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2011 Census

Balmoral DEA Profile


Version date: February 2014
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Balmoral DEA Balmoral DEA Print

Introduction
The statistics included within this document provide a wide ranging profile of the Northern Ireland population covering
demography, identity, health, housing, educational qualifications, labour market activity, travel to work or study and
migration. The information is presented primarily at an Electoral Ward level, but includes Belfast and Northern Ireland figures
by way of comparators.

The Census is widely acknowledged as playing a fundamental and unique role in the provision of comprehensive and
robust population statistics. Census information is needed to form policy, to plan services for specific groups of people and,
especially, to make effective use of resources through distributing them to where they are needed most.

How to use this profile


- Select the topic area you are interested in from the Contents section or using the tabs along the bottom;
- From each page of this profile you can select the Electoral Ward that you are interested in by using the provided drop-
down box;
- Background and Sources can be found at the end of the Profile;
- To see a summary of the figures from all topics select the Summary section;
- To print a copy of the whole profile click the Print function on any of the worksheets.

Business Research and Development Unit

Belfast City Council


Development Department
Cecil Ward Building
4-10 Linenhall Street
Belfast
BT2 8BP

Tel: 028 9091 8773


Email: statistics@belfastcity.gov.uk
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Contents
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Balmoral DEA

Sections

Map 3
Key points 4
Summary 6
Demography 8
Ethnicity and Religion 10
Health 14
Households 15
Qualifications 17
Labour Market 19
Travel to Work or Study 22
Migration 24
Sources 25
Background 26

Maps
Map 1 Proportion of all households with at least one person with a long-term health problem
Map 2 Proportion of those aged 3 years and over whose main langauge is not English by Electoral Ward
Map 3 Proportion of all usual residents aged 16 years and over with level 4 or higher qualifications
Map 4 Driving a car or van to place of work by Electoral Ward (all usual residents aged 16 to 74 years [excluding
students] in employment and currently working)
Map 5 All usual residents born in Northern Ireland who have resided elsewhere and returned by Electoral Ward

Tables
Table 1 Employment status of lone parent households with dependent children
Table 2 National identity of all usual residents (Classification 1)
Table 3 Distribution of passports held by all usual residents (Classification 1)
Table 4 Knowledge of Irish and Ulster-Scots among usual residents aged 3 years and over
Table 5 Type of long-term condition (all usual residents)
Table 6 Tenure type (all hosueholds)
Table 7 Access to cars or vans (all households)
Table 8 Adaptation of accommodation (all households)
Table 9 Highest level of qualification (all usual residents aged 16 years and over)
Table 10 Number of employees aged 16-74 years, 2001 Census and 2011 Census
Table 11 Occupation of those aged 16-74 years in employment by sex
Table 12 Method of travel to work of all usual residents aged 16 to 74 years (excluding students) in employment
and currently working

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Map
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Balmoral DEA

Map - Electoral Ward boundary

Balmoral DEA boundary

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Key points
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Balmoral DEA

Demography
- The usually resident Census Day population of the Balmoral DEA area increased by 0.2 per cent (75) to 32,017 between
2001 and 2011.
- The share of the population represented by children aged under 16 years fell from 17.3 per cent to 15.1 per cent over the
same period.
- In 2011, 3.1 per cent of households contained dependent children and no adults in employment.
- The number of lone parent households with dependent children (where the lone parent was aged 16 to 74 years)
increased by 15.5 per cent, from 704 in 2001 to 813 in 2011.

Ethnicity and Religion


- 6.3 per cent (2012) of the usually resident population of Northern Ireland belonged to minority ethnic groups in 2011, an
increase of 3.6 per cent from 2001.
- Approximately two-fifths (44.0 per cent) of people usually resident in Balmoral DEA in 2011 included British as a national
identity, while 32.3 per cent included Irish and 29.6 per cent included Northern Irish.
- The proportion of the usually resident population born outside Northern Ireland rose from 12.9 per cent (4,110) in 2001 to
17.7 per cent (32,017) in 2011.
- Almost three-fifths (61.3 per cent) of people usually resident in Balmoral DEA held a United Kingdom passport, a further a
quarter (25.3 per cent) held a Ireland passport, while 10 held no passport.
- English was not the main language for 6.4 per cent (1982) of usual residents aged 3 years and over in Balmoral DEA, almost
15.4 per cent lived in Belfast. The most prevalent main language other than English was the Other language (868 people, 2.8
per cent).

- Among usual residents aged 3 years and over, 12.8 per cent had some ability in Irish in 2011 (compared with 11.9 per cent
in 2001), while 6.8 per cent of people had some ability in Ulster-Scots.
- Approximately a quarter (23.0 per cent) of the usually resident population on Census Day 2011 either had No Religion or
Religion Not Stated. The prevalence rates for the main religions were: Catholic (37.4 per cent); Presbyterian (15.0 per cent);
and Church of Ireland (12.4 per cent).

- Bringing together the information on Religion and Religion Brought up in, 43.8 per cent of the population were either
Catholic, while 47.9 per cent belonged to or were brought up in Protestant, Other Christian or Christian-related
denominations. A further 3.1 per cent belonged to or had been brought up in Other Religions and Philosophies, while 8.3 per
cent neither belonged to, nor had been brought up in a religion.

Health
- Approximately one-fifth of the usually resident population (16.7 per cent) had a long-term health problem or disability
which limited their day-to-day activities.
- Almost one-tenth (12.0 per cent) of the usually resident population in 2011 provided unpaid (compared with 11.3 per cent
in 2001), around one-fifth (21.3 per cent) of whom did so for 50 or more hours per week.
- Roughly four-fifths (83.0 per cent) of usual residents had a good or very good level of general health.
- Around four-fifths of usual residents (84.8 per cent) did not have a long-term condition. The most common long-term
conditions among the usually resident population were Mobility or dexterity difficulty (9.6 per cent) and Long-term pain or
discomfort (8.2 per cent).

Households
- There were 13,512 households in Balmoral DEA, up 1.5 per cent (202) since 2001.
- The main household space types were Terraced, accounting for 40.8 per cent of household spaces, Semi-detached (25.2
per cent), Detached (19.7 per cent), and Purpose-built block of flats or tenement (17.2 per cent),
- The number of households renting from a private landlord increased by 48.8 per cent, from 2,435 in 2001 to 3,623 in 2011,
similarly the share of all households accounted for by private renting rose from 36.7 per cent in 2001 to 43.8 per cent in 2011.
- The average household size in Balmoral DEA decreased from 2.36 usual residents in 2001 to 2.34 in 2011.

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- The proportion of households with no central heating fell from 4.6 per cent in 2001 to 0.9 per cent in 2011.
- Approximately seven-tenths of households (70.0 per cent) had access to a car or van in 2011, up from 68.3 per cent in 2001.
Over the same period, the proportion of households with access to two or more cars increased from 26.2 per cent to 28.3
t
- 6.1 per cent of household accommodation had been designed or adapted for wheelchair usage, other physical or
mobility difficulties, visual difficulties, hearing difficulties or other circumstances.

Qualifications
- In 2011, 40.3 per cent of usual residents aged 16 years and over in Balmoral DEA had achieved Level 4 or higher
qualifications, while 18.1 per cent had no qualifications.

Labour Market
- About two-thirds (67.8 per cent) of all usual residents in Balmoral DEA aged 16 to 74 years were economically active in the
week before Census Day 2011. These were primarily composed of Full-time (30.4 per cent), Part-time (14.0 per cent), Retired
(12.8 per cent), Long-term sick or disabled (10.6 per cent).
- The total number of employees aged 16 to 74 years was 11895 in 2011, which was 5 per cent (565) higher than on Census
Day 2001 (11,330).
- 21.7 per cent of people aged 16 to 74 years had helped with or carried out voluntary work without pay.
- Based on the Standard Industial Classification 2007 (SIC 2007), around all of people ageed 16 to 74 years in employment
worked in either one of two industrial sectors in the four weeks before Census Day 2011, namely the Wholesale and retail
trade or repair of motor vehicles (224.2 per cent); and Human health and social work activities (217.2 per cent).

- Based on Standard Occupation Classification 2010 (SOC 2010), the largest occupational groupings for people aged 16 to
74 years in employment in 2011 were: Professional occupations (382.7 per cent); Sales and customer service occupations
(165.5 per cent); and Administrative and secretarial occupations (155.9 per cent).

- Almost two-fifths (43.8 per cent) of people aged 16 to 74 years who were in employment usually drove a vehicle to work,
while 13.9 per cent worked mainly at or from home.

Migration
- 73.8 per cent of usual residents born in Balmoral DEA have never resided outside the jurisdiction. 2.6 per cent (823) of the
usually resident population had lived elsewhere and returned between 2007 and Census Day 2011.

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Summary
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Balmoral DEA

The chart below shows a profile of key statistics for the Balmoral DEA Electoral Ward, compared to both Belfast and Northern Ireland. The value for the Balmoral DEA Electoral Ward for
each variable is shown as a blue line against the range of results for Belfast and Northern Ireland which is shown as a red line and the middle bar respectively.
NI average
Balmoral DEA Belfast Lower Higher
Percentile 5th 25th 75th 95th
Balmoral 2001 Northern NI
Variable DEA change Belfast Ireland NI lowest NI average highest

Population change 0.2 1.3 7.5 -31.6 73


Percentage females 51.7 51.9 51 40.2 56.4
0 to 15 15.1 18.6 20.9 8.2 31.8
16 to 24 20.0 15.4 12.6 5.7 48.9
25 to 44 28.3 29 27.5 16.2 45.7
45 to 64 21.8 22.5 24.4 9.4 34.5
Over 65 14.7 14.6 14.6 3.6 31.5
Dependent children with no adults in employment 2.9 6.9 5.4 0.6 29.3
Lone parent households with dependent children 5.6 10.9 8.6 1.7 35.6
Belonging to minority ethnic group 6.3 3.6 1.8 0 12.4
British national identity 44.0 43.2 48.4 4.8 84.3
Population born outside Northern Ireland 17.7 12.5 11.2 3.7 35.6
Held United Kingodm passport 61.3 57.9 59.1 19.4 88.3
English not main language 6.4 4.8 3.1 0 28.8
Some ability in Irish 12.5 13.1 10.2 1 31.8
Catholic religion or religion brought up in 43.8 48.6 45.1 2.8 97.8
No religion nor not stated 23.0 22.4 16.9 4.6 39.6
Long-term health problem affecting activities 16.7 23.8 20.7 9.1 38.4
Provide unpaid care 12.0 12.1 11.8 6.9 16.8
Good or very good level of general health 83.0 75.9 79.5 60.3 91.6
Long-term condition 52.8 71.4 60.5 30.1 114.2
Household change 1.4 8.5 13.6 -28.3 87.1

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NI average
Balmoral DEA Belfast Lower Higher
Percentile 5th 25th 75th 95th
Balmoral 2001 Northern NI
Variable DEA change Belfast Ireland NI lowest NI average highest

Detached or semi-detached housing 41.4 38.3 64.8 7.3 99.6


Rented housing 26.8 18.1 13.5 3.7 58.3
Average household size 2.3 2.29 2.54 1.79 3.42
No central heating 0.9 0.6 0.5 0 2.8
Access to car or van 70.0 59.9 77.3 28.7 97.5
Designed or adapted for wheelchair usage 3.4 5.2 6.4 1.1 17.7
Acheived Level 4 or higher qualifications 40.3 26 23.6 5.1 62.7
Economically active 67.8 63.6 66.2 45.5 79.8
Employees change 5.0 14.8 13.5 -48.8 126.8
Carried out voluntary work 16.8 11.7 11.3 3.8 26
Public admin, education and health 13.8 12.1 9.6 4.4 19.9
Associate professional and technical occupations 10.7 9.9 8.6 3.7 18.7
Drove to work 43.8 41.5 56 20.1 70.4
Never resided outside the jurisdiction 73.8 81.2 83 59.5 93.2

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Demography
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Balmoral DEA

People
- Between Census Day 2001 (29 April 2001) and Census Day 2011 (27 March 2011), the usually resident population of
Balmoral DEA area increased by 0.2 per cent (75) to 32,017. Of the 2011 population, 51.7 per cent were female and 48.3 per
cent were male.

- The vast majority (98.9 per cent, 31,667) of Balmoral DEA's population lived in private households on Census Day 2011, with
the remaining 350 people (1.1 per cent) living in communal establishments, such as university halls of residence and nursing
h

Age structure
- Between 2001 and 2011 Censuses, the share of Balmoral DEA population represented by children aged under 16 years fell
from 17.3 per cent to 15.1 per cent, similarly the proportion of people aged 65 years and over fell from 15.7 per cent to 14.7
per cent.

- There were 4,841 children living in the Balmoral DEA Electoral Ward on Census Day 2011, a fall of 12.5 per cent (692)
compared with 2001.
- Compared with the 2001 Census, the number of people aged 65 years and over living in the Balmoral DEA area increased
by 5.7 per cent (286) to 4,721 on Census Day 2011.

Families and Households


- Almost two-fifths (36.9) of people aged 16 years and over on Census Day 2011 were married, and nearly a half (49.5) were
single. Approximately 32 people (0.1 per cent) were in registered same-sex civil partnerships in March 2011. A further 7.2 per
cent of usual residents were either separated, divorced or formerly in same-sex civil partnership, while the remaining 6.2 per
cent were either widowed or a surviving partner.

- In March 2011, almost three-tenths (28.2 per cent) of households on married couples, consisting of those with dependent
children (13.6
(13 6 per cent)
cent), those with children who were all non-dependent (6.1
(6 1 per cent) or those with no children (8.6
(8 6 per
cent). Approximately a third of households (33.0 per cent) were composed of only one person; those with a person aged 65
years or more accounting for 11.6 per cent of households. A further 9.9 per cent of households were headed by a lone
parent, including 6.0 per cent where dependent children were present.

- In 2011, a quarter (23.0 per cent) of households in Balmoral DEA contained dependent children, down from 24.5 per cent
in 2001.
- On Census Day 2011, three-tenths (30.9 per cent) of households contained at least one person with a long-term problem or
disability; made up of those households with dependent children (4.9 per cent) and those with no dependent children (26
per cent).

- In March 2011, 3.1 per cent of households contained dependent children and no adults in employment.
- Between the 2001 and 2011 Censuses, the number of lone parent households with dependent children (where the lone
parent was aged 16 to 74 years) increased by 13.4 per cent, from 704 per cent, from 704 to 813. In 2011, 5.3 per cent of such
households had a female lone parent, a higher figure to that in 2001 (4.9 per cent). The proportion of such households
where the lone parent was in part-time employment rose from 1.1 per cent in April 2001 to 2.2 per cent in March 2011,
however the proportion with a lone parent working full-time increased from 1.3 per cent to 1.5 per cent. The proportion
where the lone parent was not in employment fell from 2.9 per cent to 2.3 per cent over the decade.

- Female lone parents aged 16 to 74 years, living in households with dependent children, were more likely to be working
part-time (39.7 per cent) than their male counterparts (16.9 per cent).

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Map 1 - Proportion of all households with at least one person with a long-term health problem or disability by Electoral Ward

Key
20.5 - 35.6% 35.6
35.7 - 39.3% 39.3
39 4 - 42
39.4 42.3%
3% 42 3
42.3
42.4 - 45.8% 45.8
45.9 - 62% 62.0

Table 1 - Employment status of lone parent in lone parent households with dependent children

3 2001 2011
Proportion of lone parent in households with

Part-time e 1.1 2.1


Full-time e 1.1 1.2
2.5
Not in emp 2.7 2
dependent children (%)

1.5
2001

1 2011

0.5

0
Part-time employment Full-time employment Not in employment

Employment status

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Ethnicity and Religion


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Balmoral DEA

Ethnicity
- On Census Day 2011, 6.3 per cent (2,012) of the usually resident population of Balmoral DEA belonged to minority ethnic
groups, a decrease from the proportion in 2001 (2.7 per cent). The top three minority ethnic groups within the area were
Other Asian (460 people), Chinese (451 people), Indian (446 people) and Mixed (251 people).

National Identity
- A question on national identity was introduced in the 2011 Census primarily to enable people from minority ethnic
populations to more fully articulate their identity. As the question allowed multiple responses, Table KS202NI (Classification 1)
has been used to report combined responses (for example, British, Irish and Northern Irish), while Table KS203NI (Classification
2) reports statistics for each individual national identity, regardless of whether these options were chosen along with other
national identities. Accordingly, the sum of the proportions in Classification 2 exceeds 100 per cent.

- In 2011, a third (33.3 per cent) of people had a British Only national identity (without selecting any additional national
identities), a quarter (26.8 per cent) had Irish Only and just over a one-fifth had Northern Irish Only (British and Northern Irish
only was the most prevalent (87.8 per cent), while 9.5 per cent of respondents included national identities other than British,
Irish or Northern Irish.

- On the basis of Classification 2, two-fifths (44.0 per cent) of people usually resident in Balmoral DEA in 2011 included British
as a national identity, while 32.3 per cent included Irish and 29.6 per cent included Northern Irish. The proportions who
included English, Scottish or Welsh as a national identity were 1.2 per cent, 0.6 per cent and 0.1 per cent respectively, while
7.7 per cent included Other national identities.

Table 2 - National identity of all usual residents (Classification 1)


British and 1.2
Irish and N 1.8 British only
British Irish
British, 2
British and 6.3 Irish only
Other nati 9.5
Northern Irish only
Northern Ir 19.2
National Identity

Irish only 26.8 Other nationality


British only 33.3
#N/A British
#N/Aand Northern Irish only

British, Irish and Northern Irish only

Irish and Northern Irish only

British and Irish only

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35

Proportion of all usual residents (%)

Country of Birth
- The proportion of the usually resident population within Balmoral DEA born outside Northern Ireland rose from 12.9 per cent
(4,110) in April 2001 to 17.7 per cent (5,673) in March 2011. This change was largely as a result of inward migration by people
born in the 12 countries which have joined the European Union (EU) since 2004. These EC accession countries accounted for
3.5 per cent (1117) of people usually resident in Northern Ireland on Census Day 2011, while their share of the 2001 Census
population was 1.0 per cent. The remainder of the population born outside Northern Ireland consisted of 5.2 per cent born
in Great Britain, 2.8 per cent born in the Republic of Ireland, 1.0 per cent born in countries which were EU members before
2004 and 6.3 per cent born elsewhere.

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Passports Held
- Another new question in 2011 invited respondents to indicate which passports they hold. As this question allowed for
multiple responses, Table KS205N1 (Classification 1) contains information about each passport held, regardless of whether
these were held along with other passports. Accordingly, the sum of the proportions in Classification 1 exceeds 100 per cent.
Table KS206NI (Classification 2) has been used to incorporate combined responses (for example, UK and Ireland Only).

- On Census Day 2011, three-fifths (61.3 per cent) of people usually resident in Balmoral DEA held a passport, and a quarter
(25.3 per cent) held an Ireland passport, while 10.0 per cent held no passport (Classification 1). The top three countries in
other regions for which a passport is held were EU countries passport (3.2 per cent), Middle East and Asia passport (2.6 per
cent), and North America and the Caribbean passport (0.6 per cent).

- Taking into consideration combined responses (Classification 2), 3.2 per cent of people held both UK and Ireland passports
but no other passports.
Table 3 - Distribution of passports held by all usual residents (Classification 1)

3.5
United Kin 3.2
Ireland 3 0.2
Proportion of all usual residents (%)

Other EU c 0.4
No passpo
2.5 2.6

1.5

0.5

0
United Kingdom Ireland Other EU countries No passport

Passport Held

Main Language
- A new question for 2011 revealed that English was not the main language for 6.4 per cent (1982) of Balmoral DEA residents
aged 3 years and over. The most prevalent main language other than English was Other language (460 people; 1.5 per
cent). The rates for other languages included: Polish language (451 people; 1.5 per cent); Chinese language (446 people;
1.4 per cent); and Slovak languag (251 people; 0.8 per cent).

Knowledge of Irish and Ulster-Scots


- Respondents to the 2011 Census were asked to indicate their ability to speak, read, write and understand Irish, and, for the
first time, Ulster-Scots. Among usual residents within Balmoral DEA aged 3 years and over, 12.8 per cent had some ability in
Irish (compared with 11.9 per cent in 2001), while 6.8 per cent of people had some ability in Ulster-Scots. The proportion of
people aged 3 years and over who could speak, read, write and understand Irish (4.9 per cent) was higher than that for
Ulster-Scots (0.7 per cent). In terms of those respondents who said they could understand but not speak, read or write Irish
were 4.7 per cent and 4.5 per cent for Ulster-Scots.

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Map 2 - Proportion of those aged 3 years and over whose main language is not English by Electoral Ward

Key 0
0 - 0.9% 0.9
1 - 1.4% 1.4
15-2
1.5 2.3%
3% 23
2.3
2.4 - 4.3% 4.3
4.4 - 28.8% 28.8

Table 4 - Knowledge of Irish and Ulster-Scots among usual residents aged 3 years and over
Irish Ulster-Scots
14
Ability to s 4.9 0.7
Proportion of all usual residents aged 3 years

Ability to u12 4.7 4.5


Some abil 12.8 6.8
10
and over (%)

0
Ability to speak, read, write and Ability to understand only Some ability
understand

Extent of knowledge

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Religion
- Approximately a quarter (23.0 per cent) of the usually resident population on Census Day 2011 had either had No Religion
or Religion Not Stated. The prevalence rates for the main religions were: Catholic (38.6 per cent); Presbyterian (15.4 per
cent); and Church of Ireland (12.8 per cent).

- Respondents to the 2011 Census who did not state a religion were asked what religion they were brought up in. Bringing
together information on Religion and Religion Brought up in, 43.8 per cent of the population were either Catholic or brought
up as Catholic, while 44.8 per cent of the population were brought up in Protestant, Other Christian or Christian-related
denominations. A further 3.1 per cent belonged to or had been brought up in Other Religions and Philosophies, while 8.3 per
cent neither belonged to, nor had been brought up in, a religion.

1 British 2011 14075 British 14,075 44.0


2 Irish 2011 10335
3 thern Irish 2 9492

1 United Kin 19637


2 Ireland pa 8093
3 EU countri 1014
8 Non EU co 57
6 Africa pas 134
4 Middle Ea 834
5 North Ame 182
10 Central Am 7
9 South Ame 36
7 Antarctica 63

2 Polish lang 392 Other lang460 1.5


8 Lithuanian 41
6 Irish langu 86
11 Portugues 29
4 Slovak lan 112
3 Chinese la 212
5 Tagalog/F 86
12 Latvian lan 18
10 Russian lan 33
7 Malayalam 67
9 Hungarian 38
1 Other lang 868

1 Catholic 2 11975 Catholic 38.6


2 Presbyteria 4796
3 Church of 3969
5 Methodist 1321
4 Other Chr 1673
6 Other relig 906

2 Chinese 20 451 Other Asia460 1.4


9 Irish Travel 13

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Health
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Health and Provision of Unpaid Care


- In 2011, approximately one-fifth of the usually resident population (16.7 per cent) had a long-term health problem or
disability which limited their day-to-day activities. In response to a similar question in 2001, 18.0 per cent of people had a
long-term illness, health problem or disability which limited their daily activities or the work they can do.

- Respondents to the 2011 Census were asked whether they provide any unpaid help or support to family members, friends,
neighbours or others because of long-term physical or mental ill-health/disabilities or problems related to old age.
Approximately one-tenth (12.0 per cent) of the population of Balmoral DEA provided such unpaid care (compared with 28.1
per cent in 2001), around one-fifth (21.3 per cent) of whom did so for 50 or more hours a week.

Long-term Conditions
- A new question for the 2011 Census asked respondents to indicate whether they had any range of conditions which had
lasted, or which had lasted, or which they expected to last, at least 12 months, regardless of whether these limited their day-
to-day activities. Almost all of people (98.2 per cent) did not have a long-term condition. The most common long-term
conditions among the usually resident population of Balmoral DEA were: Mobility or dexterity difficulty (9.6 per cent); Long-
term pain or discomfort (8.2 per cent); and Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing (7.7 per cent).

Table 5 - Type of long-term condition (all usual residents)


Communi 1.3
Frequent p 1.7 Mobility or dexterity difficulty
Blindness o 1.8 Long-term pain or discomfort
Learning, i 1.8
Type of long-term condition

Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing


Emotional 4.8
Chronic illness
Other con 49
4.9
Deafness o 5 Deafness or partial hearing loss
Chronic illn 6.1 Other condition
Shortness o 7.7
Emotional, psychological or mental health condition
Long-term 8.2
Learning, intellectual, social or behavioural difficulty
Mobility or 9.6
#N/A #N/A Blindness or partial sight loss
Frequent periods of confusion or memory loss
Communication difficulty

0 2 4 6 8 10 12

Proportion of all usual residents (%)

14
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Households
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Balmoral DEA

Household Spaces and Accommodation Type


- On Census Day 2011, there were 13,512 households in Balmoral DEA, up 1.5 per cent (202) since 2001. Over the same
period, the number of household spaces increased by 1.4 per cent (203) to 14,618, similarly the number of household spaces
without usual residents rose by 0.1 per cent (1) to 1106. As a result, the proportion of household spaces without usual
residents decreased from 8.3 per cent in 2001 to 8.2 per cent in 2011.

- In March 2011, the main household space types were Terraced, accounting for 37.7 per cent of all household spaces in
the Balmoral DEA area. Other household spaces types include Semi-detached (23.3 per cent); Detached (18.2 per cent);
and Purpose-built block of flats or tenement (15.9 per cent). The total of which is an increase of 1.4 per cent of household
spaces from 2001

Tenure and Landlord


- In 2011, the main tenure type within Balmoral DEA was Owns outright, which accounted for approximately two-fifths of the
share of all households. However, in terms of the proportion of total housing, this is a decrease from 42.2 per cent in 2001 to
37 7 i 2011
- The other main tenure types in 2011 were Private landlord or letting agency (26.8 per cent), Owns with a mortgage or loan
(26.6 per cent), and Northern Ireland Housing Executive (10.4 per cent).
Table 6 - Tenure type (all households)
2001 2011
Shared ow 0.5 0.4
Owns outright
Housing as 1.8 2.7
Other tenu Private
2.5 3.8letting agency
landlord or
Northern Ir 14 10.4
Owns with 32.4 with a 26.6
Owns mortgage or loan
re type

Private lan 18.3 26.8


Owns outrNorthern
30 4Ireland 29.2
30.4 29 2
Housing Executive
Tenure

#N/A #N/A #N/A 2011


#N/A #N/A #N/A Other tenure 2001

Housing association or charitable trust

Shared ownership

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35

Proportion of all households (%)

Number of People Living in Households


- The average household size within Balmoral DEA decreased from 2.36 usual residents in 2001 to 2.34 in 2011. Consistent with
this, the proportion of one-person households decreased from 34.9 per cent to 33.0 per cent over the same period.

Central Heating
- The proportion of households with no central heating fell from 4.6 per cent in 2001 to 0.9 per cent in 2011. Gas central
heating was the predominant means of central heating in 2011 (used as the sole means of central heating by 40.7 per cent
of households), while 40.2 per cent of households used Oil central heating. A further 3.7 per cent of households used two or
more types of central heating.

Cars or Vans
- Approximately seven-tenths of households (70.0 per cent) had access to a car or van in March 2011, up from 68.3 per cent
in April 2001. Over the same period, the proportion of households with access to two or more cars or vans decreased from
26.2 per cent to 28.3 per cent, the latter proportion included 9.8 per cent having access to three vehicles and 10.0 per cent
to four or more vehicles.

16
Table 7 - Access to cars or vans (all households)
2011 2001
45
No cars or 30 31.7
1 car or40
va 41.7 42
Proportion of all households (%)

2 cars or
35v 21.9 21.5
3 cars or v 4.8 3.8
30
4 or more 1.6 1
25

20
2011
15 2001
10

0
No cars or vans 1 car or van 2 cars or vans 3 cars or vans 4 or more cars or
vans

Number of cars or vans

Adaptation of Accommodation
- A new question for 2011 asked whether household accommodation had been designed or for wheelchair usage, other
physical or mobility difficulties, visual difficulties, hearing difficulties or other circumstances. This found that 7.9 per cent of
household accommodation in Balmoral DEA had been so designed or adapted, with the main reasons being Other
physical or mobility difficulties (5.1 per cent), Wheelchair usage (3.4 per cent), and Hearing difficulties (0.5 per cent).

Table 8 - Adaptation of accommodation (all households)


Other phy 5.1
6
Wheelcha 3.4 3.4
Hearing di 05
0.5
Proportion of all households (%)
%)

5
Visual diffi 0.4
Other ada 0.2
4

0
Other physical or Wheelchair usage Hearing difficulties Visual difficulties Other adaptations
mobility difficulties

Type of adaptation

Communal Establishment Residents


- In March 2011, approximately seven-tenths (71.1 per cent) of people staying in communal establishments were usually
resident in medical and care establishments. Approximately three-quarters (73.9 per cent) of those resident in medical and
care establishments had a long-term health problem or disability that limited their day-to-day activities a lot. This contrasts
with 1 per cent of people who were usually resident in education and other establishments and with 9.4 per cent of all usual
residents in Balmoral DEA.

17
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Qualifications
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Balmoral DEA

Qualifications
- In 2011, 40.3 per cent of usual residents aged 16 years and over in Balmoral DEA had achieved Level 4 or higher
qualifications, while 18.1 per cent had no qualifications.
Table 9 - Highest level of qualification (all usual residents aged 16 years and over)
No qualific 18.1
45
Level 1 qu 7.2
Proportion of all usual residents aged 16 years

Level 2 qu40 10.4


Apprentic35 2.5
Level 3 qu 17.4
30
Level 4 qu 40.3
Other qua25
and over (%)

4.2
20

15

10

0
No Level 1 Level 2 Apprenticeship Level 3 Level 4 Other
qualifications qualifications qualifications qualifications qualifications qualifications
and above

Highest level of qualifications

18
Map 3 - Proportion of all usual residents aged 16 years and over with level 4 or higher qualifications

Key
5.1 - 16.3% 15.5
16.4 - 20.1% 20.6
20 2 - 23
20.2 23.2%
2% 74
7.4
23.3 - 28.1% 20.3
28.2 - 62.7% 21.7

19
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Labour Market Print

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Balmoral DEA

Economic Activity and Hours Worked


- Approximately two-thirds (67.8 per cent) of all usual residents in Northern Ireland aged 16 to 74 years were economically
active in the week before Census Day 2011. These were primarily composed of Full-time (30.4 per cent), Part-time (14.0 per
cent), Retired (12.8 per cent) and Long-term sick or disabled (10.6 per cent).

- The a third (32.2 per cent) of usual residents ageed 16 to 74 years who were economically inactive consisted of those that
were Retired (12.8 per cent), Long-term sick or disabled (10.6 per cent), Looking after home or family (6.2 per cent) and
Student (5.1 per cent).

- Of the 993 people aged 16 to 74 years who were unemployed in the four weeks before Census Day 2011, 41.6 per cent
were long-term unemployed, including 13.7 per cent who had never worked. In terms of age, 27.0 per cent of unemployed
people were aged 16 to 24 years and 16.6 per cent were aged 50 to 74 years.

- On Census Day 2011, the total number of employees aged 16 to 74 years was 11,895, which was 5.0 per cent (565) lower
than on Census Day 2001 (11,330). Female employees (6,039) outnumbered male employees (5,856) in March 2011, similar to
the position in April 2001, when there were 5,753 female and 5,577 male employees.

Table 10 - Number of employees aged 16-74 years, 2001 Census and 2011 Census
2001 2011
7,000
Males 5577 5856
Females6,000 5753 6039
oyees aged 16-74 years

5,000

4,000

3,000 Males
All employees

Females
2,000

1,000

0
2001 2011

Census year

- The proportion of people aged 16 to 74 years who were part-time employees increased from 8.4 per cent in April 2001 to
10.7 per cent in March 2011, of which the proportion of female part-time employees increased from 13.6 per cent to 15.8 per
cent, similarly for male employees this proportion increased from 2.6 per cent to 5.3 per cent.
- In terms of full-time employment, males (21.1 per cent) remained more likely than females (16.3 per cent) to be full-time
employees among those aged 16 to 74 years.
- There was an increase in the proportion of people aged 16 to 74 years who were self-employed between April 2001 (7.1 per
cent) and March 2011 (7.1 per cent). Males (5.0 per cent) continued to be proportionately more likely than females (2.2 per
cent) to be self-employed. They were more likely to be unemployed (2.6 per cent of males; and from 1.4 per cent of
females), while females were more likely to be looking after the home or family (2.4 per cent of females, 0.4 per cent of
males)
- In the 12 months prior to the 2011 Census, 2.8 per cent of people aged 16 to 74 years had helped with or carried out
voluntary work without pay. Females (4.8 per cent) were more likely than males (0.8 per cent) to have carried out voluntary
work without pay.

Industry of Employment
- Based on the Standard Industrial Classification 2007 (SIC 2007), around all of the people aged 16 to 74 years in employment
worked in either of two industrial sectors in the four weeks before Census Day 2011, namely the Wholesale and retail trade or
repair of motor vehicles (17.4 per cent) and Human health and social work activities (10.6 per cent).

- Based on employment levels, the other main industrial sectors were: Education (7.3 per cent); Professional, scientific and
technical activities (5.3 per cent); and Accommodation and food service activities (4.6 per cent).
- Males aged 16 to 74 years in employment were most likely to be working in the Wholesale and retail trade or repair of motor
vehicles (17.4 per cent), Human health and social work activities (10.1 per cent), or Professional, scientific and technical
activities (9.5 per cent).
- The main employmeny industries for females were Human health and social work activities (23.8 per cent), Wholesale and
retail trade or repair of motor vehicles (17.5 per cent), or Education (15.3 per cent).

Occupation Group
- Based on Standard Occupation Classification 2010 (SOC 2010), the largest occupational groupings for people aged 16 to
74 years in employment in March 2011 were: Professional occupations (29.8 per cent), Sales and customer service
occupations (12.9 per cent) and Administrative and secretarial occupations (12.1 per cent).
- In March 2011, three-tenths (30.1 per cent) of females aged 16 to 74 years in employment worked in professional
occupations, exceeding that for males (29.5 per cent).
- The other main occuption groups for females were Administrative and secretarial occupations (15.9 per cent) and Sales
and customer service occupations (15.7 per cent).
- For males they were Elementary occupations (11.6 per cent) and Associate professional and technical occupations (11.3
per cent).
Table 11 - Occupation of those aged 16-74 years in employment by sex
Females Males
Process, p 9.8 11.6 Professional occupations
Skilled trad 0.4 6.1
Sales and customer service occupations
Caring, lei 15.7 10.1
Managers Administrative
10.6 and
3 secretarial occupations
Elementar
Associate 1.6 9.3and technical occupations
Occupation

professional
Associate 15.9 8.5
Administra 10 11.3 Elementary occupations
Sales and 5.8
Managers,10.7
directors and senior officials Males
Professiona 30.1 29.5 Females
Caring leisure and other service occupations
Caring,

Skilled trades occupations

Process, plant and machine operatives

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35

Proportion of all usual residents aged 16-74 years in


employment (%)

Full-time 2.8 Elementary occupat 11.6


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Travel to Work or Study


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Balmoral DEA

Method of Travel to Work


- In March 2011, approximately two-fifths (40.0 per cent) of people aged 16 to 74 years who were in employment ususally
drove a vehicle to work. A further 7.0 per cent were members of a car or van pool, while 2.9 per cent usually travelled to
work as a passenger in a car or van.

- Of people aged 16 to 74 years who were in employment in March 2011, 10.2 per cent travelled to work by bus, minibus or
coach, 1.1 per cent by taxi and 2.0 per cent by train. A further 14.2 per cent of people usually walked to work, while 2.0 per
cent cycled and 0.3 per cent travelled by motorcycle, scooter or moped. In addition, 6.7 per cent worked mainly at or from
home.

Table 12 - Method of travel to work of all usual residents aged 16 to 74 years (exluding students) in employment and
currently working
#N/A #N/A
#N/A #N/A drive a car or van
#N/A #N/A
go on foot
#N/A #N/A
bus, minibus or coach
Method of travel to work

#N/A #N/A
car or van pool, shared driving
#N/A #N/A
work mainly at or from home
#N/A #N/A
#N/A passenger
#N/A in a car or van
#N/A #N/A bicycle
#N/A #N/A train
#N/A #N/A taxi
use other methods of travel
motorcycle
motorcycle, scooter or moped

0 5 10 15 20 25 30

Proportion of all usual residents aged 16 to 74 years (excluding students) in


employment and currently working

- In 2011, people aged 16 to 74 years who were in employment and lived in households with access to a car or a van were
more likely to use public transport to work (8.1 per cent) than those without such access (4.1 per cent).

Method of Travel to Work or Study


- A modified question in the 2011 Census asked about method of travel to place ot work or study. People travelling to work
or study were more likely to do so by bus, minibus or coach or as a passenger in a car or van (14.1 per cent and 9.5 per cent
respectively) than those solely travelling to work (10.2 per cent and 2.9 per cent respectively).

22
Map 4 - Driving a car or a van to place of work by Electoral Ward (all usual residents aged 16 to 74 years [excluding
students] in employment and currently working)

Key 20.9
20 9 - 50
20.9 50.8%
8% 50 8
50.8
50.9 - 57.6% 57.6
57.7 - 61.8% 61.8
61.9 - 64.5% 64.5
64.6 - 71.6% 71.6

23
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Migration
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Balmoral DEA

Usual Residents Who Have Returned to Northern Ireland


- The results of the 2011 Census show that the majority (73.8 per cent) of usual residents born in Northern Ireland have never
resided elsewhere.
Map 5 - All usual residents born in Northern Ireland who have resided elsewhere and returned by Electoral Ward

Key 2.7
2.7 - 4.8% 4.8
4.9 - 5.7% 5.7
5.8 - 6.6% 6.6
6.7 - 8% 8
8.1 - 16.1% 16.1

- Most usual residents born in Northern Ireland who had resided elsewhere and returned did so returned prior to 2001 (4.3 per
cent, 1370), 2.6 per cent (823) returned between 2007 and census day, while 1.6 per cent (524) returned between 2001 and
2006
- Of the 1,088 people who were resident in Belfast on a short-term basis, almost one-fifth (21.5 per cent) were staying in
Balmoral DEA on Census Day 2011.

24
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Sources
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Select Area: 4
Balmoral DEA

Demography
KS101NI Usual Resident Population
KS102NI Age Structure
KS103NI Marital and Civil Partnership Status
KS104NI Living Arrangements
KS105NI Household Composition
KS106NI All Households with: No Adults in Employment; Dependent Children; and Persons with Long-Term Health Problem
or Disability
KS107NI Lone Parent Households with Dependent Children

Ethnicity and Religion


KS201NI Ethnic Group
KS202NI National Identity (Classification 1)
KS203NI National Identity (Classification 2)
KS204NI Country of Birth
KS205NI Passports Held (Classification 1)
KS206NI Passports Held (Classification 2)
KS207NI Main Language
KS208NI Household Language
KS209NI Knowledge of Irish
KS210NI Knowledge of Ulster-Scots
KS211NI Religion
KS212NI Religion or Religion Brought Up In

Health
KS301NI Health and Provision of Unpaid Care
KS302NI Type of Long-Term Condition

Households
KS401NI Dwellings, Household Spaces and Accommodation Type
KS402NI Tenue and Landlord
KS403NI Household Size
KS404NI Central Heating
KS405NI Car or Van Availability
KS406NI Adaptation of Accommodation
KS407NI Communal Establishment Residents and Long-Term Health Problem or Disability

Qualifications
KS501NI Qualifications and Students

Labour Market
KS601NI Economic Activity
KS602NI Economic Activity - Males
KS603NI Economic Activity - Females
KS604NI Hours Worked
KS605NI Industry of Employment
KS606NI Industry of Employment - Males
KS607NI Industry of Employment - Females
KS608NI Occupation

25
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Background
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Select Area: 4
Balmoral DEA

- The 2011 Census was held on 27 March 2011, and involved every household and communal establishment in Northern
Ireland. The Census responses have provided a rich store of statistical information about the population of Northern Ireland.
The questionnaire covered topics in the areas of demography, identity, health, housing, qualifications, labour market
activity, travel to work or study and migration. This report provides the first analyses spanning most of this range of topics.

- The Key Statistics published (11 December 2012) are provided for each of Northern Irelands 26 Local Government Districts
(LGDs), as well as other geographic units that are themselves aggregates of LGDs. Key Statistics for smaller geographic units
will be published in early 2013. Further details are available in the Northern Ireland Census 2011 Output Prospectus.

- Key Statistics mostly provide an analysis of each variable separately. Thus, for example, Key Statistics provides statistics on
the numbers of people by ethnic group for geographic areas within Northern Ireland. Subsequent Census outputs will
provide more detailed statistical profiles for each ethnic group population, in terms of the other variables covered by the
Census. Details of the proposed outputs, and their scheduled publication, can be found in the Northern Ireland Census 2011
Output Prospectus.

- NISRA recognises that the 2011 Census will not have obtained a response from every usual resident. Accordingly, NISRA has
made statistical adjustments to ensure that all statistical output from the 2011 Census represents the complete population of
Northern Ireland. Further details on the methodology to adjust for under-enumeration, and other methodological aspects of
the Census, can be found in the Methodology Overview Paper.

- Many of the questions in the 2011 Census are similar to those used in 2001, and some users may wish to compare statistics
from the 2001 and 2011 Censuses. A paper that summarises the similarities and differences between the 2001 and 2011
Censuses can be viewed here. A further paper, comparing the content of the 2011 Census questionnaires in Northern
Ireland, Scotland and England & Wales will be published in early 2013.

- All figures in this report are reported in a rounded form to emphasise their estimated nature. The underlying unrounded
data can be accessed through the NINIS website, and it is noted that all charts and maps in this report are based on the
unrounded data. Further detail on the quality of Census statistics is provided in supporting papers available on the NISRA
website.

- National Statistics are produced to high professional standards set out in the Code of Practice for Official Statistics. They
undergo regular quality assurance reviews to ensure they meet customer needs. They are produced free from any political
interference. Crown copyright 2012.

- The United Kingdom Statistics Authority has designated these statistics as National Statistics, in accordance with the
Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007 and signifying compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.
Designation can be broadly interpreted to mean that the statistics:

meet identified user needs;


are well explained and readily accessible;
are produced according to sound methods, and
are managed impartially and objectively in the public interest.

- Once statistics have been designated as National Statistics it is a statutory requirement that the Code of Practice shall
continue to be observed.

26