Engagement in activities may involve responding to auditory cues and/or listening for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts. favourite sports. interests. bands. family members. family. pets. dislikes. pets. colours. Students • participate in a variety of name games. family members. interests. Oral. hobbies. favourite sports.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. eg name alliteration.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Interaction may involve: – making eye contact and/or responding to a peer’s voice or physical presence – gesturing and/or using facial expression – use of augmentative and alternative communication systems – displaying the scrapbook and/or collage to a peer – exchanging information such as names and interests – engaging in sustained conversation by asking questions of the respondent and responding to the answers – introducing the peer to others and relaying information about them. to encourage interaction and to facilitate identification of information to share. family and friends. • to assist students to use effective communication skills. objects. in a range of contexts with a range of audiences. selection and arrangement of texts to represent important events and people in their lives and to reflect on these events Interaction may involve responding to auditory cues in a range of contexts and/or listening for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts. and/or using spoken language to interact with. 32 . instruction and assessment create a personal scrapbook which may include: – photographs of self. It may involve communicating for a variety of purposes. memorabilia. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher: • to support identification. Programming and Assessment Focus: Myself – sharing and engaging with others (cont) Integrated learning experiences. Feedback Oral. It may involve using technology and aids to communicate with. with appropriate captions – awards. illustrations and artwork – a personal timeline depicting significant events in their life – a family tree – descriptions of the significance of the items in the scrapbook – personal reflections on and evaluations of the items in the scrapbook and the events they represent • interact with a peer to share information about themselves in response to peer and/or teacher prompting. a range of audiences. • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Construction of the scrapbook may involve recognising and/or using visual texts in a range of contexts.

Individual student participation may include: – identifying symbols to indicate significant events such as religious holidays/school holidays – attaching stickers to a calendar to denote significant dates – describing significant events – recording assessment dates in the school handbook or diary – recording significant dates related to family members and/or peers. Entry of events on the calendar may involve writing short texts for everyday purposes and/or communicating for a variety of purposes and in a range of contexts. • to guide and acknowledge the inclusion of relevant information in the email. and transmission of the email. Development of diary entries may involve writing short texts for everyday purposes and/or communicating for a variety of purposes. Individual student participation may include: – acknowledging photographs taken of themselves and others participating in daily events – choosing photographs/symbols to sequence events in the day – recount events of the day – recording thoughts and opinions – responding to texts and stimulus materials • compose and send an email to a peer or known adult outlining details of an event/activity recorded in their daily diary. It may involve communicating for a variety of purposes. use of appropriate language and language structures. in a range of contexts and with a range of audiences. Response by the recipient provides peer/adult feedback. Programming and Assessment Focus: Myself – composing texts Integrated learning experiences. Oral.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. sporting events. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm identification and entry of events on the calendar. These may include birthdays. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher: • to assist and confirm the identification of appropriate events to record and to encourage full participation in the recording process Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback The composition and sending of the email may constitute writing short texts for everyday purposes and/or composing increasingly complex written texts. favourite television shows and concerts. eg birthdays. anniversaries. Oral. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides guidance/assistance for the development of a personal diary including photographs of activities • provides guidance/assistance for composing and sending an email • provides a calendar format and guidance/assistance in the maintenance of a calendar • provides materials and guidance/assistance in the composing of a personal greeting • provides guidance/assistance for research activities. Individual student participation may include: – identifying one event/activity recorded in their diary – describing one event/activity recorded in their diary – describing selected aspects of an event/ activity based on a knowledge of the interests of the recipient – recording reflections and opinions on events and seeking advice and information from the recipient • maintain a calendar of events and dates significant to themselves. Students • develop a personal diary recording daily events in their lives. 33 . their family and/or their peers. in a range of contexts and with a range of audiences. holidays.

Audience response to the presentation provides feedback. magazines. eg favourite football team. • Research activities may involve reading and responding to short written texts and/or responding to increasingly complex texts and/or viewing and responding to a range of visual texts. Resources: Internet access. It may involve communicating for a variety of purposes. Feedback Oral. The presentation may involve composing increasingly complex written texts and/or communicating for a variety of purposes. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher: • to encourage selection of appropriate sources and methods of research and recording of information • present research information to the class. Activities may include: – identifying a topic of interest – sequencing information provided – locating and/or selecting relevant information from print and electronic media – identifying providers of information and making personal contact to request the supply of information Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) The personal greeting may involve writing short written texts for everyday purposes and/or composing increasingly complex written texts. a note to congratulate a friend on the success of their football team. Programming and Assessment Focus: Myself – composing texts (cont) Integrated learning experiences. computer and appropriate software. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and acknowledge the identification of a circumstance in which to send the greeting. choice of an appropriate format and appropriateness of the message.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. newspapers etc – leaving a message on voice mail – creating text messages. library resources. 34 . Oral. • to guide and affirm the choice of method and process of presentation. It may indicate communicating for a variety of purposes and with a range of audiences. This may include: – positioning images. A response from the recipient provides feedback. stars of a favourite film/television series. band. newspapers. media and multimedia. Activities may include: – identifying an event on the calendar – selecting images and/or text from a collection of old cards. digital camera. artefacts and/or text in a prominent place in the classroom – using augmentative and alternative communication systems to present an oral presentation – making a presentation to the class verbally – writing a summary of research information – making a multimedia presentation. eg a birthday card. in a range of contexts and with a range of audiences. instruction and assessment • compose a personal greeting to a peer or known adult. magazines. in a range of contexts and with a range of audiences. eg SMS – writing text and/or illustrating or drawing images – using desktop publishing software conduct research on a topic of special interest.

nsw. This unit is based on a unit of the same name in the support document Mathematics Years 7–10 Syllabus: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 20–26).1 Unit title Number Unit description In this unit students participate in teaching and learning activities to develop their number skills. read. Students develop their ability to use money to purchase goods and services in a variety of everyday situations and to estimate and calculate with money. 35 . order and record numbers.au).4 Unit title Time Unit description In this unit students learn to match familiar activities with time frames. They learn to read and write amounts of money.edu.boardofstudies. The sample units should be read in conjunction with the Mathematics Years 7–10 Syllabus and the support document Mathematics Years 7–10 Syllabus: Advice on Programming and Assessment already distributed to schools and available on the Board of Studies website (www.3 Money In this unit students learn to recognise and match coins and notes. 6. organise personal time and manage scheduled activities. Programming and Assessment 6 Mathematics The following sample units are provided as examples to clarify the process of programming for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content from the Mathematics key learning area.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. In this unit students learn to recognise and use fractions in everyday contexts using concrete materials. 6. Content Strand: NUMBER Unit number 6. They learn to recognise language that is descriptive of number. They learn to count real objects and count.2 Fractions Content Strand: MEASUREMENT Unit number 6. Students learn to recognise and use the language of time and develop their ability to tell the time using both analog and digital clocks.

hundreds chart.2 A student counts objects. Reflecting) • recognising and reading numerals in a range of • interpret numerical information from text. Working Mathematically Outcomes Questioning Applying Strategies Communicating Reasoning Reflecting Asks questions Uses a range of Responds to and uses Checks solutions and Links their about strategies in solving mathematical reasons to reach mathematical mathematics problems language in everyday conclusions experiences to situations everyday life A selection of the content from NLS. … tenth board games Links Numeracy is a fundamental component of learning across all areas of the curriculum. counters on CD and DVD players. more items than a given group or • comparing and ordering groups of objects fewer items than a given group (Applying • counting objects by twos. digital displays. odometers Resources Language Counters. tens Strategies) • count objects into equal bundles (Applying Strategies) NLS.2 • counting objects • count in meaningful situations (Applying Strategies) • matching groups of objects that have the same • identify groups that have the same number of items number of items as a given group. fives. card games. Knowledge and Skills Working Mathematically Students learn about Students learn to NLS. third. ordering and recording two• identify and locate numbers in a range of situations digit numbers (Applying Strategies.4 is included below.2 and NLS. ruler used as a number line.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 36 .4 NLS. after. tens and hundreds • recognising odd and even numbers • recognising and reading numbers with more than three digits Technology Calculator. eg digital clocks. NLS.1 Number NLS. For further details. first. refer to the relevant Mathematics Years 7–10 Life Skills outcomes and content pages. calendar. before. computer software.2 NLS. Reflecting) • counting and reading. more than. as many as. blocks.4 A student counts and reads. ordering and recording three• ask questions involving counting (Questioning) digit numbers • write ordinal terms (Communicating) • counting forwards and backwards from a given number in the range 0–100 • counting by twos. fives. graphs formats and tables (Applying Strategies. Programming and Assessment 6. number line. less than. orders and records numbers. ordering and recording • identify some of the ways numbers are used in our numbers 0–9 lives (Reflecting) • counting and reading.4 • counting and reading. The same as. second.

odd and even house numbers in a street. eg seat numbers in a theatre. printed and displayed • research an area of interest that relates to numbers. then put the pages in the correct order • respond to numbers embedded in a song. 5s and 10s • sort items into sets of 2. speed signs • collect numbers that relate to themselves and record them in a booklet or diary.4 Students could: • identify and locate numbers in a range of situations. telephone numbers. grid references on street maps. keeping a tally and/or by marking off on a number line. worksheets for the class. Students could create their own spreadsheet or table on the computer to record their information • be given several pages from an old telephone book that have been shuffled. 15–25 • use a number line graduated from 0–30 to follow and repeat the teacher’s demonstration of: – counting from 0 by twos – counting from 0 by fives – counting from 0 by threes. football scores. eg football scores in weekend matches could be compiled and presented to the rest of the class • observe as the teacher places a handful of objects (eg counters. clock faces.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. A student (possibly with teacher assistance) counts out the items in the container • follow and repeat a teacher’s demonstration of counting rhythmically aloud to identify number patterns. eg how many people in the class enjoy going to the movies. teachers should first demonstrate the concepts and skills and then provide a range of opportunities and contexts for students to develop and practise the concepts and skills. players in a sports activity • count objects into equal bundles. number of new chickens in the school’s agriculture plot. NLS. bus numbers. page numbers in a book. eg telephone numbers. aisles in the supermarket. by 2s. numbers on raffle tickets. classroom numbers. and 10. uniforms for the sports team. continued 37 . eg lunch orders to go to the canteen. addresses. numbers in a shopping centre lift. eg bundles of 10 pencils. The teacher and/or students record the estimates. enjoy eating out? The numbers can then be entered into a spreadsheet program. NLS. 5. eg ‘How many brothers/sisters do you have?’ • respond (as a class) to number questions that can be tallied and displayed. eg stressing (saying louder) every second number 1 2 3 4 5 6 • use a number line with a range of 0–10. train station platform numbers. film or story • respond to questions concerning numbers. ages. birthdays. buttons) into a clear plastic container and respond to a request to estimate (guess) how many are in the container. eg match pictures of objects to a number • identify groups that have the same number of items. inventory of items in the school canteen. rhyme. more items and/or fewer items than a given group • count objects. timetables. bundles of 30 newsletters for distribution to classes • respond to prompts such as ‘Are there five lunch orders?’ • match groups of objects that have the same number of items • sort/match items to a model/picture provided. Programming and Assessment Learning Experiences and Assessment Opportunities In the following activities. and respond to a teacher’s request to indicate the number that is: – before 3 – after 5 – after 9 – before 10 – two more than 6 – two less than 6 • use a number line to count forwards or backwards from a given number in other ranges. eg 1– 20.2 Students could: • count out a given number of items and place them in a bag or bundle. numbers on a calendar. eg 8 apples in a bag • count in meaningful situations. money.

for example. second) within an everyday context. … . could potentially address all the working mathematically outcomes. The students count how many cards they each have. ludo. etc. to produce the required sequence of numbers. Below are possible methods for different types of calculators: Method 1 Method 2 Method 3 Press Press Press 2 2 2 + + = + 2 Ans ss = = + then continue to press = = = = 2 then continue to press = then continue to press In each case the calculator display should be 2. and/or consult the calculator manual. 10 to 20. Programming and Assessment Games Card and board games enable students to practise number recognition. 4. housie. Calculators Students could: • practise entering given numbers into a calculator • use the constant facility on a calculator to reinforce counting by a given number. This is repeated until there are no cards in the original pack. The winner is the student with the most cards • play board games such as dominoes.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. eg 0 to 10. eg use the constant facility on a calculator to count from 2 by twos. 6. pictures. Students could: • construct simple board games and play these with peers in the class • write a story that involves numbers for a younger student in the school or a younger sibling. Students could: • be given a set of cards with numbers represented by numerals. the students sort the cards into matching sets and/or play card games such as Snap    3 three play card games using a pack of numeral cards marked. from 1 to 50. 8. Each player takes a card from the pack. continued 38 . 12. 10. It also links strongly with the working mathematically outcome of using a range of strategies in solving problems. counting and the language of turn-taking (eg first. The teacher may need to experiment with the calculator. In pairs. Cards should be provided within an appropriate range. such as those listed below. The student whose card has the highest number wins and takes both cards. dots or words. • Extension activities Further activities. snakes and ladders.

on another chart the squares for counting by fives (from 5) and on another the squares for counting by tens (from 10) • be provided with jigsaw puzzles that have been made by cutting along the lines on a hundreds chart to form pieces.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. eg two students race to 100 by rolling the dice in turn and moving their counters along the chart the number of places shown on the dice. The first to reach 100 wins. Programming and Assessment Using a hundreds chart Students are given 10 strips of paper each containing ten squares. the numbers 11 to 20 on another strip and so on up to 91 to 100 • align the strips to form a number line from 1 to 100. then rearrange the strips to form a hundreds chart 1 11 21 31 41 51 61 71 81 91 2 12 22 32 42 52 62 72 82 92 3 13 23 33 43 53 63 73 83 93 4 14 24 34 44 54 64 74 84 94 5 15 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 95 6 16 26 36 46 56 66 76 86 96 7 17 27 37 47 57 67 77 87 97 8 18 28 38 48 58 68 78 88 98 9 19 29 39 49 59 69 79 89 99 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 • • practise counting forwards and backwards from a given number using a hundreds chart practise counting on/off decade to 100. 30. Further activities using a hundreds chart The construction of the hundreds chart from a number line is aimed at reinforcing that the number after 10. 39 . On one hundreds chart they are asked to colour in the squares for counting by twos (from 2). Students could: • place the numbers 1 to 10 in the squares on one strip. etc is at the beginning of the next row. Students are given the task of reassembling the pieces to produce the hundreds chart • play dice games using the hundreds chart. Students could: • be given their own copy of a hundreds chart and then discuss with their teacher the patterns they can see eg all the numbers ending in 2 are in the same column. 20. all the numbers in the thirties are in the same row • use a hundreds chart to follow and repeat the teacher’s demonstration of: – counting by one – counting by twos – counting by fives – counting by tens • be given several hundred charts copied onto a worksheet.

For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes. one half. eg ‘If I take one half of the six lollies.2 uses appropriate equipment and techniques in making a variety of food items. dimensional materials such as fraction cakes (square a half. Fraction concepts are applied in other learning areas including: A student: English LS.5 A student recognises fractions in everyday contexts. a quarter. 2D fraction one third.7 reads and responds to short written texts Food Technology LS.5. a third. one quarter. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 4 unit ‘Fractions’ in Mathematics Years 7–10 Syllabus: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 20–26). more than.6 Half and halves • recognising the need for two equal parts when • allocate portions or divide materials (Applying dividing a whole in half Strategies) • putting two halves together to make a whole eg two • question if parts of a whole object. Programming and Assessment 6. three quarters. Working Mathematically Outcomes Questioning Applying Strategies Communicating Reasoning Reflecting Asks questions Uses a range of Responds to and uses Checks solutions and Links their about mathematics strategies in solving mathematical reasons to reach mathematical problems language in everyday conclusions experiences to situations everyday life A selection of the content from NLS. fraction mats.6 NLS.2 Fractions NLS. less than. cuisenaire rods. paper squares and circles.5 Half and halves • respond to fraction language in everyday situations • recognise the terms ‘half’ and ‘halves’ in everyday (Applying Strategies. NLS. Knowledge and Skills Working Mathematically Students learn about Students learn to NLS. cakes.6 is included below. refer to the relevant Mathematics Years 7–10 Life Skills outcomes and content pages.5 and NLS.5.1 participates in making food items LS. measuring cups. half. equal. calculators Resources Language Food items such as sandwiches. are equal • halving a group of objects by sharing into two equal (Questioning) piles. fruit. Reflecting) ! • using fraction notation for quarters • follow instructions involving the use of ‘quarter’ Thirds and/or ‘third’ (Applying Strategies) • using the term ‘third’ in everyday situations • indicate the relative size of a fraction or mixed • sharing an object by dividing it into three equal parts number (Communicating. jugs and spoons Links Fraction concepts are applied in other areas of mathematics.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. or collection of half sandwiches is the same as one whole sandwich objects. 40 .5 NLS. For further details. Reasoning) • using fraction notation for thirds Technology Computer software. three The same as. and round). Reflecting) situations • follow an instruction involving fraction language in • sharing an object everyday situations (Applying Strategies) Quarters • recognise the use of fractions in everyday contexts • recognising the term ‘quarter’ in everyday situations (Reflecting) • sharing an object NLS. I will • identify items that are about a half have three lollies’ (Applying Strategies) "1% • identify items that are less than a half or more than a • using fraction notation for a half $ ' #2& half (Applying Strategies) • combining a half with whole numbers • describe situations using the terms ‘half’ and Quarters ‘halves’ (Communicating) • putting four quarters together to make a whole • recognise the use of fractions in everyday contexts • putting two quarters together to make a half (Communicating.6 A student uses fractions in everyday contexts. eg time and measurement. two thirds circles and squares.

eg ‘give half a chocolate bar to a friend’. Students could: ! • match equal parts of an object. ‘cut a piece of tape or string in half’. The teacher could explain that the bottom number indicates the number of equal parts that a whole object has been divided into. eg circles with a line across. the students find the triangles and/or rectangles that are half of the square 1 1 • label diagrams as being ‘ ’ or ‘not ’ 2 2 • • • label diagrams as being ‘less than find examples of the 1 2 1 2 ’ or ‘more than 1 2 ’ notation in everyday situations. The teacher names each piece as a quarter of the whole object. The students could discuss how to share equally the seventh apple • demonstrate cutting an object into four equal pieces and then indicate that the pieces are the same size. The collection should include some that show two equal parts and some that show two unequal parts. ‘colour half the picture’. 2 2 2 41 . Teacher Demonstration The teacher could: demonstrate cutting an object such as an apple into two equal pieces and then emphasise that the two pieces are the same size. ‘cut a ball of plasticine in half’. eg the yellow rod is half as long as the orange rod • respond to instructions that involve the term ‘half’.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. ‘cut a ribbon in half’. The students discuss what is meant by ‘three quarters’ • introduce the notation for two quarters "2% $ ' # 4& and three quarters &3# $ ! %4" . eg ‘give me half a sandwich’. eg recipes apply an understanding of half/halves in practical situations. ‘cut an apple in half’. ‘pour half a glass of water’ • follow instructions involving whole numbers and a half. The teacher names each piece as a half of the whole object. ‘cut a cake in half’. Note: Many of the experiences below can be modified to involve quarters or thirds. eg ‘each piece is a quarter of the apple’. ‘colour one half of the flag red’ • select a matching half from a collection of different shapes. The teacher explains that as each person has received an equal amount. each person has half of the lollies • • • introduce the notation for a half "1% $ ' #2& demonstrate sharing a collection of an odd number of objects. eg seven apples. Students determine whether each person received the same number of lollies. eg ‘each piece is a half of the apple’ • demonstrate sharing equally a bag containing an even number of objects between two people. teachers should first demonstrate the concepts and skills and then provide a range of opportunities and contexts for students to develop and practise the concepts and skills. while the top number refers to the number of equal parts required. Programming and Assessment Learning Experiences and Assessment Opportunities In the following activities. eg sharing eight counters or lollies equally between two people. Students indicate which circles are divided in half • use cuisenaire rods to find which rod is half as long as another rod. eg ‘bring me two and a half apples’. The teacher ! explains that two pieces taken together form ‘two quarters of the apple’. ‘cook a chicken for 1 1 hours’. ‘use 2 1 cups of flour in a recipe’. eg given a square. eg put together two halves of an orange • be given a collection of shapes that have been divided into two parts. ‘draw a line to divide the page in half’. ‘put 1 1 sandwiches on each plate’. ‘fold a square of paper in half’.

dollars. Communicating) NLS. Applying • writing amounts in dollars Strategies.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.11 NLS. • counting notes of the same denomination Reasoning) • counting notes of different denomination • use the language of money in a range of contexts • matching a range of coins to demonstrate (Communicating) equivalence of value • check the details of purchases on receipts or dockets • matching a range of notes to demonstrate (Reflecting. Reflecting) • write amounts of money involving cents.13 • recognising that money has value • use coins to pay for purchases (Applying Strategies) • recognising that money is a medium for obtaining • use coins or notes to pay for services (Applying goods and services Strategies) • recognising the hierarchy of value attached to goods • tender an amount of money using a combination of and services coins and notes (Applying Strategies.13 NLS. Working Mathematically Outcomes Questioning Applying Strategies Communicating Reasoning Reflecting Asks questions Uses a range of Responds to and uses Checks solutions Links their about mathematics strategies in solving mathematical and reasons to reach mathematical problems language in everyday conclusions experiences to situations everyday life A selection of the content from NLS.13 A student uses money to purchase goods and services. refer to the relevant Mathematics Years 7–10 Life Skills outcomes and content pages. Reflecting. Programming and Assessment 6.12.14 is included below. Applying Strategies. and combinations of dollars and cents (Applying Strategies) • complete a cheque using words and decimal notation (Applying Strategies. For further details.11. NLS.13 and NLS.12 A student reads and writes amounts of money.3 Money NLS. Knowledge and Skills Working Mathematically Students learn about Students learn to NLS. NLS.12 NLS.11 • recognising a range of coins and notes • indicate the appropriate coin to purchase a specific • matching and sorting coins and notes into groups on item in the school canteen (Applying Strategies) the basis of face value • indicate the most appropriate note to purchase an • ordering coins and notes on the basis of face value item in a shop (Applying Strategies) • recognising that coins and notes have different values NLS.14 A student estimates and calculates with money.12 • recognising the cost of goods or services • identify the cost of items up to $10 in value by • writing amounts in cents locating prices (Communicating. NLS. Reasoning) • counting coins of the same denomination • determine if they have enough money to pay for a • counting coins of different denomination particular item or service (Applying Strategies. Reflecting) • writing amounts of money using decimal notation • identify the cost of items up to $100 in value by • writing amounts of money in words locating prices (Communicating. NLS. Applying Strategies) equivalence of value continued 42 . NLS.11 A student recognises and matches coins and notes.

vending machines.7 makes informed decisions about purchasing and services LS. dollars. price. Reasoning) • calculating the amount of time it will take to save for items at a specific rate per week or month Technology Calculators. ATMs. Programming and Assessment NLS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. EFTPOS Resources Language Coins. notes.13 LS.2 recognises ways in which people obtain goods and services in the community LS. Geography 43 . cheque books.14 estimating amounts of money to tender for goods or • estimate the cost of a range of items and select the services appropriate coin or note to pay for the items • calculating amounts of money to tender for goods or (Applying Strategies) services • calculate the cost of several items and tender the • estimating the amount of change due in relation to a appropriate amount (Applying Strategies.12 LS. cents. transaction for goods or services Reasoning) • calculating the amount of change due in relation to a • estimate the amount of change due and check using transaction for goods or services a calculator (Applying Strategies.14 NLS.8 LS. value.8 purchases goods and services LS. notes. cash registers. worth.9 LS.2 responds to increasingly complex written texts writes short texts for everyday purposes communicates for a variety of purposes communicates in a range of contexts communicates with a range of audiences experiences a range of environments moves around in the environment. cash Links A student: Commerce LS.1 LS. catalogues Coins. payslips.14 LS.9 uses financial services • English LS.1 explores the differences between needs and wants LS. cost.

$10. eg to buy lunch in the school canteen. four 20 cent coins to make 80 cents • combine coins of different value to make a specified amount less than or equal to one dollar. $2. eg going to the movies.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 50 cents. 10 cents. eg selects a $2 coin to pay for a can of soft drink from a vending machine. $5. 44 . five 20 cent coins to make one dollar. eg offer $1 coin to purchase a muesli bar that costs 75 cents. eg ten 10 cent coins to make one dollar. eg place a $2 coin for an item costing $1. NLS. vending machines • match coins to prices of items in a catalogue. for-sale signs and on notice boards at theatres/cinemas that display admission prices. $50 and $100 • combine coins of the same value to make a specified amount less than or equal to one dollar. NLS. eg a 50 cent coin.13 Students could: • identify item to be purchased and its price and determine the value of money needed to purchase the item • use coins or notes to pay for purchases.11 Students could: • select the appropriate coin or note when requested.50 if a $5 note is tendered • estimate the cost of purchasing a number of items of clothing for a special event • estimate the cost of purchasing grocery items in order to cook a meal • calculate the difference in price between similar items in different stores. NLS. to pay for items at a supermarket. $4 to meet a purchase of $3. teachers should first demonstrate the concepts and skills and then provide a range of opportunities and contexts for students to develop and practise the concepts and skills. card or gift. shelf prices. Programming and Assessment Learning Experiences and Assessment Opportunities In the following activities. to rent a video/DVD • use coins or notes to pay for services. eg $2 to meet a purchase of $1. eg place a $5 note for an item costing $4. $20.75. $1. 20 cents. eg a particular CD may be cheaper in a department store compared to a specialist music store. selects a $20 note to pay for cinema tickets • calculate the cost of two items at the school canteen and tender the appropriate amount • estimate the amount of change due and check using a calculator.99 • match notes to prices of items in a catalogue. dollars and combinations of dollars and cents • writing amounts of money using decimal notation • complete a cheque using numerals and words. eg the change due for a purchase of $3. having a haircut • identify the next whole dollar amount that is more than a given amount. a 20 cent coin and a 5 cent coin to make 75 cents • identify the smallest and largest valued coins and notes.14 Students could: • estimate the cost of a range of items and select the appropriate coin or note to pay for the item. Notice boards in video stores that state the cost of renting videos/DVDs could also be used for the cost of renting a movie • write amounts in cents • write amounts in dollars • write amounts of money involving cents.80 • insert appropriate coins and/or notes in public telephones.12 Students could: • read money amounts in catalogues and on shop dockets. eg 5 cents. eg student selects a ten-cent coin when asked • sequence coins and notes in order of value. NLS. to purchase a magazine.99 • purchase an item of food from the school canteen using the above method.

MLS. Programming and Assessment 6.2.3 MLS.3 Clocks and Watches Clocks and Watches • reading the hour on digital clocks or watches • use ‘hour’ within a personal context (Reflecting) • reading the hour on analog clocks and watches • use ‘half hour’ within a personal context (Reflecting) • reading half and quarter hour on digital clocks and • use minutes within a personal context watches (Reflecting) • reading half hour and quarter hour on analog clocks • respond to questions related to time or watches (Communicating) • reading minutes on clocks or watches • ask questions related to time (Questioning) • describing the relationship between analog and digital time • reading am and pm on digital clocks and watches continued 45 .2 A student recognises and uses the language of time. MLS.4 Time MLS. MLS. For further details.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.4 is included below. MLS.3 A student reads and interprets time in a variety of situations. MLS.4 A student organises personal time and manages scheduled activities. Knowledge and Skills Working Mathematically Students learn about Students learn to MLS.1 • associating familiar activities involving eating.2 MLS. Reflecting) • recognise activities that occur on the weekend (Applying Strategies.1. Reflecting) • recognise activities that occur on weekdays (Applying Strategies.3 and MLS. Reflecting) MLS. • indicate an association (using personalised personal care and social routines with times of the strategies) between a time of the day and a range of day familiar activities (Applying Strategies.1 MLS. Working Mathematically Outcomes Questioning Applying Strategies Communicating Reasoning Asks questions Uses a range of Responds to and uses Checks solutions and about mathematics strategies in solving mathematical language reasons to reach problems in everyday situations conclusions Reflecting Links their mathematical experiences to everyday life A selection of the content from MLS.2 • recognising the language of time in relation to • use or respond to the language of time in relation to specific personal activities a range of personal activities (Communicating) • recognising the language of time in a range of • respond to questions involving the language of time everyday situations (Communicating) • using the language of time to describe activities in a • use the language of time to describe personal range of everyday situations activities and events (Communicating) MLS. Reflecting) • identify activities that occur on specific days and at specific times (Applying Strategies.1 A student matches familiar activities with time frames. refer to the relevant Mathematics Years 7–10 Life Skills outcomes and content pages.

Reflecting) • read and interpret a written timetable for TV programs (Applying Strategies. a variety of calendars.1 explores the concepts of time and chronology LS. Reflecting) • read and follow a school timetable for group or class activities (Applying Strategies.4 identifying the amount of time needed for a range of activities • structuring activities of a school day in relation to the time required for each event • making choices and decisions about activities on the basis of time available • planning personal time over a day or a week so that activities do not clash • scheduling events over a day or week taking into account a range of activities and personal responsibilities Technology Digital and analog clocks Resources Photographs.4 • recognise that specific activities require a particular amount of time (Reflecting) • recognise the order and sequence of events in relation to carrying out regular routines (Reflecting) • identify priorities in relation to personal time. Reflecting) • read and interpret a timetable for using community transport (Applying Strategies.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 46 . and discriminate between essential and non-essential activities (Reflecting) • prepare a personal timetable for a weekend (Applying Strategies. personal diary Links History • Timetables read and follow an individual sequence chart (timetable) for a range of activities (Applying Strategies. Reflecting) • Language Morning. Programming and Assessment Calendars and Planners reading the names or symbols for days of the week on a calendar • reading the months of the year on a calendar • locating special days and events on a calendar • recognising that calendars are used to plan special events and activities • identifying number of days.2 explores personal connections to history. months between one event and another • MLS. pictures and symbols. weeks. days of the week A student: LS. Reflecting) • use a calendar to plan special events and activities (Reflecting) • use a calendar or planner to calculate time for particular activities (Reflecting) • use electronic formats of calendars and planners (Applying Strategies) MLS. Reflecting) Calendars and Planners • locate birthdays of significant people on a calendar (Reflecting) • use a calendar/diary to plan for regular personal activities (Applying Strategies. evening. afternoon.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Learning Experiences and Assessment Opportunities
In the following activities, teachers should first demonstrate the concepts and skills and then provide a range of opportunities and contexts for students to develop and practise the concepts and skills. MLS.1 Students could: • indicate from a sequence of photographs the activities that relate to morning, afternoon, evening, eg indicate a photograph or picture of getting ready for school in the morning in response to ‘What do you do before school in the morning?’ • sort photographs or pictures to represent weekday and weekend activities • match activities with particular days of the week using objects or pictures, eg swimming or PDHPE is on Wednesdays, Food Technology is on Thursdays • associate personal activities with time, eg ‘It is now one o’clock and it’s lunchtime’, ‘Where are you going to sit for lunch today?’ • prepare a visual sequence of the activities that have taken place on any given day from a selection of photographs or pictures • prepare a daily timetable with the sequence of activities before school, during school and after school • prepare a weekly timetable using a calendar. MLS.2 Students could: • arrange photographs or pictures in response to questioning, eg ‘When are you going shopping – in the morning or the afternoon?’ • use the language of time to describe personal activities, eg ‘We’re going shopping, tomorrow’, ‘The party is on next week’ • use photographs or pictures to respond to questioning about weekend activities • compose a story about a school excursion or event that happened on the weekend • label class activities under the headings ‘Yesterday’, ‘Today’, ‘Tomorrow’ • respond to teacher questions about the days of the week, eg ‘If today is Tuesday, then yesterday was _____ and tomorrow will be _____ ?’ MLS.3 Students could: • recognise, in a range of settings, that the minute hand points straight up to indicate ‘o’clock’ on analog clocks, eg 2 o’clock • recognise, in a range of settings, that the minutes appear as :00 on a digital clock to indicate ‘o’clock’ • recognise, in a range of settings, that the minute hand points straight down to indicate ‘half past’ on analog clocks • observe the complementary action of the hour and minute hands on an analog clock, eg using a real clock, set the hands to show 10 o’clock. Then move the minute hand to 6, that is half way around the clock, observing that the hour hand has moved half way between 10 and 11 and the time shown is half past 10. • recognise, in a range of settings, that the minutes appear as :30 on a digital clock to indicate ‘half past’ • recognise, in a range of settings, that the minute hand points to the 3, or the corresponding position, to indicate ‘quarter past’ on an analog clock • recognise, in a range of settings, that the minutes appear as :15 on a digital clock to indicate ‘quarter past’ • recognise, in a range of settings, that the minute hand points to the 9, or the corresponding position, to indicate ‘quarter to’ on an analog clock • recognise, in a range of settings, that the minutes appear as :45 on a digital clock to indicate ‘quarter to’ • recognise that a clock showing 7:05 can be read as ‘five minutes past seven’ as well as ‘seven-o-five’ • work in pairs to position the hour hand to indicate a time. Swap clocks with their partner. Partner states the time on the clock and gives reasons for their choice • write the numbers 1 to 12 around a circle to represent a clock • count 5-minute intervals around the clock • recognise the number pattern – 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60. • be given a clock face and students draw a line to cut the clock in half and in quarters. Label the clock highlighting ‘o’clock’, ‘half past’, ‘quarter past’, ‘quarter to’… continued

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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

indicate analog time on individual clock faces in response to verbal statements of digital time. Reverse the procedure. Given analog time, students indicate digital time. • use matching games (eg cards with time on clock faces, time in words, time in digital notation) to recognise am/pm time • match activities to suitable times (eg 7 am – breakfast, 1 o’clock – lunch )

recognise that the next time shown on a digital clock after 6:59 is 7:00 (not 6:60) recognise that time is often expressed to the nearest five minute mark on an analog clock (eg 7:28 would be read as ‘nearly half past seven’) • recognise that time before noon is denoted as ‘am’ and after noon as ‘pm’, eg 7 am is in the morning, 7 pm is at night • given a scenario, the student describes the situation as being ‘early’, ‘on time’ or ‘late’, eg ‘the bus was late, it arrived at school after 9 o’clock’ • explore and discuss the common features and the differences using a range of calendars. Students could count how many days there are in each month, then note the last day on a given month and the first day of the next month. They could compare the date of a given Tuesday with that of the Tuesday in the following week. Students may also label significant days on the calendar, eg birthdays, school holidays. • practise sequencing order of days and months • locate birthdays of significant people, public holidays and special events on a calendar • use a calendar to plan for regular personal activities, eg swimming every second Friday • use a calendar to plan special events and activities, eg camp, birthday party • plan an afternoon or evening of television viewing by referring to television guides, noting the channel and start and finish times for each program to be watched • read bus and train timetables. MLS.4 Students could: • predict the movement of the hands on a clock and tell the new time after a given period of time, eg if the time is now 3:15 what time will it be after 5 minutes, 10 minutes, one hour, 2 hours, half an hour? • participate in specific timing activities, eg time taken to do one lap of the bike track or walk to the bus stop • identify the start and finish times for the lesson period, recess, lunch, the school day • estimate/guess and check the amount of time needed for a range of activities, eg eat lunch, shower and dress, travel home from school • identify the start time of the various activities on a particular day, eg on Monday – get up at 7 am, catch bus at 8:15 am, school starts at 9 am • find from a television guide, the start and finish times of a particular television show • identify the routine activities they undertake each day of the week, eg go to school on each week day, go to youth club on Friday evening • prepare a personal timetable for particular days of the week, eg for a school day, for Saturday, for Sunday • use a calendar or planner to calculate time between particular activities • schedule events over one week • set the alarm on a clock and/or clock radio to ring after a given period of time, eg 5 minutes, 1 hour, 8 hours (to wake up after sleeping) • set the time on a VCR to record a television program at a particular time • keep a personal diary.
• •

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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

7

Science

The following sample units are provided as examples to clarify the process of programming for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content from the Science key learning area. The sample units should be read in conjunction with the Science Years 7–10 Syllabus and the support document Science Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment already distributed to schools and available on the Board of Studies website (www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au). In developing and delivering teaching programs teachers should be aware of, and adopt, relevant guidelines and directives of their education authorities and/or schools. Teaching programs should recognise and reflect State and Commonwealth legislation, regulations and standards including Occupational Health and Safety Standards, Chemical Safety in Schools and Animal Welfare guidelines. Teachers need to be aware of activities that may require notification, certification, permission, permits and licences.
Unit number 7.1 Unit title The needs of living things Unit description This unit develops students’ skills in working scientifically. They are involved in planning and conducting investigations to develop knowledge and understanding of living things and their interrelationships with the environment. Students also examine ways in which human activity impacts on the environment. This unit develops students’ knowledge and understanding about the applications and uses of science. They are involved in identifying forms and sources of energy and in investigating ways in which energy is used in our daily lives. Students engage in experiences that focus on ways in which energy brings about change, and explore ways to reduce energy wastage in the classroom/school/home context.

7.2

Energy in everyday life

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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

7.1

The needs of living things

Unit title: The needs of living things Description: This unit develops students’ skills in working scientifically. They are involved in planning and conducting investigations to develop knowledge and understanding of living things and their interrelationships with the environment. Students also examine ways in which human activity impacts on the environment. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Animal Welfare Guidelines for Teachers: Animals in Schools LS.2 recognises that the process of science involves conducting investigations Existing textbooks/reference material LS.9 recognises characteristics of and changes in living things Access to information in the print and electronic media LS.15 explores the impact of human activity on the Earth’s resources Access to computer hardware and software LS.16 describes the impact of human activity on living systems Access to site visits in the local environment such as wildlife parks, reserves LS.17 participates in the development of a plan to carry out an investigation Access to animals to investigate in the school environment (eg Rent-A-Chook LS.18 participates in an investigation http://www.rentachook.com, Chicks R Us http://www.chicksrus.com.au) LS.19 communicates information about an investigation Potted seedlings/plants and materials necessary for their growth LS.20 suggests a way to solve a problem Light bulb/tube for growing plants (eg Gro-Lux®) available from hardware or nursery LS.21 undertakes a variety of team and individual tasks. Links A student: A student: Agricultural Technology Information and Software Technology LS.2 investigates some environmental factors that affect plant and animal LS.5.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology production solutions English Mathematics LS.5 recognises visual texts in a range of contexts DLS.2 gathers, organises and displays data LS.12 communicates for a variety of purposes PDHPE LS.13 communicates in a range of contexts LS.26 uses problem-solving strategies in a variety of contexts LS.14 communicates with a range of audiences Visual Arts LS.17 uses individual and collaborative skills in the learning process LS.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences, responses or a point Geography of view. LS.5 explores the effects of people’s activities on the physical environment LS.10 recognises the importance of active and informed citizenship LS.11 uses a variety of strategies to locate and select information LS.12 uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes, teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 4 unit ‘Living things’ (pp 26–35) in Science Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment.

In developing and delivering teaching programs teachers should be aware of, and adopt, relevant guidelines and directives of their education authorities and/or schools. Teaching programs should recognise and reflect State and Commonwealth legislation, regulations and standards including Occupational Health and Safety Standards, Chemical Safety in Schools and Animal Welfare guidelines. Teachers need to be aware of activities that may require notification, certification, permission, permits and licences.
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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Focus: Animals and their needs as living things Outcome: LS.9 Students learn about Students learn to

Integrated learning experiences, instruction and assessment Teacher • provides examples/photographs/images of a variety of animals • provides opportunities for students to observe, record and communicate about investigations on animals in the school and/or community environment • assists students to recognise the needs of animals as living things for air, food, shelter, care and protection. Students • recognise a variety of animals in the school and/or community environment. This may include: – observing and/or interacting with animals that are brought to the school – observing and/or interacting with animals in a wildlife park, zoo, pet shop, natural environment – recording their experiences with animals by photographing, videoing, illustrating, writing, creating tactile pictures/models – presenting their observations/experiences to others

Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes)

Feedback

LS.9 • characteristics of living things

recognise livings things at home, at school and in the community

Recognising a variety of animals in the school and/or community may involve recognising the characteristics of and changes in living things.

Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • recognition of a variety of animals in the school and/or community

LS.9 • the needs of living things

recognise the needs of living things

recognise that animals, as living things need air, food, shelter, care and protection. This may include: – researching the needs of one or more animals through practical observations and/or print and electronic media – recording their findings – presenting their findings to others.

Exploring and/or recording the needs of one or more animals may involve recognising the characteristics of and changes in living things.

recognition that animals as living things need air, food, shelter, care and protection.

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LS.2. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to: • guide and affirm student’ development of a plan to care for a selected animal and meet its needs in the school environment. as it grows • assists students to develop a step-by-step plan to care for one or more selected animals within the school environment (refer to Animal Welfare Guidelines) • assists students to observe and record changes in the selected animal as it grows. LS. light and grooming needs – how the needs will be met over time Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • participate as part of a team a scientific investigation of an observed phenomenon in the local school environment Designing a plan to investigate a selected animal’s needs may involve recognising that the process of science involves conducting investigations and/or participating in the development of a plan to carry out an investigation.9.9 • changes that occur in living things over time • observe changes that occur in an animal over time • predict the animal’s food and water requirements as it grows. LS. eg locating a convenient source of food such as mulberry leaves – care needs. LS.18.21 • the scientific process – observing – questioning – planning – participating – communicating Students • develop a plan to investigate a selected animal’s changing needs as it grows. eg temperature. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Investigating the needs of animals as they grow Outcomes: LS. This may include responding to questions and/or pictures about type of food. LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to investigate a selected animal’s needs for air.17. Oral.19. food and water requirements. LS. amount of food.9. It may also involve undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. continued 52 . LS. Predicting an animal’s changing needs for food and water may involve recognising characteristics of and changes in living things. such as clear glass tank for silk worms – the air.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. LS.2. LS. food. frequency of feeding • assist students to consider the food and water requirements for the animal as it grows and affirm predictions. eg silk worms. young chickens – the appropriate environment in the classroom.17. This may include determining: – the animal for investigation.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. water and shelter.

19. chick. • communication of the results of their investigation with others in an appropriate format. moth. light and warmth – feeding the animal at prescribed intervals – cleaning the animal’s habitat regularly – undertaking grooming and/or caring for the animal as appropriate – adjusting food and water requirements as the animal grows record observations at regular intervals of the animal during its stages of growth in their folio/workbook. oral and/or written report. • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Implementing a care plan to meet an animal’s changing needs may involve recognising that the process of science involves conducting investigations and/or participating in an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. 53 .18. larva.2. LS. LS. hatchling.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS. LS. This may include: – taking photographs and/or recording videos at regular intervals – measuring length and weight at regular intervals – recording information using tables.21 • the scientific process – observing – questioning – participating – communicating Students • implement the care plan and work as part of a team to meet the animal’s changing needs. chickens at egg stage.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.21 • the scientific process – observing – questioning – participating – communicating • participate as part of a team in a scientific investigation of an observation phenomenon in the local school environment Recording observations of the animal’s growth may involve recognising that the process of science involves conducting investigations and/or participating in an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. • observation and recording of the changes in the animal over time in a appropriate format LS2. LS.19. LS.17. posters. LS. visual and/or tactile formats – developing a graph to show growth over time • communicate information about the investigation to others.18. eg silkworms at egg stage. LS. This may include following the step-by-step plan to care for the animal through: – placing the animal in a suitable area to allow for fresh air. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • involvement in implementing the care plan for the selected animal and adjusting food and water requirements as the animal grows LS.2.21 • the scientific process – observing – questioning – participating – communicating • participate as part of a team in a scientific investigation of an observation phenomenon in the local school environment Communicating the results of their investigation to others may involve recognising that the process of science involves conducting investigations and/or participating in an investigation and/or communicating information about an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. cocoon.18. LS.18. LS. multimedia presentation.2. instruction and assessment LS. LS. Feedback • participate as part of a team in a scientific investigation of an observation phenomenon in the local school environment Oral. LS.9. Programming and Assessment Focus: Investigating the needs of animals as they grow (cont) Outcomes: LS. This could take the form of photographs taken at regular intervals.

water and nutrients. recognition that plants as living things need air. aquatic plants in the playground. ferns.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. no water etc). LS.2. grasses. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides opportunities for students to observe. Oral feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • recognition of plants in the school/community environment • LS. bush. vegetables. light.18. nursery.9 • characteristics of living things • recognise some characteristics of living things • recognise that plants.19. record and communicate their observations of a variety of plants in the school/community environment • assists students to explore the needs of plants as living things for air. light. Students may observe trees. Students • recognise a variety of plants in the school/community environment. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Plants and their needs as living things Outcomes: LS. wetland. water and nutrients • assists students to identify the different parts of plants and their function. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.9. This may include researching the needs of plants through practical observations such as growing watercress in different conditions (eg no light. water and nutrients. light. continued 54 .9 • the large variety of plants • identify plants in the local school environment Recognising a variety of plants in the school or local community environments may involve recognising characteristics of and changes in living things. as living things need air. shrubs. creek. and then recording and communicating their findings to others Recognising the needs of plants may involve recognising characteristics of and changes in living things. park. beach Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback LS. LS.

and observing the results after several hours or overnight – placing a small plant on a window sill. leaves absorb light and make food. LS. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. record and communicate about investigations into the parts and functions of a typical plant.21 • characteristics of living things • the scientific process – observing – questioning – planning – participating – communicating recognise the parts of plants • participate as part of a team in a scientific investigation of an observed phenomenon in the local school environment • communicate information about the investigation • Students • observe. LS. instruction and assessment Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Plants and their needs as living things (cont) Outcomes: LS. eg stem provides support and transport of water and nutrients.18. Observing. and observing its growth towards the light over several weeks. 55 .19. It may also involve participating in an investigation and/or communicating information about an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. and observing the results after several hours or overnight – placing a small plant with roots in coloured water.9. LS. LS. roots take up water and nutrients.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.18. Oral feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ participation in an investigation. LS.9.19.2.2. LS. LS. investigating recording and communicating about the parts and functions of a typical plant may involve recognising that the process of science involves conducting investigations and/or recognising characteristics of and changes in living things and/or participating in an investigation. Investigations may include: – placing a freshly cut end of stem of celery or white carnations into water coloured with food dye.

18.9. The steps in the plan may be developed by the teacher and include: – selecting an appropriate type of plant to grow.18. record and communicate observations of a planned fair test/controlled experiment into the effect of light on plant growth • assists students to follow a step-by-step plan to undertake the investigation. eg height and colour Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • participate as part of a team in an investigation to explore the effect of light on a plant over time recognise the needs of living thing • recognise the parts of a plant • Planning an investigation of the effect of light on plant growth may involve recognising that the process of science involves conducting investigations and/or recognising characteristics of and changes in living thing. Programming and Assessment Focus: Investigating the effect of light on plant growth Outcomes: LS. LS. continued 56 .2. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm the planning of a fair test/controlled experiment into the effect of light on plant growth. LS. LS. LS. LS.19. LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to plan. LS. beans. LS.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.17. It may also involve participating in the development of a plan to carry out an investigation and/or participating in an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks.9. eg marigolds.21 • the scientific process – observing – questioning – planning – participating – communicating • the needs of living things • importance of light and water to plants Students • plan a fair test/controlled experiment to investigate the effect of light on plant growth. watercress. bulbs – identifying the control plants that will be exposed to full light and the experimental plants that will have restricted light – setting up strategies for recording changes. LS. Oral.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. LS.17. conduct.2.

19. Oral.21 • the importance of light and water to plants Students participate as part of a team in an investigation to explore the effect of light on a plant over time • observe changes that occur in a plant over time • participate as part of a team in a scientific investigation of an observed phenomenon in the local school environment • • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • changes that occur in living things over time the scientific process – observing – questioning – planning – participating – communicating • conduct the planned fair test by following a teacherdeveloped series of steps.9. 57 .17. LS. This may involve: – displaying posters and graphs – producing booklets for future reference and sharing with peers – using multimedia presentations at a school assembly. LS. LS. eg they compare. LS. LS. LS. instruction and assessment LS.2. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • following the steps of the investigation and support and affirm their participation in the investigation • communicate information about the investigation • Recording results of the investigation may involve recognising that the process of science involves conducting investigations and/or recognising characteristics of and changes in living things.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. This should involve: – setting up two identical groups of plants (eg two groups of five plants). LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Investigating the effect of light on plant growth (cont) Outcomes: LS. a control group and an experimental group – following a consistent procedure for tending the plants.2.18.19. eg height or number of leaves. eg amount of water and light (eg setting up the plant light bulb or Gro-Lux® tube on both the control and experimental group) – covering the plants in the experimental group with a box for a set period each day to restrict light availability (eg 4–6 hours) – measuring and recording plant growth. of plants in both the control and experimental groups at regular intervals (eg once a week) maintain a record of the results of the investigation in their folio/workbook. LS. describe and explain differences.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.18. Participation in an experiment by following a developed series of steps may involve recognising that the process of science involves conducting investigations and/or recognising characteristics of and changes in living things and/or participating in an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. LS. This may include: – photographing plant growth at regular intervals – recording information on a spreadsheet – calculating averages of the measurements in each group – creating graphs of the results for each group communicate information about the investigation into plants and light to others. • recording of the results of the investigation in an appropriate format • communicate information about the investigation • • selection of appropriate format and their communication of the results of the investigation to others.9. Communicating the results of their investigation into the effect of light on plant growth may involve communicating information about an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks.

LS. other living things and/or people • recognition of waste in the school and home and the importance of recycling. LS. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. cleaning up the local area. pictures. This may involve: – sorting and matching pictures of waste products – conducting a lunchbox survey at school and recording waste products – developing a display of waste products collected at the school – investigating how waste is collected at home and where it goes – contacting local councils for information about recycling programs and why they are important – recognising waste products that can be recycled. eg rubbish in the school and home.17.18.19.15. shelter. LS.16.2. recycling. Programming and Assessment Focus: Investigating how people change the environment Outcomes: LS. This may involve creating a poster of natural resources to meet human needs using photographs. eg composting. Students • recognise and record the natural resources that are essential to meet human needs. LS. planting trees.9. food and shelter • assists students to recognise what waste is.20. Recognising waste in the school and home and identifying items that can be recycled may involve describing the impact of human activity on living systems.16 • the effect of human waste products on natural systems recognise the needs of living things • participate as part of a team in a scientific investigation of an observed phenomena in the local school environment • Teacher • assists students to identify human needs for clean air and water. LS. other living things and/or people Identification of human needs and how these may be met may involve recognising that the process of science involves conducting investigations and/or recognising the characteristics of and changes in living things. continued 58 . LS. clean air. cardboard.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. • recognise that human activities produce waste • recognise items of waste.2. instruction and assessment Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback LS. including personal waste and school waste • assists students to recognise the human activities that negatively affect resources in the environment • assists students to explore ways in which they can improve the environment. and identify items that can be recycled. paper. eg soft drink bottles. food and water. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • recognition that humans as living things need clean air. images of any of food and water. LS. drawings. food scraps – investigating ways of creating a compost heap Oral. aluminium cans. shelter.9 • the needs of living things • the scientific process – observing – questioning – planning – participating – communicating LS.

LS. tables. LS.16. LS. Oral. LS.20. LS. responsibilities of class members to publicise. eg sorting litter for recycling and composting. instruction and assessment LS. This may involve: – identifying examples of school waste that could be reduced or recycled – identifying an area of the school to be investigated – collecting. LS.15.2. recording quantity of litter and recycled materials over a period of time. videos. recording and sorting waste products produced in the identified area over a school day – developing a plan to ascertain the activities that will be undertaken.17.20.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. spreadsheets – reporting at a school assembly the results of the investigation and the improvements made to the school environment Participation in an investigation to reduce the impact of rubbish in the school environment may involve exploring the impact of human activity on the Earth’s resources and/or describing the impact of human activity on living systems. It may also involve participating in the development of a plan to carry out an investigation and/or participating in an investigation and/or communicating about an investigation and/or suggesting a way to solve a problem and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ participation in an investigation to reduce the impact of rubbish in the school environment. LS.15. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Investigating how people change the environment (cont) Outcomes: LS.19.9.18.18.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.17. LS. sort and monitor progress – recording the results of their investigation at regular intervals through photographs. LS. LS. LS.16.21 • ways to conserve or monitor the resources of the earth • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback the effect of human waste products on natural systems explore ways in which people can reduce the quantity of resources used • recognise that human activities produce waste • explore ways in which people can reduce the impact of rubbish • Students • participate in an investigation to reduce the impact of rubbish in the school environment.19. LS. continued 59 .

It may also involve participating in an investigation and/or communicating about an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. interviewing local residents – communicating the results of their investigation with others.9. 60 . visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to affirm students’: • researching. LS. This may include: – identifying community and local government groups and ways in which students can participate in the group’s planned activities such as tree planting. photographs or videos. multimedia presentation.21 • the effect of human waste products on natural systems Students identify waste products in the local area • participate as part of a team in a scientific investigation of an observed phenomenon in the local school environment • • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback participate in an investigation to explore positive and negative changes in the local area as a result of human activity. using the internet. Programming and Assessment Focus: Investigating how people change the environment (cont) Outcomes: LS. LS.19.18. Participating in an investigation to explore changes in the local area may involve exploring the impact of human activity on living systems and/or describing the impact of human activity on living systems. Participation in a community project to remove litter or regenerate gardens/bushland may involve a number of outcomes including: describing the impact of human activity on living systems and/or exploration of the impact of human activity on the Earth’s resources. LS. multimedia presentation. This may include: – researching the reasons for changes in the local area and the effect of changes in the local area.15.16. LS. LS. instruction and assessment LS.17. LS.17. LS.15. letters to the editor of the local paper. LS. • participation in a community project and recording and communicating their observations in an appropriate format. posters.2.18. Oral. litter removal – researching information on current community activities such as Clean Up Australia Day. LS. eg collecting newspaper articles. eg school or community – recording changes in their folio/workbook. It may also involve participating in the development of a plan to carry out an investigation and/or participating in an investigation and/or communicating about an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. videos. LS.16.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. recording and communicating the changes to the local area resulting from human activity LS. article in school newsletter.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. taking photographs. LS.19. removing litter or regenerating school gardens or bushland. oral report.21 • the effect of human waste products on natural systems • the effect of noxious weeds on natural systems recognise that human activities produce waste • identify plants that are weeds in the local area • • participate in a community project as part of a team or individually. LS. eg changes to open spaces as a result of building.16. LS. LS. written text – communicating the results of their participation in a community project through posters.20. LS. eg tree/garden planting.19. LS.18. eg annotated photographs or videos. accessing local papers and newsletters – recording their participation through photographs.

LS. Students engage in experiences that focus on ways in which energy brings about change.15 explores the impact of human activity on the Earth’s resources A variety of types and sizes of batteries LS. Links A student: A student: English Food Technology LS.6 recognises some forms and sources of energy Selection of battery operated devices LS.20 suggests a way to solve a problem LS. 61 .2 Energy in everyday life Unit title: Energy in everyday life Description: This unit develops students’ knowledge and understanding about the applications and uses of science. a variety of switches LS.17 participates in the development of a plan to carry out an investigation LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.21 undertakes a variety of team and individual tasks. Programming and Assessment 7. preparation and processing LS. and explore ways to reduce energy wastage in the classroom/school context. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests.19 communicates information about an investigation LS.1 recognises the relationship between food properties.17 uses individual and collaborative skills in the learning process.2 recognises that the process of science involves conducting investigations Electrical appliances.7 explores the ways that energy is used in our daily lives Simple circuit boards LS.12 communicates for a variety of purposes Mathematics LS.2 gathers.13 communicates in a range of contexts DLS. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Energy provider websites or local energy provider shop fronts LS.5 recognises visual texts in a range of contexts LS2.18 participates in an investigation LS. They are involved in identifying forms and sources of energy and in investigating ways in which energy is used in our daily lives.14 communicates with a range of audiences LS. organises and displays data.

changes occur • demonstrates that when there is no energy source. matching pictures of devices – developing a poster of electrical appliances – creating a multimedia presentation of devices that need electricity Observing and exploring the effects when no energy is available may involve recognising some forms and sources of energy and/or exploring the ways that energy is used in our daily lives. LS. This may include: – sorting. fan. This may be explored through investigations of a range of devices to show that appliances will not operate if not plugged in or switch is not turned on including: – battery-operated devices such as torch. radio. CD player – simple circuits identify commonly used devices at school and at home that need electricity.7 • energy as an agent of change • the use of energy in the wider community recognise changes that occur when energy is used • recognise things don’t happen if there is no energy source • identify energy use in the wider community • observe and explore the effects when no energy is available from the source. LS. • identification of devices that need electricity.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. radio to produce sound – plugging in/turning on a fan to produce movement – plugging in/turning on a hairdryer to produce heat • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback LS.7 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. clock – electrically operated devices such as hairdryer. Students • observe and explore the effects of turning switches on and off. Programming and Assessment Focus: ‘Plug-ins’ – impact of energy on daily life Outcomes: LS. This may include: – following safety instructions and using electrical devices appropriately – turning on a light switch or lamp to produce light – plugging in/turning on a CD player. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • exploration of the effects of turning switches on and off LS.7 • the use of energy in the wider community • identify energy use in the wider community • Identifying commonly used devices at school and at home may involve exploring the ways that energy is used in our daily lives. instruction and assessment Teacher • demonstrates that when energy is used. 62 .6.6. Oral. changes do not occur • explicitly teaches and demonstrates rules for safety with electricity (electrical energy) and danger signs. • recognition of the need for energy to operate appliances LS. LS.6.7 • energy as an agent of change • the use of energy in the wider community recognise changes that occur when energy is used • recognise things don’t happen if there is no energy source • identify energy use in the wider community • Observing and exploring the effects of turning switches on and off may involve recognising some forms and sources of energy and/or exploring the ways that energy is used in our daily lives.

7 • sources of energy • the use of energy within the home identify the sources of energy we use in the home/school • participate individually or as part of a team in an investigation into how a specific form of energy is used in the home • Identifying and recording sources of energy used in their daily lives may involve recognising some forms and sources of energy and/or exploring the ways that energy is used in our daily lives. batteries • assists students to identify different types of energy. LS. eg sun.6. eg batteries for a Walkman. batteries to use a Walkman Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback LS. LS.7. gas bottles for a BBQ • assists students to investigate changes to a variety of foods as a result of heat energy. light.6. Students • identify and record sources of energy used in their daily lives. petrol to run a car. mobile phones Exploring the ways in which energy can be stored may involve recognising some forms and sources of energy.2. gas bottles for a BBQ – recognising that some batteries are rechargeable and observe the ways in which they can be recharged. LS. eg video cameras. electricity. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification and exploration of sources of energy LS. electricity to operate the TV.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. petrol. wind. Programming and Assessment Focus: Types and sources of energy Outcomes: LS. eg batteries operate a Walkman. continued 63 . eg torches.18. Oral. This may include: – exploring the effect of removing batteries from different devices. for example. burning candles. batteries. LS. • observation of the use of stored energy in. food. eg heat.17. sound. gas. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to recognise the sources of energy.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.19. eg sun and wind to dry clothes. watches – exploring the ways in which stored energy can be used when other energy sources are not available. walkmans. electrical (electricity) • demonstrates how energy can be stored. LS. electric wheelchairs. LS. LS.6 • energy as an agent of change • types of energy • sources of energy recognise things don’t happen if there is no energy source • recognise forms of energy we use in our home/school • identify the sources of energy we use in the home/school • • explore the ways that energy can be stored.

6. LS. texture.17. LS.19.18. LS. Oral.2.18.19. LS. This may include: – predicting the changes to various foods as a result of the application of heat energy by responding to questions and/or pictures – cooking cakes or pancakes. LS. LS.21 • energy as an agent of change • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback types of energy • the scientific process – observing – questioning – planning – participating – communicating recognise changes that occur when energy is used • recognise forms of energy we use in our home/school • participate as part of a team in a scientific investigation of an observed phenomenon in the local school environment • Students • investigate changes in state brought about by the application of heat energy to a variety of foods by observing. LS.2. LS.17. state – communicating information about the ways in which energy changed the food – recording the results of the investigation in their folio/workbook. This may also involve participating in an investigation and/or communicating information about an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. instruction and assessment LS. 64 .21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ participation in investigations and identification of changes brought about by application of heat energy to food.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.7. chocolate or cheese and observing the changes – recording the observed changes to the food after heating such as colour. melting ice blocks.6. Programming and Assessment Focus: Types and sources of energy (cont) Outcomes: LS. recording and communicating their observations. LS. LS. LS. Participating in investigations of changes in state brought about by applying heat energy to food may involve recognising that the process of science involves conducting investigations and/or recognising some forms and sources of energy.

7. It may also involve participating in an investigation and/or communicating about an investigation and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. LS. ‘What makes things work?’.18. LS. CD player. eg ‘Why do we need energy?’.6. Programming and Assessment Focus: Energy usage in a typical day Outcomes: LS.6. Recording the way energy is used during a typical day may involve recognising some forms and sources of energy and/or exploring the ways that energy is used in our daily lives. toaster. LS.19. a car or bus uses petrol or diesel – developing a poster or visual sequence of energy usage in a typical day. LS.18. Oral. cooktop and room heating use gas or electricity. LS. ‘How did you get to school?’ – sorting and matching pictures of devices and the types of energy they use. This may include: – responding to questions and/or pictures about their day. LS. eg a Walkman uses stored energy in batteries. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ recording of the ways in which energy is used in a typical day.21 • types of energy • sources pf energy • the use of energy within the home • the use of energy in the wider community recognise forms of energy we use in our home/school • identify the sources of energy we use in the home/school • participate individually or as part of a team in an investigation into how a specific form of energy is used in the home • identify energy use in the wider community • Students • record the ways in which energy was used during a typical day at school and/or home and communicate this to others. instruction and assessment Teacher provides a range of pictorial resources and materials to assist students to construct a record of energy usage in a typical day. a clock radio.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. 65 .7. ‘What did you use to cook breakfast?’. power tool and television all use electricity. computer. oven.19. LS. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. LS. a hot shower. light.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to investigate ways to reduce energy wastage • assists students to develop a step-by-step plan to reduce energy use and waste in the classroom • assists students to understand the impact of energy use on the environment. Students • identify ways in which wasting energy can be reduced. Programming and Assessment Focus: Conserving energy Outcomes: LS.18. LS. LS.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS.20. Oral. This may include: – turning off a Walkman when not in use so that the batteries won’t run down – switching off lights when leaving a room – turning off computers when not in use – showering for a shorter time – turning off the oven or BBQ when not in use Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback LS. continued 66 . LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to affirm students’ identification of ways in which energy can be conserved.15 • ways to conserve or monitor the resources of the earth • explore ways in which people can reduce the quantity of resources used Identifying ways that energy can be conserved may indicate exploring the impact of human activity on the Earth’s resources.15. LS.17.19.

cooling – identifying ways to conserve energy. eg lighting. 67 . open windows for ventilation instead of using air conditioners – calculating and recording on a graph the number of hours that specific items are used over a determined period of time such as one week – locating energy provider websites on the internet or contacting providers by phone or through a site visit to obtain information on the energy costs for specific items – calculating the costs of operating specific items for the determined period – identifying times in the day when lights and/or computers could be switched off. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. computers and heaters when not in use. LS.15.21 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Oral. LS.18. LS.20.19. LS. eg turn off lights. close doors and windows if air conditioning is on. eg during lunchtime – recording the reduction in kilowatt hours after energy reducing actions have been instigated – calculating the costs saved as a consequence of the energy reduction initiative and recording this information on a graph – communicating the results of their investigation. close curtains or use draft excluders when heater is on. LS.20.17. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of ways in which energy use can be reduced in the classroom • location of energy providers to obtain information • calculation and recording of energy usage • communication of the results of their investigation to others. LS. instruction and assessment Students Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback LS. Investigating ways in which energy can be conserved in the classroom may involve exploring the impact of human activity on the Earth’s resources and/or participating in the development of a plan to carry out an investigation and/or participating in an investigation and/or communicating information about an investigation and/or suggesting a way to solve a problem and/or undertaking a variety of team and individual tasks. Programming and Assessment Focus: Conserving energy (cont) Outcomes: LS. LS. heating. This may involve: – identifying the forms of energy used in the classroom.21 • ways to conserve or monitor the resources of the earth • explore ways in which people can reduce the quantity of resources used • plan and investigate ways that energy use can be reduced in the classroom.17.19. computers.15. LS. LS.18.

and experience a range of training and workplace environments. This unit involves students exploring important features of Aboriginal cultures and the ways that Aboriginal people contribute to Australian society. Issues and Events from 1946 to 2000.5 Work Education The world of work 68 . Unit number 8. This unit involves students accessing the geographical features of the school and local environment. Students develop appropriate ways to interact with members of the Aboriginal community and explore the importance of land to Aboriginal people. Programming and Assessment 8 HSIE Sample units have been prepared to assist teachers in programming Life Skills outcomes and content from the Human Society and Its Environment key learning area.1 Syllabus History Unit title Connections with History Unit description This unit involves students exploring their personal connections with history and examining time and chronology through a variety of sources. Students explore cultural diversity. The unit addresses the following topics from the syllabus: Topic 1 Introducing History.nsw.boardofstudies. Students use strategies to make informed decisions when purchasing goods or services and identify areas where consumers may need protection.2 Geography Australian communities 8. Students also study significant people and places in Australian history and engage in individual and group investigations and site visits.au).3 Aboriginal Studies Connecting with Aboriginal people and their cultures Informed consumers 8. and/or Topic 5 Significant People. the variety of groups in their local community and the distinctive features of Australia. Issues and Events from 1900 to 1945. The sample units should be read in conjunction with the appropriate syllabus and support documents already distributed to schools and available on the Board of Studies website (www. and identifying the ways in which people obtain goods and services in the community.edu.4 Commerce 8. This unit involves students exploring needs and wants. 8. This unit involves students developing skills and strategies to participate in personal transition planning. Topic 4 Significant People.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Students explore the roles of a range of services in the community.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1.2 listens for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts Mathematics LS. events and issues in Australian history Museums. Links A student: A student: Drama Languages LS. members of local historical societies LS.MBC.1 matches familiar activities with time frames LS. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.12 communicates for a variety of purposes PDHPE LS.8 investigates the importance of significant people. Students also study significant people and places in Australian history and engage in individual and group investigations and site visits. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. responses or a point of view.12 uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: LS.3 recognises the contribution of different cultures to Australian society LS.2 explores personal connections to history school.21 uses appropriate communication strategies in a variety of contexts LS.MBC. former students and staff of the LS.5 uses appropriate behaviours in social situations Information and Software Technology LS. Programming and Assessment 8.2 explores own and other cultures English LS.3 participates in drama experiences in which role-taking is used to enhance their LS.2 recognises and uses the language of time LS. galleries LS. 69 .9 writes short texts for everyday purposes MLS.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology LS.3 reads and interprets time in a variety of situations LS.10 composes increasingly complex written texts MLS. libraries.1 explores the concepts of time and chronology People in the community such as grandparents. audio and/or video recorder/player LS. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 units ‘People Power and Politics in the Post-war Period’ (pp 49–54) or ‘Constructing History’ (pp 55–59) in History Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment. The unit addresses the following topic from the syllabus: Topic 1 Introducing History. events and issues in Australian Access to computers and the internet history Existing textbooks LS.13 communicates in a range of contexts LS.6 makes a variety of visual design artworks that reflect experiences.3 participates in site studies to explore people. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.11 uses a variety of strategies to locate and select information Digital camera.5.3 uses technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences MLS.1 History Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Connections with History Unit title: Connections with History Description: This unit involves students exploring their personal connections with history and examining time and chronology through a variety of sources.1 experiences cultural diversity understanding of ideas and feelings LS. solutions.3 uses a range of software programs Visual Arts LS.MBC.1.

records/CDs. This may include: – identifying items and photographs used by the speaker – asking questions to clarify their understanding – recording key features of the presentation using audio or video formats for later discussion • group items.2. LS. cooking implements.1. sharing experiences of the past using old items and/or photographs. such as a grandparent. Participation may involve: – identifying items that are familiar/unfamiliar – indicating items which are no longer used – recording items as old or new Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback the concept of time and chronology • how we discover what happened in the past • explore the language of time • explore the concept of old and new • experience a range of historical evidence • Listening and responding to a guest speaker may involve exploring the concepts of time and chronology and/or exploring personal connections to history.3. continued 70 . models and/or images supplied by the teacher as ‘old’ and ‘new’. Programming and Assessment Focus: Personal connections with history Outcomes: LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • responses to the guest speaker • the concept of time and chronology • the concept of time and chronology Grouping of images and/or items may involve exploring the concepts of time and chronology and/or exploring personal connections to history. motor vehicles. LS. LS. Oral. how and why we keep items from the past. LS.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Students • listen and respond to a speaker.11. images of people preparing and obtaining food. coins and bank notes.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Examples may include irons. • grouping of images and/or items according to time. telephones. where. instruction and assessment Teacher • invites a guest speaker from the community to share his/her personal connections with history • provides a range of examples of old and new items and assists students to sequence items chronologically • assists students to record and communicate about their personal history • assists students through a visit to a museum or library to explore what.

Feedback the concept of time and chronology • how we discover what happened in the past • the concept of time and chronology • experience a range of historical evidence • use a variety of strategies to locate and select information • • their personal connection of history • their personal connection of history gather materials that relate to students’ individual pasts • use a variety of strategies to locate and select information • participate in the recording of their personal history • • bring examples of old and new items from home. memorabilia. instruction and assessment Students • visit a museum or library to view items from the past. This may include: – identifying items from the past – recording examples of particular items by taking photographs/videos.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Oral. making drawings. ‘how’ and ‘where’ we keep items from the past Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Visiting a museum or library to view items from the past may indicate exploring the concepts of time and chronology and/or participating in site studies to explore people. continued 71 . LS. LS. and souvenirs chronologically. This may include: – responding to questions about when they used the items – indicating events related to the items – placing items in chronological order according to when they were used • record their personal history chronologically using real items. including models. Recording their personal history may indicate exploring personal connections to history. real items Bringing examples of old and new items may indicate exploring personal connections to history. certificates. photographs.1. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of items from the past and recognition of the importance of keeping past items for future generations • identification of past items that show the student’s personal connection with history • their personal connection to history participate in the recording of their personal history • use a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information • group personal items such as baby clothes. awards.11.2.3. events and issues in Australian history. Oral.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. images and/or written text • Grouping of personal items may show evidence of exploring the concepts of time and chronology and/or exploring personal connections to history. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to encourage the exploration of the types of personal information that could be included in a personal history and guide and affirm the selection and entry of relevant data in appropriate time frames. writing descriptions – participating in a discussion about ‘why’. Programming and Assessment Focus: Personal connections with history (cont) Outcomes: LS. • organisation of items and events according to chronology. photographs. LS. photographs.

1. LS. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ sharing their personal history with others using the language of time.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. instruction and assessment Students • share their personal history with others using the language of time. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Sharing their personal history using the language of time may show evidence of exploring personal connections to history and/or exploring concepts of time and chronology. Feedback • the concept of time and chronology • use the everyday language of time Oral. Programming and Assessment Focus: Personal connections with history (cont) Outcomes: LS.2.11. LS. 72 .Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.

Nancy Wake. role-plays. events and issues in Australian history. Students • investigate the life. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to identify one or more significant Australians for investigation • assists students to identify and access a range of appropriate resources including visits to museums.8. sport or community welfare • use a variety of strategies to locate and select information • Participating in gathering information about a significant Australian may involve investigating the importance of significant people. early life experiences. discussions to assist students in their investigation • assists students to record the results of their investigation and to share this with others. library. Information gathered may include date and place of birth. times and contribution of the significant person such as books. internet – participating in one or more site studies to a museum. photographs. debates. Programming and Assessment Focus: Connecting with people from the past Outcomes: LS. • presentation of their knowledge from the investigation of a significant Australian in a range of formats. libraries and/or galleries • facilitates class activities such as interviews. eg Sir Donald Bradman. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • selection of appropriate information from a variety of sources • the contribution of significant people and/or groups • explore the contribution of one or more significant Australians Further activities may involve investigating the importance of significant people. events and issues in Australian history and/or using a variety of strategies to locate and select information. and why they are important. Ian Thorpe. Eddie Mabo.3. LS. gallery to obtain information – locating and selecting information from a variety of sources • further activities may include: – preparing questions and participating in a mock interview with the significant Australian – re-creating or re-enacting a particular event from the life of the selected Australian – participating in a short debate to argue why the selected person is significant Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • the contribution of significant people and/or groups explore the contribution of one or more significant Australians • explore the contribution of one or more significant people or groups in the areas of the arts. postcards. Mel Gibson. films. continued 73 . LS. The investigation may involve: – participating in a discussion about significant Australians – identifying a significant Australian for investigation – identifying the types of resources that will provide information on the life.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Oral. letters. times and contribution of a significant Australian.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Mum Shirl. videos. LS.11.

This may involve: – displaying the recorded information in a prominent place in the classroom or school – using a multimedia presentation – presenting an oral report. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • selection and recording of information • the contribution of significant people and/or groups • use a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information communicate the results of their investigation to others.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Focus: Connecting with people from the past (cont) Outcomes: LS. Responses from others provide feedback. This may involve: – participating in a discussion about the information obtained – creating a scrapbook of images and/or newspaper cuttings – creating a collage of annotated photographs – retelling the main events in the life of the selected person through photographs. Feedback • the contribution of significant people and/or groups • use a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information Oral.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS.11.8. pictures. multimedia presentation • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Determining appropriate ways to record information may involve using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. LS. • communication of the results of their investigation to others in an appropriate format. 74 . instruction and assessment Students • determine the most appropriate way to record and present the information gathered. Communication of the information may indicate investigation of the importance of significant people. events and issues in Australian history and/or using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information.3. LS.

It may also involve using a variety of strategies to locate and select information.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS. gallery to obtain information – interviewing a guest speaker. LS. pictures. internet.3. eg their school. organisation or institution. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • location and selection of appropriate information Determining the most appropriate way to record information from the past may involve using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. • selection of an appropriate way to record their information. Oral. Students • explore the history of a significant place. continued 75 . photographs. eg school magazines. multimedia presentation Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • how we discover what happened in the past • • • • • how we discover what happened in the past • experience a range of historical evidence participate in an investigation of the history of the school participate in an investigation of an historically or culturally significant location use a variety of strategies to locate and select information use a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information Exploring the history of a significant location. library. organisation or institution for study • assists students to identify and access the types of resources that will provide appropriate information. senior citizens • determine the most appropriate way to record the information gathered for future historical reference. This may include: – participating in a group discussion/forum to discuss the information obtained – creating a scrapbook of images. eg a former student or retired principal of the school. films. newspaper cuttings – creating a collage of annotated photographs – retelling the history of the location through photographs. This may involve: – identifying the subject of their investigation. Programming and Assessment Focus: Connecting with places of historical significance Outcomes: LS. LS. organisation or institution may indicate exploring personal connections to history and/or participating in site studies to explore people. a building in the local community. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to identify and select a significant place. preserve and publicise the results of their study • facilitates class activities where students can share information and/or re-create a particular event in the history of a significant place. a sporting club.2. including guest speakers and site studies • assists students in determining appropriate ways to record. events and issues in Australian history. eg the history of the school – identifying and accessing appropriate resources. caretaker of local museum.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.11. audio recordings – participating in one or more site studies to a museum.

LS.11.2. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • participation in re-creating a particular event in the history of a significant place • • how we discover what happened in the past • use a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information use a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information • record information of their investigation in oral. Feedback • how we discover what happened in the past use a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information • experience a range of historical evidence • Oral. eg through the local media. instruction and assessment Students • re-create or re-enact a particular event in the history of the significant place using the historical evidence gathered. • • incorporation of their information into a time capsule Sharing or publicising their investigation may involve using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. eg the formal opening of the school Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Re-creating or re-enacting a particular event may involve using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. Incorporating information into a time capsule may indicate using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. documents. artefacts over time – incorporating items/information into a time capsule – determining location of the time capsule – determining access to the time capsule after a period of time • share or publicise their investigation to others.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. visual and/or written formats Recording information may involve using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. school newsletter.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. This may include: – determining the best ways to conserve and protect photographs. LS.3. 76 . historical society. Programming and Assessment Focus: Connecting with places of historical significance (cont) Outcomes: LS. • sharing of the results of their investigation with others. LS. recording of information in an appropriate format • how we discover what happened in the past • • how we discover what happened in the past • use a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information gather items and/or information for inclusion in a time capsule.

Students explore cultural diversity.10 recognises the importance of active and informed citizenship digital camera LS. Links A student: A student: English Languages LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.MBC.6 uses visual texts in a range of contexts LS.MBC.11 views and responds to a range of visual texts.au/Worldguide/index. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Changing Australian Communities’ in Geography Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 27–35). the variety of groups in their local community and the distinctive features of Australia.2 Geography Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Australian communities Unit title: Australian communities Description: This unit involves students accessing the geographical features of the school and local environment.com.3 recognises the contribution of different cultures to Australian society LS.MBC. 77 .10 composes increasingly complex written texts Mathematics LS.21 uses appropriate communication strategies in a variety of contexts History Visual Arts LS.2 explores own and other cultures LS.theworldnews.1 experiences cultural diversity LS.12 uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes. including a LS.4 explores the effects of the physical environment on peoples’ activities Photographs of the local community LS.8 responds to increasingly complex written texts LS. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Existing textbooks LS.5. Programming and Assessment 8. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.9 recognises the contribution of Aboriginal peoples and other cultures to LS.1 experiences a range of environments SBS World Guide http://www.12 uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information Information and Software Technology LS.php3 LS.11 uses a variety of strategies to locate and select information LS.11 uses a variety of strategies to locate and select information LS.13 communicates in a range of contexts LS.2 moves around in the environment Other internet sources LS. responses or a point Australian history of view.7 explores the diversity of Australian communities Computer hardware and software appropriate to multimedia presentations.4 uses spoken language to interact with a range of audiences LS.14 communicates with a range of audiences LS.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology solutions. LS.1 reads and interprets tables and data displays LS.12 communicates for a variety of purposes PDHPE LS. media and multimedia DLS.5 uses appropriate behaviours in social situations LS.3 recognises the features of a range of environments Archival magazines and brochures LS.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences.

2. explore and record the geographical features of the school environment using safe practice • explicitly teaches geographical language to enable students to move around the school in the context of accessing classrooms. LS. eg ‘come to the front of the class’.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. if required. eg ‘I need help to get to the kitchen on the top floor’. to access particular parts of the school using a support network card#. Students • access features of the school by following a personal timetable and using safe practice.11. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to recognise. LS. ‘I need someone to push my wheelchair over the grass to get to the football field’. and playground.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. canteen. • request for assistance and safe movement in the environment. LS. ‘the kitchen is on the top floor’.1.3. Oral. ‘turn left at the end of the corridor and give this note to the secretary at the office’ – use geographical language to respond to questions such as ‘Where is …?’ For example ‘the canteen is next to the sports room’. This may include: – taking photographs of features of the school and matching/placing these on a map with text if appropriate – following directions involving geographical language to move around the school environment. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of safe movement around the school and following and/or using appropriate geographical language • moving around the environment using safe practice • identify assistance needed to move around in the immediate environment Indicating the need for assistance may be a strategy for moving around in the environment and may indicate using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. ‘meet the teacher at the southern end of the oval’. ‘wait at the top of the stairs’. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • geographical features of the immediate environment – school geographical language used to describe features of the environment • experience and participate in activities that focus on the immediate environment – school • respond to geographical language • Accessing features of the school may indicate experiencing a range of environments and/or moving around in the environment and/or recognising the features of the environment. ‘the bus leaves from the front of the building’ • indicate the need for and/or seek assistance. offices. continued # See pages 213 and 216 for details of how to develop a support network card 78 . Programming and Assessment Focus: Our community Outcomes: LS.

LS. Oral. Programming and Assessment Focus: Our community (cont) Outcomes: LS. LS. continued 79 . bus or train.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.11. how will you get to…’ – demonstrating their understanding of geographical language as they move around the community in the context of undertaking fieldwork. eg shopping and recreational areas. LS.2.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.3.1. This may include: – taking photographs of features of the community and matching/placing on a map with text if appropriate – exploring the function of a range of community facilities. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of the geographical features of the community • geographical language used to describe features of the environment • respond to geographical language Responding to questions involving geographical language to locate features of the environment may indicate moving around in the environment and/or recognising the features of a range of environments. site studies and/or specific projects Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • geographical features of the immediate environment – community • experience and participate in activities that focus on the immediate environment – community Exploring the geographical features of the community may indicate experiencing a range of environments and/or recognising the features of a range of environments and/or using a variety of strategies to locate and select information. public buildings and places of interest. site studies and/or specific projects • explicitly teaches skills and strategies for students to move around safely in the community as a passenger in a motor vehicle. • response to questions involving geographical language. as a bike rider. This may include: – responding to questions using geographical language to locate themselves in relation to features of the environment such as ‘you are here. explore and record geographical features in the community • explicitly teaches geographical language to enable students to move around in the community in the context of undertaking fieldwork. as a pedestrian. Students • recognise and explore the geographical features of the community. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides opportunities for students to engage in fieldwork to recognise. LS. eg What do libraries provide? Where would you go to deposit money? What kinds of things would you expect to find in a museum? Where would you go to buy medicine? • respond to questions using geographical language to locate features of the environment.

LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • request for assistance and safe movement in the environment • moving around the environment using safe practice use modes of travel to meet individual needs in the immediate environment • demonstrate safe practice as a pedestrian • demonstrate safe practice when travelling in a vehicle • Demonstrating appropriate skills and strategies may indicate moving around in the environment. wear a helmet when riding a bike.11. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Indicating assistance required may be a strategy for moving around in the environment.1.2. LS. instruction and assessment Students • indicate the kind of assistance required to access particular parts of the community.3. • demonstration of appropriate skills and strategies and safe movement in the community. wear a seatbelt in a car or bus. Programming and Assessment Focus: Our community (cont) Outcomes: LS. LS. Feedback • moving around the environment using safe practice • identify assistance needed to move around in the immediate environment Oral. eg cross when traffic lights are green.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. This may include: – identifying the kind of assistance required using individual communication systems – identifying appropriate trusted and known adults from whom to ask assistance – requesting assistance in a range of structured role plays – demonstrating skills in a range of community situations • demonstrate skills and strategies as they move around safely in the community. 80 . stand behind the yellow line when waiting for a train.

This may include: – bringing photographs. badges. guides. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to explore what it means to be a member of a community • facilitates fieldwork to locate and identify community groups. scouts.7. religious group to which they belong and/or support. locate and explore the activities of community groups such as youth groups. Programming and Assessment Focus: Belonging to communities Outcomes: LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • factors contributing to a sense of identity in Australian communities recognise that they are members of a variety of communities • explore the features of communities • Identifying. uniforms and other items from home – indicating the activities of the community group to which they belong and their participation in these activities – indicating what they enjoy most about belonging to and/or supporting these groups – using photographs/pictures to record on a community map the location of meeting places for identified community groups. locating and exploring the activities of community groups to which they belong may indicate exploring the diversity of Australian communities and/or recognising the importance of active and informed citizenship. eg the scouts meet at the hall in Smith Street.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. football team. LS. the football club is next to the garage on the main road – making a poster or multimedia presentation of the range of groups and activities to which students belong and/or support in the community.3. 81 .10. Students • participate in classroom activities and fieldwork to identify.11. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to affirm students’ identification of groups to which they belong and the variety of groups within the community. LS. videos. Oral. These activities may also involve using a variety of strategies to locate and select information and/or using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. LS. LS. swimming club.

constructing and/or decorating items in the classroom or school to represent a cultural theme • participation in cultural activities alongside community members. school and wider community Bringing items from home that reflect their cultural background may indicate exploring the diversity of Australian communities. Students • bring items from home that reflect features of their cultural background to share with others. stories Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • Australia’s cultural identity • recognise the range of cultures represented in the class. Oral. traditional costumes. eg food. LS. photographs.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • sharing their cultural background with others • recording of the cultural background of themselves and others in the class • Australia’s cultural identity • explore the ways that cultural diversity has contributed to Australia’s identity • share in cultural activities alongside community members. Activities may include: – plotting country of origin of class members or their parents on a world map – including items brought from home in classroom display – describing cultural similarities and diversity between class members Recording information about the cultural background of class members may indicate using a variety of strategies to locate and select information and/or using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information and/or exploring the diversity of Australian communities. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Faces in the community Outcomes: LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to identify the cultural background of themselves and others in the school/community • assists students to explore the range and contributions of cultural groups in the community • assists students to recognise individuals and groups that support and protect the community. continued 82 . LS. making and decorating models.10. school and wider community • • record information about the cultural background of class members.2.3. Sharing in cultural activities may be evidence of exploring the diversity of Australian communities. songs. eg by participating in making a mural. music. LS.11. • Australia’s cultural identity explore the features of communities • recognise the range of cultures represented in the class.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.

LS.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. • creation of a collage or multimedia presentation of the features of the local community and what makes it unique. possibly including fieldwork. eg police or ambulance officers. The collage may include community location. Feedback • natural hazards that affect people’s lives and activities • recognise individuals.11. cultural venues) and people. Programming and Assessment Focus: Faces in the community (cont) Outcomes: LS. LS.3. 83 . its facilities (such as cafes. Creating a collage or multimedia presentation of features of the local community may be evidence of exploring the diversity of Australian communities and/or using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. to obtain information on the functions of these services Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Recognition of the range of groups and personnel who support the community may be evidence of moving around in the environment and/or recognising the features of a range of environments. LS. groups and government departments/agencies that respond to disasters caused by natural hazards Oral. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of the range of groups who support the community in the event of natural hazards in the physical environment • factors contributing to a sense of identity in Australian communities recognise that they are members of a variety of communities • explore the features of communities • • creating a collage or a multimedia presentation to depict the features of the local community and the contributions of cultural groups.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. community services groups – matching photographs. and what makes it unique.2. instruction and assessment Students • recognise the range of groups and personnel who support the community. LS. places of worship.10. fire brigade or SES personnel.1. It may also indicate exploring the diversity of Australian communities and/or exploring the effects of the physical environment on people’s activities and/or using a variety of strategies to locate and select information. pictures and/or text of individuals and/or groups who support the community – identifying on a community map where these services are located – undertaking research.

1. continued 84 .2. climates. climates and/or vegetation • assist students to recognise and record the distinctive features of native Australian flora and fauna. temperature – vegetation – natural resources – soils • effects of aspects of the physical environment on people’s activities – climate – topography – natural resources • • recognise that there are varied types of landforms. • research into the effect of the physical environment on the activities of people.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of the location of their community on a map of Australia • identification of the features of coastal and inland environments • recognise that people’s activities are influenced by climate. This may include establishing links with one or more schools using communication technology and/or site studies and investigating: – recreational activities – transport – work opportunities • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • Australia’s geographical dimensions – shape • recognise the shape of Australia Identifying the location of their local community may indicate recognising the features of a range of environments. LS. vegetation and natural resources in Australia Participation in exploring the difference between coastal and inland environments may indicate recognising the features of a range of environments. topography and natural resources Participation in fieldwork may indicate exploring the effect of the physical environment on people’s activities and/or using a variety of strategies to locate and select information. Programming and Assessment Focus: Distinctive features of Australia Outcomes: LS. possibly including fieldwork. locate New South Wales and plot their community on the map • assists students to identify the coastal and inland regions of the state and their associated landforms. rainfall. This may include: – matching pictures/photographs to distinguish between coastal and inland environments – labelling pictures/photographs to indicate the type of climate associated with coastal and inland environments – labelling pictures/photographs to highlight the vegetation typical of coastal and inland environments • undertake research. LS. drawing or modelling the shape of Australia – locating the state of New South Wales on a map – plotting the location of their community on a map of New South Wales and/or Australia explore the difference between coastal and inland environments.3. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to recognise a map of Australia.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. This may include: – recognising the shape of Australia – tracing. LS. LS. Students • identify the location of their community on a map.4. patterns of: – landforms – drainage basins – climate. LS.11. Oral. to explore and compare the effect of the physical environment and the climate on the activities of people in coastal and inland communities.

written text. tables and graphs • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Participation in fieldwork to recognise and record native plants may indicate recognising the features of a range of environments and/or experiencing a range of environments.3. continued 85 . size. • identification of the most appropriate plants to grow in the local area. LS. the varieties of banksias – recording their fieldwork using photographs.11.2. It may also involve using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. This may include: – locating native flora such as eucalyptus trees. LS. wattles etc – sorting and matching photographs/pictures of the features of a variety of native trees/flowers – exploring the distinctive features of native plants. LS.1. videos. drawings. shape and colour of waratahs. instruction and assessment Students • undertake fieldwork to recognise and record native trees/flowers in the school/local environment. Programming and Assessment Focus: Distinctive features of Australia (cont) Outcomes: LS. eg the colour. the feel and smell of wattle flowers and eucalyptus leaves. banksias. Feedback • distinctive features of Australian flora recognise well-known Australian trees and flowers • recognise the distinctive features of native Australian trees and flowers • Oral. LS.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. LS.4. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • recording of native plants in the school and/or local environment determine from their fieldwork the most appropriate native trees/flowers to plant in the school or local community as part of a flora regeneration project Determining the most appropriate native trees and flowers to plant in the school/community may indicate recognising the features of a range of environments and/or using a variety of strategies to locate and select information.

This may include: – placing labelled photographs and/or a poster in a prominent position in the classroom or school – developing a multimedia presentation – presenting an oral report. The fieldwork may also involve using a variety of strategies to locate and select information and/or using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. 86 .Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS.1. pictures. wildlife sanctuary or in the local environment – observing. LS. LS. • communication of the results of their fieldwork. written text Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Participation in fieldwork to recognise and record native animals in the local environment may indicate moving around in the environment and/or recognising the features of a range of environments. Programming and Assessment Focus: Distinctive features of Australia (cont) Outcomes: LS.4. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • recording of the distinct features of Australian native animals • distinctive features of Australian fauna • use a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information • communicate results of their fieldwork to others.11. LS. Feedback • distinctive features of Australian fauna recognise well-known Australian animals • recognise the distinctive features of Australian animals • Oral.3. habitats and the way they care for their young – recording their fieldwork using photographs. instruction and assessment Students • undertake fieldwork to recognise and record the distinctive features of native animals. This may include: – recognising native animals in a visit to a zoo. LS. Communicating the results of their fieldwork with others may indicate using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. photographing and/or videoing a variety of native animals focusing on their appearance. eating habits.2.

Sydney.8 uses appropriate protocols for working with Aboriginal Peoples and communities LS. Australian National University Press.yothuyindi.au 87 .9 uses a variety of strategies to locate and select information LS.christineanu.au Yothu Yindi http://www. Carlton. Sydney.1 recognises factors that contribute to an Aboriginal person’s identity LS. Deadly Vibe Magazine. A & Hill. Sydney Naamarroo Employment Services.vibe. Roughsey. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.4 recognises the importance of self-determination and autonomy for Aboriginal Peoples LS.com Christine Anu http://www. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. The Rainbow Serpent.atsic. D. Redfern Videos The Dreaming Series.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.com. reprinted by Heinemann Library.au Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission http://www.gov. Australian Aborigines Series. Traditional Aboriginal Culture and Society (Information Pack) ATSIC.10 uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. Djugurba – Tales from the Spirit Time. ABC Series. Aboriginal Australia Reading Series. Sydney. Collins. Darlinghurst. D. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. M.net. Collins.au Australian Museum http://www. Canberra Department of Aboriginal Affairs. P & Roughsey. Tresize. Canberra. PO Box 810.com. Aboriginal Nations Pty Ltd. Programming and Assessment 8. Students develop appropriate ways to interact with members of the Aboriginal community and explore the importance of land to Aboriginal people.5 recognises the significant contribution of Aboriginal people to Australian society LS. 2008 Message Stick. Jacaranda Press. Posters ATSIC.com Deadly Vibe Magazine http://www.6 explores the ways in which the wider Australian community interacts with Aboriginal Peoples and cultures LS.amonline. Rushcutters Bay. Desert Dreamings. Sydney.bangarra. Sydney. Macmillan. Stokes. reprinted by Angus & Robertson. 97 Rose St Chippendale.3 Aboriginal Studies Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Connecting with Aboriginal people and their cultures Unit title: Connecting with Aboriginal people and their cultures Description: This unit involves students exploring important features of Aboriginal cultures and the ways that Aboriginal people contribute to Australian society. 2010. Gidja. D. Websites Bangarra Dance Theatre http://www. Resources Books Barlow. Life Skills Outcomes A student: LS.

cultural and historical contexts LS. LS. 88 .3 participates in site studies to explore people.2 explores a variety of materials.16 explores social and cultural issues through texts LS. media and multimedia PDHPE LS.MBC.5 uses appropriate behaviours in social situations Geography LS.1 experiences cultural diversity LS.7 experiences music from a variety of social.11 views and responds to a range of visual texts.MBC.9 recognises the contribution of Aboriginal peoples and other cultures to Australian society.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology LS.23 supports and cooperates with others in a range of contexts LS.5.9 appreciates a variety of music LS.1 experiences a variety of artmaking activities History LS. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Aboriginal Loss of Autonomy after Invasion’ (p 15) or ‘Aboriginal Organisations in the Post-invasion Context’ (pp 16–21) in Aboriginal Studies Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment.2 listens for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts LS.3 uses technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences LS. events and issues in Australian history LS.4 explores the effects of the physical environment on people’s activities LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.2 moves around in the environment Visual Arts LS.2 explores their own and other cultures solutions English Music LS. Programming and Assessment Links A student: A student: Aboriginal Languages Information and Software Technology LS. techniques and processes. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.

food outlets. greetings. clothing/costumes. festivals. traditions. stories Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • factors that contribute to identify • recognise that each person has their own identity Bringing items from home representing students’ cultural backgrounds is important in recognising factors that contribute to an Aboriginal person’s identity.8 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. stories response to and identification of the cultural background of themselves and others in the class. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • sharing their cultural background with others • • explore factors that contribute to identity • identify features of diversity in their local community such as food. musical instruments. songs. songs. Oral. eg photographs. music. special occasions.1. dance. traditional costumes. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to identify the cultural background of themselves and others • assists students to explore aspects of cultural diversity • invites members of the Aboriginal community to share features of their culture. chants. Students • bring items from home that reflect features of their cultural background to share with others. Identifying features of diversity in their local community is important in recognising factors that contribute to an Aboriginal person’s identity. music.6.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. continued 89 . LS. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring traditional and contemporary Aboriginal culture Outcomes: LS.

spiritual connections • use of appropriate protocols when listening to an Aboriginal guest speaker.1. Feedback • the increasing interaction of nonAboriginal people with Aboriginal Peoples and culture • explore how people in the wider community are accessing aspects of Aboriginal culture Oral. stories. dance and cultural presentations may indicate exploring the ways in which the wider Australian community interacts with Aboriginal Peoples and cultures. Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring traditional and contemporary Aboriginal culture (cont) Outcomes: LS. communicating with and showing respect for Aboriginal Peoples • listen to and ask questions of an Aboriginal guest speaker on the significance of the land for Aboriginal people in relation to food. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • participation in Aboriginal cultural activities share in cultural experiences alongside Aboriginal community members. feel and sound produced by musical instruments – listening to/viewing stories. participate in creating artwork using traditional Aboriginal methods Participation in shared cultural experiences may indicate exploring the ways in which the wider Australian community interacts with Aboriginal Peoples and cultures. Responses by the guest speaker can also provide feedback. Listening to Aboriginal guest speakers may indicate using appropriate protocols for working with Aboriginal Peoples and communities. • participation in cultural experiences alongside Aboriginal community members • the appropriate protocols for communicating and showing respect for Aboriginal Peoples and cultures • explore the appropriate ways of behaving towards. kinship. LS. instruction and assessment Students • explore aspects of Aboriginal culture with one or more members of the Aboriginal community. continued 90 .6. This may include: – listening to traditional and contemporary Aboriginal music associated with a range of celebrations – exploring the movement. eg participate in preparing and eating a variety of food. eg Dreamtime stories – observing and participating in a dance associated with a particular occasion or ceremony – visiting an Aboriginal cultural centre or gallery • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Exploring aspects of Aboriginal culture through traditional music.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. LS.8 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.

model or multimedia presentation to illustrate a particular aspect of Aboriginal culture such as music. LS. stories.6.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1.1. LS. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Illustrating a particular aspect of Aboriginal culture may indicate exploring the ways in which the wider Australian community interacts with Aboriginal Peoples and cultures. model or multimedia presentation about a particular aspect of Aboriginal culture in an appropriate format. LS.8 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Oral. Focus: Land and its significance for Aboriginal identity Outcomes: LS. eg Rabbit Proof Fence • explore factors that – viewing/listening to Dreamtime stories contribute to an – viewing/listening to Aboriginal visual and Aboriginal person’s performing artists sense of identity – discussing the significance of the colours and design of the Aboriginal flag Exploring the significance of the land for Aboriginal people may indicate recognising factors that contribute to an Aboriginal person’s identity. Students • factors that contribute • recognise the centrality • explore the significance of the land for Aboriginal to Aboriginal identity of land to Aboriginal people through: identity – viewing films. continued 91 . visiting artists and the Aboriginal flag and the identification of the link between the land and Aboriginal identity. LS. culture and the land. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm creation of a poster. stories. Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring traditional and contemporary Aboriginal culture (cont) Outcomes: LS.10 Teacher • assists students to explore links between contemporary Aboriginal enterprises. LS. Feedback • the increasing interaction of nonAboriginal people with Aboriginal Peoples and culture • explore how people in the wider community are accessing aspects of Aboriginal culture Oral.9.4. art. dance. food. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm responses to films. instruction and assessment Students • make a poster.

Programming and Assessment Focus: Land and its significance for Aboriginal identity (cont) Outcomes: LS. It may also involve using a variety of strategies to locate and select information. Recording the results of research and presenting findings may involve using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information.9.1.4. Feedback • the importance of the land and economic independence for Aboriginal selfdetermination and autonomy • a variety of strategies to access information to meet a particular need recognise the links between economic independence and autonomy • identify the importance of the land for Aboriginal selfdetermination • locate information using appropriate strategies • Oral. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • investigation of contemporary Aboriginal organisations and enterprises strategies for organising information • formats for communicating information • • evaluate and order information select and use appropriate written. LS. oral and graphic forms to communicate information • • record the results of their research and present their findings to others. LS.10 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. This may include answering the following questions: – What does the organisation/enterprise do? – Where does it operate? – How does it service the needs of the community? – What are the links between the organisation/enterprise and various expressions of Aboriginal culture? Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Undertaking site studies or research may involve recognising factors that contribute to an Aboriginal person’s identity and/or recognising the importance of self-determination and autonomy for Aboriginal Peoples. This may include: – annotating photographs taken on the site study – completing a teacher-structured worksheet – creating a poster – presenting an oral report – developing a multimedia presentation.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 92 . Responses by others provide feedback. • recording of results and presentation to others. instruction and assessment Students • undertake site studies and/or communication technology research to explore contemporary Aboriginal organisations/enterprises. LS.

eg Jason Gillespie. Individuals may be selected from the areas of: – visual arts. eg Linda Burney. continued 93 . Bronwyn Bancroft – performing arts. including organising a visit by.6. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides information on a range of contemporary and prominent Aboriginal people • assists students to select a prominent Aboriginal person as the subject of a case study • assists students to identify and access a range of resources. eg Deborah Mailman – sport. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of well known Aboriginal people and their roles in the community • • the contribution of Aboriginal people to Australian society • participate in the development of a case study regarding the contribution of an Aboriginal person to Australian society selection of an appropriate Aboriginal person as the subject of a case study. David Gulpilil – film and television.8. Oral.10 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Cathy Freeman – politics. Aiden Ridgeway – human rights.5. eg Sally Morgan. the selected person • assists students to record their investigation in appropriate formats to share with others. Mandawuy Yunupingu. LS. or interview with. Students • participate in class activities to explore roles of wellknown Aboriginal people in the community.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. eg Christine Anu. LS. LS. LS.9. Programming and Assessment Focus: Connecting with prominent Aboriginal people Outcomes: LS. Selection of an Aboriginal person as the subject of a case study may indicate recognising the significant contribution of Aboriginal people to Australian society. This may include: – identifying well-known Aboriginal people – sorting and matching well known Aboriginal people with the area in which they are famous – recognising through discussion that Aboriginal people are now more visible and vocal in the community • select an Aboriginal person as the subject of a case study. Nova Peres-Kneebone. eg Dr Lowitja O’Donoghue Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • the increasing interaction of nonAboriginal people with Aboriginal Peoples and culture • recognise the ways in which Aboriginal Peoples are increasingly visible and vocal in the community Participation in class activities to explore roles of well-known Aboriginal people may indicate exploring the ways in which the wider Australian community interacts with Aboriginal Peoples and cultures.

This may involve: – participating in a discussion about the Aboriginal person – identifying the types of resources that will provide information on the life and contribution of the person such as books. LS.5.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.6. This may involve: – creating a scrapbook of photographs. LS.10 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. photographs. in person – participating in a group discussion/forum to discuss the information they have collected for the case study Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Undertaking the case study may indicate recognising the significant contribution of Aboriginal people to Australian society. videos and websites – locating and selecting information – participating in preparing questions and interviewing the selected person by phone. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification. Feedback • the contribution of Aboriginal people to Australian society • the appropriate protocols for communicating and showing respect for Aboriginal Peoples and cultures • a variety of strategies to access information to meet a particular need • • • • • strategies for organising information • participate in the development of a case study regarding the contribution of an Aboriginal person to Australian society explore the appropriate ways of behaving towards. LS. Responses by others can provide feedback. This may include: – placing labelled photographs or a poster in a prominent position in the class or school – developing a multimedia presentation – presenting an oral report. instruction and assessment Students • undertake the case study.9. pictures. Programming and Assessment Focus: Connecting with prominent Aboriginal people (cont) Outcomes: LS. newspaper cuttings – creating a collage of annotated materials – retelling the main events in the life of the selected Aboriginal person through photographs. multimedia presentation • share their case study with others. LS.8. oral and graphic forms to communicate information determine the most appropriate way to record the information gathered as part of the case study. email. • recording of their information in an appropriate format Sharing their case study with others may indicate using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. location and selection of appropriate resources that will provide information on the life and contribution of the person • formats for communicating information • select and use appropriate written. • Determining the most appropriate way to record the information gathered may indicate using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. 94 . newspaper cuttings. films. communicating with and showing respect for Aboriginal Peoples locate information using appropriate strategies select relevant information from identified sources evaluate and order information Oral. It may also indicate using appropriate protocols for working with Aboriginal Peoples and communities and/or using a variety of strategies to locate and select information. • communication of the results of their case study in an appropriate format.

1 experiences a variety of artmaking activities LS.6 uses visual texts in a range of contexts NLS.14 communicates with a range of audiences Visual Arts Information and Software Technology LS.2. and identifying the ways in which people obtain goods and services in the community.fido.asic.gov.gov.gov.au Life Skills Outcomes 5.4 explores rights and responsibilities as a consumer NSW Office of Fair Trading LS.dft. financial. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Consumer Choice’ in Commerce Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 19–28).gov.5.org.gov.au LS.11 uses a variety of strategies to locate and select information National Children’s and Youth Law Centre http://www.12 communicates for a variety of purposes LS.au/shopping/shoppingtips/lay-bys with commercial and legal problems and issues http://www. solutions.nsw.au LS. Students use strategies to make informed decisions when purchasing goods or services and identifying areas where consumers may need protection. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. Links A student: A student: English Mathematics LS.gov.accc.fairtrading. 6 and 9. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. Not all the ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements for http://www.8 responds to increasingly complex written texts PDHPE LS.com.12 uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information Scamwatch http://www.consumersonline.nsw.nsf/byheadline/Teacher+resources?openDocument each outcome are included in this sample unit.au LS.nsw.au community Australian Consumers’ Association http://www.lawstuff.au LS.7 reads and responds to short written texts NLS. responses or a point LS.fido.10 identifies appropriate community support personnel and agencies who can assist http://www.au LS. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.scamwatch. however teachers may incorporate these if they are considered to be appropriate to the needs of their students.1 explores the differences between needs and wants Websites LS.13 uses money to purchase goods and services LS.3 explores consumer.7 makes informed decisions about purchasing goods and services http://www. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: LS.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences.8 purchases goods and services http://www.gov.dft.choice.13 uses individual and collective skills in the learning process Australian Securities and Investment Commission Note: Teachers may develop other units of work to address syllabus content related to http://www.13 communicates in a range of contexts LS.4 Commerce Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Informed consumers Unit title: Informed consumers Description: This unit involves students exploring needs and wants.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1 uses information and software technology in solving a range of problems LS.au LS. 95 .dft. legal and employment issues which affect daily life Consumers Online http://www.asic.gov.15 plans personal finances LS.26 uses problem-solving strategies in a variety of contexts LS.moneystuff.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology of view.gov.2 recognises ways in which people obtain goods and services in the local Australian Competition and Consumer Commission http://www.au/fido/fido.21 uses appropriate communication strategies in a variety of contexts LS.nsw. Programming and Assessment 8.au/shopping LS.

CDs. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ demonstration of the differences between needs and wants and their appreciation that they don’t need to buy things to be happy. eg love.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. education and health care – identifying items that might be desirable but are not essential. Oral. shelter. doctors and hospitals provide health care – recognising that some needs cannot be purchased. friendship. clothing. care.) Outcome: LS. mobile phones – sorting real objects and/or using advertising material to make an individual or group poster that differentiates between student ‘needs’ and ‘wants’ – matching photographs/pictures to illustrate the ways in which their basic needs are met. fashionable clothing. love and well-being. eg parents/carers provide food and shelter. DVDs.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Focus: Needs and wants (Note: This focus area relates specifically to ‘needs’ and ‘wants’. eg computer games. 96 . Students • identify the differences between needs and wants. Evidence of learning Feedback basic needs and wants common to all young people • how needs and aspirations of young people may be met • identify basic needs common to all young people • identify ways in which the needs of young people may be met • Identification of needs and wants may indicate exploring the differences between needs and wants. This may include: – identifying the basic needs of all young people for food. Teachers may choose to design other activities to address ‘aspirations’ where appropriate. well-being. instruction and assessment Teacher • explicitly teaches the differences between ‘needs’ and ‘wants’ by focusing student attention on items that are essential to meet basic needs as opposed to ‘wants’ that are desirable but not essential • assists students to identify the ways in which their basic needs are met • assists students to identify those needs that cannot be purchased.

a vaccination for a dog at the veterinary clinic – participating in simulated or actual site visits to identify appropriate community providers for purchasing/obtaining goods and/or services.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Oral. eg prescription medicines from a chemist. Evidence of learning Feedback • the differences between goods and services where goods and services may be obtained how goods and services may be obtained • • • • • • • identify providers of goods identify providers of services identify where specific goods may be obtained identify where services may be obtained make a purchase directly from a retail outlet Matching specific goods and services to appropriate providers may indicate recognising the ways in which people obtain goods and services in the local community. goldfish from a pet shop – making a poster to indicate goods that can be purchased from multiple providers. fruit from a greengrocer or supermarket – matching and labelling pictures or photographs to indicate where services may be obtained and/or purchased. a dental check at the dentist. petrol from a service station. eg meat from a supermarket or butcher. 97 . Students • match specific goods and services to appropriate providers. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides students with pictures of a range of goods and services and assists students to determine where these can be purchased/obtained • assists students to determine items that can be purchased from a single provider and those that can be purchased from multiple providers • organises simulated or actual site visits to identify the range of providers of goods and services in the local community.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. eg a hair cut from a hairdresser. This may involve: – matching pictures of specific goods to a single provider or place of purchase. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ matching of specific goods and services to appropriate providers and identification of the ways in which people obtain goods and services in the local community. Programming and Assessment Focus: Where do you get it? Outcome: LS.

Oral.12. LS. Students • participate in role-plays and/or discussions to develop an understanding of how ‘rights’ and ‘responsibilities’ for consumers apply in real life. LS. LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • explicitly teaches the rights and responsibilities of consumers. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ participation in consumer scenarios and identification of some of their rights and responsibilities as consumers. LS.11. vendors.10.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. providers • explicitly teaches the features and conditions related to store protocols • arranges site studies to stores and/or service providers for the purpose of clarifying the rights and responsibilities of vendors/providers and students as consumers when borrowing. eg taking in bags. hiring or purchasing goods and services • explicitly teaches the features of basic contracts. pets – purchasing goods in good condition and consistent with advertised details – recognising conditions for returning purchased items – returning borrowed/hired goods in the same condition and on time – recognising conditions for hiring some items.4.13 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. continued 98 . eg paying a ‘holding deposit’ which is refunded on return of an item Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • responsible consumer behaviour • return hired goods in same condition and on time Participating in role-plays about rights and responsibilities of consumers may indicate exploring rights and responsibilities as a consumer. This could include: – recognising conditions for entering some stores. Programming and Assessment Focus: Rights and responsibilities as a consumer Outcomes: LS.

13 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. borrowing. LS.10. restricted sale of some goods – recording terms and conditions. This may include: – clarifying with staff at a council library the terms and conditions when borrowing books/other items – clarifying with video store manager the terms and conditions for hiring videos/computer games – clarifying with a store manager the conditions for entry such as searching bags. An example of a contract is the offer of free time in exchange for a student completing set tasks. this may include: – negotiating an amount of free time that will be provided to the student in exchange for completing set tasks – negotiating time frame for the contract – specifying consequences for both parties if the conditions of the contract are not met – recording and signing the contract with the teacher – determining if the contract is to be renewed or changed Participation in drawing up a sample contract may assist students to recognise the need for consumer protection and exploring their rights and responsibilities as consumers.4. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • participation in site visits and recording of their rights and responsibilities as consumers evaluate and order information take on responsibilities to work independently and as a member of a group • explore the features and terms of basic contracts • • participate in drawing up a contract within the class to clarify that contracts consist of an offer and an acceptance. Feedback • responsible consumer behaviour a variety of strategies to access information to meet a particular need • strategies for organising information • researching and presenting individually and in groups • the need for consumer protection • return hired goods in same condition and on time • recognise the importance of making payments on time • locate information using appropriate strategies • • Oral. rights and responsibilities for purchasing. hiring a range of goods following site studies – present and share the information with others individually and/or as part of a group Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Participation in site studies to clarify mutual rights and responsibilities may assist students in exploring their rights and responsibilities as consumers and/or using individual and collective skills in the learning process. • participation in drawing up a sample contract.12. continued 99 .Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. LS. In detail. Programming and Assessment Focus: Rights and responsibilities as a consumer (cont) Outcomes: LS. instruction and assessment Students • participate with others in site studies to stores and/or service providers for the purpose of clarifying mutual rights and responsibilities.11. LS. Signatures of both the student and teacher represent an acceptance of the terms and conditions of the contract. LS.

11.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Focus: Rights and responsibilities as a consumer (cont) Outcomes: LS. personnel and other sources of assistance which individuals can access in relation to legal and commercial issues • Oral. lay-bys.12. 100 . conditions and legal obligations associated with entering into contracts.4. eg mobile phone plans. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Exploring the implications of ‘fine print’ in common contracts may involve exploring rights and responsibilities of consumers and/or exploring individual legal rights and responsibilities in relation to contracts. eg ensuring that all sections of a contract are read. LS.13 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS.10. understood and agreed to before signing – legal consequences for both parties if the terms and conditions of the contract are not met. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of the importance and binding nature of contracts and the need for care before entering into contracts. instruction and assessment Students • explore the implications of the ‘fine print’ in a range of common contracts. LS. Feedback the need for consumer protection • support personnel and agencies in the community who can assist with commercial and legal issues • explore the features and terms of basic contracts • identify agencies. LS. This may include identifying: – individuals or agencies from whom they would seek assistance before entering into a contract – specific rules.

continued 101 . LS. eg price. This may include: – indicating to a shop assistant that the change has not been given or is incorrect – indicating to a shop assistant that goods purchased are inconsistent with advertised details – indicating to staff in a video outlet that a hired video tape did not play correctly – returning a faulty item to a store and asking for a replacement Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • the need for consumer protection • identify areas where consumers may need protection Identification of situations in which consumers may need protection may assist students in exploring their rights and responsibilities as consumers. colour – checking that a service has been provided as requested.4. size. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of situations in which they may need protection as consumers • • the need for consumer protection • recognise the process for redress as a consumer Practising methods of redress in structured role-plays may assist students in exploring their rights and responsibilities as consumers.10. This may include: – checking that correct change is given when purchasing an item – checking that goods are without obvious fault and are consistent with advertised details. LS.11. Students • participate in structured role-plays to identify situations where consumers may need protection. LS.13 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. participation in a range of consumer scenarios and recognition of methods of redress for consumers.12. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Consumer protection Outcomes: LS. eg shoes have been re-soled. Oral. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to explore scenarios that highlight the need for consumer protection • explicitly teaches methods of redress that can be used in a range of consumer scenarios • assists students to identify individuals and/or groups who can provide help in relation to consumer protection.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. a punctured bike tyre has been repaired successfully • recognise methods of redress that can be used in a range of consumer scenarios and apply these in structured role-plays.

13 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. instruction and assessment Students • recognise ways of seeking additional assistance to redress consumer dissatisfaction. LS. LS. LS. evaluate and order information • select and use appropriate written. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Recognising when additional assistance may be required and individuals and/or groups that can assist may indicate exploring their rights and responsibilities as consumers and/or indicate identifying appropriate community support personnel and agencies that can assist with commercial and legal problems and issues. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of situations in which they may need protection as consumers and the people and/or agencies who can assist them. contacting and communicating with others to redress consumer dissatisfaction. eg when a store refuses to replace faulty goods or to correct a repair – developing a list of individuals and/or groups who can assist in advocating for their consumer rights – demonstrating skills in locating. LS.10. This may include: – recognising when additional assistance may be needed to redress consumer dissatisfaction. oral and graphic forms to communicate information • 102 .4.12. personnel and other sources of assistance which individuals can access in relation to legal and commercial issues • locate information using appropriate strategies • Oral. Programming and Assessment Focus: Consumer protection (cont) Outcomes: LS. Feedback • the need for consumer protection • support personnel and agencies in the community who can assist with commercial and legal issues a variety of strategies to access information to meet a particular need • strategies for organising information • formats for communicating information • identify areas where consumers may need protection • recognise the process for redress as a consumer • identify agencies.11.

catalogues. eg sports or film personalities – use of language. Programming and Assessment Focus: Look. movement. billboards. Oral.) Students • within the context of a case study. continued 103 . instruction and assessment Teacher • uses a variety of advertisements to explicitly teach and assist students to identify techniques that are used to influence consumer choice and persuade consumers to buy products • assists students to ‘shop around’ and compare the cost and value-for-money of a range of items and services • assists students to determine product items that can be tried before purchase • assists students to undertake a case study that involves selecting a major item for purchase (eg mobile phone) and investigating and recording factors that influence the purchasing process. exaggeration. radio. images – use of high profile people. try before you buy Outcomes: LS.11. posters. sound. LS. (Students may access consumer websites to examine issues associated with purchasing the selected item.7. explore techniques used to persuade consumers to buy a product by listening to and/or viewing a range of multimedia advertisements from television. ‘offer ends soon’ – offer of special deals.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Techniques that may be discussed include: – use of colour. get one free’ Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • factors that influence selection of goods and services • identify factors that influence customer choices Exploring techniques used to persuade consumers to buy products may assist students to make informed decisions about purchasing goods and services. eg ‘buy one.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. eg humour. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of ways that consumers are persuaded to buy products and so help them make informed decisions about purchasing goods and services. think. amount of information provided – use of slogans and jingles. eg ‘everybody needs one’.

comfort and appearance. listening to a chosen track on a CD to confirm choice. This may include: – indicating the need for help when purchasing goods and services – identifying trusted and known adults who can provide help when purchasing goods and services – sorting and matching pictures/photographs of goods and services that are similar – identifying the cheapest price for a range of goods and services from printed catalogues and/or online catalogues – telephoning and/or visiting supermarkets to compare the cost of the same size and brand of grocery item – visiting a range of outlets to compare prices. across several outlets – studying online catalogues.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. eg mobile phone plans – recording information obtained in an appropriate format to demonstrate price comparisons and share this information with others • try appropriate items before purchase. eg designer or generic brand sports shoes. try before you buy (cont) Outcomes: LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Look.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. eg trying shoes or clothing for fit. CD/tape/radio players.7. LS. • identification of items that should be tried before purchase so that informed decisions may be made about purchasing the goods. It may also indicate using a variety of strategies to locate and select information and/or using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. eg clothing – requesting assistance to try items. think. • factors that influence selection of goods and services • identify factors that influence consumer choices Recognising that some items should be tried before purchase may assist students in making informed decisions about purchasing goods and services. 104 . Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Comparing prices of products and services may assist students to make informed decisions about purchasing goods and services. This may include: – identifying appropriate items that can be tried before purchase. quality and value-for-money for specific items. Feedback factors that influence selection of goods and services • a variety of strategies to access information to meet a particular need • • strategies for organising information identify factors that influence consumer choices • locate information using appropriate strategies • select information from identified sources • evaluate and order information • Oral.11. telephoning and/or visiting service providers to compare the full costs of similar services across several providers. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • request for help when purchasing goods and services and comparison of prices of products and services so that they can make informed decisions about purchases. instruction and assessment Students • compare prices of products and services. LS.

identifying features and value for money across suppliers – researching to identify whether items for purchase are made from recycled materials and/or are presented in recyclable packaging – recognising the guarantee and/or warranty available – identifying the conditions for return or exchange of goods Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • factors that influence consumers responsible consumer behaviour • • • factors that influence selection of goods and services • purchasing goods and services • a variety of strategies to access information to meet a particular need • • • • • • strategies for organising information • recognise the factors that influence consumer decisions identify ways in which individuals promote responsible consumer behaviour identify factors that influence consumer choices identify items for purchase locate information using appropriate strategies select relevant information from identified sources evaluate and order information Examination of influences on consumer behaviour may indicate exploring consumer.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Focus: Making an informed purchase Outcomes: LS.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS. This may include: – determining the item to be purchased and the funds available – researching through the internet.8. LS. LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • negotiates with students and/or parents a specific item that will be purchased for the classroom or home • assists students to develop a plan that reflects the issues for consideration when planning the purchase.3. LS. continued 105 . Oral.11. financial. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of the steps to follow when purchasing items so that they can make informed decisions about purchasing goods and services.4. legal and employment issues which affect daily life and/or making informed decision about purchasing foods and services. catalogues and site studies to identify whether the item can be purchased from one or more outlets. comparing costs.7. Students • identify and follow the steps in a process to make an informed purchase. LS.

12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS.4. Programming and Assessment Focus: Making an informed purchase (cont) Outcomes: LS.7. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Purchasing the item may indicate purchasing goods and services and/or making informed decisions about purchasing goods and services. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ purchase of goods and/or services.3. LS. This may include: – identifying and locating the outlet where the item is to be purchased – locating the item and checking that it is consistent with advertised details in respect of price. LS. LS. quality.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Feedback • purchasing goods and services locate appropriate outlets to purchase goods • locate items to be purchased • make payment appropriately • Oral. instruction and assessment Students • purchase the item. LS. size and features – wait appropriately and in turn to be served or to pay for item – tendering appropriate amount to pay for the item at the checkout and checking the amount of any change due – retaining the receipt and/or guarantee or warranty in a safe place in case there is a need to return the item. 106 .8.11.

employment and training systems Australian Government Department of Education.au LS.workplace. Science and Training (Enterprise and LS. training and employment WADU Resource (vocational education resources for Indigenous students and LS.12 uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.anta. training and employment service providers LS.com.actu.3 identifies the roles and responsibilities of a variety of organisations in the Computer hardware.ecef. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests.com.6 explores strategies that facilitate effective planning for and management of Career Education Foundation): http://www.au LS.myfuture. training and employment http://www.8 recognises skills for effective participation in the workplace myfuture website: http://www.worksite.11 uses a variety of strategies to locate and select information Australian Government Department of Employment and Workplace Relations: LS.au LS.gov. Programming and Assessment 8.asn.au/WaduResource/WADU_PC.ecef. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.htm LS.gov. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Contact details for education. http://www.5 recognises the roles of education.10 evaluates personal skills and strengths to facilitate participation in pathways Australian Council for Trade Unions (worksite for schools): planning http://www.au transition to further education. multimedia and word-processing software and access to the internet community Websites LS. Students explore the roles of a range of services in the community.5 Work Education Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: The world of work Unit title: The world of work Description: This unit involves students in developing skills and strategies to participate in personal transition planning.4 identifies appropriate support personnel and agencies in the community Australian National Training Authority: http://www.7 communicates personal preferences and choices within the context of planning communities): for transition to further education.edu.au Resources produced by the NSW Department of Education and Training The Student Guide to Workplace Learning The Employment Related Skills Logbook and Support Supplement School to Work Planning Teacher Resource WRAPS Careers: What Do You Want to Be? (video) 107 .1 explores the nature of work and the workplace Images and video excerpts related to work safety LS. and experience a range of training and workplace environments.

10 composes increasingly complex written texts LS. A student: Information and Software Technology LS.13 communicates in a range of contexts LS.26 uses problem-solving strategies in a variety of contexts Visual Arts LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.11 demonstrates safe practices that promote personal wellbeing LS.7 uses appropriate strategies to initiate and manage relationships LS.17 uses individual and collaborative skills in the learning process Geography LS.1.14 communicates with a range of audiences LS.4 uses spoken language to communicate with a range of audiences LS. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.10 recognises and responds to safe and unsafe situations LS. Programming and Assessment Links A student: Drama LS. responses or a point of view.5.3 participates in drama experiences in which role-taking is used to enhance their understanding of ideas and feelings English LS. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘The World of Work’ in Work Education Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 16–33).2 moves around in the environment.5 uses appropriate behaviours in social situations LS.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences.22 uses appropriate strategies in response to at-risk situations LS. 108 .12 communicates for a range of purposes LS.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology solutions PDHPE LS.1 experiences a range of environments LS.

enrolling for the forthcoming sports season Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback planning and managing the transition to further education. Activities may include using a daily and/or weekly school diary or timetable to plan ahead for specific events such as excursions. LS. training and employment • planning processes to assist transition to further education. oral and graphic forms to communicate information • Using a daily and/or weekly diary or timetable to plan ahead may indicate using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. training and employment. carers and friends • explore options and requirements for education. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of a range of strategies to plan ahead planning and managing the transition to further education.6.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. training and/or employment – identifying the time and place for the meeting – identifying the people who will attend the meeting and the ways in which they can assist the student Recognising the goals of transition planning may assist students in communicating personal preferences and choices within the context of planning for transition to further education.5. continued 109 . weekend trips. LS. Oral. training and employment • recognise current education and training options • explore education and training options with family. training and employment with school and community-based personnel • recognise the purposes of planning processes and the role of the student in these processes • • participate in discussions to clarify the purpose and nature of transition planning. training and employment • strategies for organising information • formats for communicating information • education and training systems • evaluate and order information • select and use appropriate written. This may involve: – recognising the importance of planning ahead for future goals – recognising that discussions at a transition planning meeting will provide information about options for further education. LS. Students • participate in discussions about the importance of planning ahead and engage in processes that will facilitate planning. LS. LS.10. Programming and Assessment Focus: Planning ahead Outcomes: LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to participate in planning processes on a day-by-day and/or weekly basis • assists students to recognise the importance of planning ahead for specific events • assists students to participate effectively in informal and formal planning processes.7.11. • identification of the goal of transition planning.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.

punctuality. LS. The personal folio should be in an appropriate format with photographs and/or visual/written text and may include information about: – preferred subjects at school – preferred work environments. patience.11. preferences and choices and give reasons for these • map personal skills and strengths in the context of pathways planning • Participation in structured role-plays may assist students in communicating personal preferences and choices within the context of planning for transition to further education. training and employment. Programming and Assessment Focus: Planning ahead (cont) Outcomes: LS. LS. perseverance. continued 110 . Feedback • identifying personal skills and strengths • identify personal skills and strengths Oral. training and employment. personal care and presentation • participate in simulated transition planning meetings.6. instruction and assessment Students • develop a personal folio/résumé that highlights what they like to do and their personal skills and strengths in preparation for discussions at a transition planning meeting. Students may use their folios as the basis for asking questions and seeking clarification about options for further education. training and employment. working in a team or independently – skill areas – details of previous work experience – acknowledged areas where improvement would enhance their personal skills and strengths such as the need to work as part of a team. LS. resolve conflict. The scenarios should also provide an opportunity for students to defend a personal point of view about preferred options and choices Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Developing a personal folio/resume to highlight their goals and personal skills/strengths and areas for development may assist students in communicating personal preferences and choices within the context of planning for transition to further education. LS. eg inside/outside – preferred hobbies and interests – personal attributes such as negotiation/communication/listening skills. • participation in simulated transition planning meetings and communication of personal preferences and choices. LS. deal with criticism. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of goals and personal skills/strengths the communication skills required for effective participation in planning for transition • linking personal skills to pathways planning • articulate goals.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.10.5.7.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.

This may include: – using the information in their folio to express preferences – participating in decision-making processes.11. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ active participation in the transition planning meeting.5. training and employment and/or evaluating personal skills and strengths to facilitate participation in pathways planning. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Participation in a transition planning meeting may indicate communicating personal preferences and choices within the context of planning for transition to further education.10. 111 .12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS. instruction and assessment Students • participate in a scheduled transition planning meeting. Feedback • linking personal skills to pathways planning • participate in pathways planning Oral. identifying and recording actions to be taken following the meeting – determining the timeframe for subsequent meetings – undertaking actions agreed to at the meeting. eg expressing a point of view – listening.7. Programming and Assessment Focus: Planning ahead (cont) Outcomes: LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. LS.6. LS. LS. LS.

Programming and Assessment Focus: Services in the community Outcomes: LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides information on the roles and functions of a variety of departments. photographs. bank for opening a personal account. services or personnel that can assist with individual support needs locate information using appropriate strategies select relevant information from identified sources Identification of relevant service providers to meet individual needs may involve identifying appropriate support personnel and agencies in the community.11. businesses and services in the community • assists students to recognise the ways in which specific departments. LS. 112 . business and/or service that can provide assistance – recording the function and contact details of relevant departments. police & community youth club for information on leisure activities. LS. agencies and organisations that can assist in meeting individual needs.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. automatic tellers in banks for withdrawing money using a keycard. eg RTA for applications for a learner’s permit. Students • identify agencies that can be accessed to meet individual needs. agencies. Centrelink for payments and assistance with jobs. agency. agencies. businesses and services in the community – identifying individual needs for support and indicating the appropriate department. Medicare office to apply for a Medicare card. and contact with. Oral. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • organisations in the community – government – business – service • • • accessing support services in the community to meet individual needs • • • a variety of strategies to access information to meet a particular need • strategies for organising information • • • identify the roles of government departments and agencies identify the roles of businesses in the community identify the roles of services in the community identify individual support needs identify appropriate departments. agencies. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm the identification of.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. LS. agencies. businesses and services in an appropriate format. public transport authority to ascertain which railway stations have ramps and/or lifts. businesses and/or services in the community can assist in meeting their individual needs. businesses. text to indicate the roles and functions of departments.3. This may include: – matching pictures.4.

11. she sells jewellery and she works in a department store – recording the information obtained on a poster or multimedia presentation. This may involve: – sorting and matching photographs/pictures to identify what is work and what is not work – recognising the different types of work such as paid. Students • explore different types of work. where specific jobs are done and the reasons why people work may indicate exploring a range of current work and employment issues and/or identifying skills for effective participation in the workplace. permanent or temporary work – interviewing family members or friends to explore work options and the reasons why people work – recounting the work experiences of people from their research – exploring the links between types of work and workplace environments such as indoor/outdoor.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of different types of work and skills necessary for participation in the workforce. alone or with others. Programming and Assessment Focus: What’s work all about Outcomes: LS.1. eg she is a doctor and she works in a hospital.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. strategies for organising information • formats for communicating information • • • 113 . instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to explore the meaning of the term ‘work’ and the reasons why people work • assists students to access the internet and other resources to obtain information about the types of work and workplace environments. and the reasons why people work. he is a builder and he works outside. part-time or casual work. unpaid and voluntary work. Oral. LS. where specific work is undertaken. oral and graphic forms to communicate information Exploring different types of work. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • the purposes of work • • the types and variety of work options • the types and variety of work places • • • • a variety of strategies to access information to meet a particular need • • explore the meaning of the term ‘work’ identify the reasons why people work identify the types of work options recognise links between types of work and workplace environments locate information using appropriate strategies select relevant information from identified sources evaluate and order information select and use appropriate written. full-time.

a packer in a factory Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • planning and managing the transition to further education. and the variety of training and work environments Recording their observations and experiences of work and training site studies may indicate using a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information. eg green or pink ladies at a hospital. training and workplace environments • assists students to participate in workplace experiences. cashiers and assistants in retail outlets.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. assistants at a preschool • recognise the links between the types of work and workplace environments • • Participating in site studies to observe and experience a variety of training and/or work environments may involve exploring strategies that facilitate effective planning for and management of transition to further education. machine operators in a factory. continued 114 . eg panel-beating. training and employment and/or investigating the nature of work and the workplace. eg train guard.6.1. food service – training sites in the community. LS. fast food outlet – voluntary and paid work. LS.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. eg apprentices working at a smash repair shop. instruction and assessment Teacher • organises site visits to a range of education. parks and gardens personnel at council facilities. oral and graphic forms to communicate information • • record their observations and experiences of work and training site studies in their folio to reflect on the link between the types of work and training. eg retail outlets. Students • participate in site studies to observe and record experiences of a variety of training and/or work environments for the purpose of clarifying individual preferences. LS. Oral. council parks and gardens – individual or team workplaces. LS. training and employment environments to observe the work of packers. • recording their observations and experiences of work and training site studies in an appropriate format.8.10.9. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • participation in site studies to observe and experience a variety of training and/or work environments strategies for organising information • strategies for communicating information • evaluate and order information select and use appropriate written. Programming and Assessment Focus: Experiencing training and workplace environments Outcomes: LS. trainees working at a child care centre – indoor/outdoor workplaces. training and employment • the types and variety of workplaces visit a range of education. This may include visits to: – a TAFE or community college to observe training programs/workshops.

continued 115 . LS. and demonstrate the skills necessary for effective participation in training and/or workplace experiences Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Indicating their preferences and demonstrating skills necessary for participation in training and/or workplace experiences within structured role-plays may involve demonstrating skills for effective participation in the workplace. enthusiasm Oral.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. LS. LS. training and employment • • • • recognise factors that lead to effective participation in the workplace • identify factors necessary for effective participation in training and/or workplace experiences such as punctuality. outline their preferences for participation in training and/or workplace experiences.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. appropriate personal and interpersonal skills. LS. Identifying factors necessary for effective participation in training and/or workplace experiences may involve recognising skills for effective participation in the workplace.10.6. training and employment employee responsibilities demonstrate skills that lead to effective participation in the workplace • set goals.8. LS.1. establish preferences and choices in relation to education. instruction and assessment Students within structured role-plays. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • communication of preferences for participation in training and/or workplace experiences • identification of workplace skills identifying personal skills and strengths • linking personal skills to pathways planning • identify personal skills and strengths • map personal skills and strengths in the context of pathways planning • • record the skills they already have for effective participation in training and/or workplace experiences • recording of the skills they already have in an appropriate format. Programming and Assessment Focus: Experiencing training and workplace environments (cont) Outcomes: LS. Recording the skills they already have may involve evaluating personal skills and strengths to facilitate participation in pathways planning.9. reliability. Feedback • employee responsibilities • planning and managing the transition to further education.

6. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of workplace skills in the context of simulated training and/or workplace experiences within the school • participation in a range of training and/or workplace experiences. LS.9. LS.1. work habits and enthusiasm – comply with rules and requirements for workplaces such as wearing and using appropriate protective equipment – identify. LS. This may include: – communicating and behaving appropriately with others – working safely – dressing appropriately – staying on task and attending to own work Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Participating in simulated training and/or workplace experiences within the school may involve investigating the nature of work and the workplace. locate and communicate with appropriate personnel in the workplace who can provide assistance if needed. reliability.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. instruction and assessment Students • participate in a range of simulated training and/or workplace experiences within the school where a range of workplace skills can be explored.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Participating in training and/or workplace experiences in the community may involve investigating the nature of work and the workplace. LS. These experiences should provide students with opportunities to: – demonstrate travel skills involved in attending training/workplaces – demonstrate skills for effective participation in the workplace such as punctuality. honesty.10. appropriate personal and interpersonal skills. LS. Feedback • a range of workplace experiences • participate in workplace experiences • participate in a range of training and/or workplace experiences in the community. 116 .8. Programming and Assessment Focus: Experiencing training and workplace environments (cont) Outcomes: LS. Oral.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. This unit involves the planting. planter box or toy (Industrial Design) or T-shirt (Fashion Design). preparation and storage of food items in the context of these projects.3 Design and Technology Storage matters 9. This unit involves students participating in a range of practical activities that highlight the importance and role of food in celebrations. materials and tools in the plant production process. techniques and/or computer technology. personalise a design or embellish an existing timber box with appropriate decorations.boardofstudies. Students use a variety of plants.au). Teachers should consider this when delivering this unit of work. This unit involves students in the development of either a personal or group logo to personalise a variety of items.nsw. This unit involves students in the design.1 Syllabus Technology (Mandatory) Unit title What do you make of it? Unit description This unit involves students in designing. These sample units should be read in conjunction with the relevant Years 7–10 syllabus and support documents already distributed to schools and available on the Board of Studies website (www. A variety of growing environments may be used such as pots.6 Industrial Technology Timber utility box . Students may develop their own designs. tools and techniques by students is essential in the Technology (Mandatory) course and teachers should consider this when delivering this unit. A range of technologies and materials may be used to make a product. Students plan and prepare a range of food items in the context of small-scale catering activities for celebrations within the school. producing and evaluating an individual project that may include a bag (Accessories Design). Safe and responsible use of materials. A range of technologies may be used in constructing and/or embellishing the storage device. tools and techniques by students is essential in the Agriculture Technology course. hydroponics and/or garden plots.edu. development and production of a timber utility box. 117 9.4 Food Technology Celebrations 9. They demonstrate safe handling. This unit involves students exploring storage solutions and producing and evaluating their own storage device. Students explore the function of logos and design their own personal or group logo. growing and harvesting of vegetables and the marketing of vegetable products.2 Agricultural Technology Vegetable production enterprise 9. individualise a design provided by the teacher or embellish a completed storage device. bracelet (Jewellery Design). Programming and Assessment 9 Technological and Applied Studies Sample units of work have been prepared to assist teachers in programming Life Skills outcomes and content from the Technological and Applied Studies key learning area.5 Graphics Technology Stand-out logos 9. Safe and responsible use of materials. Students design their own timber utility box. The logo design is produced using a variety of media. Unit number 9.

8 118 . Students may design a decorated fabric item. Students learn to operate a variety of computer hardware and software in the creation of a multimedia presentation to record a significant school event. personalise a design or embellish an existing fabric item with appropriate decorations. Programming and Assessment Unit number 9.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 9.7 Syllabus Information and Software Technology Textiles Technology Unit title School events in digital Creating with fabrics Unit description This unit introduces students to a variety of digital media. This unit involves students creating with fabrics to produce decorated fabric items.

SGLS.1 Technology (Mandatory) Years 7–8 Life Skills unit: What do you make of it? Unit title: What do you make of it? Description: This unit involves students designing. bracelets. sequins.2 selects the appropriate tools. tools and equipment in the context of producing a design project LS 3. Safe and responsible use of materials. producing and evaluating an individual project that may include a bag (Accessories Design).1 evaluates the success of completed design projects LS 6. calico. planter boxes and T-shirts LS 2. leather.8 estimates and measures length and distance solutions. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.1 gathers and uses information in the context of producing design projects A variety of embellishments such as tassels.4 cares for materials. bracelet (Jewellery Design).4 responds to the language of position SGLS. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.6 uses the language of measurement in everyday contexts LS.12 communicates for a variety of purposes MLS. uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology MLS.2 uses a variety of techniques to communicate ideas in the context of producing A variety of materials that could include beads. lacquer projects A variety of tools and equipment for the making of the product LS 3. timber.2 evaluates the design of everyday products in terms of intended use.2 recognises factors that influence design Examples and images of bags. transfers.1 participates in producing design projects LS 6. equipment and materials for specific design A variety of finishes that could include paint.2 gathers. planter box or toy (Industrial Design) or T-shirt (Fashion Design). shells. Links A student: A student: English Mathematics LS. media and multimedia DLS. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests.5 responds to the language of measurement in everyday contexts Information and Software Technology MLS. denim.2 explores a variety of materials. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 4 unit ‘Toy Maker’ in Technology (Mandatory) Years 7–8: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 24–38). stickers LS 2.3 demonstrates safe practices in the use of materials. jewellery design projects thread. closing devices.5 uses the language of position in a variety of situations Visual Arts LS.1 experiences a variety of artmaking activities LS.1 recognises that a process is used to produce design projects word-processing LS 1. wood stain. 119 . scanners and software such as LS 1. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Access to computer hardware such as digital cameras. techniques and processes.11 views and responds to a range of visual texts. handles LS 3. hessian. tools and equipment LS 5.5. stencils.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. canvas. Programming and Assessment 9. studs. tools and techniques by students is essential in the Technology (Mandatory) course and teachers should consider this when delivering this unit. organises and displays data LS. plastic. A range of technologies and materials may be used to make a product. vinyl.

2. planter boxes and T-shirts. LS.2. planter box or toy (Industrial Design) or T-shirt (Fashion Design) and discusses the different uses of these products • assists students in recording their involvement at each step of the design process in a folio. LS. Oral.1. ‘Which of these T-shirts would be most suitable to wear for sport?’ Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • considering the design of everyday objects in terms of meeting their end use • evaluate everyday products in terms of their – function. finish.2. continued 120 . bracelets. LS.1. safety and stability of planter boxes. instruction and assessment Teacher • displays a variety of products that may include a bag (Accessories Design). durability – stability. This may include: – collecting and exploring examples and/or pictures of a variety of products from home.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Programming and Assessment Focus: Function of a variety of products Outcomes: LS. safety – materials used Exploring the different uses of products may involve evaluation of the design of everyday products in terms of intended use. eg consider the appeal of bracelets. Students • explore the function of a variety of products such as bags (Accessories Design). school and the local community.6. the construction.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.2. appeal – usefulness. toys (Industrial Design) or T-shirts (Fashion Design). eg ‘Which bag is the most useful for taking to the beach?’. the materials and finish used for a variety of bags and T-shirts – respond to questions about the purposes and usefulness of a variety of bags. planter boxes. ergonomics – construction. bracelet (Jewellery Design). bracelets (Jewellery Design). visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of the use and function of a variety of products.

LS. Establishing and maintaining a record in a folio may indicate recognition that a process is used to produce design projects and recognition of factors that influence design.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS.2.1. instruction and assessment Students • recognise features that enhance the functions of various products.1. finish. durability – stability. Oral. Programming and Assessment Focus: Function of a variety of products (cont) Outcomes: LS. Feedback • considering the design of everyday objects in terms of meeting their end use • using a variety of communication techniques evaluate everyday products in terms of their – function. the durability of wooden toys Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Recognising the features that enhance the function of products may involve evaluation of the design of everyday products in terms of intended use. safety – materials used • use techniques to communicate ideas • • establish and maintain a record of their involvement at each step of the design process in a folio. eg closing devices for bags and bracelets. LS.2. the weight of materials used for planter boxes. ergonomics – construction. Items in the folio may include: – photographs and/or other images of their participation at various steps of the process – descriptions of their activities at each step – personal observations – data and information relevant to the project – personalised step-by-step plan for producing the project – evaluation of the project. the durability of decorations or embellishments on T-shirts.6.2. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of features that enhance the functions of various products • recording of their participation in the design process in an appropriate format. 121 .Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.2. appeal – usefulness.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. This may include: – selecting a project after observing and experimenting with the samples – indicating a preference for a project – accessing the internet to explore aspects of design. a variety of wooden toys • provides access to computer technology and internet to assist students in the design process. decorations – generating designs that take into account the function and purpose of the project using computer graphics software. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ selection of an appropriate project. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides examples of completed projects. T-shirts with screen printing or embellishments.1. eg bags made from different materials such as denim.2. participate in designing and producing a product 122 . Oral. eg colour. bracelets made using different materials such as shells or beads.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. size. Students • select a project from either the examples provided or from their own research and personal preference. calico. Programming and Assessment Focus: Selecting a product design Outcomes: LS 1. LS 2. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • factors that influence design obtaining information from a variety of sources • applying the design process in the context of producing a design project • recognise that the design of an object is related to its function and purpose • access sources of information • • Selection of an appropriate project may involve gathering and using information in the context of producing design projects and/or recognising factors that influence design. LS 2. planter boxes with different finishes such as stained or painted.

1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Students • recognise the steps in the personalised step-by-step plan. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • the steps in a process to produce a design project • recognise the steps in producing a project including: – identifying a need – exploring ideas – choosing a preferred idea – planning steps for producing the design project – selecting tools. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides a personalised step-by-step plan of the steps in the production process. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of the steps needed to produce a design project.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Focus: Planning steps for producing a product Outcomes: LS. 123 . Oral. equipment and materials – producing a design project – evaluating a design project Identification of steps in the production process may indicate recognising that a process is used to produce design projects.1. This may involve: – including the personalised step-by-step plan in their folio – following through each step of the plan recognising the activities at each step.

3. tools equipment.1. equipment and tools that make them dangerous use safe work practices when using materials. This may include: – recognising rules for the safe use of materials.3. Oral. tools and equipment and provides opportunities for supervised practice • explicitly teaches and demonstrates care and storage of tools and equipment used in the project. tools equipment • demonstration of safe use of materials. factors that influence safety – in the classroom – in specialist rooms – in external areas • the application of Occupational Health and Safety practices • • recognise factors that influence the safety of conditions • • recognise properties of materials. Programming and Assessment Focus: Safe use of tools.3. continued 124 . LS.2. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. instruction and assessment Teacher • introduces the specific tools necessary for the project • explicitly teaches and models safe work practices when using the identified materials. equipment and materials may indicate selecting appropriate tools. equipment and materials necessary for the completion of the project Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback the nature and purpose of a range of tools and equipment • properties of materials • select appropriate tools and equipment for a design project • select materials that are appropriate for a design project • Selection of tools. tools and equipment in the context of producing a design project. tools and equipment. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of appropriate materials. tools and equipment – using materials. equipment and materials for specific design projects. LS.4 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. equipment and materials in producing a product Outcomes: LS.3.3. tools and equipment safely and appropriately under supervision Use of safe practices may indicate recognising safe and unsafe conditions when undertaking design projects and demonstrating safe practices in the use of materials. Students • select tools.

T-shirt or toy using the selected design and materials. Students • participate in the production process for the project according to the personalised step-by-step plan.3. • managing resources and time to complete a design project applying the design process in the context of making a design project • participate in designing and producing a product Participation in the production of a product may involve participating in producing design projects.3. This may involve: – making a product. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ demonstration of the care and storage of tools and equipment. Feedback • caring for materials. tools and equipment appropriately • keep workplace clean and clear of hazards • Oral. planter box or toy using the selected design and materials.3. bracelet.1.5. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Appropriate storage of items and the maintenance of a tidy work area may indicate caring for materials. tools and equipment store materials.4 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. tools and equipment in the production process. equipment and materials in producing a product (cont) Outcomes: LS. tools and equipment appropriately during the production process.3. This may include: – returning materials.1 Teacher • reviews the personalised step-by-step plan for the production of the project.3.2. instruction and assessment Students • store materials. and/or – embellishing/decorating a bag. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ demonstration of following the plan and use of materials. LS. eg bag. tools and equipment. Focus: Producing the product Outcome: LS. 125 . tools and equipment to their storage space after use – tidying the work area – reporting any faults or damage to tools and equipment. • • follow the steps to complete a design project Oral. LS. planter box. T-shirt.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Focus: Safe use of tools. modelling each activity as required.

1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. 126 . This may include: – responding to questioning such as.2. This may include: – displaying the folio in a prominent place in the school – describing aspects of their folio to others – participating in discussion and answering questions about the folio and activities represented in it. Oral.2. Programming and Assessment Focus: Evaluating the completed product Outcomes: LS. ‘What are the features of your bracelet that make it look good?’ – trialling the bag and completing a teacher-designed questionnaire regarding performance to be included in the folio – including photographs in their folio of the planter box in use – recording in their folio the reactions of other students to the T-shirt – evaluating the toy’s durability – making suggestions in their folio about how the design and/or construction could be improved or replicated • share the information in their folio with others. society and environment • use techniques to communicate ideas • • Evaluation of the project may indicate evaluating the success of completed design projects and/or using a variety of techniques to communicate ideas in the context of producing design projects. Students • evaluate their product in terms of function and aesthetics. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • evaluation of the product in terms of function and aesthetics use techniques to communicate ideas Sharing the information in their folio to others may involve using a variety of techniques to communicate ideas in the context of producing design projects. • sharing their information with others in an appropriate format.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.6. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to evaluate the product • facilitates students sharing their experiences of the production process with others. LS. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • evaluating a design project in terms of – function – aesthetics – available resources – social and cultural appropriateness – environmental impact – marketability using a variety of communication techniques • using a variety of communication techniques • evaluate a completed design project • evaluate a design project in terms of – presentation – packaging – price/cost – safety – impact on individuals.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. HarperCollins Publishers (Australia) LS. (1990) Agriculture and You. L.5 recognises visual texts in a range of contexts LS. J. (2001) Enterprising Agriculture. Programming and Assessment 9. fertiliser. seedlings. growing and harvesting of vegetables and the marketing of vegetable products. LS.4 explores how agricultural production contributes to our daily lives McGraw-Hill LS.5. (1980) Introduction to Agriculture. soil. responses or a point of view. R and McGregor. R. garden bed. Teachers should consider this when delivering this unit of work. tools and techniques by students is essential in the Agriculture Technology course. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Books LS. Safe and responsible use of materials.9 recognises characteristics of and changes in living things LS. L. Hanlon. media and multimedia. Students use a variety of plants.5 participates in the production process of an agricultural enterprise • Brown. hoe.13 demonstrates safe practice in the use of equipment. S.14 maintains and cares for equipment.8 purchases goods and services MLS. New York: McGraw Hill requirements of an agricultural enterprise • Workboot series books and resources Cloverdale. Hindmarsh. R..7 reads and responds to short written texts Visual Arts LS.2 investigates some environmental factors that affect plant and animal Macmillan Education Australia production • Brown. R and McGregor. M.. A variety of growing environments may be used such as pots. hydroponics and/or garden plots. W. 127 . materials and tools • Yates (2002) Yates Garden Guide.2 Agricultural Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Vegetable production enterprise Unit title: Vegetable production enterprise Description: This unit involves the planting. materials and tools.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology solutions community Mathematics LS.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences. sprinkler. water. pest control products Links A student: A student: Commerce Information and Software Technology LS. Sydney: LS.6 uses visual texts in a range of contexts LS.12 selects appropriate equipment.A. rake. Thornthwaite. R. face masks.2 recognises ways in which people obtain goods and services in the local LS. (1998) Dynamic Agriculture Book 1. Hindmarsh.5 responds to the language of measurement in everyday contexts English MLS.10 uses information and communication technologies to collect. Sydney: LS. gloves. materials and tools to meet the • Sutherland. Kondinin Group LS. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. S. B.1 experiences a range of plant and animal production enterprises • Bannerman. (1999) Dynamic Agriculture Book 2. Melbourne: Nelson and present information related to an agricultural enterprise Australia LS. hose. potting mix. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. Sydney: LS. Tools such as garden spade.6 uses the language of measurement in everyday contexts LS. seeds. organise • Francis. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes. hand tools Materials/Equipment such as pots. and Ramsay. materials and tools in the plant production process. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Vegetable Production Enterprise’ in Agricultural Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 23–30).2 listens for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts Science LS. L. and Gant.14 recognises that living things depend upon each other and on their environments LS.A.11 views and responds to a range of visual texts.6 participates in marketing an agricultural product McGraw-Hill LS.9 writes short texts for everyday purposes LS.

eg prepare salad ingredients for a BBQ. Students • experience vegetables in their unprocessed and processed states.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. organise and present information related to an agricultural enterprise. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • agricultural products and their uses • identify the different types of products that are derived from animals or plants Experiencing vegetables in their unprocessed and processed states may involve exploring how agricultural production contributes to our daily lives. Oral.10 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Programming and Assessment Focus: Vegetable products Outcomes: LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of the relationship between raw and processed vegetables in the context of making a meal • recording of their involvement in the production process in an appropriate format. LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides samples of vegetables in their unprocessed and processed states • demonstrates how fresh vegetables can be prepared/processed in the context of making a meal. use vegetable peeler and knife to prepare carrots for eating • establish and maintain a folio/workbook of their involvement at each step of the production process. This may include: – distinguishing between unprocessed and processed vegetables by viewing. using safe and hygienic practices • assists students in recording their involvement at each step of the production process in a folio/workbook. feeling. smelling and/or tasting using safe and hygienic practices – identifying the parts of vegetables that are suitable for eating – preparing/processing vegetables in the context of making a meal using safe and hygienic practices. Items in the folio/workbook may include: – photographs and/or other images of their participation at various steps in the production process – descriptions of their activities at each step – personal observations – data and information relevant to the process – personalised step-by-step plan for the process – evaluation of the production process.4. • organising and presenting data collected • print and display information for an identified purpose Recording their involvement in the production process in a folio/workbook may involve using information and communication technologies to collect. 128 .

Selection of an appropriate location for plant germination and growth may indicate investigating environmental factors that affect plant and animal production.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. LS. eg access to sunlight and rainfall.5. eg carrots and/or lettuce to be grown in garden plots and/or tomatoes to be grown hydroponically for use in the school canteen • assists students to prepare the location for growing vegetables and gather necessary tools. time frame and planning steps of the production process • arranges site studies to retail outlets to explore and determine products that may be marketed. time frame and steps to produce and market the vegetable product may indicate participating in the production process of an agricultural enterprise and/or participating in marketing an agricultural product. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of the nature of the enterprise and the vegetable product that will be produced • selection of an appropriate location for the enterprise. protection from wind – available resources – accessibility Oral.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Programming and Assessment Focus: Planning and preparation Outcomes: LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to determine the nature. LS. This may involve students considering: – environmental factors necessary for germination and growth of plants. location. This may include: – visiting retail outlets to explore and determine vegetables that may be grown and marketed – surveying and determining a potential market for specific vegetable products in the school community – selecting the vegetable product that will be marketed – selecting the particular variety of vegetables best suited to the identified market Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • reasons for plant production systems selecting plants in context of project • identify the purpose of the plant production enterprise • select appropriate plant species and strain/varieties for the production system • Recognising the purpose.1. Students • determine the nature of the enterprise.6. continued 129 . materials and equipment.2. • environmental factors that affect plant production different production systems available • identify significant environmental factors that affect plant production • determine the production system to be utilised in the light of available resources • • determine and prepare the location/s for the growing of vegetables. LS.

materials and equipment Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Determination and selection of items may indicate selecting appropriate tools. materials and equipment needed for the production process.12 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.5. fertiliser – appropriate numbers of packets of seeds/punnets of seedlings – the necessary tools.1. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • selection of appropriate tools. This may include: – growth media. materials and equipment • • • participate in a group project to grow a range of suitable crop plants from seed • determine the steps to produce and market the vegetable product in an appropriate timeframe. pots. 130 . identification of steps involved in growing. This may involve: – including a personalised step-by-step plan of the production process in their folio/workbook – following through each step of the plan.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Focus: Planning and preparation (cont) Outcomes: LS. LS. Feedback • the nature and purpose of a range of tools. equipment and materials • establishing supply and demand requirements growing a range of suitable crop plants using a variety of production systems select tools and equipment in relation to an agricultural project • select materials in relation to an agricultural project • calculate requirements to meet the demand • Oral. harvesting and marketing vegetable products. Determination of the planning steps may indicate experiencing a range of plant and animal production enterprises and/or participating in marketing an agricultural product. LS. LS.6. LS. equipment and materials to meet the requirements of an agricultural enterprise and/or participating in the production process of an agricultural enterprise.2. instruction and assessment Students • determine and gather/purchase the tools. recognising the activities at each step.

materials and tools undertake regular maintenance • store materials. LS. materials and equipment. under supervision and in accordance with instructions. materials and tools. fertilisers. demonstrates and supervises the safe use and handling of tools. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • the application of Occupational Health and Safety practices use a mask and gloves when handling potting mix. materials and tools to their storage space after use – carrying out routines for the cleaning of materials. materials and tools. eg gloves and face masks when using potting mix and/or agricultural chemicals – recognising rules for the safe use of tools and equipment – carrying and using materials. tools and equipment during the production process. materials and tools Outcomes: LS. tools and equipment after use • keep work environments clear and clean • Appropriate routines to maintain and care for items may indicate maintaining and caring for equipment. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of the safe use of tools and personal protective equipment • maintenance routines for care of equipment. This may involve: – putting on safety equipment. Students • use tools and personal protective equipment safely in the context of the production process. materials and equipment safely • Appropriate and safe use of tools and personal protective equipment may involve demonstrating safe practices in the use of equipment. 131 . Oral.13. pesticides and herbicides • use materials. potting mix. tools and equipment after use – tidying the work environment – reporting unsafe equipment and/or dangerous situations. agricultural chemicals. This may include: – returning equipment. • demonstration of routines for the care and maintenance of equipment. and the use of personal protective equipment in the context of the project • explicitly teaches routines to maintain and care for tools. safely. tool and equipment safely in the context of projects • carry and transfer tools. 14 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. eg mixing nutrient solutions in the correct ratios for a hydroponic system • apply routines to appropriately maintain and care for materials. tools and equipment appropriately. materials and tools. tools and equipment appropriately • regularly clean materials. instruction and assessment Teacher • explicitly teaches.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Focus: Safe use of equipment.

and yield.10. assists and supervises tending of plants. materials and tools. eg number.13 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. eg watering. This may involve: – observing and/or photographing plants – measuring and/or describing features of plants – tabulating and/or graphing plant development. fertilising plants and controlling for pests using safe practices Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • requirements for seed germination conditions for effective growth and production • processes for transplanting plants • • plant seeds or seedlings using appropriate techniques • maintain vegetable plants • the application of Occupational Health and Safety practices using measuring devices to collect data • • organising and presenting data collection transplant seedlings when necessary using appropriate techniques • use a mask and gloves when handling potting mix. Programming and Assessment Focus: Planting and caring for vegetable plants Outcomes: LS. assists and supervises planting of seedlings/seeds • demonstrates. colour. LS. size. instruction and assessment Teacher • reviews the step-by-step plan for the production process and assigns tasks to class members • demonstrates. pesticides and herbicides • measure an aspect of a plant or animal production system in relation to yield or growth • print and display information for an identified purpose • Planting and tending of vegetable seeds and seedlings may involve participating in the production process of an agricultural enterprise and/or demonstrating safe practices in the use of equipment. 132 . growth rate. Oral. Students • engage in the planting and care of plants by following the step-by-step plan. LS. This may involve: – planting seeds in pots or garden beds – transplanting seedlings – tending plants.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.5. Observation and record keeping may involve using information and communication technologies to collect. organise and present information related to an agricultural enterprise. • recording of the growth of the vegetable seedlings in an appropriate format. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of safe work practices and techniques in planting and caring for plants • observe and record in their folio/workbook features of the plants at regular intervals. fertilisers. weeding.

133 . process and store vegetable produce Outcome: LS. This may involve: – storing vegetables to control the ripening process and preserve quality. size or number – preparing.5 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. packaging and labelling products. • techniques used to control ripening and preservation postharvesting • use strategies to control ripening processes and preserve crop postharvest • store and/or process vegetables appropriately. Storage and processing of produce may indicate participating in the production process of an agricultural enterprise. sorting – dividing vegetables into bundles or placing in bags. storage and processing of vegetable produce. Oral. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of appropriate and safe techniques for harvesting vegetables • demonstration of appropriate techniques for processing and storing vegetables. eg washing. eg in the fridge or in a dark cupboard – processing vegetables for finished product. assists and supervises the harvesting. instruction and assessment Teacher • demonstrates. according to weight. Programming and Assessment Focus: Harvest. Students • harvest vegetables appropriately Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • harvesting methods for particular plant species • harvest crop using appropriate techniques Use of harvesting techniques may indicate participating in the production process of an agricultural enterprise.

take orders and distribute the vegetable products. Programming and Assessment Focus: Marketing vegetable products Outcomes: LS. Students • produce.6 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. design of an order form and demonstration of skills in taking orders for vegetable products • demonstration of skills in distributing vegetable products to customers. This may involve: – developing an appropriate order form – distributing order forms – recording orders • distribute products to customers in the school community. Distribution of products may indicate participating in marketing an agricultural product. display and distribute promotional material to potential customers in the school community. Oral. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • selection and use of information. • 134 . Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • marketing strategies to meet supply. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides examples of marketing brochures and opportunities for site studies to assist students to determine ways to market vegetable products in the school community • assists students to develop an order form. brochures. product presentation and pricing – selecting appropriate advertising material – creating posters from magazine cuttings. This may involve: – collecting payments – recording payments. demand and consumer preferences • market product in the context of the purpose of the project Production of advertising material may indicate participating in marketing an agricultural product. This may involve: – visiting local retail outlets or markets to explore promotional material. images and techniques to create effective marketing materials Collection of orders may indicate participating in marketing an agricultural product. seed packets and photographs taken during the enterprise – creating video/audio/multimedia advertisements – arranging tastings of vegetable products • take orders for vegetable products in the school community.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.

This may involve: – completing a teacher-designed questionnaire on their involvement to be included in the folio/workbook – including photographs in their folio/workbook of their participation in various steps of the process – recording. LS. organise and present information related to an agricultural enterprise.10 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. the reactions of customers to the product – making suggestions in their folio/workbook about how the production process could be improved or replicated – responding to questioning such as. organise and present information related to an agricultural enterprise. instruction and assessment Teacher • facilitates students sharing their experiences of the enterprise with others. 135 .5. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • evaluation of the success of the enterprise • organising and presenting data collected • print and display information for an identified purpose Sharing their experiences of the production process with others may involve using information and communication technologies to collect. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • techniques for reviewing project processes in relation to yield and quality • review the project in terms of yield and quality Participation in the evaluation of the enterprise may indicate participating in the production process of an agricultural enterprise and/or using information and communication technologies to collect. ‘What were the advantages and disadvantages of the garden site we chose?’ ‘How were we able to control for pests?’ ‘What could be changed to improve the quality and yield?’ • share their experiences of the production process with others. This may involve: – displaying the folio/workbook in a prominent place in the school – developing a multimedia presentation. Students • evaluate the vegetable production enterprise in terms of quality and yield. Programming and Assessment Focus: Evaluating the vegetable production process Outcomes: LS. • communication of their participation in the production process with others in an appropriate format.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. in the folio/workbook. Oral.

2 explores a variety of materials. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. desktop publishing.3.1 evaluates the work of designers in terms of the benefits to the individual. Links A student: A student: English Mathematics LS.1.6.1.2 participates in producing design projects LS. tools and equipment SGLS.2.2 uses a variety of technologies to present design solutions Prefabricated templates from which to construct the project. word-processing.1 recognises that a process is used to design and make projects SGLS.6 uses the language of measurement in everyday contexts LS.5 responds to the language of measurement in everyday contexts Industrial Technology MLS.4 cares for materials.3.2 demonstrates safe practices in the use of materials.1 selects and uses appropriate materials to undertake projects LS. A range of technologies may be used in constructing and/or embellishing the storage device. eg cake boxes and gift bags LS.1 evaluates the success of projects Information and Software Technology LS.6.3 Design and Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Storage matters Unit title: Storage matters Description: This unit involves students exploring storage solutions and producing and evaluating their own storage device. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.5 uses the language of position in a variety of situations LS.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology solutions.1 gathers and uses information to generate design solutions Examples and images of completed projects and modifications/embellishments LS. techniques and processes. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. Programming and Assessment 9.12 communicates for a variety of purposes MLS.1 selects and uses appropriate processes and techniques in the context of producing design projects LS. tools and equipment. Materials. tools and techniques by students is essential in the Design and Technology course.1 recognises that a process is used to develop design solutions such as graphics.5. LS.6.2 selects appropriate tools to undertake projects Visual Arts LS.6. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: A variety of storage devices and items to be stored Access to computer hardware such as digital cameras.4 responds to the language of position LS. 136 . individualise a design provided by the teacher or embellish a completed storage device. tools and equipment appropriate to the selected project society and environments Off-cuts and samples of materials for practice purposes LS. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Safe and Sound’ in Design and Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 21–29).3 demonstrates safe practices in the use of equipment and the implementation of techniques LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. spreadsheets.5.2 considers factors that influence design Access to books and other print and electronic media for research LS. Safe and responsible use of materials.5. multimedia LS.6. scanners and computer software LS.2. Teachers should consider this when delivering this unit of work. Students may develop their own designs.1.

Programming and Assessment Focus: Function of storage devices Outcomes: LS. wardrobes. eg fridge. eg plastic bags. LS. • factors that influence design • consider the factors that influence design in the context of a design project consider the factors that influence design in the context of a design project • identify storage devices that are commonly used in the school and the items that are stored in them.1. LS. shoe boxes.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. hot and cold drinks/food. eg lockers. storerooms • factors that influence design • • experiment with storing and carrying items in a range of devices. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of the range and purpose of storage devices in the home • identification of the range and purpose of storage devices in the school • identification of appropriate storage solutions for a range of items. string bags. cupboards. clothes • facilitates discussion of the function and purpose of storage devices • organises a visit to a retail outlet specialising in storage solutions • assists students to record their involvement at each step of the storage design project in a folio.1. eg CDs.5. plastic bottles • displays a variety of items to be stored. jewellery box Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • factors that influence design • consider the factors that influence design in the context of a design project Identification of a range of storage devices in the home and their uses may indicate considering factors that influence design.2. instruction and assessment Teacher • displays a variety of storage devices. Experimenting with a range of storage devices to store and carry a range of items may involve considering factors that influence design. Students • identify storage devices that are commonly used in the home and the items that are stored in them. Oral. bags.1. cupboards. continued 137 .2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. This may involve: – placing and carrying items in a range of devices – recording the number/volume of items able to be stored in a variety of devices – choosing appropriate devices to store and carry a range of items Identification of a range of storage devices in the school and their uses may indicate considering factors that influence design. tubs. canisters.

knives in knife blocks. security and privacy that influence the way people store items. These may include: – safety. eg personal documents in a lockable drawer • establish and maintain a record of their involvement at each step of the design process in a folio.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. food in refrigerator or cool pack – security. Oral. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Exploration of the factors that lead to the way we store items may indicate considering factors that influence design. eg cash and valuables in lockable cash box or safe – privacy.1. instruction and assessment Students • explore factors such as safety. Items in the folio may include: – photographs and/or other images of their participation at various steps in the process – descriptions of their activities at each step of the project – personal observations – data and information relevant to the project – personalised step-by-step plan for producing the project – evaluation of the project. LS.5.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.1. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of the factors that lead to the way we store items • recording of their participation in the design process in an appropriate format.1. Feedback • factors that influence design • consider the factors that influence design in the context of a design project the steps in a design process • communicating throughout the design process • a variety of communication techniques • • recognise the steps in a design process • use techniques to communicate ideas The recording and reflection on activities throughout the design process may indicate recognising that a process is used to develop design solutions and/or using a variety of techniques to present design solutions. Programming and Assessment Focus: Function of storage devices (cont) Outcomes: LS. 138 . LS.2. eg chemicals and medication in childproof containers.

Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring features of storage devices Outcomes: LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 139 . aesthetics. Students • explore features of storage devices such as placement. Examples could include packaging for food products. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • evaluating designs • factors that influence design evaluate a variety of products in terms of cost and benefits • consider the factors that influence design in the context of a design project • Identification of design features of a variety of storage devices may involve considering factors that influence design.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides examples. images and diagrams of a range of storage devices. dimensions. durability and cost.2. LS.3. Activities may include: – indicating the purpose of storage devices – identifying materials used in the construction of each device from lists provided by the teacher – describing the advantages and disadvantages of the construction materials used – commenting on ease of use of storage devices. functions. a CD holder.1. handbag/wallet. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of a range of design features in modern storage devices. Oral. portability. school bag.

Focus: Planning steps for producing the storage design project Outcome: LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of the steps to produce their storage design project. libraries.1 Teacher • provides a personalised step-by-step plan of the steps in the production process. bags made from textiles. instruction and assessment Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback Teacher • provides examples of storage design projects. Programming and Assessment Focus: Selecting a storage design project Outcomes: LS. and/or – producing a storage design project from personal research. Oral.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. This may include: project design project – personalising an existing storage solution. stencils.5.1. prefabricated projects such as magazine holders. the texture of a container. changing the surface newspapers.1. 140 . process design process This may involve: – including the personalised step-by-step plan in their folio – following through each step of the plan recognising the activities at each step.6. decoupage. CD-ROMs – selecting an appropriate construction kit or prefabricated storage solution. eg using • obtaining information • access sources of colour. sources electronic media.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. and/or internet. commercially produced kits and gift bags • provides access to research materials for the development of a storage design project. eg CD holders made from timber or acrylics. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ selection of an appropriate project. attaching a lock onto a container. Oral. adding form a variety of information including material to stabilise an object such as Velcro. LS. Students • the steps in a design • recognise the steps in a • recognise the steps in the personalised step-by-step plan. Selection of a preferred project may indicate gathering and using information to generate design solutions and/or selecting and using appropriate techniques in the context of producing design projects. Students • producing a design • participate in producing a • select a storage design project. adding handles. Identification of the steps for producing the project may indicate recognising that a process is used to develop design solutions.

tools and equipment in the context of the project. tools and equipment safely and appropriately under supervision Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback the application of Occupational Health and Safety practices in relation to – handling and using a variety of materials – handling and using hand tools. equipment and materials in producing the storage design project Outcomes: LS. materials and equipment. Programming and Assessment Focus: Safe use of tools. tools and equipment safely in the context of projects • Use of safe practices may involve demonstrating safe practices in the use of equipment and the implementation of techniques and/or caring for materials.3. Oral.6. tools and equipment may indicate caring for materials. tools and equipment appropriately • keep workplaces clean and tidy • • follow routines to care for and store materials. equipment and tools that make them dangerous • use materials. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of safe practices when using materials. tools and equipment.6. tools and equipment during the production process. LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • explicitly teaches and models safe work practices when using materials. tools and equipment store materials. Following routines to care for and store materials. tools and equipment to their storage space after use – tidying the work area. This may include: – returning materials. tools and equipment • identify properties of materials. tools and equipment and provides opportunities for supervised practice • explicitly teaches and demonstrates routines to care for and store tools.4 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. This may include: – recognising rules for the safe use of materials. power tools and appliances – handling and using machine and computer equipment – safe lifting practices • routines for care of materials. tools and equipment. 141 . Students • use safe work practices when using materials. • demonstration of the skills to care for materials.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. tools and equipment. tools and equipment – using materials.

2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Oral. instruction and assessment Teacher • reviews the step-by-step plan and models each step in the plan as required • provides pre-cut pieces and kits for the project where required • demonstrates the specific skills and techniques appropriate to individual projects. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ production of the storage design project by following the personalised step-by-step plan. and/or – assembling a construction kit or prefabricated storage device. Students • engage in the process for producing a storage device by following the personalised step-by-step plan.1.6. LS. 142 .6.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. and/or – personalising an existing storage device. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback producing a design project • techniques used to develop projects across a range of technologies • follow the steps to complete a design project • uses techniques to produce design projects across a variety of technologies • Engagement in the production of the storage design project may indicate selecting and using appropriate processes and techniques in the context of producing design projects and/or participating in producing design projects. This may include selecting and using appropriate processes and techniques in: – constructing a storage device. Programming and Assessment Focus: Producing a storage design project Outcomes: LS.

Students • evaluate their storage design project in terms of dimensions.1. Activities may include: – using the device for its designated purpose – commenting on the usefulness of the device – suggesting ways that the design could be improved – obtaining feedback from others Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • producing a design project • follow the steps to complete a design project – evaluate design project Evaluation of the projects may involve selecting and using appropriate processes and techniques in the context of producing design projects and/or participating in producing design projects.2.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ evaluation of the storage design project and its appropriateness for its intended use. 143 . portability and durability. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ sharing their experiences of the production process with others in an appropriate format. LS. Oral.6. Oral. Feedback from others on the folio. Programming and Assessment Focus: Evaluating the storage design project Outcomes: LS 5. Sharing the information in the folio with others may involve using a variety of techniques to communicate ideas in the context of producing design projects. aesthetics.6.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Peer and self-feedback on the storage device. • a variety of communication techniques • use techniques to communicate ideas • share the information in their folio with others. This may involve: – displaying the folio and storage design project in a prominent place in the school – describing aspects of the process to others – developing a multimedia presentation. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to evaluate their project’s suitability for intended use.

1 experiences cultural diversity MLS.2 explores their own and other cultures MLS. Safe and responsible use of materials.1 demonstrates hygienic and safe practices in the selection.2 listens for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts NLS.3 recognises the contribution of different cultures to Australian society. 144 .4 cares for equipment LS.3 demonstrates safe practices in the making of food items LS.2 demonstrates safe practices in the use of materials. handling and Ingredients.1 recognises language that is descriptive of number LS. techniques and processes LS. material. preparation and storage of food items in the context of small-scale catering projects.4 Food Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Celebrations Unit title: Celebrations Description: This unit involves students participating in a range of practical activities that highlight the importance and role of food in celebrations.5 recognises fractions in everyday contexts Industrial Technology NLS.5.2 explores a variety of materials.8 responds to increasingly complex written texts NLS.4.1 participates in making food items Access to computers and appropriate software to present information LS. Links A student: A student: English Mathematics LS. Students plan and prepare a range of food items in the context of small-scale catering activities for celebrations within the school.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. tools and equipment MLS.6 uses fractions in everyday contexts LS1.6 uses the language of measurement in everyday contexts MBC.5 responds to the language of measurement in everyday contexts Languages MLS. equipment and appliances necessary for the preparation and serving storage of food of celebration foods LS. responses or a point of view. Health and Physical Education LS.5.13 demonstrates appropriate behaviours associated with eating and drinking Visual Arts LS.1 gathers and uses information from a variety of sources Recipes and images of celebration foods LS.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences. tools and techniques by students is essential in the Food Technology course and teachers should consider this when delivering this unit. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Examples of foods served at special occasions and celebrations LS.6. Students demonstrate safe handling.5.12 makes healthy nutritional choices LS.9 estimates and measures capacity MBC. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.2 uses appropriate equipment and techniques in making a variety of food items LS. Personal Development.2 recognises the significant role of food in society.4. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Celebrations’ in Food Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 23–35).2 uses a variety of communication techniques Access to electronic and print media for research LS.1.10 estimates and measures mass MBC. Programming and Assessment 9.5.

visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of a variety of physiological reasons for eating food • identification of a variety of social reasons for eating food • identification of special foods that may be eaten at celebrations and special occasions. BBQ with friends. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to recognise the role of food in their lives • facilitates discussion of food served on special occasions • assists students in recording their involvement throughout the unit in a folio.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Identification of foods eaten on special occasions may indicate recognising the significant role of food in society.6. This may include: – indicating special occasions they have experienced – identifying foods eaten on these special occasions – acknowledging that food eaten on special occasions may be different from everyday foods Recognition of meals that are shared with others may indicate recognising the significant role of food in society. LS. school and community. • recognise meals that are shared with others in the home. eg breakfast at home. continued 145 . Oral.4.4.1. Programming and Assessment Focus: The significance of food in celebrations Outcomes: LS. lunch at school. LS.2.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Students • recognise food eaten on a daily basis. This may include: – expressing preferences for particular foods – keeping a diary of food consumed over a period of time – giving reasons why food is important – recognising foods that are safe for them to eat – indicating food intolerances Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • the role of food in society recognise food as a basic physical need • recognise the social aspects of food • Recognising why we eat food may indicate recognising the significant role of food in society. celebrations • recognise food associated with celebrations and special occasions.

146 . Programming and Assessment Focus: The significance of food in celebrations (cont) Outcomes: LS. Feedback Oral. menus.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. eg cultural.2. religious or social.4. and the foods traditionally served. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • recording of their participation in the design process in an appropriate format • obtaining information from a variety of sources • using a variety of communication techniques • access sources of information in the context of a food project • use techniques to communicate ideas • Investigating celebrations and the foods associated with them may involve gathering and using information from a variety of sources.4.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS. instruction and assessment establish and maintain a folio recording their involvement throughout the unit in a folio. • • using a variety of communication techniques • use techniques to communicate ideas Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Establishing and maintaining a folio may indicate gathering and using information from a variety of sources and/or using a variety of communication techniques.1. internet. LS. recipes.6. Items in the folio may include: – photographs and/or other images of their participation at various steps of the process – descriptions of their activities at each step – personal observations – data and information relevant to the project – personalised step-by-step plan to produce food items – evaluation of the project • investigate one or more celebrations. supermarket catalogues that are relevant to particular celebrations across cultures – creating a collage of foods associated with particular celebrations – collecting traditional recipes associated with particular celebrations • share their information with others. research and demonstrated selection of relevant information • the role of food in society • using a variety of communication techniques recognise the social aspects of food • explore cultural influences on food • use techniques to communicate ideas • Sharing their information to others may indicate recognising the significant role of food in society and/or using a variety of communication techniques. This may include: – bringing photographs from home of family celebrations – sharing information about family celebrations with others – locating and selecting information from a variety of sources such as photographs. • communication of their information on the role of food in society to others in an appropriate format.

keeping chilled foods cool.1. and the safe selection. eg refrigerate/cover food – retain hot and cold food at correct temperature. handling and storage of food. This may include: – washing hands – wearing personal protective equipment – covering cuts and abrasions – covering and/or securing hair – using separate chopping boards for different foods to avoid cross-contamination • use hygienic and safe practices in storing food items – storing food appropriately. handling and storage of food. • demonstration of the correct procedures for storage of food. instruction and assessment Teacher • explicitly instructs and demonstrates the use of personal protective equipment. Students • recognise and identify safe and unsafe food in the context of making food items. handling and storage of food • use hygienic and safe practices in handling and preparing food Use of hygienic and safe practices may indicate demonstrating hygienic and safe practices in the selection. 147 . This may include: – checking for observable contamination. returning dairy products to the fridge immediately after use. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of safe and unsafe foods • hygiene and safe practices in the selection. handling and storage of food • possible health risks • • use hygienic and safe practices in selecting food recognise risk areas • Recognition and identification of safe and unsafe food may indicate demonstrating hygienic and safe practices in the selection. rotten apple (appearance) – recognising and/or checking packaging for damage or tampering – recognising and/or checking use by dates – communicating an awareness of personal food intolerances/allergies • use hygienic and safe practices in handling and preparing food. sour milk (smell). Oral. handling and storage of food. • demonstration of safe practice in the handling and preparing food • use hygienic and safe practices in storing food recognise risk areas • possible health risks • Correct storage of food may indicate demonstrating hygienic and safe practices in the selection. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback hygiene and safe practices in the selection. handling and storage of food. eg mouldy bread (appearance). eg ice cream in the freezer. Programming and Assessment Focus: Hygienic and safe practices Outcomes: LS.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.

5.1. print media. LS. the internet. eg recipe books. internet. tasting and selecting food items from a variety provided by the teacher – locating recipes appropriate to the occasion from a variety of sources. utensils and appliances. Programming and Assessment Focus: Special occasion catering Outcomes: LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of a range of appropriate food options for special occasions. This may include: – indicating the special occasion and/or invited guests being catered for – examining. magazines Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • obtaining information from a variety of sources • access sources of information in the context of a food project including electronic media.5. ingredients. Oral.4. continued 148 . LS. library. Students • identify a variety of food items suitable for a special occasion such as a birthday celebration for a class member.2. LS.4. LS.4. CD-ROM Identification of a range of food options may involve gathering and using information from a variety of sources. a thank you morning tea or a multicultural day. LS.2.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. instruction and assessment Teacher • organises opportunities for students to work in groups to prepare a variety of food items for special occasions • assists students to access information about foods that may be prepared • provides a variety of food items for students to examine and taste • assists students to develop a personalised step-by-step plan to prepare the food items • explicitly instructs and demonstrates the safe handling of materials.1. LS.5. LS.1.5.3.6.1.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Focus: Special occasion catering (cont) Outcomes: LS.1.1, LS.4.1, LS.4.2, LS 5.1, LS.5.2, LS.5.3, LS.5.4, LS.6.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences, instruction and assessment Students • follow a personalised step-by-step plan to prepare the selected food items. This may include: – putting on and wearing personal protective equipment – selecting techniques and requirements – preparing food items using appropriate appliances, equipment and hygienic practices – presenting food items in an appealing manner

Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Preparation of the food items may indicate demonstrating hygienic and safe practices in the selection, handling and storage of food and participating in making food items.

Feedback

hygienic and safe practices in the selection, handling and storage of food • using a process in the context of making a food item • techniques used in making food items • equipment used in making food items
• •

use hygienic and safe practices in handling and preparing food • follow the steps in a process to make a variety of food items

Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of hygienic and safe practices in the preparation of food items

the application of OHS practices in relation to safe handling of a variety of materials/ ingredients, utensils and appliances

recognise properties of materials, ingredients, utensils and appliances that make them dangerous • carry and transfer materials, utensils and appliances safely

demonstrate appropriate care when handling utensils/materials that are hot, heavy, sharp or flammable in the context of making food items. This may include responding to teacher modelling and demonstration in: – transferring hot food from microwave to bench using oven mitts – bending knees to pick up box of vegetables – picking up knife by handle, rather than blade – keeping flammable items away from stovetop follow instructions when using electrical appliances such as microwaves, kettles, toasters

Appropriate care when handling materials may indicate demonstrating safe practices in making a variety of food items.

demonstration of care in handling a range of materials

use materials, utensils and appliances safely in the context of making food items

Careful use of electrical appliances may indicate demonstrating safe practices in making a variety of food items.

demonstration of safe work practices when using electrical appliances. continued

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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Focus: Special occasion catering (cont) Outcomes: LS.1.1, LS.4.1, LS.4.2, LS.5.1, LS.5.2, LS.5.3, LS.5.4, LS.6.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences, instruction and assessment Students • clean up workspaces, utensils and equipment after use. This may involve: – washing up and putting away utensils – wiping down surfaces – cleaning and storing equipment

Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Following routines to clean workplaces, utensils and appliances may indicate caring for equipment.

Feedback

routines for care of equipment including utensils and appliances

regularly clean equipment after use

the role of food in society

using a variety of communication techniques • participates in making food items
• •

enjoy a variety of food recognise the social aspects of food • use techniques to communicate ideas
• •

the role of food in society

follow the steps in a process to make a variety of food items • enjoy a variety of food • recognise the social aspects of food

share food with others in the context of the celebration. This may involve: – responding to others during the celebration – offering food to others using hygienic practices – naming and/or describing food items – experiencing food items with others • evaluate the food item/s prepared for the celebration in terms of visual appeal, variety, taste, colour and texture.

Sharing food items may involve recognising the significant role of food in society.

Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of skills in maintaining a clean workplace • participation in the social aspects of eating

Evaluation of the food items produced may indicate participating in making food items and/or recognising the significant role of food in society.

evaluation of the prepared food items and identification of ways in which the items could be improved.

Responses by others to the food items can provide feedback.

150

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

9.5

Graphics Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Stand-out logos

Unit title: Stand-out logos Description: This unit involves students in the development of a personal or group logo to personalise a variety of items. Students explore the function of logos and design their own personal or group logo. Safe and responsible use of materials, tools and techniques by students is essential in the Graphics Technology course. Teachers should consider this when delivering this unit of work. The logo design is produced using a variety of media, techniques and/or computer technology. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Drawing equipment such as drawing boards, coloured pencils and markers LS.1.1 participates in the development of graphics projects CAD program 3D capability LS.1.2 undertakes graphical presentations to communicate ideas Contemporary Technical Graphics (DET publication, 1984) LS.2.1 recognises appropriate techniques for a variety of projects Kemnitzer, R.B. Rendering with Markers LS.2.2 evaluates the effectiveness of graphical presentations Examples of graphic representations and logos LS.4.1 uses computer based presentation techniques LS.5.1 demonstrates safe practices in the use of tools, materials and techniques in undertaking a project LS.6.1 recognises the use of graphics technology in a variety of contexts. Links A student: A student: Design and Technology Information and Software Technology LS.1.1 recognises that a process is used to develop design solutions LS.1.2 uses a range of hardware LS.1.2 considers factors that influence design LS.1.3 uses a range of software programs LS.5.1 gathers and uses information to generate design solutions LS.2.1 uses information and software technology in solving a range of problems LS.5.2 uses a variety of techniques to present design solutions Languages LS.6.1 selects and uses appropriate processes and techniques in the context of LS.MLC.1 recognises internationally shared signs, symbols and words producing design projects Mathematics LS.6.2 participates in producing design projects SGLS.3 identifies the features of three-dimensional objects and two-dimensional shapes LS.6.4 cares for materials, tools and equipment Visual Arts English LS.1 experiences a variety of artmaking activities LS.3 uses technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences LS.2 explores a variety of materials, techniques and processes. LS.6 uses visual texts in a range of contexts Industrial Technology LS.2.1 recognises that a process is used to design and make projects LS.4.1 uses a variety of communication techniques in the context of undertaking projects. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes, teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Children’s Toys’ in Graphics Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 24–31).

151

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Focus: Exploring the purpose of graphic representations Outcomes: LS.1.1, LS.1.2, LS.2.2, LS.6.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences, instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to recognise and explore commonly used symbols and graphic representations • focuses students’ attention on the features of a variety of graphic representations including logos • assists students to identify advantages of having a logo • assists students to record their involvement at each step of the graphic design project in a folio. Students • explore the use of symbols and graphic representations. This may include: – identifying and collecting symbols/product logos from magazines, the internet, packaging, school, community – matching logos with the symbols/logos of products which they represent – making a collage of collected material – suggesting reasons why symbols/logos are used – identifying universally recognised graphics for signage, instruction, marketing • explore design features of various graphic representations such as colour, shape, size, symbols, and materials. This may include: – collecting and sorting logos by colour, shape, size – responding to images of logos in brochures and magazines – discussing how the features attract attention and give information – recording particular design features of logos selected from print and electronic media – comparing design features of a variety of logos

Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes)

Feedback

the role of graphics in society

recognise the use of graphics in society

Examination of symbols and graphic representations may indicate recognising the use of graphics technology in a variety of contexts.

Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of logos, their purposes and the meanings they convey

the role of graphics in society • features of graphical presentation

recognise the use of graphics in society • recognise the features of graphical presentation

Exploring design features of various graphic representations may involve recognising the use of graphics technology in a variety of contexts and/or evaluating the effectiveness of graphical presentations.

identification of the design features in a variety of graphic representations and/or logos.

continued

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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Focus: Exploring the purpose of graphic representations (cont) Outcomes: LS.1.1, LS.1.2, LS.2.2, LS.6.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences, instruction and assessment Students • recognise the advantages of having a logo for personal or group identification. This may include: – bringing samples of logos associated with particular groups to which students belong and/or support, eg scouts, church group, football teams – discussing the advantages of having a logo for personal or group identification – recognising that all logos are unique and belong to one company and/or community group and cannot be used without their permission • establish and maintain a record of their involvement throughout the graphic design project in a folio. Items in the folio may include: – photographs and/or other images of their participation at various steps of the process – descriptions of their activities at each step – personal observations – data and information relevant to the project – personalised step-by-step plan to produce the project – evaluation of the project.

Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Exploring the advantages of having a logo may indicate recognising the use of graphics technology in a variety of contexts and/or evaluating the effectiveness of graphical presentations.

Feedback

the role of graphics in society

recognise the use of graphics in society

Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of the advantages of having a group or personal logo

a design process for graphics projects

using a design process in the context of a project

use a variety of communication techniques to present ideas • participate in a specific graphics project

The recording and reflection on activities throughout the design process may indicate undertaking graphical presentation to communicate ideas and/or participating in the development of graphics projects.

recording of their participation in the design process in an appropriate format.

153

154 . visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • selection of an appropriate logo design • reflection on their logo design and decision that it will be suitable for its intended purpose. eg badge. Students • identify a preferred logo design. letterhead • explicitly teaches the use of freehand sketches to express ideas. Programming and Assessment Focus: Developing a logo design Outcomes: LS. team T-shirt. • using a design process in the context of a project • refine ideas using a variety of techniques • refine ideas about preferred logo design.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.1. Oral.1. This may include: – selecting from a range presented by the teacher – personalising an existing design – researching ideas for a logo – sketching a preferred design freehand – sketching a logo using computer technology Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • a design process for graphics projects use freehand sketches to express ideas • use simple conventions for drawing • make drawings • Selection of a logo design may involve undertaking graphical presentations to communicate ideas. This may include asking and responding to questions such as: – Are the symbols readily understood by others? – What features of the logo do you like best? – What colours would make the logo stand out more? – How could you change the size of the logo to fit onto a T-shirt? Refining ideas about the logo design may involve undertaking graphical presentations to communicate ideas. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to develop a logo design for personal or group identification.1. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. simple conventions for making drawings and techniques for refining ideas.

Oral.1. 155 . Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • using a design process in the context of a project • participate in a specific graphics project Identification of steps in the production process may indicate participating in the development of graphics projects. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of the steps involved in producing their project.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Focus: Planning steps to produce the logo Outcome: LS. This may involve: – including the personalised step-by-step plan in their folio – following through each step of the plan recognising the activities at each step.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Students • recognise the steps in the personalised step-by-step plan. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to develop a step-by-plan for producing the logo.

1.1. tone • explicitly teaches and demonstrates the skills for freehand drawing. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Students’ demonstration of skills and techniques in the context of producing a logo. care for and store drawing equipment and drawing media safely and appropriately • explicitly teaches and demonstrates appropriate drawing techniques. eg drawing regular geometric shapes.4. LS.1.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Students • apply skills and techniques safely in the context of producing a logo Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • safe work practices • use safe work practices in practical areas safe handling and storage of drawing equipment and drawing media • safe work practices • use drawing equipment and drawing media safely • care for and store drawing equipment • use safe practices in practical areas • • use and store markers and related graphics equipment appropriately. grouping objects.2. LS.1.5. resizing objects. eg using tool bars to create shapes. use of colour. Programming and Assessment Focus: Producing the graphics project using appropriate equipment and techniques Outcomes: LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • explicitly teaches the skills to use. This may include: – gripping equipment appropriately – returning equipment to correct storage containers – using all equipment appropriately and according to safety regulations as specified by the teacher Applying skills and techniques safely in the context of producing a logo may indicate demonstrating safe practices in the use of tools. using simple geometric constructions. compass • explicitly teaches and demonstrates skills for using paint/draw programs and making computer-aided drawings. eg sketching straight lines and curves • explicitly teaches and demonstrate the skills for manual drawing techniques. continued 156 . materials and techniques in undertaking a project. Teacher demonstration of skills and techniques. materials and techniques in undertaking a project. Safe and appropriate use and storage of equipment may indicate demonstrating safe practices in the use of tools. Students’ demonstration of the safe use and storage of tools and materials. shade. eg using set squares.

5.4. This may include responding to teacher demonstration by: – recognising media for specific purposes – using media appropriately – creating different effects using a combination of media Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Using appropriate drawing media may indicate recognising appropriate techniques for a variety of projects. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of the use of appropriate drawing media in the context of making drawings for producing a logo design • demonstration of the use of appropriate drawing techniques in the context of making drawings for producing a logo design Completing final drawings may indicate participating in the development of graphics projects.1.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. continued 157 . Programming and Assessment Focus: Producing the graphics project using equipment and techniques (cont) Outcomes: LS. This may include responding to teacher instruction by: – selecting appropriate media for final drawings – placing the finished product on selected medium • Using a variety of drawing techniques may involve recognising appropriate techniques for a variety of projects.1. Oral. LS. LS. instruction and assessment Students • recognise and experiment with drawing media in the context of producing a logo design. This may include responding to teacher instruction and demonstration by: – drawing lines of various thickness and orientation – matching and selecting various colours for parts of the logo – applying shade and shadow to the logo – creating a design by importing images – drawing two and three dimensional shapes – resizing.2.1. • completion of final drawings. LS. Feedback • different drawing media a design process for graphics projects • recognise appropriate drawing media for specific purposes • make drawings • • different drawing techniques a design process for graphics projects computer-aided drawing programs • • • • • • • recognise appropriate drawing techniques for a specific purpose refine ideas using a variety of techniques make drawings paint/draw programs in the context of design projects make computer-aided drawings • using a design process in the context of a project • participate in a specific graphics project recognise and experiment with drawing techniques and/or computer software in the context of producing a logo design.1.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. manipulating and aligning shapes – scanning logo onto computer hard drive – saving work to a floppy disk and printing using a printer • complete final drawings for the folio.

Others provide feedback on the success of the logo.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • evaluation of their logo design • sharing of their logo design with others in an appropriate format.4. This may include: – obtaining feedback from others – answering questions such as. This may include: – developing a multimedia presentation of the steps in the production process – displaying the logo and folio in a prominent place in the school – including completed logos in school newsletter – emailing logos to local businesses for comment. a design process for graphics projects • using a design process in the context of a project use a variety of communication techniques to present ideas • participate in a specific graphics project • Sharing their final logo design with others may indicate participating in the development of graphics projects and/or undertaking of graphical presentations to communicate ideas. 158 . LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.5. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Producing and applying the logo design may indicate participating in the development of graphics projects Feedback • using a design process in the context of a project • participate in a specific graphics project Oral. Programming and Assessment Focus: Producing the graphics project using equipment and techniques (cont) Outcomes: LS. Students • evaluate the success of the logo design in terms of aesthetics and function. ‘What do you like best about the way it looks?’ ‘What would you change?’ – using the logo for the identified purpose • share their final logo design with others.1 Teacher • assists students to evaluate their logo design • assists students to share their logo design with others. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ production and application of the logo design to personal or group items.1. instruction and assessment Students • produce and apply logo design to items for personal or group identification. Oral. LS.1. LS.2.1.1. This may include incorporating the logo onto personal and/or group items such as: – badges – team T-shirts – letterhead. LS. Focus: Evaluating the logo design Outcomes: LS.4.1. It may involve using computerbased presentation techniques.1. a design process for graphics projects • using a design process in the context of a project • • evaluate process and product • participate in a specific graphics project • Evaluating the logo design may indicate participating in the development of graphics projects.2.1. LS.

2 explores a variety of materials.2 demonstrates safe practices in the use of materials.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.4.6.1 recognises safe and unsafe conditions in the context of undertaking a project Hand and power tools LS.5. techniques and processes producing design projects LS. Safe and responsible use of materials. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Examples of timber boxes.6. Programming and Assessment 9. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests.3 demonstrates safe practices in the use of equipment and the implementation Work Education of techniques LS.1. personalise a design or embellish an existing timber box with appropriate decorations.1.1 develops innovative design solutions Visual Arts LS.1. Links A student: A student: Design and Technology Mathematics LS. Information and Software Technology LS. and decorative finishes LS.1 selects and uses appropriate processes and techniques in the context of LS.1 uses skills and processes in a variety of contexts and projects Images of items that would be stored in various timber boxes LS. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 General Wood Core Module 2 unit ‘Trinket box’ in Industrial Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 30–36). development and production of a timber utility box. tools and equipment Pre-cut pieces and/or kits for construction LS.2 considers factors that influence design MLS.1 recognises that a process is used to design and make projects Images and designs of projects and completed projects LS.9 demonstrates skills for effective participation in the workplace.5.2. Teachers should consider this when delivering this unit.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences. tools and techniques by students is essential in the Industrial Technology course.1 recognises that a process is used to develop design solutions MLS.2 participates in producing design projects of view LS.6 Industrial Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Timber utility box Unit title: Timber utility box Description: This unit involves students in the design. Students design their own timber utility box.6. materials. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes. 159 . responses or a point LS. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.4.6 evaluates the success of projects.5 responds to the language of measurement in everyday contexts LS.1.6 uses the language of measurement in everyday contexts LS.1 uses a variety of communication techniques in the context of undertaking Digital camera projects Research materials including access to the internet and library LS.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology solutions.

2. 160 . eg lids. Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring the function of a variety of timber boxes Outcome: LS.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Students • explore the function and features of a range of timber boxes. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • a design process that includes: – analysis of a problem – idea creation – synthesis of ideas and information – making – evaluating • recognise the steps in a design process including: – identify a need – explore ideas – choose preferred ideas – plan steps for making the project – select tools. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of the design features and functions of a range of timber boxes. This may include: – collecting pictures of timber boxes from catalogues or bringing examples from home – recognising and sorting boxes for different purposes. closing devices. Oral. instruction and assessment Teacher • displays a variety of timber boxes • assists students to consider the features and purpose of a range of timber boxes. eg Would I store my tools in a trinket box? – recognise the features that enhance the function of a variety of timber boxes. strength and type of handles. equipment and materials – make project – evaluate project Exploration of the function and features of a range of timber boxes may indicate recognising that a process is used to design and make projects.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. number of compartments.

2. LS. Recognising the planning steps to complete the project may indicate recognising that a process is used to design and make projects.1 • Selection of a project may involve recognising that a process is used to design and make projects and/or using a variety of communication techniques in the context of undertaking projects. Programming and Assessment Focus: Choosing a timber box project Outcomes: LS. This may involve: – following through each step of the plan recognising the activities at each step. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of the steps needed to produce the timber design project. Students • select a project from the range of options provided according to their personal preference. 161 . Oral. This may include: – selecting a project after investigating the features of sample boxes – indicating a preference for a timber box project – determining a design that takes into account the function and purpose of the project. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ selection of an appropriate style of timber box for their needs and abilities. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback a design process that • recognise steps in the includes: design process – analysis of a – choose preferred idea problem – idea creation – synthesis of ideas and information – making – evaluating • using a variety of • use techniques to communication communicate ideas techniques Focus: Planning steps for producing a timber box Outcome: LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides examples of completed timber box projects that could be produced. • a design process that includes: – analysis of a problem – idea creation – synthesis of ideas and information – making – evaluating • recognise the steps in a design process – plan steps for making the project Teacher • assists students to develop a personalised step-by-step plan for the production process.2.1. Oral. box for tools/sports equipment/games/CDs. eg trinket box for jewellery. Students • recognise the steps in the personalised step-by-step plan to complete the project.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.4.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.

screwdrivers. continued 162 . goggles Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • factors that influence safety – in specialist rooms handling and using a variety of equipment including machine tools and computer equipment • recognise factors that influence safety in specialist areas follow safety labelling • • Demonstrating safe practice in specialist rooms may indicate recognising safe and unsafe conditions in the context of undertaking a project and/or demonstrating safe practices in the use of materials. Programming and Assessment Focus: Safe use of materials. tools and equipment Outcomes: LS.1. This may include: – following safety labelling – identifying location of safety protection equipment and first aid kit – recognising potentially dangerous equipment and situations – putting on personal protective equipment.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. instruction and assessment Teacher • reviews factors that influence safety in a specialist area • explains the properties of materials. equipment and tools which make them dangerous • explicitly teaches and demonstrates the use of a range of hand tools. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ demonstration of safe practice in specialist rooms. LS. LS.1. Oral. chisels • provides opportunities for supervised practice in the use of materials.1. eg hammers. tools and equipment. tools and equipment.1.2.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Students • demonstrate safe practice in specialist rooms. eg mask.

cut shape. tools and equipment. LS. power tools and machines. power tools and machines • recognise factors that influence safety in specialist rooms – storage: tools. join and finish materials Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Using materials.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. hazardous substances • • care for and store materials.1.1. safe carrying techniques for a length of timber. tools and equipment.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. materials. Feedback • the application of OHS practices in relation to: – handling and using a variety of materials – handling and using a variety of hand tools and power tools • recognise properties of materials. tools and equipment safely • undertake regular checks of hand tools. Programming and Assessment Focus: Safe use of materials. This may include: – returning materials. power tools and machines • factors that influence safety • carry and transfer materials. tools and equipment.1. eg – flammability – toxicity – sharpness – weight – temperature – moving parts – electrical operation Oral. measure.1. modelling and prompting in: – recognising the rules for the safe use of materials. safe passing techniques for chisels. tools and equipment during the production process may indicate caring for hand tools. tools and equipment appropriately and safely under supervision. • demonstration of the safe storage of materials. instruction and assessment Students • use materials. tools and equipment safely and appropriately under supervision to mark.2. applying paint/varnish in a well-ventilated area – using materials. eg safe handling of a hammer. tools and equipment handling and using a variety of equipment including machine tools and computer equipment • caring for hand tools. LS. tools and equipment (cont) Outcomes: LS. 163 . tools and equipment safely may indicate recognising safe and unsafe conditions in the context of undertaking a project and/or demonstrating safe practices in the use of materials. equipment. This may involve responding to teacher instruction. tools and equipment safely – use materials. tools and equipment during the production process. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of safe and appropriate use of materials. tools and equipment to their storage space after use – tidying the work area – reporting unsafe equipment and or dangerous situations. Caring for and storing materials. safe use of adhesives. equipment and tools that make them dangerous.

5. nails.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. stencils – fitting hardware such as handles and locks Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback continued 164 . while incorporating relevant OHS practices at every point: – measuring and marking out the project – cutting out timber using templates and appropriate hand or power tools and equipment – shaping timber using appropriate hand or power tools and equipment – joining timber using methods such as adhesives.1. modelling each step as required • focuses on the development and application of specific skills related to producing a timber box • explicitly teaches each of the skills and techniques and their application in the context of the production of a timber box. surface decoration – preparing/sanding surface in readiness for applying selected finish using appropriate hand or power tools – applying appropriate finishes. joints – constructing their timber box using techniques such as turning of handles. varnish. screws. oil in a well-ventilated area – applying appropriate decorations such as decoupage. LS. eg paint. Programming and Assessment Focus: Producing a timber box Outcomes: LS.2. instruction and assessment Teacher • reviews the personalised step-by-step plan for the production of the timber box.

5. equipment and tools that make them dangerous. Oral. LS. eg – flammability – toxicity – sharpness – weight – temperature – moving parts – electrical operation • Teacher demonstration of skills and techniques.2. Feedback using skills to make a project in a variety of technologies • applying the design process • the application of OHS practices in relation to: – handling and using a variety of materials – handling and using a variety of hand tools and power tools • participate in making a project in a variety of technologies • follow steps to complete a project • recognise properties of materials.1. Programming and Assessment Focus: Producing a timber box (cont) Outcomes: LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 165 . Teacher guides and reinforces students’ skill development in the context of producing the project. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of the steps needed to produce the project. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Using skills and techniques to engage in the production process for completing a timber box may indicate demonstrating safe practices in the use of materials tools and equipment and/or using skills and processes in a variety of contexts and projects. instruction and assessment Students • use skills and techniques to engage in the production process for completing a timber box project according to the personalised step-by-step plan and in accordance with relevant OHS practices.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.

Oral. This could be done through photographs.6.1. video. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to evaluate their timber box in a project report • facilitates students communicating their experiences of the production process with others. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • evaluating a project in terms of – function – aesthetics – available resources – environmental impact – marketability • evaluate a completed project eg – does the finished product require modification? – what changes.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. need to be made? – will it be used? – does the project look well made? – does the project meet the identified need? use techniques to communicate ideas. need to be made?’ – preparing a project report in which information about the materials. if any. Students • evaluate their timber box in terms of function and aesthetics. eg ‘Could you demonstrate how the timber box will be used?’. tools and processes used in the project is outlined. ‘What do you like best about the way it looks?’. 166 . • sharing of their completed project with others in an appropriate format.4. This may include: – responding to questioning. This may include: – developing a multimedia presentation of the steps undertaken to complete the project – displaying the project in a prominent place in the school – presenting their completed project to the class or at a school assembly. if any. eg – present a completed practical project to a class or school assembly Evaluation of the timber box may indicate evaluating the success of projects and/or using a variety of communication techniques in the context of undertaking project. ‘What changes. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • evaluation of their timber box in terms of aesthetics and function • using a variety of communication techniques which may include – oral presentations – discussions • Sharing their completed project with others may indicate using a variety of communication techniques in the context of undertaking project. Programming and Assessment Focus: Evaluating the timber design project Outcomes: LS. LS. need to be made • share their completed project with others. drawings and/or text to demonstrate the stepby-step plan used to produce the project. if any. The project report could also include information about what changes.

167 .5. scanner. printer.1.5.2 evaluates information and software technology solutions LS. current and emerging information technologies LS.4.1. voice output device.1 uses information and software technology to participate in and manage their Hardware: personal computer. Teachers should consider this when delivering this unit of work.2 uses a range of hardware LS. graphics.7 Information and Software Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: School events in digital Unit title: School events in digital Description: This unit introduces students to a variety of digital media.1 uses information and software technology in solving a range of problems LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1 demonstrates communication skills in the development of information and software technology solutions LS. Safe and responsible use of materials.5. digital camera.3 uses a range of software programs LS.1 explores the impact of past. environment data projector. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests.1.2.2 uses collaborative skills in the development of information and software technology solutions LS. adaptive technology LS. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Software: word-processing. Students learn to operate a variety of computer hardware and software in the creation of a multimedia presentation to record a significant school event. internet access LS. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. tools and techniques by students is essential in the Information and Software Technology course. Programming and Assessment 9.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology solutions.2.

168 . Programming and Assessment Links A student: Design and Technology LS.6.1 selects and uses appropriate processes and techniques in the context of producing design projects LS. A student: Graphics Technology LS.1 gathers and uses information from a variety of sources LS.4 explores ways in which meaning is conveyed by written language Mathematics SGLS.2. Digital Media Project’ in Information and Software Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 41–48).1 recognises appropriate techniques for a variety of projects LS.3 uses technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences LS.4.6 uses visual texts in a range of contexts LS.6.2 undertakes graphical presentations to communicate ideas LS.2 uses a variety of communication techniques.4.1.4 responds to the language of position SGLS.6.2 uses a variety of techniques to present design solutions LS.MLC.14 communicates with a range of audiences Food Technology LS.MLC.5.1 uses skills and processes in a variety of contexts and projects LS.5.1 uses a variety of communication techniques in the context of undertaking projects LS.10 composes increasingly complex written texts LS.4.4.1 recognises the use of graphics technology in a variety of contexts Industrial Technology LS.6.1 uses computer-based presentation techniques LS.1 evaluates the success of projects Languages LS.5 uses the language of position in a variety of situations.12 communicates for a variety of purposes LS.3 explores ways in which meaning is conveyed by spoken language LS.5 recognises visual texts in a range of contexts LS.2 participates in producing design projects English LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Option 4. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.

• demonstration of use of personal technology devices in the context of managing their environment. Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring current and emerging technologies Outcomes: LS. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of personal technology devices • the ways in which information and software technology can be used to enhance daily life recognise that technology can be used to make choices and express preferences • use personal technology devices for a variety of purposes • use own personal technology devices to communicate for a range of purposes. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to recognise and use their own personal technology devices to communicate and manage their environment • assists students to recognise the impact of new and emerging technologies • assists students to select information and software technology options to communicate about school events • assists students in recording their involvement at each step of the design process in a folio.5.1. These may include: – switch activated equipment – voice output communication aids – computer – mobile phone – pocket organiser • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • the ways in which information and software technology can be used to enhance daily life • recognise personal technology devices Recognition of personal technology devices may indicate using information and software technology to participate in and manage their environment.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS.5. LS. This may include: – requesting and rejecting – protesting – expressing emotions – expressing needs – giving information – participating in conversations Using personal technology devices to communicate for a range of purposes may indicate using information and software technology to participate in and manage their environment.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1.1.4.1. continued 169 . Students • recognise their own personal technology devices. Oral.

LS. Feedback • the impact of changing technology in school and community contexts • explore the changes that technology has made to daily life Oral. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring current and emerging technologies (cont) Outcomes: LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. in both the home and school. instruction and assessment Students • identify ways in which technology impacts on daily life. Walkman.1. Items in the folio may include: – photographs and/or other images of their participation at various steps – descriptions of their activities at each step – personal observations – data and information relevant to the project – personalised step-by-step plan to produce the project – evaluation of the project.5.1. digital cameras – including examples of identified items in their folio • establish and maintain a record of their involvement throughout the design project in a folio.1.5. 170 . visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of the ways in which technology impacts on daily life communicating effectively across a range of contexts in relation to developing solutions • using technology to present solutions • • experience group discussions to find solutions • use a word processor/digital camera/video/ multimedia software to present information to a group Establishing and maintaining a folio may indicate demonstrating communication skills in the development of information and software technology solutions and/or using a variety of techniques to present information and software technology solutions.1. • recording of their participation in the design process in an appropriate format.4. game boys.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Identifying the ways in which technology impacts on daily life may indicate exploring the impact of past. current and emerging information technologies. LS. eg mobile phones. videos. This may include: – identifying technology items that have improved communication between people. email – identifying technology items that have impacted on personal and group recreation and leisure activities such as television.

visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ consideration of a wide range of technology solutions and guide identification of appropriate technologies for the particular purpose of recording a significant school event. 171 . eg digital photographs to show students enjoying lunch time. multimedia presentation of school camp – suggesting items of computer hardware and software to undertake the project.2. audio recording of a school assembly. video of dance performance.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to select a significant school event to record using information and software technology • assists student to select appropriate information and software technology to record the school event. Students • explore appropriate information and software technology options for communicating about school events. Programming and Assessment Focus: Selecting a design project Outcome: LS. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • matching appropriate technology strategies to a specific problem • select an appropriate strategy for a given problem Exploration of appropriate information and software technology options to communicate about school events may indicate using information and software technology in solving a range of problems.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. This may involve: – indicating events which are of particular interest – making suggestions about the best ways to communicate about school events. Oral.

visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • following a plan to record the significant school event • demonstration of the use a range of hardware and software to develop a multimedia presentation that could include a digital camera. Using a range of hardware and software to develop a multimedia presentation of the school event may involve using a range of hardware and/or using a range of software. Programming and Assessment Focus: Following the plan to produce the project Outcomes: LS.3. LS. publicity. multimedia software and word-processing. continued 172 .2.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. computer peripherals such as scanner • assists students to develop a step-by-step plan to produce the multimedia presentation of the significant school event.5. eg digital and video camera. Students • follow a step-by-step plan to record the identified significant school event Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback how a variety of hardware and software can be used for a range of purposes in a variety of school and community contexts • the range and type of hardware which can be accesses in school and community contexts • operate a range of hardware/software • use a range of hardware/software for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts • recognise a range of hardware • use a range of hardware/ software for a variety of purposes in a range of context • • use a range of hardware and software to develop a multimedia presentation of a specific school event in response to teacher demonstration and instruction. instruction and assessment Teacher • demonstrates and explicitly teaches students to operate a range of hardware and software. authors. acknowledgments Following the step-by-step plan to record the significant school event may indicate using a range of hardware and/or using a range of software programs. LS.2.2. Oral.1. LS. audio recorder. This may include: – taking photographs – recording video footage – scanning photographs/images into computer – downloading digital images to computer – adding graphics/text to images – recording music – recording voice/environmental sounds – recording a commentary using a voice output/communication device – word-processing title.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1.

pace make a permanent record of the presentation to share with others Presentation of the slideshow may involve using a variety of techniques to present information and software technology solutions.1.1. demonstration of appropriate skills in the presentation of the slideshow • how a variety of hardware and software can be used for a range of purposes in a variety of contexts • use a range of hardware/software for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts • Audience reaction provides feedback.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. This may include: – selecting preferred images – sequencing – editing – adding text • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Compiling the final multimedia presentation may involve using a range of hardware and/or use of a range of software Feedback how a variety of hardware and software can be used for a range of purposes in a variety of school and community contexts • using technology to present solutions • • use a range of hardware/software for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts Oral. Students may: – activate the application – monitor the presentation and cue slides – make adjustments to the presentation. instruction and assessment Students • compile the final multimedia presentation.2. LS. continued 173 .Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. eg volume. Making a permanent record of the presentation to share with others may indicate using a range of hardware and/or using a range of software. Oral.3. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Following the plan to produce the project (cont) Outcomes: LS.2.5. LS.2. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of appropriate technologies for making a permanent record of a significant school event. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • compilation of the final presentation • • use multimedia software to present information to a group present the slideshow to an audience using a data projector.

time. LS.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Programming and Assessment Focus: Following the plan to produce the project (cont) Outcomes: LS. This may include: – responding to feedback from others on the presentation – responding to questions such as ‘Were the processes you used for editing the presentation effective?’. cost. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Evaluating their project may indicate evaluating information and software technology solutions.2. ‘How could the presentation be improved?’ – recording in the folio the reaction of others to their presentation – making suggestions in their folio about how the presentation could be improved. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ evaluation of their project in terms of its effectiveness. LS. 174 .2. LS. Feedback • evaluating a project in terms of available resources. ‘What did other people like about the presentation?’.2.3. instruction and assessment Students • evaluate their project in terms of its effectiveness. effectiveness • • evaluate strategies makes suggestions for improvement Oral.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1.5.1.

Students may design a decorated fabric item.1 gathers and uses information for design purposes the project LS.6. fabric paints. Links A student: A student: English Information and Software Technology LS. Teachers should consider this when delivering this unit of work. materials and techniques in MLS.1 evaluates the success of projects. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Stimulus materials such as fabrics. completed projects LS.1 evaluates the design of clothing and household items in terms of function and Digital camera. LS.6 uses the language of measurement in everyday contexts undertaking a project SGLS.1 applies appropriate evaluation techniques to a textiles project. personalise a design or embellish an existing fabric item with appropriate decorations.2.5.5 uses the language of position in a variety of situations LS.4 responds to the language of position Industrial Technology SGLS. 175 .4. eg dyes.5. glue.5.1 selects and uses appropriate materials to undertake projects LS.1 selects fabrics.4. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘The World is a Stage’ in Textiles Technology Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 35–47).5.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1.3.14 communicates with a range of audiences solutions Graphics Technology Mathematics LS.1 demonstrates skills and techniques in the context of a textiles project LS.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology LS. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.1 demonstrates safe practices in the use of tools.8 Textiles Technology Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Creating with fabrics Unit title: Creating with fabrics Description: This unit involves students creating with fabrics to produce decorated fabric items.5. tools and techniques by students is essential in the Textiles Technology course.2 demonstrates safe practices in the use of equipment and the implementation of techniques LS.12 communicates for a variety of purposes LS. Programming and Assessment 9. lace. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. tools and equipment Visual Arts LS. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.2 demonstrates safe practices in the use of materials. Safe and responsible use of materials.2 explores a variety of materials. embellishments.2 uses a variety of techniques to present design ideas and solutions LS. stencils LS. yarns and fibres appropriate to intended use Equipment and materials for decoration.6.3 undertakes textiles projects LS. techniques and processes. computer and appropriate software aesthetics Wall chart or handout illustrating a flow chart or step-by-step instructions for producing LS.1.

theatrical costumes • arranges a visit to fabric outlets to explore the texture.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.4. patterns.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. This may involve: – visiting specialist fabric and/or retail outlets – collecting. techniques and embellishments in the context of a fabric design project • using a variety of communication techniques • use techniques to communicate ideas The recording and reflection on activities throughout the design process may indicate using a variety of techniques to present design ideas and solutions. • recording of their participation in the design process in an appropriate format. cushion covers. LS. 176 . yarns and fabrics • obtaining and using information from a variety of sources for design purposes • select fabrics for particular purpose and use • gather information from a variety of sources • use information for design purposes • Exploration of a range of fabrics.1. 2.1. Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring fabric design projects Outcomes: LS. Oral. yarns and fibres appropriate to intended use and/or gathering and documenting information for design purposes. finished fabric items. eg fabric painting using hand prints. glued trimmings. LS. tie dye.4. batik. patterns. iron on transfers. transfer crayons.1. matching and sorting samples of fabrics and embellishments – comparing the texture. colour and weight of fabrics and the variety of decorating techniques and embellishments • assists students in recording their involvement at each step of the design process in a folio.1. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback fibres. eg T-shirts. instruction and assessment Teacher • presents a variety of completed fabric design items. quilt covers. Items in the folio may include: – photographs and/or other images of their participation at various steps – descriptions of their activities at each step – personal observations – data and information relevant to the project – personalised step-by-step plan to produce the project – evaluation of the project. LS. permanent markers. decorative techniques and embellishments may indicate selecting fabrics. colour and weight of fabrics – exploring examples of decorative techniques and embellishments. fabric products. decorative techniques and embellishments. Students • explore a range of fabrics. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of a range of fabrics. finished fabric items. accessories that can be stitched in place • establish and maintain a record of their involvement throughout the development of the fabric design item in a folio.

visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • selection of an appropriate fabric design item • • skills and techniques that are necessary to undertake a specific textiles project • demonstrate skills and techniques in the context of a textiles project selection and demonstration of appropriate techniques to make their fabric item • skills and techniques that are necessary to undertake a specific textiles project • demonstrate skills and techniques in the context of a textiles project • select designs and techniques for decoration and embellishment.5. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to select a fabric design item. This may include indicating a preference for: – decorating an existing item. fabric paint. Programming and Assessment Focus: Selecting a fabric design project Outcomes: LS. Students • determine their preferred fabric design item.2. or – making and decorating an item. tie dying/batik printing. Oral. LS.1.5. • selection and demonstration of appropriate designs and techniques for decorating their fabric item. Selecting appropriate designs and techniques for decoration may indicate demonstrating skills and techniques in the context of a textiles project. Selecting appropriate techniques for making fabric items may indicate demonstrating skills and techniques in the context of a textiles project. eg cushion cover for their bedroom. hand or machine stitching Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback undertaking a textiles design project • using a variety of communication techniques • undertake a specific textile project • use techniques to communicate ideas • Determining a preferred fabric design item may indicate undertaking textiles projects and/or using a variety of techniques to present design ideas and solutions. appliqué and embroidery. 177 .4.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. eg a T-shirt or quilt cover. eg glueing. eg a bandanna for a school dance party • select techniques for producing the item.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. or – making and/or decorating an item. eg iron-ons. LS. beads. sequins. iron-on tape.

tools and equipment. Programming and Assessment Focus: Safe use of tools and equipment Outcome: LS. Students • use materials.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.5. equipment and appropriate techniques safely under supervision in the context of making and/or decorating fabric items. instruction and assessment Teacher • explicitly teaches and models techniques and safe use of equipment in the context of making and/or decorating fabric items. This may include: – passing and using scissors – handling pins and needles – following instructions to thread a needle for hand sewing – following instructions for fabric glue – using gloves and protective clothing for tiedying/batik – using electrical items such as iron/sewing machine – selecting appropriate setting on iron for pressing fabrics or fabric items and/or applying transfers/stencils – carrying a sewing machine – following instructions to thread a sewing machine – sewing fabrics Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • handling and using a variety of equipment safely using safe techniques in the context of a textiles design project • identify characteristics of textile equipment that could make them dangerous • carry and transfer equipment safely • Use of appropriate techniques and skills in the context of making and/or decorating fabric items may indicate demonstrating safe practices in the use of equipment and the implementation of techniques. Oral. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ demonstration of safe use of materials.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. 178 .

179 . using scissors to cut material • reviews the personalised step-by-step plan for the production of the fabric item. attaching fasteners.5. recognising the activities at each step to make and/or decorate the fabric item. Students • demonstrate the skills and techniques required for the completion of the fabric item.5.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Engagement in making and/or decorating of a fabric item may indicate undertaking textiles projects. threading a needle. This may include: – using fabric glue – threading a sewing machine – attaching fasteners – threading a needle – using scissors to cut material • engage in the production process for completing the fabric item according to the personalised step-by-step plan. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • skills and techniques that are necessary to undertake a specific textiles project • demonstrate skills and techniques in the context of a textiles project how skills and processes may be combined to complete a project • undertaking a textiles design project • demonstrate a combination of skills and processes in the context of a textiles project • undertake a specific textiles project • Demonstrating the skills and techniques to complete the fabric item may involve demonstrating skills and techniques in the context of a textiles project.1. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of the skills and techniques to complete the fabric item • following of the step-by step plan to produce the fabric item. eg using fabric glue. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides materials and equipment for making and/or decorating the fabric item • explicitly teaches skills and techniques in the context of making and/or decorating fabric items. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Focus: Producing a fabrics design project Outcomes: LS. threading a sewing machine. Oral. This may involve: – including the step-by-step plan in their folio – following through each step of the plan. modelling each step as required.

visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • evaluation of their textile project in terms of intended use • using a variety of communication techniques • use techniques to communicate ideas Sharing the information in their folio to others may involve using a variety of techniques to present design ideas and solutions. This may involve: – displaying the folio and fabric item in a prominent place in the school – describing aspects of their folio to others – participating in discussion and answering questions about the folio and activities represented in it.6. functionality. LS. This may involve: – responding to questioning such as ‘What are the features of your fabric item that make it look good?’ – trialling the fabric item and completing a teacher designed questionnaire regarding performance to be included in the folio – including photographs in their folio of the fabric item being produced and used – recording in their folio the reactions of others to the fabric item – making suggestions in their folio about how the design and/or construction could be improved or replicated • share the information in their folio with others. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to evaluate their fabric design item and folio • provides an opportunity for students to share their folio with others. Oral. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • evaluating a project in response to aesthetic appeal.2. • sharing of their information and fabric item with others in an appropriate format. 4. 180 .Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. eg – Do you like it? – Would you change anything? – Is it strong enough? – Will it last? Evaluation of the textiles project may indicate applying appropriate evaluation techniques to a textiles project. Programming and Assessment Focus: Evaluating the fabrics design project Outcomes: LS. Students • evaluate their textiles project. durability and costeffectiveness • respond to questions.

5 Visual Design My Magazine 10.au). They develop their individual skills and participate as part of a group to develop and perform a narrative and explore dramatic forms and theatre conventions.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. stencils. They explore the work of artists and participate in the development of their own artworks over time.4 Drama Roles. In this unit students explore characters.nsw. characters. Students experiment with light sources to produce and manipulate shadows. in pairs and as part of a group. Students investigate 2D and 3D forms such as painting and collage techniques and stencil-making. roles. In this unit students explore the design of magazines. Students use safe dance practices to engage in activities individually. A variety of wet and digital photographic activities are suggested as ways of extending this structural exploration of light. and the work of graphic designers and artists.1 Syllabus Music Unit title Australian music Unit description In this unit students explore a wide variety of traditional and contemporary Australian music through experiences in listening and performing that may involve individual. Students participate in scenarios where role-taking is used to expand and enhance students’ participation in real-life experiences. In this unit students are introduced to light and shadow as phenomena in the world around them.boardofstudies. prints.3 Dance Let’s dance! 10.6 Photographic and Digital Media Shapes and Shadows 181 . They participate in identifying different audiences for different magazines and they use basic typography and simple digital imaging processes and/or collage techniques to make a magazine cover for a specific audience.edu. students develop self-portraits that may include photographs.2 Visual Arts ‘I am’ 10. Students also experiment with musical sounds. 10. In this unit students appreciate and respond to dance performances. The sample units should be read in conjunction with the relevant Years 7–10 syllabus and support documents already distributed to schools and available on the Board of Studies website (www. casts and/or masks. shadow and shape. action! 10. In this unit students learn about portraits and self-portraits. Unit number 10. magazine covers and posters. and explore ways in which environmental sounds may be incorporated into musical works. Programming and Assessment 10 Creative Arts Sample units of work have been prepared to assist teachers in programming Life Skills outcomes and content from the Creative Arts key learning area. colours and textures to represent themselves. Using the concept of ‘I am’. experiment with body movements and create and perform movement/dance sequences. their personality and interests to an audience. situations and actions through a range of activities. group and whole class activities. explore the relative opacity/translucency of objects and record the shapes caused by shadows.

2 explores.1 demonstrates a range of movement skills LS. and explore ways in which environmental sounds may be incorporated into musical works. Students also experiment with musical sounds.9 appreciates a variety of music LS. cultural and historical contexts LS.1 recognises language that is descriptive of number NLS.1 Music Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Australian music Unit title: Australian music Description: In this unit students explore a wide variety of traditional and contemporary Australian music through experiences in listening and performing that may involve individual.5 experiments in organising musical sounds LS.4 experiments in making musical sounds LS. eg Yothu Yindi.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. sings or plays an instrument as part of a group Dreamtime stories LS.MBC. LS.1 responds to auditory cues in a range of contexts LS. sings or plays an instrument eg Waltzing Matilda.1 experiences cultural diversity LS.2 explores own and other cultures Mathematics NLS.MBC.8 communicates responses to a variety of music LS. Botany Bay.2. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 4 unit ‘Australian Music’ in Music Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 24–30). The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests.7 experiences music from a variety of social. Programming and Assessment 10. composing and listening experiences for enjoyment.1 uses movement. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Examples of the following types of music – Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander.7 explores the diversity of Australian communities. group and whole class activities.3 recognises and responds to ordinal terms PALS. Christine Anu.10 engages in performing. A student: History LS.1.6 experiments in representing and recording musical sounds LS. selects and sequences movement to express feelings and ideas English LS. 182 . Click Go the Shears. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.2 vocalises.3 vocalises.1 recognises repeating patterns. Links A student: Dance LS. Australian folk music. LS.9 recognises the contribution of Aboriginal peoples and other cultures to Australian society Languages LS.10 composes increasingly complex written texts Geography LS. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes. vocalisation or instruments to respond to a range of music Contemporary Aboriginal music. LS.

3 performing as part of a group in informal and formal situations LS.1 LS.4 LS.6 use equipment to record musical sounds organise musical experiments into a composition experimenting in representing and recording musical sounds through graphic forms • experimenting with recording technologies • structuring simple musical ideas continued • 183 .2 LS.5 • • making a variety of musical sounds organising musical sounds LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes Life Skills content Students learn to: Performing • move all or part of body in response to music vocalise hum and/or whistle along with the music use non-melodic percussion instruments to keep the beat of the music vocalise and/or sing to a variety of known music sing new songs vocalise on cue in the context of a group song play and cease playing an instrument on cue play an individual part within a musical piece Composing • experiment with voice to produce musical sounds • produce a sound on cue • reproduce a sound at determined intervals on cue • reproduce a sound at determined intervals when playing in a group • compose a simple repeated rhythm (ostinato) for performance individually and/or in a group • use graphic notation for representing musical sounds • • • • • • • • • Students learn about musical concepts through: responding to a range of music through the use of the body and body percussion • vocalising to a range of music • responding to a range of music through the use of percussion • performing individually in informal and formal situations • • LS.

7 experiencing a variety of music understanding that different instruments and instrument groups produce different sounds understand ways in which sound can be changed in different instruments understanding the concept of high and low and that smaller instruments produce smaller sounds understanding that changes in dynamics can be sudden or gradual and these changes can be sudden or gradual and these changes can be used for different effects understanding that music works within various structures and sections understanding how people value and appreciate music in a variety of settings recognise the manipulation of sound recognise high and low sound recognise louds and softs LS. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes Life Skills content (cont) Students learn to: Listening • experience music of various styles • experience music of different cultures • recognise sound sources • • • Students learn about musical concepts through: • • • • • LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.8 recognise sections/patterns respond appropriately to music in a range of social contexts demonstrate appropriate audience behaviour when listening to music in different performance situations • use nonverbal communication to indicate like or dislike for particular music • use verbal communication to indicate like or dislike for particular music • give reasons for their response to particular music • • • • • • • • non-verbally communicating responses to a variety of music verbally communicating responses to a variety of music discussing their responses to a variety of music 184 .

1 LS.10 Integrated learning experiences. customs and traditions Students listen to examples of traditional music and respond using: – body movements such as nodding head. eg – didgeridoo – provides a long sustained note (drone) – clap sticks – provide rhythm – vocals – provide melodic line Students simulate the sounds of the above instruments using available classroom instruments ✓ • description of the roles of particular instruments • ✓ • simulation of the sounds of individual instruments using available resources. cultural and historical contexts and/or using movement.9 LS. to communicate between groups. eg for ceremonial. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • responses to a variety of traditional music • Students listen to and describe the role of particular instruments. Simulating the sounds of traditional instruments may involve engaging in performing. tapping legs. Listening to and describing the role of instruments may involve experiencing music from a variety of social.8 LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. composing and listening experiences for enjoyment. stamping feet – vocalisation and humming – non-melodic percussion instruments such as tambourine. waving arms – body percussion such as clapping hands. drums and rain sticks ✓ • ✓ ✓ Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Listening and responding to traditional music may involve experiencing music from a variety of social. and to pass on stories. instruction and assessment P C L • Teacher plays examples of traditional music of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and explains how this music was used for a variety of purposes. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes LS. P – Performing C – Composing L – Listening 185 . composing and listening experiences for enjoyment. cultural and historical contexts and/or communicating responses to a variety of music and/or appreciating a variety of music. vocalisation or instruments to respond to a range of music and/or engaging in performing. social and sacred occasions.7 LS. triangle. Feedback Oral.

P – Performing C – Composing L – Listening 186 . composing and listening experiences for enjoyment.10 Teacher plays examples of contemporary indigenous music. sway and/or play appropriate instruments to the beat of contemporary music • ✓ ✓ ✓ Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Experimenting with vocal sounds. and perform their composition as part of a group while the Dreamtime story is being read • ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ LS. body percussion and instruments to portray a story may involve using movement.1 LS. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • experimentation with vocal sounds. composing and listening experiences for enjoyment. Feedback Oral. vocalisation or instruments to respond to a range of music and/or engaging in performing. body percussion and classroom instruments to portray a story • notation of their composition in an appropriate format.10 Integrated learning experiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Listening to and responding to contemporary Aboriginal music may involve using movement. Oral. Students may identify the elements of the work that are traditional and those that are contemporary. Notating their composition may involve experimenting in representing and recording musical sounds. instruction and assessment P C L Teacher presents a traditional Dreamtime story and assists students to experiment with vocal sounds. contemporary may involve the use of rock instruments and English language • Students listen to the music and clap.1 LS. eg Yothu Yindi. eg traditional may involve the use of didgeridoo and Aboriginal language. body percussion and available classroom instruments to portray the story • Students may notate their composition using traditional graphic notation. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm effective listening and responses to music. vocalisation or instruments to respond to a range of music and/or engaging in performing. Christine Anu • Students listen to the music and indicate the similarities and differences between traditional and contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander music. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes LS. 6 LS.

singing or playing an instrument and/or vocalising. Feedback Oral. composing and listening experiences for enjoyment. eg ‘Click go the shears’ (A D E) or ‘Botany Bay’(C F G). indicate their preferences and give reasons for these ✓ ✓ ✓ Teacher assists students to: – vocalise and/or sing a chosen traditional song – perform the lyrics of a particular song individually or as part of a group – accompany the lyrics with body percussion and non-melodic percussion • Students may rewrite the lyrics of a verse of a song. singing or playing an instrument and/or engaging in performing. composing and listening experiences for enjoyment. eg ‘Click Go the Shears’ (rulers on desk.10 • Teacher plays examples of traditional Australian folk music. instruction and assessment P C L LS. Playing chordal accompaniments. singing or playing an instrument as part of a group.10 • Teacher assists students to play chordal accompaniment or bass line to selected songs. P – Performing 187 .8 LS. ‘swagman’. ‘Click go the Shears’. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to encourage and affirm students’ active participation. using instruments/vocals to add meaning C – Composing L – Listening ✓ ✓ ✓ Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Listening to traditional Australian folk/country music and indicating preferences may involve vocalising. Programming and Assessment Outcomes Integrated learning experiences. ‘ringer’ – experiment with sound sources to find suitable rhythmic accompaniment to songs. chorus – dramatise a song. Rewriting the lyrics of a song may involve vocalising. ‘Botany Bay’ • Students listen to the examples. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • indication of preferences to traditional Australian folk music • experimentation and responses • writing of new lyrics. eg ‘Botany Bay’ through: – sequencing images – substituting individual words – retelling the narrative in their own words and/or – rewriting the whole verse using contemporary language and themes • LS.3 LS. It may also indicate engaging in performing.2 LS. eg ‘jumbuck’. singing or playing an instrument and/or engaging in performing. ‘billabong’. Oral. eg verse. singing songs with accompaniment and related activities may involve vocalising. eg ‘Waltzing Matilda’. tapping pencils for the ‘click’) – add percussion part to the melody and accompaniment – discuss the structure of the songs. Students may: – sing song with accompaniment – discuss the words of the songs – find meanings for slang terms/Australian words.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. composing and listening experiences for enjoyment and/or communicating responses to a variety of music.2 LS.

melody and instruments used in contemporary Australian music.7 LS. A variety of melodic and non-melodic instruments as well as body percussion and vocalisation can be used. eg James Morrison. cultural and historical contexts and/or appreciating a variety of music. washboard – clap/sway/move to the beat of the music – use percussion instruments or preset functions on keyboards to create and perform a suitable rhythmic accompaniment to the music individually or as part of a group – create and perform a simple bass line to the song following the chordal structure • Teacher plays examples of music by Australian Jazz artists. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • active participation and response to examples of Australian Jazz ✓ • experimentation with structuring musical sounds.6 LS. Experimenting with structuring musical sounds may involve experimenting in organising musical sounds.5 • Students experiment with organising musical sounds. Monica and the Moochers.9 LS. Programming and Assessment Outcomes Integrated learning experiences. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • indication of preferences and responses to words.10 LS. and responding to examples of music by Australian jazz artists may involve using movement.10 Teacher plays a variety of contemporary music from Australian country music artists. and assists students to focus on the words. ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Students listen to and: – indicate a preference for a particular piece of music – clap/sway/play appropriate instrument to the beat of the music – compose a short rhythmic pattern to be repeated to the music – notate the rhythm using traditional and/or graphic notation – vocalise/sing/play along with recorded examples as part of a group – play/sing versions of the examples without the recording in a simplified form if appropriate LS. instruction and assessment P C L LS. Feedback Oral. composing and listening experiences for enjoyment. Vince Jones. Oral. eg Slim Dusty. eg lagerphone. the melody and the instruments being used in the songs • Students may: – listen to selected songs and indicate/give reasons for their preferences – indicate the instruments being used and identify those that are typically Australian. indicating preferences for. singing or playing an instrument as part of a group. Kasey Chambers.1 LS. 188 . Don Burrows and focuses students attention on melodies and instruments • • ✓ ✓ ✓ Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Listening to and giving preferences for Australian folk/country/bush music may involve experiencing music from a variety of social. It may also indicate engaging in performing.3 LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. vocalisation or instruments to respond to a range of music and/or vocalising. Experimentation may involve: – producing a sound when prompted – producing a sound at intervals when prompted – repeating a sequence of sounds – repeating a rhythm consisting of sounds of different duration and pitch P – Performing C – Composing L – Listening Listening to. John Williamson.

eg bird calls. sound of water. Participation in creating a soundscape may involve experimenting in making musical sounds and/or organising. instruction and assessment P C L LS. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ active listening and identification of sounds. waterfalls • Students listen to the music and indicate recognition of particular features such as source of the sounds. city noises • ✓ Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Listening to music featuring the sounds of Australia may involve vocalising. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to affirm or encourage students’ active listening and responses to sounds of Australia.10 • ✓ ✓ Oral. eg sounds of living things. Student participation may include: – recording and playing sounds – reproducing one sound vocally or instrumentally – producing sequences of sounds either as individuals or in groups ✓ Oral. musical sounds. singing or playing an instrument and/or engaging in performing.5 LS. Programming and Assessment Outcomes Integrated learning experiences. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ experimentation with methods of reproducing sounds and demonstration of the use of these sounds in a soundscape performance. composing and listening experiences for enjoyment.10 • Students observe sounds in the environment outside the classroom.6 LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Responses to sounds may include: – using facial expression and/or gesture – exploring the source of sounds through senses such as touch and sight – imitating sounds – describing sounds in terms of the musical concepts such as tone.4 LS. Identification of sounds heard outside the classroom may involve engaging in performing. Feedback Oral. LS. LS. P – Performing C – Composing L – Listening 189 . composing and listening experiences for enjoyment.2 LS.10 Teacher plays a variety of music featuring the sounds of Australia. pitch and volume Students create a soundscape of individual sounds identified in the environment in response to teacher cues/prompts. sound of the weather.6 LS.

techniques and processes Picasso’s Weeping Woman. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.5 uses the language of position in a variety of situations. their personality and interests to an audience. They explore the work of artists and participate in the development of their own artworks over time.3 explores the function of a variety of artists and audiences • Australian artists and Archibald Prize entries from past and current exhibitions LS. 190 .5 responds to the language of measurement in everyday contexts SGLS. casts and/or masks. Programming and Assessment 10. responses or points of • Masks from different cultures. eg Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa.4 responds to the language of position SGLS. This may include examples from the following view cultures or types: LS. Egyptian. Using the concept of ‘I am’.7 explores how ideas and interests in the world can be represented in their – Egyptian artmaking – Mexican LS. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.2 explores a variety of materials. African artworks • portraits from other cultures. – African – Warrior masks – Masks for protection and camouflage – Masks for use in cultural celebrations • Materials for creating collages.MBC.1 explores the concepts of time and chronology LS. Pablo LS.1 experiences a variety of artmaking activities • Historical examples from Western Art.5 recognises visual texts in a range of contexts LS.2 Visual Arts Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: ‘I am’ Unit title: ‘I am’ Description: In this unit students learn about portraits and self-portraits. A student: Languages LS. Students investigate 2D and 3D forms such as painting and collage techniques and stencil-making. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests.4 investigates how people lived in various societies over time.1 recognises language that is descriptive of number MLS. stencils.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences. eg Frida Khalo’s self portraits LS.9 uses a range of materials.MBC. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 4 unit ‘Portrait in Words’ in Visual Arts Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 25–31).2 explores own and other cultures Mathematics NLS.8 explores ways to develop ideas in artworks – North American LS.4 explores the ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in • Portraits and sculptural figures from ancient cultures.6 uses visual texts in a range of contexts History LS. stencils and portraits • Materials for creating surface effects Links A student: English LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Vincent Van Gogh’s Self-portraits LS. techniques and processes to make artworks. students develop self-portraits that may include photographs. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: LS.5 recognises that various interpretations of artworks are possible • Gordon Bennett’s I am LS. prints.1 experiences cultural diversity LS. colours and textures to represent themselves.

shading. rubbing.1 LS. pencil. impasto. paint on paper and other surfaces experiment with a range of materials and techniques.8 the process of developing and making artworks the different technical processes for making 2D artworks ideas and interests in the world that can be represented in a range of artworks • the development of artworks over time • exploring ideas and interests in the world and a range of forms to make a variety of artworks Conceptual Framework • the work of a variety of artists • the role of artists • the role of audiences in relation to artworks • how experiences of the world can be represented in artworks Frames • responding to and interpreting artworks • communicating experiences. collage. airbrushing. spraying/dripping. eg painting. eg 2D forms: wet and dry media. glazing.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. stencil making explore the qualities of 2D materials. responses or a point of view adapt.9 the qualities of a variety of materials in 2D forms a range of materials used in making artworks LS. palette knives follow a procedure to make an artwork use technical processes for making artworks represent ideas and interests in the world in a range of artworks and forms participate in the development of artworks over time represent ideas and interests in the world • • • • • • • • explore the work of a variety of artists recognise that artists create artworks for different purposes participate appropriately as an audience identify artworks which communicate experiences of the world respond to an artwork identify particular visual qualities of artworks make artworks that reflect experiences. crayon. finger painting. ink.4 LS. responses and points of view • communicating using images from a variety of sources • • • • • • • • participate in a variety of artmaking activities including 2D forms.6 LS. rollers.2 LS.5 LS. use of sponges. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes Life Skills content Students learn about: Practice • a variety of artmaking activities • • Students learn to: • • • LS. revise and reinterpret an image from an existing artwork to produce a new artwork 191 . charcoal. splattering.3 LS. eg wet and dry media.7 LS.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Teaching, learning and assessment activities Artmaking Critical and Historical Studies Students Students 1. LS. 7 2. LS. 7 • bring to school pictures of themselves, with their family and pets • respond to teacher questions about why photographs are taken of themselves and • examine photographs of themselves. This may include examining photographs of family members, eg photographs for display and identification; acknowledge that we themselves: value representations of ourselves and others – as younger children • explore photographs and the concept of portraits/self portraits. This may involve: – with immediate and/or extended family – distinguishing between photographs of people and photographs of objects – with pets – determining what a portrait is and why portraits are created, eg as a historical – with favourite things record, as a personal tribute to another person or self – at favourite places – identifying differences between a variety styles of portraits provided by the • respond to teacher questions about aspects of the images such as: teacher – their age and size when specific photographs were taken – the colours in the photographs – the feelings evident in the photographs – the clothes they are wearing – who/what are other people, objects and/or pets in the image and their significance • recall information about the occasion such as: – when and/or where the photograph was taken – whether the photograph was taken inside or outside – why was the photograph taken – what was happening – the time of day and the time of year the photograph was taken – who took the photograph – what they like most about the photograph Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 1 and 2 Examining photographs of themselves and responding to questions may involve exploring how ideas and interests in the world can be represented in their artmaking. Feedback 1 and 2 Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of aspects of photographs, portraits and self-portraits. Numbers in the teaching, learning and assessment activities indicate the suggested sequence of activities in artmaking and critical and historical studies.

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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Teaching, learning and assessment activities Artmaking Students 4. LS.8 • create an ‘I am’ focus in a personalised Visual Arts diary. The diary can be used to record students’ artmaking and other experiences throughout the unit. The diary may initially include: – photocopied and/or scanned preferred images of themselves – identified features of themselves such as their name, interests, family, friends, likes and physical characteristics represented in a range of formats – items of personal interest such as magazine cuttings, freehand sketches, personal reflections • decide on an appropriate arrangement of images in the Visual Arts diary. The images may be arranged chronologically or reflect a home, school, community sequence. Alternately, a collage of images may be developed with a central photocopied or scanned image of the student, surrounded by other images that show aspects of the student’s life.

Critical and Historical Studies Students 3. LS.3, LS.4 • view a range of historical and contemporary images of portraits from a range of sources. This may include: – historical examples from Western Art, eg Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, Pablo Picasso’s Weeping Woman; Vincent Van Gogh’s Self-portraits – Australian artists and Archibald Prize entries from past and current exhibitions – portraits and sculptural figures from ancient cultures; Egyptian, African – portraits from other cultures, eg Frida Kahlo’s self-portraits • look at differences between portraits • recognise that the artworks all feature people • identify and/or describe the subjects of the artworks • select one portrait to explore in detail and examine the following features: – what colours are used – what materials did the artist use – how does it make you feel – distinguish between portraits and self-portraits

Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 3 • Viewing a range of historical and contemporary images of portraits may involve exploring the function of a variety of artists and audiences. • Selecting and exploring one portrait in detail may involve exploring the function of a variety of artists and audience and/or exploring the ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated through artworks. 4 • Creating an ‘I am’ focus and deciding on a preferred arrangement of images in a personalised Visual Arts diary may involve exploring ways to develop ideas in artwork. Feedback 3 • Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to focus students’ attention on aspects of photographs, portraits and self-portraits 4 • Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ entries in an ‘I am’ focus in a personalised Visual Arts diary to reflect what is important to the students. Numbers in the teaching, learning and assessment activities indicate the suggested sequence of activities in artmaking and critical and historical studies.

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Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Teaching, learning and assessment activities Artmaking Critical and Historical Studies Students 5. LS.1, LS.2, LS.9 • make personal prints (stamp or trace) using hands, fingers and/or feet with accompanying descriptions. This may include: – arranging images or as part of a class display with other images that show other aspects of student’s life surrounding it – recording images or representations of images in their personal Visual Arts diary • create an upper torso outline tracing of themselves, using expressive and visually interesting poses undertaking a variety of activities. This may include: – using an overhead projector to trace outline – taking paper outside in sun and tracing around the shadow cast on the paper – taping plastic onto a window, the student sits on one side and another person traces around profile onto plastic • create surface effects on upper torso outlines using a range of selected materials, colours and techniques that reflect their personal preferences and feeling about themselves. This may include experimenting with different ways of making marks and creating surface effects, eg finger painting, spraying/dripping, splattering, airbrushing, rubbing, shading, dotting, use of flat colour, scumbling, glazing, washes, stipling, sgraffito, broken colour, impasto, and use of sponges, palette knives and rollers, use of textured materials such as string, feathers and leaves, glitter, ribbon, dental floss, bubble paint/pens Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 5 • Making personal prints, creating outlines and experimenting with surface effects may involve experiencing a variety of artmaking activities and/or exploring a variety of materials, techniques and processes and/or using a range of materials, techniques and processes to make artworks. Feedback 5 Demonstration of different ways of making marks and creating surface effects by the teacher. Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ personal prints and upper torso outlines and experimentation with making surface effects. Numbers in the teaching, learning and assessment activities indicate the suggested sequence of activities in artmaking and critical and historical studies.

194

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Teaching, learning and assessment activities Artmaking Students 7. LS.1, LS.2, LS.9 • make an ‘identikit’ sculpture of one part of their body using plaster bandages, then decorate with favourite colours or patterns. This may include: – face - phantom mask – hands – feet • make a mask that could be used in the context of a school/community cultural celebration. This may include: – plaster bandage mask – papier mache mask on balloon surface

Critical and Historical Studies Students 6. LS.3, LS.4, LS.5, LS.8 • view images of masks from different cultures. This may include examples from the following cultures or types: – Egyptian – Mexican – North American – African – warrior masks – masks for protection and camouflage – masks for use in cultural celebrations • respond to questions about the selected examples relating to the purpose/function of masks; cultural traditions. This may include: – sorting and matching masks to cultures – responding to features of masks such as eyes, mouths – identifying materials used in the masks – identifying purposes of masks

Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 6 • viewing images of masks from different cultures may involve exploring the function of a variety of artists and audiences and/or exploring the ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in artworks and/or recognising that different interpretations of artworks are possible and/or exploring ways to develop ideas in artworks. 7 • making an ‘identikit’ sculpture of one part of their body may involve experiencing a variety of artmaking activities and/or making a variety of artworks that reflect experiences, responses or a point of view and/or using a range of materials, techniques and processes to make artworks. • making a mask that could be used in the context of a school/community cultural celebration may involve experiencing a variety of artmaking activities and/or making a variety of artworks that reflect experiences, responses or a point of view and/or using a range of materials, techniques and processes to make artworks. Feedback 6 and 7 Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of features of masks from different cultures and creation of an identikit sculpture/mask. Numbers in the teaching, learning and assessment activities indicate the suggested sequence of activities in artmaking and critical and historical studies.

195

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning, Programming and Assessment

Teaching, learning and assessment activities Artmaking Critical and Historical Studies Students Students 9. LS. 6, LS.7, LS.8, LS.9 8. LS. 3, LS.4, LS.8 • recognise their name in print • identify features of Gordon Bennett’s I am. Students may: • prepare templates based on their names. This may involve: – indicate letters or words in the painting – writing and/or typing their name – trace around these words and/or write them on another sheet – cutting out names and letters to create stencils – describe what the little boy in the painting is wearing • identify portraits to be used as a template. This may involve tracing around – list the images that the artist has included in his ‘I am’ artwork photocopies of portrait photographs of themselves and cutting out stencils • make a number of prints using their portrait/name stencils by painting surfaces within and outside of the outlines • create their own ‘I am’ self-portrait by using a variety of images and techniques. Activities may include: – indicating images that may be incorporated – printing and/or measuring the words ‘I am’ or their name on a large sheet of paper or card – trimming images, photocopies and prints and arranging these within the borders of the letters – painting background space using preferred colours and surface effects – creating an arrangement of images of themselves within the letters including images, colours, and drawings/paintings related to their interest outside of the 10. LS. 3, LS.4, LS.8 letters • identify the kinds of things included in their own ‘I am’ self-portrait. – incorporation of personal prints (stamp or tracing) of hands, feet, fingers and/or • compare the images used by Bennett with those included in their own ‘I am’ selftorso into portrait portrait. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 8 • Identifying features of Gordon Bennett’s I am and comparing images with their own ‘I am’ self-portrait may involve exploring the function of a variety of artists and audiences and/or exploring the ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in artworks and/or exploring ways to develop ideas in artworks. 9 and 10 • Creating stencils and making prints using portrait/name stencils may involve making a variety of artworks that reflect experiences, responses or a point of view and/or exploring how ideas and interests in the world can be represented in their artmaking and/or exploring ways to develop ideas in artworks and/or using a range of materials, techniques and processes to make artworks. • Creating their own ‘I am’ self-portrait and comparing this to Gordon Bennett’s I am may involve exploring how ideas and interests in the world can be represented in their artmaking and/or exploring ways to develop ideas in artworks and/or using a range of techniques and processes to make artworks. Feedback 8, 9 and 10 Oral, visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of features of Gordon Bennett’s I am, their creation of stencils, prints and own ‘I am’ portrait. Numbers in the teaching, learning and assessment activities indicate the suggested sequence of activities in artmaking and critical and historical studies.

196

2.1 experiences a variety of dance performances LS.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: • Videos of ‘Swan Lake’.11 views and responds to a range of visual texts. Students use safe dance practices to engage in activities individually.2. 197 .2 explores ways in which meaning is conveyed in nonverbal communication. selects and sequences movement to express feelings and ideas LS. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests.1 recognises language that is descriptive of number NLS.5.1.1 recognises repeating patterns SCLS.2 responds to the elements of dance in performance LS. pitch.1 explores the elements of dance to create movement and communicate ideas LS. ‘Saturday Night LS.3.7 explores the diversity of Australian communities Languages LS. LS.2 uses dance technique to communicate • Music from a range of cultural backgrounds.1 responds to auditory cues in a range of contexts LS. Programming and Assessment 10.14 communicates with a range of audiences LS.1 engages in dance activities. responses or a point of view.2 listens for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts LS.1 uses movement.MLC. in pairs and as part of a group.9 participates in a range of physical activities Visual Arts LS.1 demonstrates a range of movement skills Fever’ and/or Aboriginal Dreamtime stories conveyed through dance LS. music with different rhythm.1.3 recognises and responds to ordinal terms PALS. ‘Strictly Ballroom’. interpretive or critical Geography LS.5 uses the language of position in a variety of situations Music LS. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes. media and multimedia LS. experiment with body movements and create and perform movement/dance sequences.15 draws on background and experiences to respond to texts in ways that are imaginative.12 communicates for a variety of purposes LS. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Shapes in Space’ in Dance Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 16–31).3 demonstrates an awareness of safe dance practices tempo and volume LS.3 Dance Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Let’s dance! Unit title: Let’s dance! Description: In this unit students appreciate and respond to dance performances. vocalisation or instruments to respond to a range of music PDHPE LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Learning activities address selected ‘learn to’ and ‘learn about’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.1) Links A student: English LS. ‘Sleeping Beauty’.1. A student: Mathematics NLS.2 explores. (Note: In the syllabus this outcome is incorrectly numbered as LS.3.4 responds to the language of position SGLS.4.8 demonstrates a range of movement skills across environments LS.

direction.1 LS.1 • valuing and appreciating dance 198 .1.1 using movement in controlled ways to participate in dance LS. movement quality • recognise the capabilities and limitation of their own body and safely extend these limits where possible • use safe practices during dance and movement Composition • experiment with elements of space. expression. eg energy.1. feelings and ideas through a structured dance • extend their dance performance skills.3.2.4. time and dynamics within the context of dance composition LS. taking account of body position.2 • • selecting and sequencing movements to express feelings and ideas structuring movement to express feelings or ideas LS.3. patterns and relationships • move all or part of their body in the context of participating in various dance activities both as an individual and cooperatively as part of a group • express and communicate mood.2 • using elements of dance to communicate through movement and dance LS. time and dynamics to create and communicate meaning • create and organise movement to convey meaning that can be perceived.2 • • appreciating dance performances appreciating dance as an audience member LS.2. shared and interpreted by an audience • select specific movements to express a feeling or idea • sequence movement to express feelings or ideas structure movement in an ordered way to express feeling or ideas Appreciation • experience a range of live or recorded dance performances • display appropriate audience behaviour in different situations • respond appropriately to live or recorded dance performances • communicate responses to dance performances • recognise the elements of dance which make the performance engaging • recognise the main ideas conveyed through a dance performance • actively participate in dance performance when invited Study of dance as an artform • participate in dance activities • cooperate with others in dance activities Students learn about: • LS. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes Life Skills Content Students learn to: Performance • prepare their body for dance through movement • move all or part of their body to change their positioning in space • move all or part of their body in different ways. interpretation.1.3 • safe dance practices LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1 • the elements of space.

eg ‘What feelings or ideas are communicated through the dance?’. images. eg the integration of movements.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. costumes and music that express feelings or ideas – individual movements that the dancers used to portray the characters in the dance – the elements of dance such as time (tempo. using photographs of performers. P – Performance C – Composition A – Appreciation 199 . ‘How do the tempo.1 LS. ‘Sleeping Beauty’.2 LS. drawings and/or written description to focus on the elements of dance and how they were used to make the performance exciting. Recording responses to dance performances in a journal may involve responding to the elements of dance in performance. by other students in the school and/or on video excerpts. Sharing their responses to the elements of the dance may indicate responding to the elements of dance in performance. joyful.2 Students view one or more live narrative dance performances by visiting groups.3. rhythmic patterns and stillness contribute to the story?’ • Students record their responses to the dance performances in a journal. Programming and Assessment Focus: Let’s look at dance Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and instruction P C A Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Viewing dance performances may involve experiencing a variety of dance performances and/or responding to the elements of dance in performance. ‘How does the movement in the dance tell the story?’ ‘What shapes are used and how do they communicate meaning?’. rhythmic patterns) and space (shapes) and aspects of relationships that make the performance exciting. joyful. ‘Saturday Night Fever’ and/or Aboriginal Dreamtime stories conveyed through dance • Teacher focuses students’ attention on: – the sequence of the narrative/story conveyed through the dance – features of the dance that enhance the narrative. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • responses to a variety of dance performances and identification of some of the features of dance performances ✓ LS. Feedback LS. sad • ✓ Expression of appreciation of dance performances may involve responding to the elements of dance in performance.3. ‘Strictly Ballroom’. stillness. sad • Students demonstrate their appreciation of the dance by applauding at appropriate times • ✓ Oral.2 Teacher assists students to recognise the elements of the dance that make the dance performance engaging.3.3. eg ‘Swan Lake’. • demonstration of appropriate responses to a variety of dance performances sharing of their responses to the elements of dance in the dance performances • ✓ • recording of their responses to the elements of dance in performance in an appropriate format.2 LS.3.

Use of physical demonstration to support.2.1 LS. running incorporating movement variations • Students experiment to increase their repertoire of movements to communicate ideas. curving. sway. stretch. recordings of didgeridoo music • ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ Performing variations of movements may indicate demonstrating a range of movement skills and/or using dance technique to communicate. curve and make shapes. hands and arms can wave. such as bending. Feedback LS. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of a range of movement skills LS.2 • Students view a number of short video excerpts showing a range of dance as a stimulus for exploring and experimenting with personal movement.3 LS.1 LS. arching. crouching ✓ Oral.3. Programming and Assessment Focus: How can my body move? Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and instruction P C A Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Viewing video excerpts showing a range of dance techniques may involve experiencing a variety of dance performances and/or responding to the elements of dance in performance. kick. eg arch. arch. • performance of a combination of movements to communicate ideas. assist and encourage students in a range of movement skills. P – Performance C – Composition A – Appreciation continued 200 . whole body can sway.2. marching. shapes – perform single familiar movements. curve. eg fingers. stretch.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.2 Teacher assists students individually through instruction and modelling of safe dance practices to explore the parts of their body that can move in similar ways to those observed in the video excerpts. crouch and make shapes • Teacher assists students to: – experiment with and extend variations of a movement using safe dance practices – develop the vocabulary related to movements. such as statue poses. Teacher focuses students’ attention on movements identified from video excerpts. legs can bend. eg raising an arm – complete a sequence of familiar movements such as walking. swaying.3. Oral. stretching.1 LS.1.1. Engaging in personal movement may involve demonstrating a range of movement skills and/or demonstrating an awareness of safe dance practices. curve. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of movement skills in dance performances. This may be done through activities such as: – performing variations of movements already developed – performing movement in response to other stimuli. Exploring ways in which their bodies can move may involve demonstrating a range of movement skills. images of trees swaying in the wind.

It may involve activities such as: – changing spatial aspects of movement such as direction. auditory or kinaesthetic stimuli. Working in pairs to combine or create new movements/ shapes using safe dance practices may involve exploring the elements of dance to create movement and communicate ideas and/or exploring.1 • Students work in pairs to combine previously practised or new LS. size. pitch. Programming and Assessment Focus: How can my body move? (cont) Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and instruction P C A Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Increasing the repertoire of movements may involve exploring the elements of dance to create movement and communicate ideas and/or exploring. tempo and volume Teacher assists students to focus on qualities of the music that they hear.2. level. eg How would you respond in movement to the tempo (fast/slow). visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students working in pairs to combine movements and demonstration of safe dance practices.1. to the volume (various dynamics) Teacher assists students to explore and create movements that ‘match’ or respond to the features of the selected music Students develop changes to movement in response to changes in aspects of selected music such as rhythm. volume. pitch.2 movements/shapes using safe dance practices. tempo and volume. change level of movement in response to pitch ✓ Oral. P – Performance C – Composition A – Appreciation 201 .2.2 • Students listen to a range of music as a stimulus for movement and dance.1 LS. plane in consultation with partners to explore other dimensions – performing individual movements in unison (concurrently).1 LS. pitch. to the pitch (high/low movements or shapes). selecting and sequencing movement to express feelings and ideas. as prompted by the teacher – performing individual movements in canon (consecutively) – performing movements which involve interaction between partners ✓ ✓ Oral. This may be in response to LS. pitch. Focus: Let’s move together LS. selecting and sequencing movement to express feelings and ideas.2. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • attention on qualities of music and matching these to appropriate body movements ✓ Creating and using different movements may involve exploring the elements of dance to create movement and communicate ideas and/or exploring. Feedback LS. eg change from a walk to a run. selecting and sequencing movement to express feelings and ideas and/or demonstrating an awareness of safe dance practices. • listening and response through movement to changes in selected music.2. music with different rhythm. such as tempo. eg music from a range of cultural backgrounds.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.2.2 • • • • • LS.3 visual.2. volume Teacher assists students to develop movement ideas from the quality of music Teacher assists students to explore the elements of dance to create dance movement derived from the qualities of the music such as tempo.

2.2. selecting and sequencing movements to express feelings and ideas. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • retelling of a narrative/story using safe dance practices LS. This may involve students working individually. sequence and structure movement to express the ideas in the narrative/story provided by the teacher ✓ • Oral. in pairs or groups using safe dance practices Students explore.2 LS.1 • Students select a narrative/story sequence.1 LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Performing dance together Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and instruction P C A Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Creating appropriate dance movement to communicate a narrative/story may involve exploring the elements of dance to create movement and communicate ideas and/or exploring. P – Performance C – Composition A – Appreciation continued 202 .2. This may involve students in: – selecting and combining movement to convey the ideas in the narrative/story – sequencing and structuring movement to create a dance – selecting music to accompany the dance – selecting costumes and props to complement the dance – selecting and/or arranging an appropriate performance space for the dance Students perform the dance to convey the story sequence with the accompaniment of appropriate background music. and using costumes or props if appropriate ✓ ✓ ✓ • exploration. • performance of the story sequence.2 • Teacher provides a narrative/story sequence and assists students to re-tell the story using a range of dance movements. and tell the story through dance. selecting and sequencing movements to express feelings and ideas.1. selecting and sequencing movement to express feelings and ideas and/or using dance technique to communicate and/or engaging in dance activities and/or demonstrating an awareness of safe dance practices. Selecting appropriate dance movement to communicate a narrative/story may involve exploring.1 • ✓ ✓ Using dance movements to perform the story sequence may involve exploring. selection and sequence of movements LS.1.2 LS.1.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Feedback LS.4. select.4.1 LS.2. or create their own.3 LS.3 LS.

LS. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ focus and positive response to dance performed by others. Feedback LS.2 Teacher assists students to maintain their journal to reflect their activities throughout their learning experiences.2 • Students view and respond appropriately to the dances performed by others ✓ Oral.3.3. Maintenance of the journal may involve responding to the elements of dance in performance. visual and tangible feedback prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ journal entries. Entries may include: – photographs that the teacher takes of them during the activity – images from magazines and brochures etc related to the activity – free hand drawings – personal reflections on the activity – descriptions of the activity • Students use their journal to share their experiences of dance with others P – Performance C – Composition A – Appreciation • ✓ Oral. Programming and Assessment Focus: Performing dance together (cont) Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and instruction P C A Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Viewing and responding to dances performed by others may involve experiencing a variety of dance performances and/or responding to the elements of dance in performance.3.1 LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 203 .

2 listens for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts Mathematics LS. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the sample unit ‘Playbuilding’ in Drama Years 7– 10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 21–38).4 responds to the language of position LS. roles.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.3.1.1. roles. characters.3.16 explores social and cultural issues through texts. Students participate in scenarios where role-taking is used to expand and enhance students’ participation in real-life experiences.1.3 recognises and responds to ordinal terms LS.2 identifies and responds to the elements of drama or theatre in performances LS. documentaries LS. Links A student: A student: English Languages LS.2 explores ways in which meaning is conveyed in nonverbal communication LS.2. situations and actions through drama activities A range of taped segments from television shows.15 draws on background and experiences to respond to texts in ways that are SGLS. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: LS. action! Description: In this unit students explore characters. LS.5 uses the language of position in a variety of situations imaginative. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.4 Drama Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Roles. situations and actions through a range of activities.2 explores a variety of playbuilding activities Video camera LS.11 demonstrates safe practices that promote personal wellbeing. characters.12 communicates for a variety of purposes NLS. action! Unit title: Roles.3.1 responds to auditory cues in a range of contexts LS.13 communicates in a range of contexts PALS. interpretive or critical PDHPE LS.1 experiences a variety of drama or theatre performances LS.2 participates in the preparation of drama works and theatrical productions LS.3 participates in drama experiences in which role-taking is used to enhance their understanding of ideas and feelings LS.2.1 recognises language that is descriptive of number LS. media and multimedia NLS.3 recognises that drama and theatre performances can communicate meaning and ideas. 204 .9 participates in a range of physical activities LS. videos and DVDs.1 explores dramatic forms and theatrical conventions LS.14 communicates with a range of audiences SCLS. Programming and Assessment 10.1 recognises repeating patterns LS.MLC.1 explores characters.11 views and responds to a range of visual texts. They develop their individual skills and participate as part of a group to develop and perform a narrative and explore dramatic forms and theatre conventions.

3 LS. sets.2. movement.1. makeup. literature. lighting. stance and gesture • the use of improvisation to explore roles/characters and relationships • playbuilding strategies such as improvisation. anger.1. publicity. applying makeup. or on computer different responses to drama. middle.2 • • • • LS.1 LS. theme characters and issues) • a dramatic sequence – beginning. agreeing with an idea or issue raised in a performance. end – to convey dramatic meaning • the fact that taking on a role is like ‘stepping into another person’s shoes’ • showing feelings such as happiness. sound. trust and collaboration with others • • Students learn to: • identify a range of familiar characters • explore the use of verbal and non-verbal communication appropriate to roles/characters • explore roles/characters through improvisation techniques • • LS.3.1. such as in drawing or collage. timing and facial expressions • developing confidence. class discussion.3.3.1 Life Skills content Students learn about: • the characteristics of familiar roles/characters from live theatre. climax. personal life • ways to create verbal and non-verbal communication such as voice. situation.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. TV. front of house. or describing how the interaction between characters affected the mood of a particular performance ways to turn their ideas into a monologue or a playbuilt scene the way and individual drama or theatre performance. TV show or film has conveyed ideas participate in role-taking experiences display different ideas and feelings when in roles use performance skills to participate in the making and performing of a variety of drama and theatre performances develop confidence when moving and acting in a designated performance space identify some of the different activities associated with a dramatic or theatrical production participate in a range of activities involved in preparing for a dramatic or theatrical production experience a range of live or recorded drama or theatre performances identify and display appropriate audience behaviour in different situations • communicate responses to drama and theatre in different ways • communicate responses to their work or the work of others. costumes. film/video. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes LS. front of house or backstage work appreciating different performances appropriate ways of engaging in audience participation different ways to express ideas about drama.3 • • production elements such as acting.2 playbuild using a variety of stimuli to communicate dramatic meaning sequence playbuilt scenes in an ordered way LS. expressing enjoyment in response to a comedy. helping with sets. 1 • • • • • • LS. excitement in different roles • the use of performance and expressive skills in dramatic presentations such as voice. such as displaying empathy for a particular character in a drama.2. projection. different stimuli (such as place. or to live or recorded drama and theatre performances • • • • express their own ideas in a piece of drama recognise that drama and theatre are ways for individuals and groups to convey meaning and ideas 205 . finding or making costumes. stage management and publicity the operation of basic lighting and sound equipment.2 LS.

films/videos.1.3.3. Feedback Oral. and explore featured characters. pilot. LS.1. Programming and Assessment Focus: Characters in real life Outcomes: LS.2 Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and assessment LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students: • identification of various characters from television and film etc LS.1 • Students explore the role and features of a selected character.1 Students view a range of selected television programs.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. situations and actions through drama activities. LS. LS. physical and personal characteristics of particular characters – indicating their preference for particular characters and giving reasons for their choice • Students match and label photographs/pictures to identify features of the characters.3.1. and/or interact with others like the character Identification of the features of characters may involve exploring characters. This may involve: – identifying characters/roles such as policeman. roles.1 LS3. chef. situations and actions through drama activities and/or identifying and responding to the elements of drama or theatre in performance. • identification of features of characters Teacher encourages.1.3. Exploring the role and features of selected characters may involve exploring characters. eg hats or shoes to walk or move like the character. roles. continued 206 . tennis player.1.1. This may involve: – using gestures – using simple props – using simple costume items. supports and affirms students’ involvement in exploring a character. eg – how they look – how they move – how they communicate – verbally and nonverbally – how they dress – how they treat others • Evidence of Learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Identification of familiar characters may involve experiencing a variety of drama or theatre performances and/or identifying and responding to the elements of drama or theatre in performance.2 LS. historical documentaries and/or live theatre presentations. doctor by responding to pictures/photographs – matching characters/roles with costumes using pictures or photographs – indicating their preferences for particular characters by responding to pictures/photographs – identifying the age.

1.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.3. happiness. Setting up and participating in a mock interview with one or more characters in role may involve participating in drama experiences in which role-taking is used to enhance understanding of ideas and feelings. film and/or live productions may involve exploring characters. roles. another adult (an outsider) or the student.3 • Evidence of Learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Exploring movement appropriate to a range of characters from television.1. gesture to communicate feelings such as pride. where they live – the feelings of the character. fear – use an appropriate tone and volume of voice to communicate feelings such as anger. Teacher provides encouragement and affirms students’ participation in mock interview activities.2 Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and assessment LS.3. eg – walk like an important person – jump or leap like someone who has just scored a winning goal – adopt a pose of someone who is scared – gesture like a bully LS. LS.3. The role of the character may be taken by the teacher.1.1. Programming and Assessment Focus: Characters in real life (cont) Outcomes: LS. continued 207 . eg what makes them happy. LS. who do they love – how the character treats others LS. LS. Exploring verbal and nonverbal communication appropriate to a range of characters may involve exploring characters. excitement.1 • Students explore movement appropriate to a range of characters. Teacher provides demonstration. eg their family. Feedback Teacher encourages. situations and actions through drama activities.1. eg – use facial expression. roles.1. pain Students set up and participate in a mock interview (hot seating) with one or more characters in role.1 • Students explore verbal and nonverbal communication appropriate to a range of characters. situations and activities through drama activities and/or identifying and responding to the elements of drama or theatre in performances. modelling or advice to support and affirm students’ exploration of verbal and nonverbal communication appropriate to a range of characters. Students prepare and ask questions to assist in exploring: – the background of the character. assists and affirms students’ involvement in exploring movement appropriate to a range of characters.1.

1. roles.1. LS.1 • Students explore real-life situations through scenarios with students in role. missing a bus.1.3. Focus: What’s my role. eg losing a friend’s wallet. others in role LS.3 • Students video the mock interview and discuss the character’s responses to the questions Evidence of Learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Videoing and discussing the mock interview may involve participating in drama experiences in which role-taking is used to enhance understanding of ideas and feelings.3.1.3 (outsiders). arriving late at school – asking for assistance from known/unknown people using personal communication strategies (perhaps using a support network card) – dealing with a bully in the playground.3.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1.1. This may include: – using the telephone to place an order and/or return faulty goods to a store and/or relate to helpful or unhelpful staff – engaging in contingency planning for unexpected events such as locking themselves out of the house. LS. and/or teacher in role (as narrator).1.1. situations and actions through drama activities and/or participating in drama experiences in which role-taking is used to enhance understanding of ideas and feelings.2 Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and assessment LS. making another choice if the preferred item is not available for purchase – giving an explanation for personal actions. LS. Oral. what’s your role? Outcomes: LS.1. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting to encourage.1.3 LS. guide and affirm students’ participation in role taking experiences. at the bus stop. Feedback Teacher affirms student involvement in mock interview activities by highlighting the character’s response in selected video excerpts. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Characters in real life (cont) Outcomes: LS. on the sports field Participating in scenarios to explore real-life situations may involve exploring characters. 208 .

2.3.1.1 LS.1 LS. an image of what the character may look like – selecting. descriptions of personality and appearance which match the character – creating a character profile. what happened after. one character in the narrative that they would like to focus on.3 • Students create a series of scenes around an identified theme. LS.2. an accident to a star sportsperson on the field or in the pool Students explore characters and/or roles in depth within the framework of the narrative they have developed.2. story or event with an identified beginning. LS. talking.1.2.1 • Evidence of Learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Creating a series of scenes around an identified theme.3.3. LS. continued 209 .2. It may also involve participating in the preparation of drama works and theatrical productions and/or recognising that drama and theatre performances can communicate meaning and ideas. eg walking. from a range. – developing a sequenced narrative to recreate an event or incident from a selected television show/video – re-creating an event from history or recent past and developing a narrative to relate the sequence events. from a range.2. landing on the moon. Further activities may include: – identifying items of costume that the character may wear – selecting. LS. story or event may involve exploring a variety of playbuilding activities and/or exploring dramatic forms and theatrical conventions. developing and performing a narrative Outcomes: LS. These scenes may later be used as the basis for a group/class performance. accepting a prize after a sports carnival and developing a series of scenes to explore the sequence of events relating to the photograph. Students’ exploration of characters and/or roles within the framework of the narrative may involve exploring dramatic forms and theatrical conventions.3. what happened next.1.2 LS. A student then develops a narrative to indicate what happened before. occupation – undertaking activities. Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring.2 LS. middle. Feedback Teacher encouragement and affirmation of students’ participation in the creation of a narrative that includes a series of scenes.2.2. These scenes may include: – using images or photographs of students participating in a celebration or school event. with teacher assistance. eg the capture of Ned Kelly.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. moving in the manner of the character LS. Teacher offers positive and constructive advice and encouragement on student involvement in exploring characters/roles within the framework of a narrative. Students may do this by identifying.3 Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and assessment LS. climax and end. eg determining age.

LS. seating. LS. sale of tickets. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ research of the elements of drama. Teacher provides affirmation of the effectiveness of pace and timing.1.2. props and scenery that enhance the drama – make up techniques that enhance the qualities of the characters • Students use theatrical techniques in the context of preparation for performance. This may involve the use of: – appropriate lighting techniques to enhance dramatic impact – sound effects appropriate to the action – music to create and enhance the atmosphere – costumes.2. continued 210 . Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring. Feedback Oral.2.2 • Students explore and engage in activities associated with theatre productions. Teacher gives support.2.2 • students participate in final rehearsals – refine scene linkages – present sections to the class – respond and/or reflect on the performances of others Using pace/timing during scenes may involve exploring dramatic forms and theatrical conventions. role of ushers LS.2 Students research theatrical techniques such as the use of: – lighting techniques that enhance dramatic impact.2.2. LS. how lighting can be dimmed to create mood – sound effects that can be produced using technology and/or real objects – music that creates and enhances the atmosphere – costumes. Teacher provides advice and assistance to students to clarify choices and issues.2. eg how spotlights work.3 Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and assessment LS.3. Participation in final rehearsals may involve participating in the preparation of drama works and theatrical productions. props and scenery to enhance the drama – make-up to enhance the qualities of the characters • Students use pace/timing during the scenes to heighten the dramatic tension • Evidence of Learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Researching theatrical techniques may involve participating in the preparation of drama works and theatrical productions.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.2 LS.2. visual and/or tangible feedback throughout the rehearsal process. eg choice/selection of performance space/venue. developing and performing a narrative (cont) Outcomes: LS.2 LS. visual and/or tangible feedback by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of the elements of drama in the context of preparation for a performance. Oral. LS.2. preparation of programs.3. encouragement and oral.1. Using theatrical techniques may involve participating in the preparation of drama works and theatrical productions.2. Exploring and engaging in activities associated with theatre productions may involve participating in the preparation of drama works and theatrical productions.

2. incident or scenario for others in the class.2 • Students perform the event.2. LS. Evaluating their own performance may involve identifying and responding to the elements of drama or theatre in performance.2.2. Teacher coordinates discussion to affirm student evaluation.2. LS. Feedback Teacher discussion with students to affirm the successful elements of the performance.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 211 .2. LS.3 Outcomes Integrated learning experiences and assessment LS.3. Programming and Assessment Focus: Exploring.1.2.1. LS. developing and performing a narrative (cont) Outcomes: LS. and/or in the school/community LS.2 • Students evaluate their performance in terms of feedback from the audience and/or video recordings Evidence of Learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Performing for others may involve participating in the preparation of drama works and theatrical productions.3.

Links A student: English LS. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Power.5 Visual Design Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: ‘My Magazine’ Unit title: My Magazine Description: In this unit students explore the design of magazines.1 experiences a variety of visual design procedures to make visual design • Magazines artworks • Comics LS. Martin Sharp (Luna Park posters) and Marie LS. magazine covers and posters.3 uses a variety of materials. 212 .6 makes a variety of visual design artworks that reflect experiences.5 uses the language of position in a variety of situations Visual Arts LS5.9 uses a range of materials.8 explores ways to develop ideas in visual design artworks • Examples of works by Redback Graphix. responses • Scanner or a point of view • Photocopying LS.4 responds to the language of position SGLS. and the work of graphic designers and artists.3 explores the function of a variety of visual designers and audiences • Scissors and glue LS.6 uses visual texts in a range of contexts LS.7 explores a variety of subject matter that can be represented in visual design • Photographs of students artworks • Overhead transparencies LS. They participate in identifying different audiences for different magazines and they use basic typography and simple digital imaging processes and/or collage techniques to make a magazine cover for a specific audience. techniques and processes • Images of posters.2 explores own and other cultures Mathematics SGLS. advertising and a range of design and layout solutions LS. Publicity and Propaganda’ in Visual Design Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment.4 explores ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in • Paints and drawing materials visual design artworks • Digital imaging program LS.2 explores a variety of materials.4 uses spoken language to interact with a range of audiences LS.2 uses a range of hardware LS1.5 recognises that various interpretations of visual design artworks are possible • Digital camera LS.3 uses a range of software programs A student: Languages LSMBC.9 writes short texts for everyday purposes LS. techniques and processes to make visual design McMahon artworks. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: LS. media and multimedia Information and Software Technology LS1. Programming and Assessment 10.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.14 views and responds to a range of visual texts. techniques and processes For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.

• identify. logo. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes Life Skills content Students learn about: Practice LS. eg a unit of work • OHS practices and a safe working environment. assess and adopt strategies to create and maintain a safe working environment and practices in making visual design artworks. font size.2 LS. symbols.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1 LS. text colour. 213 . comic book design • • • different aspects of visual design activities • the process for developing and making visual design artworks follow a procedure to make visual design artworks – analyse the visual design concept – brainstorm ideas related to the visual design concept – research visual designers and their works – collect images and materials related to the visual design concept – develop ideas using small sketches in Visual Design journal – experiment with materials and processes to make visual design artworks and prototypes – present finished visual design artworks for exhibition or audience response – respond verbally or in writing about visual design artworks • the development of visual design artworks over time • participate in the development of the visual design artworks over time.9 • Students learn to: participate in different aspects of visual design practices which may include: Print – publications and information – illustrations and cartooning – interactive and multimedia – advertising and communication eg explore the use of a range of text types and formats to communicate ideas and interests – layout.

eg communicate like or dislike for visual design artwork – smile.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. vocalise. offer opinion in a verbal or written form • communicating personal experiences and responses • make visual design artworks that reflect personal experiences and responses. 214 . eg design a cover for a personal diary • communicating issues and ideas of personal significance. gesture.8 • the role of audiences in relation to visual design artworks Students learn to: • participate appropriately as an audience. eg communicate.6 LS. nod.5 LS.4 LS.7 • responding to and interpreting visual design artworks • respond to visual design artworks. describe or discuss responses • how experiences of the world can be communicated in the making of • identify visual designers and how they communicate their experiences of the visual design artworks world Frames LS. eg view and respond to visual design artworks in a variety of contexts • recognise some of the effects that visual design artworks have on an audience.3 LS. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes Life Skills content Students learn about: Conceptual Framework LS. • make visual design artworks that reflect issues and ideas of personal significance.

fashion. paste and arrange images. LS. These reasons could include gender. and cut. 215 . information • record this information in their Visual Design journal • with teacher assistance prepare a chart/s with the names of all the magazines members of the class have nominated as their favourites and record their name next to their favourite magazine. eg interest. The collage may include: – the name of the magazine or comic – images and/or text to show what the student likes about the magazine – images and/or text to show the purpose of the magazine – a layout in the form of a magazine cover. surfing. techniques and processes. cover. Critical and historical interpretations Students 1.) • identify their favourite magazine or comic and provide reasons why they like them.7 • participate in a discussion about different types of magazines. favourite publications and different audiences. Identifying why different people like different magazines may indicate an exploration of a variety of visual designers and audiences. Programming and Assessment Teaching. Feedback 1. focusing on the arrangement of text and images – images – collage.2 • make a collage titled ‘My Favourite Magazine’ using a copy or photocopied pages of their favourite magazine or comic. drawing. content. LS. interests – films.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. foods. age. cars. visual and/or tangible feedback.1. They can also: . learning and assessment activities – ‘My Magazine’ Making Students 2. cartoons. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 1 Choosing a favourite publication may involve recognition that various interpretations of visual design artworks are possible.record their name (or place their photograph) next to other magazines they like that are included on the chart • discuss and view the chart/s and recognise that different people like different magazines and that these people can be identified as an audience • identify the reasons why some people like magazines of the same subject matter. photographs of other class members who also like to read this magazine. Students are asked to bring in a copy of a magazine or the teacher may provide a range of magazines of interest to the students. comics. sport. (These will also be used in activity 2. pictures.3. eg music. LS. 2 Oral.attach a photograph of themselves to the chart . prompting and assistance from teacher as students identify their interests. colours. painting. music. sports. television shows.5. 2 Creating a collage may involve experience of a variety of visual design procedures to make visual design artworks and exploration of a variety of materials. LS. LS.

5 Oral. A sheet of transparencies of their name styles is created. 5. size and font – date – logo – print finishes. satin. LS. Feedback 3.1 • experiment with the basic operations of Photoshop Elements or a simple public domain digital imaging program as appropriate to the resources available and teacher expertise. centre. 4 Discussing and identifying different features of a magazine cover and participating in the use of a digital imaging program may indicate an exploration of a variety of materials. • explore placement of text and styles by superimposing the sheet of transparencies of their name styles against images. prompting.5 • view a range of magazine covers.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. and to use the basic operations of a digital imaging software program. Critical and historical interpretations Students 3. LS. questioning and suggesting alternatives as students manipulate different layouts and styles of typography against different backgrounds. placement. learning and assessment activities – ‘My Magazine’ Making Students 4. Martin Sharp. This may involve consideration of: – top. pasting and feathering – resizing and rotating images – manipulating images using a variety of special effects tools such as solarisation. 4 Oral. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 3. photographs and drawings. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback. magazine covers and advertisements and record their ideas in their Visual Design journal. middle and bottom placement. LS.5. LS. prompting and assistance by the teacher as students discuss and identify features of a range of posters.2 • explore text and layout using their names as titles in preparation for activity (6). Activities may include: – opening and saving documents – scanning or importing images including digital photographs – creating layers – cutting. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students to identify the features that make up a magazine cover. LS. styles and sizes using a computer and simple menu or Word Art. eg matt.2.7 • view examples of typography and magazine cover layout • identify and discuss different features of a magazine cover. left or right aligned. cartoons. 6. LS. These may include works by Redback Graphix. textures. filters. LS. Marie McMahon and band advertisements • identify and describe: – the subject matter of the magazines/posters – the colours used – the images and graphics used and their effects – layout and arrangement of text and images – the different audiences targeted • record ideas about works in their Visual Design journal. gloss. These may include: – background colour and design – subject matter and images including photos and cartoons – title and subheadings colour. 5 Choices made in typography and placement activities may indicate exploration of ways to develop ideas in visual design artworks. straight or angled placement • should photocopy and record experiments in the Visual Design journal. This may involve: – hand lettering their names or typesetting their names in a variety of fonts. 6 Viewing and discussing images of magazines and posters may involve exploration of the ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in visual design artworks and recognition that various interpretations of visual design artworks are possible. screens and colour correction – using and placing text fields.8. visual and/or tangible feedback. metallics. the effects of scale.4. 216 . bill posters for a range of audiences. Programming and Assessment Teaching. 6 Oral. advertising posters. techniques and processes and an exploration of a variety of subject matter that can be represented in visual design artworks.

10 Participation in the production of a magazine. text and subheadings in their Visual Design journal. allowing for classroom display. techniques and processes to make visual design artworks. learning and assessment activities – ‘My Magazine’ Making Students 8. or magazine cover. Critical and historical interpretations Students 7. LS. images. Feedback 7 Oral.6 • identify a particular audience – themselves. students groups and reports on school activities and events.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. teachers – for their magazine cover or comic • describe the audience and their interests • plan their magazine layout. LS. LS. LS. members of their class. Opportunities for peer/audience feedback may be provided if magazine covers/pages are displayed. 10 Oral. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher as students identify a target audience for their magazine. family.4. This may involve combinations of: – digital imaging. 9. 217 . including layout for a page/s of artworks. LS. Covers and/or magazine are photocopied in colour if possible. or may include. LS. 10. friends.2. their own name. explores ways to develop ideas in visual design artworks and use of a range of materials. inclusion in the Visual Design journal and swapping between students. LS. including subject matter. software programs. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher as students plan and work towards resolving their magazine cover/pages. 8.6 • design a cover for a magazine/comic that reflects or celebrates their own interests. 8.8 • may extend their investigations of magazine design and layout by designing: a page/s for the school magazine. a series of questions and photographs for an interview with a staff member. This might involve: – a cover design – internal pages and feature articles – comic strips – photocopies of work from the Visual Design journal. LS. digital photography – collage – drawing – cartooning • choose a name for their magazine which may be. Programming and Assessment Teaching. 9. 9. 8 Participation in production of magazine cover may indicate the making of a variety of visual design artworks that reflect experiences. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 7. responses or a point of view.9 • make a finished artwork for copying.7.

5 recognises visual texts in a range of contexts SGLS.6 uses visual texts in a range of contexts Visual Arts Information and Software Technology LS5. techniques and processes to make photographic and digital works. LS.1 experiences a variety of photographic and digital procedures to make • Lamps to cast shadows in the classroom.8 explores ways to develop ideas in photographic and digital works LS. shadows.7 explores a variety of subject matter that can be represented in photographic • Examples of photographic works by Kara Walker.6 makes a variety of photographic and digital works that reflect personal • Digital cameras experiences. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: LS. shadow and shape.3 uses a range of software programs. 218 .2 explores own and other cultures LS.2 uses a range of hardware LS1. Man Ray. A variety of wet and digital photographic activities are suggested as ways of extending this structural exploration of light.3 explores the function of photographic and digital artists and how they work • Objects from around the room or brought in. LS.4 recognises some forms and sources of energy LS. explore the relative opacity/translucency of objects and record the shapes caused by shadows. Links A student: A student: English Languages LS. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes. techniques and processes are too hot for shadow drawing exercises.6 Photographic and Digital Media Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: ‘Shapes and Shadows’ Unit title: ‘Shapes and Shadows’ Description: In this unit students are introduced to light and shadow as phenomena in the world around them.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. black paint.4 explores ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in drawing. Students experiment with light sources to produce and manipulate shadows. Olive Cotton and digital works LS.3 uses technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences LSMBC. pencils. chosen for the interest or ease of LS. techniques and processes.4 uses spoken language to interact with a range of audiences Science LS.3 uses a variety of materials. LS1.9 uses a range of materials. This may include. cast shadows as appropriate to students photographic and digital works • Materials for drawing. Programming and Assessment 10. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Shapes and Shadows’ in Photographic and Digital Media Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment. These should be ordinary table lamps photographic and digital works that have a flexible arm to direct light in a specific direction. responses or points of view • Digital imaging program LS.5 recognises that various interpretations of photographic and digital works are • Materials such as chalk for drawing shadows outside possible • Darkroom with enlarger and developing facilities and materials LS.2 explores a variety of materials. Photographic lamps LS. markers.

Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes Life Skills content Students learn about: Students learn to: • Practice LS. digital media explore the operational handling and features of a variety of photographic equipment including pinhole. 35mm SLR and/or Polaroid Instamatic cameras and digital cameras. cropping. eg techniques of scanning images from various sources using a digital camera and drawing on the desktop using a mouse or stylus pen • investigate and experiment with basic digital tools and techniques of selecting. computer-generated images. shutter. using darkroom techniques and processes • experiment with methods of importing images into a computer.2 LS. image transfers. tripods and supports • the operation of photographic and digital media technologies available to them • • techniques and processes for developing and making photographic and digital media works experiment with techniques and processes involved in wet photography. assess and adopt strategies to create and maintain a safe working environment and practices in making photographic and digital works. eg locate lens. collage. recognise the purpose and use of various accessories including different lenses. load and remove film.1 LS. flashlights. cutting. • 219 . eg a unit of work identify.9 • different photographic and digital media practices in still. montage. eg taking photographs using various cameras. • the development of photographic and digital media works over time • • OHS practices and a safe working environment. viewfinder. pasting and painting to layer and overlay images to create different effects in digitally generated images • • • the process for developing and making photographic and digital media works follow a procedure to make a photographic and digital media work: – select an idea or interest/theme – explore qualities and technical applications of media and record these in photographic and digital media journal record these in photographic and digital media journal – develop idea or plan for the photographic and digital media work – consider technical processes to make photographic and digital media form participate in the development of photographic and digital media works over time. interactive and moving forms participate in different aspects of photographic and digital media practices which may include: – still forms: camera and noncamera-based works. compact.

eg visit a gallery to view photographs. nod. make photographic and digital works that reflect personal experiences and responses • make photographic and digital works which explore how visual qualities are used to communicate ideas and meanings. functional. invite a photographer to the school • • • the role of audiences in relation to photographic and digital works participate appropriately as an audience. symbolic. vocalise. view a film or video. Programming and Assessment Life Skills Outcomes Life Skills content Students learn about: Students learn to: • Conceptual Framework LS.7 • responding to and interpreting photographic and digital works • • communicating personal experiences and responses • • communicating issues and ideas of personal significance. digital works. gesture. cultural. lighting. shading Frames LS.8 • photographic and digital artists and how they work recognise that photographic and digital artists create works for different purposes including personal. offer opinion in a verbal or written form identify particular qualities of a photographic and digital work.5 LS. recognise different colours. eg view and respond to photographic and digital works in a variety of contexts respond to photographic and digital works.6 LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. eg point to work and identify areas of interest.3 LS. video and digital filmmakers. • 220 . political identify techniques and processes that photographic and digital artists use in relation to: – still forms – interactive forms – moving forms • the work of a variety of photographic and digital artists • • the role of photographic and digital artists recognise that photographic and digital artists include men and women from a wide range of social and cultural backgrounds and that they may work individually or in groups • explore the work of a variety of photographic and digital artists including multimedia artists/designers. eg communicate like or dislike for photographic and digital works – smile. photographers. social.4 LS.

LS. outline and edge. chairs. shadow. LS. flowers. LS. learning and assessment activities – ‘Shapes and Shadows’ Making Students 1. organic. The Photographic and Digital Media journal can be used to record the making experiences throughout the unit. crockery on a table in front of a light source – tracing shadows using permanent markers or other drawing materials – selecting an outline and filling it in using black paint – draw.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Programming and Assessment Teaching. Feedback 1. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 1. 2 Understanding the relationship between object. 3 Recognising the use of shadow and outline in photographic and other works may involve the exploration of the function of photographic and digital artists and how they work. light sources and shadows is an important step to exploring ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in photographic and digital works. These may include: – Indonesian shadow puppets – silhouette portraits – works of the contemporary American artist Kara Walker – Olive Cotton’s Tea Cup Ballet.3 • view and discuss images that employ shadows. • record examples of silhouettes and outlines and their effects in their Photographic and Digital Media journal. This may involve: – using photographic lights or ordinary lamps to cast shadows – experimenting with selected objects to cast shadows – using their own bodies to cast shadows. This may involve: – arranging objects such as bottles. 3 Oral. Drawing around shadows or indicating outlines may demonstrate evidence of student understanding of shadow and outline and an exploration of a variety of materials.4 • explore the relationships between light source. or have drawn. object and cast shadow. techniques and processes. plastic cutlery. their own shadows. LS. 221 . • explore the features of shadows using the outlines created in (2) eg how the shadow has edge and outline but no internal detail.4 • create an outline of cast shadows from a range of objects in the classroom and/or outdoors using and identifying natural and artificial light sources. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to direct and guide student identification of relationships between light sources. Critical and historical interpretations Students 3. 2.2. 2. and shadows from other objects outside using chalk – labelling the outline with features of the shape such as geometric.

Feedback 4.2. 6. 222 . visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and develop students’ understanding of the relationships between objects.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 8 Oral. some or lots of light through for photograms. 8. LS. 7 Oral. 5 Oral. LS. 7 Using a digital camera. LS. images with a lot of mid-tone greys and images with a lot of white • discuss and identify the most and least interesting and dramatic images. 5 Study of rayograms may involve exploration of the function of photographic and digital artists and how they work. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by teacher can affirm students’ observations about the structure and effects of photographs.4 • identify and photograph the shadows cast by objects outside.7 • view a selection of the ‘rayograms’ – the photograms of Man Ray • identify which objects Man Ray used and how much light they let in • place the objects they used to make their photograms next to the resulting prints • respond to teacher questions about objects that let no. Critical and historical interpretations Students 5. This may include: – using the viewfinder to select and frame a view – using the zoom function to refine their selection – using the autofocus button. techniques and processes and the ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in photographic and digital works. grey in between areas and white areas. aprons and protective glasses – placing a variety of opaque and translucent objects on sheets of photographic paper and exposing them using enlargers set to a standard illumination and time – developing prints – arranging prints in Photographic and Digital Media journal.2 • experiment with the basic operations of a digital camera to take photographs. LS. 8 Making judgements about. LS. in particular the use of gloves. This may involve: – shadows identified in activity (2) – using class members to create shadows • download photographs onto computer and print a proof sheet for student review and evaluation. LS.3. This may involve: – reinforcing safe working practices in the darkroom. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 4 Production of photograms and work in the darkroom may involve experience of a variety of photographic and digital procedures.1.2 • explore relationships between light source. LS. 7. learning and assessment activities – ‘Shapes and Shadows’ Making Students 4. taking and downloading of photographs may indicate experience of photographic and digital procedures as well as materials. This may involve: – tracing photocopies of the photograph using acetate sheets and marker pens – sequencing photographs light to dark – sequencing photographs from least shadow to most shadow • compare images with a lot of dark shadow. Speculation about the objects used in rayograms may involve exploration of a variety of subject matter that can be represented in photographic and digital works.5 • view a selected black-and-white photograph • identify the darkest areas. and sorting photographs may indicate recognition that various interpretations of photographic and digital works are possible. LS. LS. and evidence student understanding of safe working practices. LS. Programming and Assessment Teaching. light conditions and the visual effects they create. 6. interrupting object and cast shadow by making photograms in a photographic darkroom if available.1.1. 6. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting to assist students to use a digital camera to record photographs of shadows and participate in photographic processes such as downloading and printing images.

LS.9 • name their favourite black-and-white photograph and include a description of the subject matter and where it was taken • produce a catalogue for the exhibition entitled ‘Shapes and Shadows’.6 • evaluate their proof sheets and respond to teacher questions about the identification of: – darkest/lightest images and objects – most liked/least liked – strongest shapes – most dramatic compositions. Critical and historical interpretations Students 9. manipulating and printing images may indicate exploration of ways to develop ideas in photographic and digital works and exploration of a variety of photographic and digital works that reflect personal experiences.8. responses or a point of view. Feedback 9.6 • use their experience of sorting and classifying in activity (8) and select a photograph with strong dark tones and whites and minimal greys for printing. 12 Oral. LS. 11. LS.8. 12. LS. Programming and Assessment Teaching. 10 Participation in selecting. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. This may involve: – cutting and cropping images – transforming the mode of the image from RGB to black-and-white or sepia – changing the contrast in their black-and-white image – solarising the image. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher as students extend and develop ideas about the world in digital or photographic works. 11. 12 Participation in the production of a photographic exhibition and publication may indicate the use of a range of techniques and processes to make photographic and digital works. 223 . 11. 10 Oral. • experiment with manipulating and enhancing the image using Photoshop or a simple public domain paint program.9 The resolved image is printed for a class exhibition. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) 9. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher as students participate in the process of a photographic exhibition and/or publication. A photocopy of the catalogue is produced for each student. LS. learning and assessment activities – ‘Shapes and Shadows’ Making Students 10.

Students examine ways in which they can access help and support and how they can support their peers. including their location in the school and/or the community. The sample units should be read in conjunction with the PDHPE Years 7–10 Syllabus and the support document PDHPE Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment already distributed to schools and available on the Board of Studies website (www.1 Facing new challenges In this unit students develop strategies to manage some of the challenges associated with adolescence and transitions to new and unfamiliar situations.nsw. skills and strategies in a range of scenarios.edu. positive and friendly social interactions between students are promoted. Health and Physical Education key learning area. and the type of support they can provide. In the context of physical activities. 224 . Programming and Assessment 11 Personal Development. if required.boardofstudies. (This activity is similar to that outlined in the Stage 4 unit ‘Meeting new people – facing new challenges’ in the PDHPE Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment pp 30–32. and use a personal support network card to seek assistance from others. In this unit students learn to develop and use strategies that promote their personal safety and wellbeing in a wide range of situations. Health and Physical Education The following sample units are provided as examples to clarify the process of programming for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content from the Personal Development.au). This card includes information on support people in the school and/or community.2 Personal safety net Students in these units develop a support network card. 11. Unit number Unit title Unit description 11.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. students demonstrate behaviours. Through structured opportunities.) The support network card should be made in a format that is appropriate to the needs of individual students.

5 uses appropriate behaviours in social situations LS.8 demonstrates a range of movement skills across environments LS.13 communicates in a range of contexts LS.1 experiences cultural diversity Mathematics SGLS.14 recognises and assists with routine health care procedures LS.4 uses strategies to manage feelings and emotions LS. These challenges and the people and resources available to students if they need help and advice are identified.1 explores the elements of dance to create movement and communicate ideas Drama LS.17 identifies the appropriate and inappropriate use of substances.3 recognises the feelings and emotions associated with adolescence LS. A student: Languages LS.) The support network card should be made in a format that is appropriate to the needs of individual students.17 uses individual and collaborative skills in the learning process. Life Skills Outcomes A student: LS. including their location in the school and/or the community.9 participates in a range of physical activities LS.4 uses spoken language to interact with a range of audiences LS.6 uses simple maps and plans Visual Arts LS.1 Facing new challenges Unit title: Facing new challenges Description: In this unit students develop strategies to manage some of the challenges associated with adolescence. 225 . (This activity is similar to that outlined in the Stage 4 unit ‘Meeting new people – facing new challenges’ in the PDHPE Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment pp 30–32. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. responses or a point of view. positive and friendly social interactions between students are promoted. By participating in enjoyable physical activities. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students.11 demonstrates safe practices that promote personal wellbeing LS. new environments and/or meeting new people.5 uses the language of position in a variety of situations SGLS. This card includes information on support people in the school and/or community. Students examine ways in which they can access help and support and how they can support their peers. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 4 unit ‘Meeting new people – facing new challenges’ in PDHPE Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 30–32).2.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.3 participates in drama experiences in which role-taking is used to enhance their understanding of ideas and feelings English LS.1. Links A student: Dance LS.3 uses technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences LS. Resources Photographs of students and school staff members Charts to record student characteristics such as size.MBC.1 recognises the personal characteristics and needs that make them similar to others yet unique LS. Programming and Assessment 11. weight Equipment and materials to develop a support network card such as computer and appropriate software SUPPORT NETWORK CARD: Students in this unit develop a support network card. and the type of support they can provide.

Programming and Assessment Focus: Getting to know you Outcomes: LS. 226 . songs. LS.4. This may include: – passing an object around a circle – shaking hands around a circle – responding to questions from other students about themselves. LS. video segments and/or discussion. instruction and assessment Teacher • organises a range of icebreaker/group activities that provide opportunities for students to interact positively with each other and foster teamwork • assists students to recognise ways in which they are both similar to. This may include recording the following: – hair/eye colour – height – interests/abilities – likes/dislikes – goals – feelings – preferences for music/food/people Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • participating in physical activities participate in physical activities as part of a group • recognise and demonstrate behaviour which is appropriate for participation in a preferred physical activity at school • Participation in icebreaker and other group activities may indicate participating in a range of physical activities. eg their favourite food.3. Oral. Students • participate in a range of icebreaker and other group activities.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.9 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • participation in practical group activities how people are similar to each other • how people are different from each other • what makes people unique • recognise similar characteristics of students within the class group • recognise some differences between students within the class group • identify the strengths. LS. games.1. • identification and recording of the characteristics they have in common with other students and those that are different. and different from. clothes and indicating the interests or preferences they have in common – taking turns to lead a game or activity – assisting others to participate in a game or activity • identify and record characteristics and feelings that they have in common and those that are different from other students using class photographs. each other • facilitates opportunities for students to share feelings and concerns about new situations with others. abilities and characteristics that make students within the group unique • Recording the similarities and differences between themselves and others may indicate recognising the personal characteristics and needs that make them similar to others yet unique.

collaboratively. situations in which assistance from others may be required. Oral. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. medication or equipment – communicating concerns and managing feelings about school rules. LS.4.11. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ recognition of situations in which they may need assistance from others.3. instruction and assessment Teacher • facilitates the development of a support network card of trusted adults • provides opportunities through structured role-plays for students to use their support network card in meaningful situations within the school context • provides opportunities for students to move efficiently around the school environment using. class or specialist room – communicating concern about losing an item of clothing.5.14. LS. LS. LS. continued 227 .8. LS. bullying or inappropriate touching by others Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • the management of feelings and emotions during adolescence • respond to the feelings and emotions of others Recognising situations in which assistance may be required may be evidence of recognising the feelings and emotions associated with adolescence. where necessary. Students • recognise. This may include: – finding a particular person. their support network card to seek advice and support.17 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Programming and Assessment Focus: Support networks Outcomes: LS.

LS. Feedback the management of feelings and emotions during adolescence • personal health care • strategies to communicate dissatisfaction and distress in relation to unwanted touching. Programming and Assessment Focus: Support networks (cont) Outcomes: LS. who can provide help in the following situations: – losing personal items – locating a particular classroom – finding out about changes to lesson times – personal health care needs – managing feelings of anger or frustration – dealing with bullying. through photographs or by naming.11. bribes.14. bribes. threats. LS. locate. continued 228 . LS.5. illegal drugs or substances are offered by others at school and/or in community contexts Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Identifying trusted adults or other students may indicate using strategies to manage feelings and emotions. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of trusted adults and/or other students who may be approached in various situations • develop a support network card that can be used appropriately and discreetly to identify. bullying or harassment Oral. unwanted touch or harassment at school and/or in community contexts – dealing with situations when medication.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.3. threats. • development and use of a support network card of trusted adults.8.4. bullying or harassment • the appropriate and inappropriate use of substances • • • • • • • strategies to communicate dissatisfaction and distress in relation to unwanted touching. LS.17 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS. threats. instruction and assessment Students • identify trusted adults or other students in the school and/or community contexts. contact and communicate with trusted adults or students who can provide assistance in school and/or community contexts. bribes. The card could be developed using a range of formats such as: – photographs of trusted staff and other adults in the school – photographs of trusted adults in community situations – photographs of other students in the school – names and contact details of staff and/or other students Developing and using a support network card may indicate using strategies to manage feelings and emotions and/or demonstrating safe practices that promote personal wellbeing. LS. bullying or harassment • identify known people within a network of trusted adults with whom it is appropriate to express and discuss personal feelings communicate health care needs to appropriate others use appropriate strategies to manage feelings and emotions demonstrate refusal skills when offered medication by another student demonstrates refusal skills when offered illegal drugs or substances for inappropriate purposes recognise known people within a network of trusted adults with whom it is appropriate to communicate dissatisfaction and distress in relation to unwanted touch.

LS. LS. locate and communicate with specific and appropriate people to seek help or advice in the school context.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. threats.14. LS. LS.3. life guards at a pool/beach.17 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. store managers or staff at an information desk in a shopping centre Identification of appropriate/trusted adults in the community may indicate managing feelings and emotions and/or using strategies to manage feelings and emotions.5.8. bribes. lunch or medication at home – needing help with menstruation – needing help in moving from one area of the school to another – clarifying school rules – dealing with bullying. LS. harassment or inappropriate touching by others – reporting offers of medication or illegal drugs/substances by others Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Participation in structured role-plays where students practise using their support network card in the school community may indicate managing feelings and emotions and/or using strategies to manage feelings and emotions and/or demonstrating safe practices that promote personal wellbeing. Feedback • the management of feelings and emotions during adolescence strategies to communicate dissatisfaction and distress in relation to unwanted touching. bullying or harassment • the appropriate and inappropriate use of substances • identify known people within a network of trusted adults with whom it is appropriate to express and discuss personal feelings • develop and use individualised strategies to communicate with trusted adults • Oral.11. harassment or inappropriate touch by others – reporting bullying. Possible scenarios include: – dealing with leaving a bag. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of skills using their support network card in meaningful situations around the school • the management of feelings and emotions during adolescence demonstrate refusal skills when offered medication by another student • demonstrate refusal skills when offered illegal drugs or substances for inappropriate purposes • identify known people within a network of trusted adults with whom it is appropriate to express and discuss personal feelings • • identify appropriate/trusted adults who can provide help in the community.4. • identification of appropriate/trusted adults in the community who can provide help in various situations. Programming and Assessment Focus: Support networks (cont) Outcomes: LS. rail or bus staff. instruction and assessment Students • participate in structured role-plays that involve using their support network card to identify. LS. continued 229 . eg police.

instruction and assessment Students • participate in structured role-plays that involve using their support network card to identify. threats or harassment on the way to or from school – reporting inappropriate touching by others – reporting the offer of medication or illegal drugs/substances by others • move efficiently and cooperatively around the school/community environment.3.8. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of skills in using their support network card in community contexts moving around in the environment • behaviour that is appropriate in a range of situations • demonstrate movement skills in the context of everyday environments • demonstrate behaviours that are socially appropriate in a range of situations • Moving efficiently around the school and/or community environment may indicate demonstrating a range of movement skills across environments. ramp. threats. bullying or harassment • demonstrate movement skills in the context of everyday environments • develop and use individualised strategies to communicate with trusted adults in relation to inappropriate touching. LS. LS. buses. locate and communicate with specific and appropriate people to seek help or advice in the community. LS. 230 .11. bus and kerb – moving safely and in an orderly way in crowded environments such as shopping centres. LS. threats. • demonstration of moving efficiently around the school and community environment. Feedback • moving around in the environment strategies to communicate dissatisfaction and distress in relation to unwanted touching. information staff or life guards for help in locating a toilet at a shopping centre.17 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.5. moving walkways – judging the gap between train and platform. swimming pool – locating a lift.4. lifts before entering. bribes. LS. bribes. Programming and Assessment Focus: Support networks (cont) Outcomes: LS. This may include: – negotiating escalators. handling. escalator at a station or shopping centre – asking a bus driver for the bus stop closest to destination – locating a pedestrian crossing to cross the road safely – finding alternatives after missing a train or bus – reporting bullying. bullying or harassment • Oral. lifts. Possible scenarios for role-plays may include: – asking a store manager. railway stations – negotiating stairs of different gradients – negotiating different surfaces – waiting appropriately in a queue for service – waiting for others to leave trains.14.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Participation in structured role-plays where students practise using their support network card in the community may indicate managing feelings and emotions and/or using strategies to manage feelings and emotions.

jumping. ‘What protective equipment do you need to wear for participation in …. and cricket teams. eg cricket bat. LS. images of scenarios into ‘safe’ and ‘unsafe’ and indicate reasons for their choice – sort. twisting and turning Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • participating in physical activities • demonstrate safe practice when participating in physical activities Viewing and/or listening to demonstrations about aspects of safety in sport may indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations. pictures.9 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. games and sports • explicitly teaches appropriate behaviour for participation in a preferred physical activity at school or in the community. This may include: – throwing. kicking. kicking. shapes and weight – using bats and/or racquets of various sizes and shapes to strike a ball. match. volleyball. fielding and propelling balls • Developing the skills for participation in specific sports may indicate participating in a range of physical activities and/or demonstrating movement skills across environments. Oral. leaping. table tennis bat. netball. continued 231 . develop. trapping and propelling balls of different sizes. Programming and Assessment Focus: Getting active Outcomes: LS. games and sports • demonstrate skills in striking. catching. Students • view and listen to presentations and demonstrations about specific aspects of safety in sport from sporting identities such as members of local football. netball. cricket. team games and sports use movement skills to participate in physical activities. throwing. practice and demonstrate the skills for participation in games or sports. catching. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • recognition of safe ways of participating in sport • participating in physical activities. As a result of these presentations students may: – sort photographs.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.’ • identify. baseball bat. tennis racquet – demonstrating skills such as running. trapping. label or draw pictures to indicate appropriate and safe behaviours for a given scenario – respond to questions such as ‘What is safe behaviour as a member of a …… (sports) team’. • demonstration of the specific skills necessary to participate in a range of physical activities. volleyball. sliding. • organises a range of physical activities to promote interaction and teamwork • explicitly teaches the rules and skills.8. identify. eg football. safe practices and the appropriate use of protective equipment for particular physical activities. instruction and assessment Teacher • arranges visits by sporting identities to discuss and demonstrate safe participation in particular sports.. fielding.

This may include: – following the rules when participating in physical activities. 232 . team games and sports • participate in physical activities as part of a group • demonstrate safe practice when participating in physical activities • recognise and demonstrate behaviour which is appropriate for participation in a preferred physical activity at school or in the community • Oral. eg take turns. LS. Feedback participating in physical activities • participating in physical activities. instruction and assessment Students • participate in a variety of games and/or sports. look after equipment and return it to storage area.8. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ participation in a range of activities. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Participation in a variety of sports may indicate participating in a range of physical activities. use facilities/equipment appropriately. Programming and Assessment Focus: Getting active (cont) Outcomes: LS. eg accepting the umpire’s decision. following instructions from team captain – wearing appropriate protective equipment when participating in specific physical activities such as bike riding – behaving appropriately when participating in preferred physical activities.9 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.

6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences. access to computer hardware such as digital cameras. Programming and Assessment 11.17 uses individual and collaborative skills in the learning process. responses or a point LS. LS.2 Personal safety net Unit title: Personal safety net Description: In this unit students learn to develop and use strategies that promote their personal safety and wellbeing in a wide range of situations.1. if required.3 uses technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences of view LS.13 communicates in a range of contexts LS. scanners and software such as word-processing Links A student: A student: Drama Mathematics LS.11 demonstrates safe practices that promote personal wellbeing to get away from the unsafe situation and to seek help. 2002. It involves the skills required to say no in threatening situations.4 uses spoken language to interact with a range of audiences Work Education LS. LS.5 uses appropriate behaviour in social situations No-Go-Tell (A series of safety steps or strategies that can be used in unsafe or LS.) LS. advice and support.4 responds to the language of position understanding of ideas and feelings Visual Arts English LS.10 recognises and responds to safe and unsafe situations threatening situations. Child Protection Education: Support materials to assist teachers of students with high support needs Videos. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.3 participates in drama experiences in which role-taking is used to enhance their SGLS. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. Child Protection guidelines material NSW Department of Education and Training.9 demonstrates skills for effective participation in the workplace. Through structured opportunities students demonstrate behaviours. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 5 unit ‘Risky Business’ in PDHPE Years 7–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 43–48). skills and strategies in a range of scenarios. Life Skills Outcomes Resources A student: Social skills program resources LS.17 identifies the appropriate and inappropriate use of substances.4 identifies appropriate support personnel and agencies in the community LS. 233 . and use a personal support network card to seek assistance from others. photographs.

As a result of this students may: – respond to direct teacher questioning regarding ways to avoid potential dangers in a variety of specific situations – demonstrate safe and appropriate behaviours in response to specific situations within the context of structured role-plays Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • behaviour that is appropriate in a range of situations safe and unsafe situations • demonstrate behaviours that are socially appropriate in a range of situations • recognise that safety depends on the behaviour of themselves and others • Focusing on specific scenarios on safe and appropriate behaviour in a range of situations may assist students to indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations.11 Students learn about: Students learn to: Integrated learning experiences. continued 234 . instruction and assessment Teacher • uses videos. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ recognition of safe and unsafe situations. LS.10. pictures and/or stories to focus students’ attention on specific aspects of safety in the environment • organises community members to provide information about aspects of safety • assists students to develop an appropriate set of guidelines for safety in a range of school/community situations.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Oral.5. Programming and Assessment Focus: Safety in the environment Outcomes: LS. LS. Students • view pictures/videos of specific scenarios that focus on safe and appropriate behaviour for both individuals and groups in a range of situations.

using recreation areas in the community. national parks rangers. As a result of these presentations students may: – identify. continued 235 . This may include identifying and using appropriate strategies for: – riding bikes in wet or windy conditions – crossing roads in wet weather – ceasing actions and moving quickly inside when a storm is approaching Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Focusing on safety in the environment may indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • recognition of safe and unsafe situations • safe and unsafe situations • recognise potential hazards in their environment and respond appropriately Responding appropriately to changed conditions that affect safety in the environment may indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations. playing indoor or outdoor games/sport. sort. as a bicycle rider. in or near water • indicate appropriate ways to respond to potential hazards in the environment. Feedback • safe and unsafe situations • recognise factors that contribute to safety in the environment Oral. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. as a passenger waiting for a train. local swimming pool life guards. as a passenger in a vehicle. fire personnel.11 Students learn about: Students learn to: Integrated learning experiences. match and sort photographs. Programming and Assessment Focus: Safety in the environment (cont) Outcomes: LS.10. instruction and assessment Students • view and listen to presentations about specific aspects of safety from appropriate personnel such as road safety consultants/local police. label or draw pictures to indicate appropriate and safe behaviours for a given scenario – respond to teacher questions such as ‘What is safe behaviour…?’ in specialist areas within the school. images of scenarios into ‘safe’ and ‘unsafe’ and indicate reasons for their choice – identify. train safe officers or station master. pictures. road/bike safety consultants. match. surf life savers.5. • appropriate response to potentially dangerous situations. as a pedestrian.

alerting trusted adults to indicators of unsafe situations and seeking support from appropriate individuals when confronted with unsafe situations • within structured role-plays demonstrate the application of developed guidelines. 236 . LS. photographs and/or written formats. broken glass.11 Students learn about: Students learn to: Integrated learning experiences. instruction and assessment Students • develop a practical set of guidelines for general safety in the environment using pictures. avoiding and reporting hazards such as we floors. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Development of a practical set of guidelines for general safety in the environment may indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations. Feedback • safe and unsafe situations • respond to indicators of unsafe situations • safe and unsafe situations • recognise that safety depends on the behaviour of themselves and others Oral.5. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • development of guidelines for general safety in the environment • demonstration of safe and appropriate behaviour in a range of situations. Possible scenarios for role-plays may include: – recognising and using safe places to cross roads – locating and wearing seat belts appropriately – recognising. Programming and Assessment Focus: Safety in the environment (cont) Outcomes: LS. Students’ responses may indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations in the environment.10.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. Such guidelines may include ways to identify indicators of unsafe situations.

pictures. LS. • safe and unsafe personal situations • recognise aspects of safe and unsafe personal situations • sort images of scenarios into those that are ‘safe’ and those that are potentially ‘unsafe’ in relation to their personal safety and wellbeing and indicate reasons for their choice continued 237 . Students • view pictures/videos of specific scenarios that focus on personal safety and wellbeing in a range of situations Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • safe and unsafe personal situations • recognise aspects of safe and unsafe personal situations Students’ participation and responses may indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations. Oral. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Personal safety and wellbeing Outcomes: LS. instruction and assessment Teacher • uses videos.11. Sorting images of scenarios into safe and unsafe may indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.17 Students learn about: Students learn to: Integrated learning experiences. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ recognition of safe and unsafe situations.5. stories and appropriate child protection resources to focus student attention on specific aspects of personal safety • supports the development and use of appropriate strategies that promote personal safety and wellbeing • provides opportunities for students to demonstrate appropriate and safe personal behaviour within the context of both role plays and actual situations.

eg sport. eg using change rooms at the local swimming pool • sort or match pictures to indicate behaviour which is appropriate for particular situations. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ recognition of safe practice in a range of situations.5. Programming and Assessment Focus: Personal safety and wellbeing (cont) Outcomes: LS. Feedback Oral.11. safety and to be treated with dignity and sensitivity • participating in physical activities • recognise appropriate touching and handling involved in carrying out personal procedures • recognise and demonstrate behaviour which is appropriate for participation in a preferred physical activity at school or in the community. continued 238 . rock concerts. These may include: – participating in or undertaking personal/health care procedures – using change rooms in both school and community contexts – relating to strangers – travelling safely alone or with others – participating with peers in recreational activities in the community. parties Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Students’ participation and responses may indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations and/or demonstrating safe practices that promote personal wellbeing. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. instruction and assessment • their right to privacy. LS.17 Students learn about: Students learn to: Integrated learning experiences.

visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • appropriate responses to potentially dangerous situations • strategies to communicate dissatisfaction and distress in relation to unwanted touching. This may include: – identifying photographs of trusted adults – naming school and community personnel who could assist in specific situations – making and carrying a support network card using photographs or names of trusted adults and/or other students who can provide personal support – establishing a routine to identify. threats. • development of a list of trusted adults who can provide support in relation to personal safety and wellbeing issues. LS. locate.11. Programming and Assessment Focus: Personal safety and wellbeing (cont) Outcomes: LS. for example: – what is ‘appropriate/inappropriate touching’ by a trusted adult in the context of personal/health care procedures – appropriate behaviour for using change rooms at a swimming pool – personal strategies to reject inappropriate touching when playing games or engaging in recreational activities with others – personal strategies to locate and tell appropriate adults about inappropriate touching. bullying or harassment • recognise known people within a network of trusted adults with whom it is appropriate to communicate dissatisfaction and distress in relation to unwanted touch.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. threats or bullying behaviour (No-Go-Tell routine) – personal strategies to reject medication or illegal drugs or substances • develop a personal list of trusted adults and/or other students who can be approached for support in relation to personal safety and wellbeing issues. bullying or harassment Students’ participation in the development of a personal list of trusted adults may assist students in demonstrating safe practices that promote personal wellbeing. threats. contact and communicate with trusted adults and/or other students in relation to personal safety and wellbeing issues Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Responding to teacher questioning and participating in structured role-plays may assist students in recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations and/or demonstrating safe practices that promote personal wellbeing. continued 239 . bribes.17 Students learn about: Students learn to: Integrated learning experiences. harassment. Feedback • safe and unsafe personal situations • recognise specific aspects of safe and unsafe personal situations • the appropriate and inappropriate use of substances demonstrate refusal skills when offered medication by another student • demonstrate refusal skills when offered illegal drugs or substances for inappropriate purposes • Oral. instruction and assessment Students • respond to teacher questions and participate in structured role-plays to clarify and indicate appropriate responses in a range of scenarios.5. bribes. bribes. LS.

Feedback • behaviour that is appropriate to a range of situations recognise private and social situations • demonstrate behaviours which are appropriate to private situations • recognise the need for other’s privacy • demonstrate behaviours that are socially appropriate in a range of situations • Oral. instruction and assessment Students • develop a set of practical guidelines for personal safety and wellbeing in a range of situations using pictures. advice and support Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Students’ participation in the development of guidelines may indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations.11. who they are going with. Programming and Assessment Focus: Personal safety and wellbeing (cont) Outcomes: LS. LS. and what time they will be home – respecting own and others need for privacy when dressing/undertaking personal health care – recognising and observing ‘personal space’ for themselves and others – refraining from expressing physical affection to inappropriate or unknown people – identifying appropriate strategies/routines in response to inappropriate personal behaviour by others • demonstrate safety steps or strategies that can be used in unsafe or threatening situations (No-Go-Tell routine). bullying or harassment • develop and use individualised communication strategies and devices to carry out ‘No-Go-Tell’ routine in a range of situations Demonstration of the NoGo-Tell routine may assist students in demonstrating safe practices that promote personal wellbeing and may indicate recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations. continued 240 .17 Students learn about: Students learn to: Integrated learning experiences.5. photographs and/or written formats: – letting others know where they are going. • demonstration of strategies for maintaining personal safety and wellbeing in unsafe or threatening situations. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • development of safety rules to address potential hazards in relationships • strategies to communicate dissatisfaction and distress in relation to unwanted touching. This involves the skills required to: – say no in threatening situations – get away from the unsafe situation – seek help.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. threats. bribes.

Programming and Assessment Focus: Personal safety and wellbeing (cont) Outcomes: LS. Feedback behaviour that is appropriate to a range of situations • the appropriate and inappropriate use of substances • • • • • • demonstrate behaviours which are appropriate to private situations demonstrate behaviours that are socially appropriate in a range of situations develop and use individualised communication strategies and devices to carry out ‘No-Go-Tell’ routine in a range of situations demonstrate refusal skills when offered medication by another student demonstrate refusal skills when offered illegal drugs or substances for inappropriate purposes Oral. instruction and assessment Students • demonstrate the application of guidelines for personal safety and wellbeing in the context of structured role-plays.17 Students learn about: Students learn to: Integrated learning experiences. LS. This may involve demonstrating: – appropriate personal behaviours in a variety of scenarios – strategies to deal with inappropriate behaviour by others in a variety of scenarios (‘No-Go-Tell’) – appropriate use of their support network card in the context of specific scenarios – strategies to reject medication or illegal drugs or substances Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Students participation in structured role-plays may indicate demonstrating safe practices that promote personal wellbeing and/or recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.11. continued 241 .5. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ identification of potential hazards in the environment and demonstration of protective behaviours to avoid danger. LS.

5. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Personal safety and wellbeing (cont) Outcomes: LS.11. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Demonstration of appropriate behaviours in school and community settings may indicate demonstrating safe practices that promote personal wellbeing and/or recognising and responding to safe and unsafe situations. Feedback • behaviour that is appropriate to a range of situations • demonstrate behaviours that are socially appropriate in a range of situations Oral. instruction and assessment Students • demonstrate appropriate behaviours in school and community situations with teacher-structured controlled variables. This may include demonstrating: – appropriate and safe personal behaviours – appropriate use of their support network card. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompts by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ demonstration of appropriate strategies that promote their personal safety and wellbeing.17 Students learn about: Students learn to: Integrated learning experiences.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. 242 . LS.

friends and country 243 . The sample units should be read in conjunction with the relevant K–10 language syllabus and support documents already distributed to schools and available on the Board of Studies website (www. and record their own experiences using visual and written text.2 Aboriginal Languages Families.nsw.boardofstudies. They acquire vocabulary.edu. Unit number 12. In this unit students develop language skills through exploring the cultural features of their school community. expressions and language structures within this context. Programming and Assessment 12 Languages Sample units of work have been prepared to assist teachers in programming Life Skills outcomes and content from the Languages key learning area. read and respond to texts. In this unit students develop language skills through cultural and community activities and explore a theme relating to community activities at the river/waterway. Students participate in a range of experiences that focus on using language within the context of a school cultural celebration.au). 12.1 Syllabus Selected K–10 Language Syllabus Unit title Let’s celebrate together Unit description This unit has been written generically and may be used for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content from any selected language syllabus. Students also listen. They also extend these skills through community-based activities.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.

opportunity to visit local restaurant/café.MLC.2 recognises the significant role of food in society. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the languages syllabuses and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. Programming and Assessment 12.MBC.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences.9 recognises the contribution of Aboriginal peoples and other cultures to LS.MLC.6. This unit has been written generically and is intended to be used for students undertaking Life Skills outcomes and content from any selected language syllabus.1 experiences a variety of artmaking activities LS. Resources Samples and images of food and drink.1 participates in making food items LS. Links A student: A student: Dance Geography LS. recipe books.2 explores own and other cultures. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 4 unit ‘Eating and Drinking’ in the selected language Stages 4 and 5: Advice on Programming and Assessment.2 uses [Language] to interact in everyday activities • identifying traditional foods LS. responses or a point of LS. materials for language games.2 explores ways in which meaning is conveyed by nonverbal communication • naming items that are eaten and drunk LS. CD-ROMs. cultural and historical contexts LS.1 experiences cultural diversity • ordering food and drink in a restaurant LS. view.7 explores the diversity of Australian communities LS.10 composes increasingly complex written texts LS.1 recognises words and phrases in [Language] • identifying food and drink vocabulary LS.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology LS.9 writes short texts for everyday purposes Music LS.4 uses written [Language] to communicate • describing food and drink LS. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests.12 communicates for a variety of purposes Visual Arts Food Technology LS.2 uses dance technique to communicate LS.5.4 explores ways in which meaning is conveyed by written language • using culturally appropriate language LS. videos.MBC.5.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.4 uses spoken language to interact with a range of audiences Information and Software Technology LS.UL. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes. Life Skills Outcomes Languages Functions and Structures A student: Language functions and structures include: LS.2 listens for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts Australian society LS. ingredients for traditional foods. They also extend these skills through community-based activities.1 Languages Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Let’s celebrate together Unit title: Let’s celebrate together! Description: In this unit students develop language skills through exploring the cultural features of their school community.1. internet.1 experiences a variety of dance performances History English LS.5 recognises visual texts in a range of contexts LS.3 obtains and gives information in [Language] • expressing likes and dislikes LS.UL.UL. textbooks.UL. Students participate in a range of experiences that focus on using language within the context of a school cultural celebration.3. 244 .7 experiences music from a variety of social.7 reads and responds to short written texts solutions LS. audiocassettes. cooking equipment and utensils.

visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • sharing of their cultural items with others • • the diversity of cultural expression • share cultural items with others. eg painting. traditions. stories • introduces students to appropriate [Language] vocabulary in the context of participating in a range of cultural activities. recognising features that are the same and different across cultures. Students • bring items from home that reflect features of their cultural background to share with others. LS. festivals/special occasions. greetings. Sharing cultural items and recognising features that are the same and different across cultures may involve experiencing cultural diversity and/or exploring their own and other cultures. Oral. eg photographs. This may include: – modelling costume items such as head wear – displaying photographs of family cultural celebrations – listening to music associated with a range of cultural celebrations – listening to/viewing stories. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to identify the cultural background of themselves and others in the classroom and school community • assists students to explore some of the features of specific cultural groups. continued 245 . eg dance. songs. eg participate in making a mural • participation of cultural diversity within the school and wider community.1. music. dancing – sharing in cultural activities alongside community members. traditional costumes. songs/chants. stories Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • cultural characteristics of the school community • • • cultural characteristics of the school community • the importance of cultural celebrations • • • • recognise visual representations of culture(s) identify names of countries in [Language] identify features of the culture(s) identify culture(s) represented in the school community identify features of the culture(s) participate in cultural activities explore the diversity of cultural practices Bringing items from home that reflect features of their culture may involve experiencing cultural diversity and/or exploring their own and other cultures. music/musical instruments.MBC. myths and legends – learning a dance associated with a particular festival – exploring the movement. clothing/costumes. feel and sound produced by musical instruments from a range of cultures – listening to/viewing cultural presentations by members of the community.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.MBC. Programming and Assessment Focus: Coming together Outcomes: LS.

continued 246 . • communication of meaning in nonverbal ways identify the meaning conveyed by gestures and facial expressions • respond to gestures and facial expressions • Teacher • explicitly teaches appropriate ways to respond to gestures and facial expressions associated with greetings • provides opportunities for students to use appropriate gestures in the context of meeting members of local cultural communities • explicitly teaches the words for greetings and farewells in [Language] • explicitly teaches [Language] vocabulary to assist students to engage in a simple conversation. LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ creation of a poster.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.UL2 • identify features of traditional lifestyle • compare aspects of their own lifestyle and beliefs with those of other communities • demonstrate respect for diverse cultural practices • • Oral. eg costumes worn for particular occasions such as weddings. Programming and Assessment Focus: Coming together (cont) Outcomes: LS. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.MBC. Students • respond appropriately to nonverbal greeting by others in the school and community. festivals. model or multimedia presentation. LS.MBC. model or multimedia presentation to illustrate a particular cultural aspect may involve exploring their own and other cultures. This may include: – whistling. offering hand in response – demonstrating appropriate gestures when meeting members of the school and/or community Responding appropriately to nonverbal greetings may involve exploring ways in which meaning is conveyed by nonverbal communication. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Making a poster.MLC.UL1. Feedback • features of lifestyles and belief systems in diverse cultures the importance of respect for the culture and lifestyle of others Focus: Meet and greet Outcomes: LS. waving in response. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ appropriate responses to nonverbal greetings. bowing in return. instruction and assessment Students make a poster/model/multimedia presentation to illustrate a particular cultural aspect.2. Oral.1.

. goodbye.2.UL2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Engaging in a conversation using [Language] vocabulary may involve recognising words and phrases in [Language] and/or using [Language] to interact in everyday activities.MLC.. how are you. LS. Feedback • words and phrases in a variety of spoken contexts • the different purposes of using known language listen to words. LS. greeting and farewelling others using appropriate words in [Language] may involve recognising words and phrases in [Language] and/or using [Language] to interact in everyday activities. eg hello. eg My name is. 247 .UL1. phrases and simple sentences to identify meaning • identify known words and phrases • establish and maintain social contact • • Oral. What is your name? Where do you live? • demonstration of use of [Language] in a conversation. maintain and conclude a conversation • respond to and use vocabulary using [Language] within the context of a conversation. instruction and assessment Students • meet/greet and farewell others using appropriate words in [Language]. I live at…. Programming and Assessment Focus: Meet and greet (cont) Outcomes: LS. This may include responding to and answering the following.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • recognition and demonstration of the use of greetings and farewells in [Language] words and phrases in a variety of spoken contexts • the different purposes of using known language • • • • • the use of language in the context of a conversation • • identify known words and phrases in conversation establish and maintain social contact use language for enjoyment share personal information engage in conversation initiate. thank you Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Meeting. I am 12 years old.

phrases and simple sentences to identify meaning identify known words and phrases identify known words and phrases in conversation read whole words. 248 . instruction and assessment Teacher • invites parents/members of the local community to share and talk about a variety of food and drink associated with their culture • explicitly teaches [Language] vocabulary associated with food and drink items of the particular culture • assists students to organise a luncheon at the school as part of a cultural celebration/multicultural day/community festival with an emphasis on using [Language] in context.MBC. LS.4.1.1. Recognising and/or using [Language] vocabulary to identify food and drink items associated with a particular culture may involve recognising words and phrases in [Language]. Programming and Assessment Focus: Let’s do lunch – at school Outcomes: LS.UL. phrases and simple sentences recognise symbols. This may involve: – matching pictures. LS. words and phrases with food and drink associated with particular cultures – recognising and/or using the images/symbols/words associated with food and drink items – naming food and drink items in [Language] Oral. LS. photographs. • words and phrases in a variety of spoken contexts words and phrases in a variety of written contexts • • • • • the relationship between printed words and symbols and their sounds and meanings • • listen to words. letters and syllables in print in [Language] • recognise and/or use [Language] vocabulary to identify food and drink items associated with a particular culture.MBC.UL.UL. Students • participate in a talk/presentation by parents/members of the local community on the food and drink associated with their culture Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • features of lifestyles and belief systems in diverse cultures • compare aspects of their own lifestyles and with those of [Language] communities Identifying the variety of food and drink items associated with a particular culture may indicate experiencing cultural diversity.3. LS.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.UL. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.2. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • identification of food and drink associated with particular cultures • identification and/or demonstration of use of language associated with food and drink.

2.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.UL. LS.1. Participating in planning a cultural celebration may involve experiencing cultural diversity. Designing printed menus may involve recognising words and phrases in [Language] and/or using written [Language] to communicate information. eg other students. LS. menus from restaurants/cafes. • demonstration of use of [Language] to name food items and the development of a printed menu using [Language].UL. phrases and simple sentences • communicate information in a variety of ways • participate in a step-by-step plan to organise a lunch at school as part of a cultural celebration/multicultural day/community festival. LS. magazines • Oral. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • demonstration of use of [Language] in a conversation • planning of a lunch associated with a cultural celebration Using language associated with food and drink in the context of a cultural celebration may involve recognising words and phrases in [Language] and/or using [Language] to interact in everyday activities.UL.4. eg use examples from the internet.UL.MBC. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Let’s do lunch – at school (cont) Outcomes: LS. members of the community – selecting traditional music and making decorations • determine the menu for the cultural celebration using [Language].2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. This may include: – selecting pictures of food and drink items for the menu – naming food and drink items in [Language] that will be made at the school and those to be brought by other members of the school/community – identifying and purchasing the food and drink items. Feedback • the use of language in the context of a conversation • engage in conversation • the importance of cultural celebrations • participate in cultural activities • written texts available for accessing information words and phrases in a variety of written contexts • ways to use written text to communicate information • locate appropriate written text to obtain information • select relevant information from written text • read whole words. LS. parents. continued 249 .1. instruction and assessment Students • participate in conversations about food and drink using [Language] Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Participating in conversation about food and drink may involve using [Language] to interact in everyday activities.3. eg identify food and drink from images/symbols and/or [Language] from packaging labels during a visit to food outlets – designing and producing a printed menu using [Language].MBC. This may include: – determining the nature and type of the celebration and who will participate.

1. • demonstration of use of written words and phrases in [Language] in the context of designing thank you notes.MBC.1. 250 . Writing thank you notes may indicate using written [Language] to communicate.4. LS. This may involve: – preparing food and drink for the luncheon as required – meeting and greeting others on arrival using gesture and/or [Language] – engaging in conversation using [Language] during the lunch – farewelling guests using gesture and/or [Language] Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Communication with others using greetings and farewells may involve exploring ways in which meaning is conveyed using nonverbal communication and/or recognising words and phrases in [Language] and/or using [Language] to interact in everyday activities.UL.2.UL. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.3.UL.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. LS. LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Let’s do lunch – at school (cont) Outcomes: LS.MLC.UL. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • participation in the cultural celebration and use of greetings and farewells in [Language] • • communicate information in a variety of ways • write thank you notes using pictures or written text in [Language] to thank others for their participation. LS. instruction and assessment Students • participate in a cultural celebration at school. Feedback • communication of meaning in nonverbal ways • words and phrases in a variety of spoken contexts • the use of language in the context of a conversation ways to use written text to communicate information respond to gestures and facial expressions use language for enjoyment • identify known words and phrases • identify known words and phrases in conversation • engage in a conversation • Oral.

LS. LS. LS. by arranging a two-stage visit to a [Language] café/restaurant • assists students to record their experiences at a [Language] restaurant in a multimedia presentation using [Language].1.UL. 251 .2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.MBC. LS. • Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • cultural features of the local community • the different purposes of using known language • diversity of cultural values and practices • • • the use of language in the context of a conversation • ways to use written text to communicate information • • • identify local places of cultural significance communicate basic needs and wants in a variety of ways recognise that there are culturally appropriate expressions and behaviour for particular contexts engage in conversation communicate information in a variety of ways Visiting and eating at a [Language] café/restaurant in the community may involve experiencing cultural diversity and/or obtaining and giving information in [Language] and/or using [Language] to interact in everyday activities.UL.1. eg ‘This is good’. ‘Can I have another drink please?’ ‘Thanks.UL. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ use of [Language] in the context of a visit to cafe/restaurant.2. instruction and assessment Teacher extends students’ experiences of using [Language] in the context of eating and drinking. Programming and Assessment Focus: ‘Let’s go out for lunch’ Outcomes: LS. LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.UL4.MBC. Oral. Recording their experiences at a [Language] café/restaurant may involve obtaining and giving information in [Language] and/or using written [Language] to communicate. I enjoyed that’ – record their experiences at a [Language] café/restaurant in a multimedia presentation using [Language].3. Students • extend their experiences of using [Language] by: – visiting a [Language] café/restaurant to sample/taste a variety of food and drink items and indicating their preferences using [Language] – obtaining a menu from a [Language] café/restaurant and identifying and recording preferences from the menu using [Language] – participating in a follow-up visit to a [Language] café/restaurant for lunch – ordering (and eating) a meal from the menu using [Language] – engaging in conversation in [Language] during the meal.

They acquire vocabulary. LS. expressions and language structures within this context. (We cooked fish. friends and country Description: In this unit students develop language skills by exploring a theme relating to community activities at the river. (This is my mother. Alice Springs We are Speaking Gamilaraay – Yuwaalaraay (book and CD) Yaama Maliyaa – An Aboriginal Languages Textbook Learn Yuwaalaraay. eg Ngaya yanaanhi.MLC. (I went. friends and country Unit title: Families.) • Recounting past events. IAD Press. Students also listen. eg Gayrr ngay Harry. A.3 explores ways in which meaning is conveyed by spoken language • Exchanging information about family activities.1 recognises words and phrases in Aboriginal languages (Their names are …) Gunii ngay nhalay.) Ngiyani guduu yilamay.4 explores ways in which meaning is conveyed by written language you doing?) Minyaaya dhaadhaa? (Where is grandfather?) Wii wiimaldanha nguu. (We live at Walgett. The unit provides a range of ways in which students may engage in learning activities and students should participate at a level appropriate to their abilities and interests. Giacon J and Lissarrague (ed) 2003.) Resources Published Resources Yuwaalayaay Dictionary – Ash.UL. Learning activities address selected ‘learn about’ and ‘learn to’ statements within the Life Skills content of the syllabus and may be prioritised and selected to suit the needs of students. (I have three brothers. Gaay Yuwaalaraay Winanga-li-gu website at: http://www.) Gulibaa ngay dhagaan .MLC.) Minyaaya baawaa ngay? (Where is my sister?) Dhaldanha LS. activities.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.2 uses Aboriginal languages to interact in everyday activities (Her name is …) Ngiyani wilay-la-nha Walgett-ga.org Teacher-made Resources • photographs.2 explores their own and other cultures.) Ngaya milan banay. (I am fishing. animals • model written text for reading activity – recount of an event at the river 252 . read and respond to texts.) Nguu LS.UL. picture flashcards of family members. eg Minyanda nginda? (What are LS. (My name is Harry. and record their own experiences using visual and written text.1 experiences cultural diversity (He is making a fire. nguu.UL.yuwaalaraay. eg Ngaya yinabildanha.MBC.MBC.) LS.) LS. (She is eating. Life Skills Outcomes Language Functions and Structures A student: • Introducing family.) Ganungu gayrr … LS. (She is swimming.2 Aboriginal Languages Years 7–10 Life Skills unit: Families. (I am eleven. Programming and Assessment 12.UL.4 uses written Aboriginal language to communicate gubiyaanha.3 obtains and gives information in Aboriginal languages • Describing present activities.) Gayrr nguungu … LS.

7 explores the diversity of Australian communities LS. responses or a point LS.3 uses technology and aids to communicate with a range of audiences LS. cultural and historical contexts LS.9 recognises the contribution of Aboriginal peoples and other cultures to Dance Australian society LS.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. media and multimedia.1 experiences a variety of dance performances LS. teachers may wish to link the activities in this unit with the Stage 4 unit ‘Families and Country’ in Aboriginal Languages Years K–10: Advice on Programming and Assessment (pp 25–36).2 explores Aboriginal culture and cultural expression History LS.3 recognises the importance of families and communities to Aboriginal people LS.11 views and responds to a range of visual texts.7 experiences music from a variety of social.3.2 uses dance technique to communicate Information and Software Technology LS.1.2 listens for a variety of purposes in a range of contexts Music LS. 253 .5.1 recognises factors that contribute to an Aboriginal person’s identity LS. of view.7 reads and responds to short written texts LS.4 uses spoken language to interact with a range of audiences Visual Arts LS. For students working towards Life Skills outcomes in regular classes.1 experiences a variety of artmaking activities LS.6 makes a variety of artworks that reflect experiences. Programming and Assessment Links A student: A student: Aboriginal Studies Geography LS.9 writes short texts for everyday purposes LS.3 uses a variety of techniques to present information and software technology English solutions LS.

stories Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • cultural characteristics of the school community • the diversity of cultural expression recognise visual representations of culture • identify names of countries • identify features of the cultures • explore the diversity of cultural practices • • explore Aboriginal cultural items.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. continued 254 .2. eg participating in making a mural. eg A Day at the River Bringing items from home that reflect features of their culture may involve experiencing cultural diversity and/or exploring their own and other cultures. Oral. Exploring Aboriginal cultural items may involve exploring their own and other cultures.UL. feel and sound produced by musical instruments – listening to/viewing cultural presentations by members of the Aboriginal community. songs.UL. constructing/decorating items in the classroom/school to represent a theme. instruction and assessment Teacher • assists students to identify the cultural background of themselves and others in the classroom/school community • assists students to explore aspects of cultural diversity • invites members of the local Aboriginal community to share features of their culture. Programming and Assessment Focus: Coming together Outcomes: LS. eg Dreamtime stories – observing and participating in a dance associated with a particular occasion or ceremony – exploring the movement. Students • bring items from home that reflect features of their cultural background to share with others. eg photographs.1. items of traditional apparel. LS. LS. This may include: – listening to traditional and contemporary Aboriginal music associated with a range of celebrations – listening to/viewing stories.UL. music.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • sharing of their own cultural items with others • response to Aboriginal cultural items. dancing – sharing in cultural activities alongside community members. eg painting.

UL. LS. LS. book and CD • assists students to recognise.UL. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ listening.1. Feedback features of lifestyles and belief systems in diverse cultures • the importance of respect for the culture and lifestyle of others • • identify features of traditional lifestyle compare aspects of their own lifestyle and beliefs with those of other communities • Oral.UL. continued 255 . LS. Focus: Family and friends Outcomes: LS. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ creation of a poster. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Making a poster.UL.3 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. participation and responses. model or multimedia presentation to illustrate a particular aspect of Aboriginal culture may involve exploring their own and other cultures. instruction and assessment Students • explore a particular aspect of Aboriginal culture through the creation of a poster/multimedia presentation. LS.4 Teacher • plays the song ‘We are one family’ from ‘We are speaking Yuwaalaraay’.UL.UL. share and label family photographs in a personal album in English and Yuwaalaraay • explicitly teaches the language to identify family members by speaking Yuwaalaraay. model or multimedia presentation.2. Oral. An example in relation to items of traditional apparel may involve: – selecting pictures/photographs of items of traditional apparel – annotating pictures of traditional apparel – researching through print and electronic media – selecting and organising information under the following headings in relation to traditional apparel (Who wears it? What do they wear? When do they wear it? Where do they wear it? Why do they wear it?) – making a poster/models/multimedia presentation to illustrate a particular aspect of Aboriginal culture. Programming and Assessment Focus: Coming together (cont) Outcomes: LS. Students • listen to and participate in the song ‘We are one family’ • words and phrases in a variety of spoken contexts • identify known words and phrases Listening/participating in singing may involve recognising words and phrases in Aboriginal languages.2.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.1.

LS. Programming and Assessment Focus: Family and friends (cont) Outcomes: LS.1.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.4 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. ‘Cathy is my cousin’.UL.2. instruction and assessment Students • display family photographs in a personal album Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Displaying family photographs may involve using Aboriginal languages to interact in everyday activities Labelling photographs may involve obtaining and giving information in Aboriginal languages Identifying photographs in an album may involve obtaining and giving information in Aboriginal languages.UL. • demonstration and use of their personal album to introduce others to their family. Feedback • the different purposes of using known language • share personal information • ways to use written texts to communicate information the different purposes of using known language • communicate information in a variety of ways share personal information • label family photographs in Yuwaalaraay Oral. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • display of items in an album • demonstration of use of Yuwaalaraay to label photographs. LS. • • • • identify family members in photographs in a personal album by speaking Yuwaalaraay. eg ‘John is my brother’. ‘Nola is our sister’ demonstration and use of Yuwaalaraay to identify family members • the use of language in the context of conversation • engage in conversation • use their personal album to introduce peers to their family by using family terms in Yuwaalaraay.UL. Using an album to introduce others to their family may involve using Aboriginal languages to interact in everyday activities. 256 .

visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ response to nonverbal greetings. Oral.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. waving in response. This may include: – whistling. LS.UL. instruction and assessment Teacher • provides opportunities to practise skills in the context of meeting others in the school and members of the community • explicitly teaches appropriate ways to respond to gestures and facial expressions associated with greetings • explicitly teaches the words for greetings and farewells in Yuwaalaraay • explicitly teaches vocabulary in Yuwaalaraay to assist students to engage in a simple conversation. LS. offering hand in response – demonstrating appropriate gestures when meeting members of the school and/or community Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • communication of meaning in nonverbal ways identify the meaning conveyed by gestures and facial expressions • respond to gestures and facial expressions • Responding to nonverbal greetings in the school and community may involve exploring ways in which meaning is conveyed by nonverbal communication.UL3. Students • respond appropriately to nonverbal greetings by others in the school and community.1. Programming and Assessment Focus: Meet and greet Outcomes: LS. bowing in return. continued 257 .2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.UL.MLC.2. LS.

258 . eg hello. thank you Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Using appropriate words in Yuwaalaraay in the context of greeting members of the community may involve using Aboriginal languages to interact in everyday activities.UL3. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • use of appropriate words in Yuwaalaraay to meet.MLC.2. I am 12 years old.1.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.. Feedback • the use of language in the context of a conversation • engage in conversation • the use of language in the context of a conversation • initiate. LS.. goodbye. LS.UL.UL. Responding to and using vocabulary in Yuwaalaraay in the context of engaging in conversation may involve using Aboriginal languages to interact in everyday activities.2 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. Programming and Assessment Focus: Meet and greet (cont) Outcomes: LS. eg My name is. LS. I live at…. instruction and assessment Students • use appropriate words in Yuwaalaraay to meet/greet and farewell others in the school and members of the community.. how are you. This may include responding to and answering the following. greet and farewell others in the school and community • use of appropriate words in Yuwaalaraay in the context of a conversation. maintain and conclude a conversation • respond to and use vocabulary in Yuwaalaraay within the context of a conversation. What is your name? Where do you live? Oral.

2. Students • listen to the teacher tell or read the cartoon story of ‘A Day at the River’ in Yuwaalaraay and sequence pictures to retell the story Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) Feedback • words and phrases in a variety of spoken contexts • listen to words.UL.3. ‘The fish is good’. ‘That is a good fire’. • words and phrases in a variety of spoken contexts • identify known words and phrases • the use of language in the context of conversation • engage in conversation use vocabulary in Yuwaalaraay to describe activities that are shown in the cartoon. LS. This may involve: – sequencing pictures to make sentences to describe activities – selecting and matching words and phrases – reading simple sentences • respond to pictures/films/videos shown by the teacher and participate in a discussion. LS. Participating in a discussion may involve using Aboriginal languages to interact in everyday activities. Programming and Assessment Focus: A day at the river Outcomes: LS.UL. eg ‘He is fishing’.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning. and teaches the vocabulary in Yuwaalaraay related to the story • uses a variety of media to lead a discussion about activities that may occur during an organised outing to a river/waterway • explicitly teaches vocabulary in Yuwaalaraay relating to the planned visit to a river/waterway • assists students to use Yuwaalaraay to describe their experiences during and after the visit. Using vocabulary to describe a story may involve recognising words and phrases in Aboriginal languages.1. LS.4 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences. • use of appropriate words in Yuwaalaraay to participate in a discussion. using Yuwaalaraay. instruction and assessment Teacher • tells. phrases and simple sentences to identify meaning Listening to and retelling a story may involve recognising words and phrases in Aboriginal languages. to suggest and talk about activities which they could undertake during a day at a river/waterway • Oral. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’: • listening to and retelling a story • use of appropriate words in Yuwaalaraay to describe activities in the story.UL. reads or displays (using picture sequences) the cartoon story of ‘A Day at the River’ in English and Yuwaalaraay.UL. continued 259 .

LS.3. what are you going to do?’ ‘I am cooking lunch’.UL.1. Programming and Assessment Focus: A day at the river (cont) Outcomes: LS. instruction and assessment Students • make a list of items using Yuwaalaraay which may be needed for their visit to a river/waterway and make other appropriate preparations • during a visit to a river/waterway students may: – engage in conversation using Yuwaalaraay to describe their activities. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ use of appropriate vocabulary in Yuwaalaraay to record their experiences following a visit to a river/waterway. maintain and conclude a conversation • Oral. speech and feeling bubbles – edit videos taken during their activities at the river and add voice-overs using words and phrases in Yuwaalaraay – develop a summary of their activities at the river using photographs and/or pictures with appropriate descriptions in Yuwaalaraay for inclusion in the school/community newsletter – document and share their experiences with other members of the school community through a multimedia presentation with appropriate commentary in Yuwaalaraay. ‘I am looking for animals’ – take photographs/videos of their activities and of the river/waterway environment – make a recording of the sounds associated with the river/waterway • following the visit to a river/waterway students may: – sequence photographs to tell a story of their visit to a river/waterway – label photographs to describe their activities at the river using words and phrases in Yuwaalaraay – make a poster or paint a mural to describe their activities at the river. visual and/or tangible feedback and prompting by the teacher to guide and affirm students’ use of appropriate vocabulary in Yuwaalaraay to plan and participate in a visit to a river/waterway.UL. making a poster. 260 . Feedback • the use of language in the context of conversation engage in conversation • initiate. editing videos or developing summaries to share their experiences with others may involve obtaining and giving information in Aboriginal languages and/or using written Aboriginal language to communicate.Life Skills Years 7–10: Advice on Planning.2.UL.4 Students learn about Students learn to Integrated learning experiences.UL. Evidence of learning (words in italics refer to Life Skills outcomes) identifying items for a visit to a river/waterway may involve using Aboriginal languages to interact in everyday activities. LS. Oral. using words and phrases in Yuwaalaraay in the form of thought. ways to use spoken text to communicate information • ways to use written text to communicate information • communicate information in a variety of ways • communicate information in a variety of ways • Labelling photographs. LS. eg ‘I am going fishing.

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