You are on page 1of 1

Present Perfect Tense Present Perfect Continuous Tense

Used to express that an action is completed or Used to emphasize the duration or continuous
to emphasize the result. e.g. I have walked the course of an action. e.g. I have been walking the
dog. dog all morning.
used to emphasize completion of an action e.g. used to emphasize the action, not the completion
I have walked the dog. e.g. I have been walking the dog.
used for past actions that happened recently
used for actions that continue into the present e.g. I
and are still in the news e.g. She has won a
have been walking the dog all morning.
medal.
used for actions that are naturally instant e.g.used for actions that naturally have a duration e.g. I
Oh no! Ive broken a glass. have been walking the dog all morning.
to state the amount of times an action took to state the length of time or to state "how long" the
place e.g. She has won this competition every action took place. e.g. I have been walking the dog
year since 1999. all morning.
The result is more important than the activity The activity is more important than the result. e.g. I
itself e.g. I have walked the dog. have been walking the dog.
Grammar rules for the present prefect continuous
Grammar rules for the present prefect tense: tense:
Subject + Auxiliary verb (has/have) + Subject + Auxiliary verb (has/have) + Auxiliary
Auxiliary verb (been) + Main verb (past verb (been) + Main verb-ing
participle) The auxiliary verb "to be" always stays in the
The main verb uses the verb form past V3/past participle form (been).
participle/V3. - ing to added to the base form the main verb.
Negative sentences - "not" is added between Negative statements - add "not" between the
the Auxiliary Verb and the main verb auxiliary verb "have" and the the auxiliary verb
Questions - the auxiliary verb comes before the "been".
subject Questions - the order is change the order the
auxiliary verb "have" comes before the subject.