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Veritas D4.1.

13 Dissemination Level (PU) Grant Agreement # 247765

Accessible and Assistive ICT

VERITAS
Virtual and Augmented Environments and Realistic User Interactions To
achieve Embedded Accessibility DesignS
247765

Final Project Report

Deliverable No. D4.1.13

SubProject No. SP4 SubProject Title Horizontal activities

Workpackage W4.1 Workpackage Title Project management


No.

Activity No. A4.1.1 Activity Title Administrative and


overall Management

Authors Dimitrios Tzovaras (CERTH/ITI), Manfred


Dangelmeier (FhG/IAO)

Status: F (Final)

Dissemination level: P (Public)

File Name: VERITAS_D4.1.13

Project start date and duration 01 January 2010, 48 Months

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Abbreviation List

VUM VIRTUAL USER MODEL

AmI AMBIENT INTELLIGENCE

AAL AMBIENT ASSISTED LIVING

3D THREE DIMENSIONAL

CAD COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN

GUI GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE

ICT INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

IT INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES

IST INFORMATION SOCIETY TECHNOLOGIES

ICD INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES

VUMS VIRTUAL USER MODELS

AUM ABSTRACT USER MODEL

GVUM GENERIC VIRTUAL USER MODEL

VUM VIRTUAL USER MODEL

UIML USER INTERFACE MARKUP LANGUAGE

USIXML USER INTERFACE EXTENSIBLE MARKUP LANGUAGE

IT INTERACTION TOOL

VERAE VERITAS AVATAR EDITOR

VERGEN VERITAS USER MODEL GENERATORY

VERIM VERITAS INTERACTION MANAGER

VERMP VERITAS MODEL PLATFORM

VERSED-3D VERITAS 3D SIMULATION EDITOR

VERSED-GUI VERITAS GUI SIMULATION EDITOR

VERSIM-3D VERITAS 3D CORE SIMULATION VIEWER

VERSIMCORE VERITAS CORE SIMULATION ENGINE

VERSIM-GUI VERITAS GUI CORE SIMULATION VIEWER

IND INDUSTRY

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SME SMALL AND MIDDLE-SIZE ENTERPRISE

RES RESEARCH

USER END USER

SAB SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD

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Table of contents
ABBREVIATION LIST ........................................................................................................................ 2
LIST OF FIGURES ............................................................................................................................... 6
LIST OF TABLES ................................................................................................................................. 9
1. FINAL PUBLISHABLE SUMMARY REPORT .................................................................... 10
1.1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..................................................................................................... 10
1.2. PROJECT SUMMARY .......................................................................................................... 11
1.2.1. Project context and objectives ....................................................................................... 12
1.3. SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL OBJECTIVES .................................................... 15
1.3.1. Main Scientific and Technological results/foregrounds ................................................ 17
1.3.1.1. The VERITAS User Model Methodology ......................................................................... 22
1.3.1.2. The Abstract User Models ................................................................................................. 22
1.3.1.3. The Multisensorial Platform............................................................................................... 26
1.3.1.4. The Task Models ................................................................................................................ 31
1.3.1.5. The Use Cases .................................................................................................................... 33
1.3.1.6. The Generic Virtual User Model ........................................................................................ 38
1.3.1.7. The VERITAS Model Platform ......................................................................................... 38
1.3.1.8. The VERITAS Core Simulation Platform .......................................................................... 41
1.3.1.9. The VERITAS Exportable Toolbox ................................................................................... 51
1.3.1.10. Simulation Models development and Integration of Veritas Platform into Application
Domains 71
1.3.1.11. Pilot planning, Pilot development and testing .................................................................... 85
1.3.1.12. User Evaluation & Feedback - Framework and Models Validation ................................... 94
1.4. POTENTIAL IMPACT ........................................................................................................ 101
1.4.1. Socio-economic impact ................................................................................................ 101
1.4.2. Ethical Implications ..................................................................................................... 102
1.4.3. Market impact .............................................................................................................. 104
Open Source Solution (OSS) ...................................................................................................... 105
Proprietary Solutions ................................................................................................................. 105
Services to third parties ............................................................................................................. 105
1.5. CONTACT DETAILS .......................................................................................................... 107
1.5.1. Project Website ............................................................................................................ 107
1.5.2. List of Beneficiaries / Consortium Composition .......................................................... 107
2. USE AND DISSEMINATION OF FOREGROUND ............................................................ 111
SECTION A. DISSEMINATION MEASURES ......................................................................... 111
A.01 DISSEMINATION STRATEGY AND CONSORTIUM ACTIVITIES .............................................. 112
A.01.1 Raising awareness to a wider public ...................................................................... 113
A.01.2 Direct Communication and knowledge management .............................................. 117
A.01.3 Standardization and International Impact .............................................................. 120
A.02 COMMUNITY ADDED VALUE AND CONTRIBUTION TO EU POLICIES OBJECTIVE .................. 121
(i) Main legal instruments ............................................................................................................... 121
(ii) European policy developments ................................................................................................... 121
(iii) Upcoming policy developments ............................................................................................ 123
A.03 SOCIETAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE PROJECT......................................................................... 124
SECTION B. EXPLOITATION OF RESULTS ........................................................................ 148
B.01 EXPLOITATION OF RESULTS ............................................................................................... 148
B.01.1 EXPLOITATION FOREGROUND ....................................................................................... 148
B.01.2 BUSINESS AND EXPLOITATION PLANS ........................................................................... 149
B.01.3 EXPLOITABLE PRODUCTS DESCRIPTION ........................................................................ 156
B.01.4 FURTHER RESEARCH BEYOND VERITAS ..................................................................... 161

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SECTION C. REPORT ON SOCIETAL IMPLICATIONS .................................................... 164


REFERENCES .................................................................................................................................. 171

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List of Figures
FIGURE 1: EXTRAPOLATION OF TECHNOLOGY TRENDS ........................................................................... 14
FIGURE 2: TYPICAL DEVELOPMENT CHAIN BEFORE VERITAS ............................................................... 16
FIGURE 3: TYPICAL DEVELOPMENT CHAIN AFTER VERITAS ................................................................. 16
FIGURE 4: THE USER MODELLING METHODOLOGY OF VERITAS .......................................................... 22
FIGURE 5: AUM TABLE INFORMATION ................................................................................................... 26
FIGURE 6: KNEE FLEXION/EXTENSION MEASUREMENTS WITH THE ELECTROGONIOMETER AND MOCAP 29
FIGURE 7: ELBOW FLEXION/EXTENSION AND INERTIAL PLATFORM .................................................. 29
FIGURE 8: WRIST ULNAR-RADIAL BEND AND HUMAN GLOVE .......................................................... 29
FIGURE 9: PULL/PUSH FORCE AND MULTI AXES LOAD CELL.............................................................. 29
FIGURE 10: FORCE PANEL WITH THE VERTICAL LINE SHOWN ON THE LCD FOR TRANSFER-
FUNCTION ESTIMATION PROCEDURE .......................................................................................... 30
FIGURE 11: DATA PROCESSING PROCEDURE ....................................................................................... 30
FIGURE 12: TASK ANALYSIS TABLE INFORMATION ............................................................................. 32
FIGURE 13: MERGING INFORMATION INTO THE GENERIC VIRTUAL USER MODEL (IN THIS CASE
PHYSICAL) .................................................................................................................................... 38
FIGURE 14: THE VERITAS USER MODEL GENERATOR TOOL ................................................................... 39
FIGURE 15: THE VERITAS MODEL PLATFORM TOOL............................................................................... 39
FIGURE 16: WORKFLOW AND COMPONENTS OF THE VERITAS MODEL PLATFORM............................... 40
FIGURE 17: CUSTOMIZATION OF THE INTELLIGENT AVATAR THROUGH THE VERITAS AVATAR EDITOR
..................................................................................................................................................... 40
FIGURE 18: VERITAS CORE SIMULATION PLATFORM ARCHITECTURE ................................................. 42
FIGURE 19: VERITAS CORE SIMULATION MOTOR MODULE ARCHITECTURE ........................................ 43
FIGURE 20: VERITAS CORE SIMULATION VISION SUB-MODULES ARCHITECTURE ............................... 43
FIGURE 21: VERITAS CORE SIMULATION HEARING MODULE ARCHITECTURE ..................................... 43
FIGURE 22: VERITAS CORE SIMULATION COGNITIVE MODULE ARCHITECTURE .................................. 43
FIGURE 23: GRAPHICAL AND PHYSICAL REPRESENTATIONS OF THE INTELLIGENT AVATAR IN THE
VERITAS CORE SIMULATION PLATFORM .................................................................................... 45
FIGURE 24: AVATAR JOINTS AND THEIR DEGREES OF FREEDOM ............................................................. 45
FIGURE 25: AVATAR POINTS OF INTEREST ............................................................................................. 46
FIGURE 26: MOTION PLANNING AND GAIT CYCLE SIMULATION EXAMPLES ............................................ 47
FIGURE 27: GRASP MODULE EXAMPLE ................................................................................................... 47
FIGURE 28: LOOKAT MODULE EXAMPLE ................................................................................................ 48
FIGURE 29: FROM LEFT: NORMAL VISION, PROTANOPIA, DEUTERANOPIA, TRITANOPIA, GLAUCOMA,
MACULAR DEGENERATION ........................................................................................................... 48
FIGURE 30: FROM LEFT: OTITIS, OTOSCLEROSIS, PRESBYCUSIS MILD, PRESBYCUSIS SEVERE ............... 48
FIGURE 31: THE THREE STATES SHOWING THE CAR'S STORAGE COMPARTMENT FUNCTIONALITY. THE
ARROWS REPRESENT THE ROTATIONAL DEGREES OF FREEDOM. THE RED BOX SHOWS THE POI,
USED FOR INTERACTION WITH THE OBJECT. THREE OBJECTS ARE PRESENTED IN THE SCREENSHOTS:
THE HANDLE (MOVEABLE), THE STORAGE COMPARTMENTS' DOOR (MOVEABLE) AND THE CAR'S
DASHBOARD (STATIC). .................................................................................................................. 50
FIGURE 32: BLOCK DIAGRAM OF A MOTOR SIMULATION CYCLE. THE SIMULATION CYCLE IS REPEATED
UNTIL EVERY PRIMITIVE TASK IS COMPLETED. AT EACH STEP THE TASK MANAGER MODULE TESTS
AND REPORTS TO THE USER IF A CONSTRAINT (I.E. ANGLE/TORQUE LIMIT, COLLISION, ETC.) WAS
VIOLATED. .................................................................................................................................... 50
FIGURE 33: THE VERITAS HOLISTIC ARCHITECTURE AND THE EXPORTABLE TOOLBOX .......................... 52
FIGURE 34: IMMERSIVE SIMULATION PLATFORM DATA FLOW ................................................................ 54
FIGURE 35: THE VERSED-3D GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE; A SCENE WITH AN OFFICE DESK HAS BEEN
LOADED. THE OBJECTS OF THE SCENE ARE ASSIGNED IN THE LEFT PANEL AND THE PROPERTIES,
SUCH AS MASS, POSITION, ORIENTATION, ETC., OF EACH OBJECT MAY BE DEFINED IN THE RIGHT
PANEL. .......................................................................................................................................... 55
FIGURE 36: THE GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE OF THE VERSIM-3D TOOL .............................................. 56
FIGURE 37: VERSIM-3DS SIMULATION CASCADE; THE USER LOADS A SCENE FILE, A SCENARIO FILE AND
ADDS THE VIRTUAL USER MODELS THAT WILL BE TESTED SEQUENTIALLY. ................................. 56
FIGURE 38: THE SIMULATION REPORT WINDOW, PART OF VERSIM-3D TOOL, PROVIDING INFORMATION
REGARDING SIMULATED SESSIONS OF DIFFERENT DESIGNS. .......................................................... 57
FIGURE 39: THE IMMERSIVE 3D SIMULATION VIEWER IN ACTION.......................................................... 58

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FIGURE 40: THE GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE OF THE VERSED-GUI TOOL; IN THIS EXAMPLE, A CAPTURE
PROJECT HAS JUST BEEN COMPLETED. THE CAPTURE INFO WINDOW AND THE USER ACTIVITY
CHART ARE DEPICTED. .................................................................................................................. 58
FIGURE 41: THE VERSIM-GUI TOOL INTERFACE. A SCENARIO OF A HEALTHCARE APPLICATION HAS BEEN
LOADED. ....................................................................................................................................... 59
FIGURE 42: RUNNING SIMULATION WITH HEALTHCARE APPLICATION USING A VISUALLY IMPAIRED USER
MODEL .......................................................................................................................................... 60
FIGURE 43: SETTING UP AND FINAL RESULT OF A MULTI-VUM SIMULATION......................................... 60
FIGURE 44: REPORT GENERATION FOR THE FINAL OUTCOMEOF A SIMULATION BY VERSIM-GUI ........... 61
FIGURE 45: INTEGRATED INTERACTION TOOL ARCHITECTURAL SCHEME .............................................. 62
FIGURE 46: VISUAL FUNCTIONAL LIMITATION EXAMPLE AND CORRESPONDING VERIM CONTROL PANEL
..................................................................................................................................................... 62
FIGURE 47: KINEMATIC LIMITATION INTERACTION TOOL I EXAMPLE AND CORRESPONDING VERIM
CONTROL PANEL .......................................................................................................................... 63
FIGURE 48: SCHEME OF THE VIBROTACTILE KFL IT II LEFT, PROTOTYPE OF THE DEVICE INTEGRATED ON
THE ARM OF THE USER. ................................................................................................................. 63
FIGURE 49: EXAMPLE OF THE KINEMATIC LIMITATION INTERACTION TOOL II AND CORRESPONDING
VERIM CONTROL PANEL .............................................................................................................. 64
FIGURE 50: PICTURE OF THE FUNCTIONAL TEST OF THE INTEGRATED DFL IT SYSTEM .......................... 64
FIGURE 51: GRAB HAPTIC USER INTERFACE IS ABLE TO DELIVER A FORCE ALONG ANY WANTED
ORIENTATION IN 3D SPACE ............................................................................................................ 65
FIGURE 52: CONTROL FUNCTIONAL LIMITATION IT APPLICATION EXAMPLE ......................................... 66
FIGURE 53: N-BACKER COGNITIVE INTERACTION TOOL OUTPUT ............................................................ 66
FIGURE 54: BEHAVIOURAL & PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERACTION TOOLS EXAMPLES ................................... 68
FIGURE 55: THE GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE OF THE MODALITY COMPENSATION AND REPLACEMENT
MODULE, AS PART OF THE MULTIMODAL INTERFACES MANAGER TOOL. ..................................... 69
FIGURE 56: INTEGRATION OF VERITAS TOOLS IN THE AUTOMOTIVE SOLUTIONS DOMAIN ................... 72
FIGURE 57: GENERATION OF OVERALL SIMULATION TASK TABLE .......................................................... 74
FIGURE 58: SUCCESS CRITERIA IN TASK TABLE ...................................................................................... 74
FIGURE 59: GENERATION OF SIMULATION SCENARIO FILES ................................................................... 75
FIGURE 60: SMART LIVING SPACES SIMULATION SYSTEM INTEGRATION METHODOLOGY ..................... 78
FIGURE 61: WORKPLACE DESIGN INTEGRATION METHODOLOGY ........................................................... 80
FIGURE 62: VERITAS GUI-BASED SIMULATION INTEGRATION ................................................................ 82
FIGURE 63: METAVERSE SIMULATION MODEL TABLE EXAMPLE ............................................................ 84
FIGURE 64: HEALTHCARE SIMULATION MODEL TABLE EXAMPLE .......................................................... 85
FIGURE 65: VERITAS OVERALL PILOT PLAN METHODOLOGY ......................................................... 86
FIGURE 66: GENERAL PILOT PLAN WITH DESIGNERS/DEVELOPERS ................................................. 87
FIGURE 67: USE OF THE CAR INTERIOR STORAGE COMPARTMENT .................................................... 90
FIGURE 68: HANDLE A POWERED TWO WHEELER ............................................................................... 90
FIGURE 69: PROGRAM THE ON-BOARD NAVIGATION SYSTEM AND ACTIVATE THE FUNCTIONALITY 91
FIGURE 70: RECEIVE AUDIBLE ALERTS FROM THE DEVICE WHILE RIDING A PTW ........................... 91
FIGURE 71: GET IN AND MOVE AROUND INSIDE A HOUSE (IMMERSIVE SIMULATION)........................ 91
FIGURE 72: USE KITCHEN APPLIANCES (INTERACTIVE CONTROL LIMITATION APPLIED IN
SIMULATION) ............................................................................................................................... 91
FIGURE 73: NAVIGATE AND INTERACT WITH FURNITURE AND DEVICES IN A WORK ENVIRONMENT 92
FIGURE 74: USE ICT COLLABORATIVE TOOLS AT WORK ................................................................... 92
FIGURE 75: USE METAVERSES ............................................................................................................. 92
FIGURE 76: PLAY A COLLABORATIVE GAME ....................................................................................... 92
FIGURE 77: PLAY A MULTI-USER GAME AIMED AT THE ELDERLY ...................................................... 93
FIGURE 78: USE REMOTE PATIENT MONITORING SOLUTION .............................................................. 93
FIGURE 79: USE MOBILE NUTRITIONAL ADVICE APPLICATION.......................................................... 93
FIGURE 80: USE HEALTH COACH APPLICATION ................................................................................. 93
FIGURE 81: USE OF THE CAR INTERIOR STORAGE COMPARTMENT: WITH HANDLE (INITIAL) AND
PUSH SPRING MECHANISM (FINAL) ............................................................................................. 96
FIGURE 82: HANDLE A POWERED TWO WHEELER: NORMAL AND LOWERED LAYOUT OVERLAPPED
SEAT LINES OF THE TWO LAYOUTS HIGHLIGHTED IN RED ......................................................... 97
FIGURE 83: PROGRAM THE ON-BOARD NAVIGATION SYSTEM AND ACTIVATE THE FUNCTIONALITY:
INITIAL AND OPTIMAL INTERACTION AREAS AND FINAL IMPLEMENTED GESTURES ................ 97
FIGURE 84: RECEIVE AUDIBLE ALERTS FROM THE DEVICE WHILE RIDING A PTW (INITIAL AND
FINAL) .......................................................................................................................................... 97

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FIGURE 85: GET IN AND MOVE AROUND INSIDE A HOUSE (INITIAL AND FINAL DESIGNS) ................... 97
FIGURE 86: USE KITCHEN APPLIANCES (INITIAL AND FINAL DESIGNS) .............................................. 97
FIGURE 87: NAVIGATE AND INTERACT WITH FURNITURE AND DEVICES IN A WORK ENVIRONMENT
(INITIAL AND FINAL DESIGNS) ..................................................................................................... 98
FIGURE 88: USE ICT COLLABORATIVE TOOLS AT WORK(INITIAL AND FINAL DESIGNS) ................... 98
FIGURE 89: USE METAVERSES (INITIAL AND FINAL DESIGNS) ............................................................ 98
FIGURE 90: PLAY A COLLABORATIVE GAME (INITIAL AND FINAL DESIGNS) ...................................... 98
FIGURE 91: PLAY A MULTI-USER GAME AIMED AT THE ELDERLY (INITIAL AND FINAL DESIGNS) ..... 99
FIGURE 92: USE REMOTE PATIENT MONITORING SOLUTION (INITIAL AND FINAL DESIGNS) ............. 99
FIGURE 93: USE MOBILE NUTRITIONAL ADVICE APPLICATION (INITIAL AND FINAL DESIGNS) ........ 99
FIGURE 94: USE HEALTH COACH APPLICATION (INITIAL AND FINAL DESIGNS) ................................ 99
FIGURE 95: VERITAS AS A SERVICE BUSINESS MODEL ...................................................................... 105
FIGURE 96: SCREENSHOTS OF VERITAS DISSEMINATION MATERIAL (NEWSLETTERS, POSTERS,
LEAFLETS, ETC/) ......................................................................................................................... 113
FIGURE 96: SCREENSHOTS OF THE VERITAS WEBSITE ........................................................................ 114
FIGURE 97: VERITAS PARTICIPATION AT MAJOR EXHIBITION EVENTS ................................................ 116
FIGURE 98: PERCENTAGE OF PROJECT RESULTS DISSEMINATION VIA DIFFERENT COMMUNICATION
CHANNELS .................................................................................................................................. 117
FIGURE 99: STANDARDIZATION EFFORTS OF THE VUMS CLUSTER ...................................................... 121

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List of Tables
TABLE 1: LIST OF PUBLIC DELIVERABLES AVAILABLE THROUGH PROJECT WEB SITE .............................. 20
TABLE 2: ICD VISUAL DISABILITIES ....................................................................................................... 23
TABLE 3: ICD CLASSIFICATION FOR MOTOR ........................................................................................... 24
TABLE 4: ICD CLASSIFICATION FOR SPEECH .......................................................................................... 24
TABLE 5: HEARING DISABILITIES............................................................................................................ 24
TABLE 6: LIST OF SENSORS USED IN THE MULTISENSORIAL PLATFORM................................................. 27
TABLE 7: PARAMETERS AND INSTRUMENTS ........................................................................................... 28
TABLE 8: PRIMITIVE TASKS EXAMPLE................................................................................................... 32
TABLE 9: TASK MODEL EXAMPLE ......................................................................................................... 33
TABLE 10: USE CASES LIST .................................................................................................................... 34
TABLE 11: USE CASE EAXMPLE: UC 1.2: USER MODEL GENERATOR..................................................... 35
TABLE 12: GENERIC VIRTUAL USER MODEL EXAMPLE .......................................................................... 38
TABLE 13: INTERFACE MODALITIES AND INPUT / OUTPUT DATA FORMAT. .............................................. 70
TABLE 14: USE CASE ANALYSIS RESULTS (DESKTOP APPLICATION) .................................................. 73
TABLE 15: USE CASE ANALYSIS RESULTS (IMMERSIVE APPLICATION) .............................................. 73
TABLE 16: WORKPLACE DESIGN SIMULATION TASK TABLE EXAMPLE ............................................. 80
TABLE 17: SMART GOAL SETTINGS FOR VERITAS ......................................................................... 87
TABLE 18: PILOT SITE PLAN PER APPLICATION AREA ....................................................................... 87
TABLE 19: PILOT SITE PLAN PER APPLICATION AREA ....................................................................... 88
TABLE 20: SUMMARY OF BENEFICIARY GROUPS IN EACH APPLICATION DOMAIN .................................... 89
TABLE 21: SUMMARY OF QUANTITATIVE RESULTS COMPARISON IN ALL DOMAINS ................................ 94
TABLE 22: SUMMARY CORRELATIONS BETWEEN RESULTS WITH VUMS AND ACTUAL USERS IN TASK
COMPLETION TIMES IN THE WORKPLACE DESIGN SCENARIOS ....................................................... 95
TABLE 23: VERITAS PRODUCTS/SERVICES CUSTOMER SEGMENTS ...................................................... 105
TABLE 24: LIST OF BENEFICIARIES ....................................................................................................... 108
TABLE 25: OVERVIEW OF VERITAS DISSEMINATION ACTIVITIES ........................................................ 116
TABLE 26: LIST OF CONFERENCES/USER FORUMS/WORKSHOPS/EVENT PARTICIPATION ..................... 126
TABLE 27: LIST OF OTHER EVENT PARTICIPATION ............................................................................... 128
TABLE 28: LIST OF CONFERENCE PAPERS/POSTERS ............................................................................. 131
TABLE 29: LIST OF JOURNAL/BOOK PUBLICATIONS ............................................................................. 144
TABLE 30:VERITAS MAIN EXPLOITABLE SERVICES ............................................................................ 148
TABLE 31: VERITAS EXPLOITABLE FOREGROUND ............................................................................. 151
TABLE 32: RESEARCH PRIORITIES ........................................................................................................ 161

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1. Final publishable summary report


1.1. Executive Summary
In the current document a comprehensive summary of VERITAS main achievements
is given, in order to review the research and technological results of the project.
Moreover a section is devoted in the scientific and technological exploitable results of
VERITAS concerning its Framework, Tools and Services.
Among the main achievements of the VERITAS project, are:
The implementation of an Open Library of user models. The user models
developed by VERITAS consist of several parameters mapping capabilities
and impairments in Motor, Vision, Hearing and Cognitive aspects to
simulatable variables accurately depicting the behaviour of groups of users
with similar severity of specific impairments.
The development of the Veritas Multisensorial Platform: a set of different
sensors (video sensing, wearable sensors, motion sensors, environmental
sensors) integrated via software in a unique frame, to create detailed virtual
user models for selected disabilities, in order to augment and fill the gaps of
the research in literature of the requested information, through the direct
acquisition of this data during several campaigns of measurement with real
beneficiaries
The VERITAS Model Platform. The model platform has two main aspects:
the first aspect is the generation of Intelligent Avatars that combine Virtual
User Models as well as sociodemographic and anthropometric parameters to
provide the VERITAS User Model. The second aspect is the generation of
Simulation Models to support simulation and testing at all stages of product
planning and development. The simulation models provide an accurate
physical description of the virtual designs tested for accessibility by adapting
a 3D design (CAD design) or GUI design from simple graphical
representations to active elements of a simulation as well as task definitions
that correspond to specific actions within a simulated environment.
The development of the Veritas Core Simulation Platform which is the basis
of all the tools developed to create, perform and analyse the simulation of the
execution of tasks by a virtual user in specific scenarios, in order to support
testing and assessment at all stages of product planning and development,
decreasing both the product development time and cost.
The development of the Exportable toolbox modules: A middleware for
interfacing the VERITAS interaction manager and simulation models to
external applications consisting of a the following set of tools and capabilities
A VR simulation environment for realistic and iterative testing providing
simultaneous multimodal (visual, aural, etc.) feedback to the
designer/developer as well as the potential for immersive realistic simulation
measures and metrics for evaluating software, product and facility
accessibility

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A multimodal simulation environment that supports modality replacement for


virtual testing of interfaces and products in realistic scenarios that offer the
opportunity to fine tune and adapt these technologies to the specific
application.
A short description of the each of these results is provided in this Final Report,
highlighting the outcomes of each one.
Later in this document, the reader can find a summary of the potential impact,
including the socio-economic impact and the wider societal implications. Finally,
complementary information about the main dissemination activities and exploitation
of results is provided in order to depict all the efforts that have been made during the
lifecycle of the project.

1.2. Project Summary


VERITAS aimed to develop, validate and assess tools for built-in accessibility
support at all stages of ICT and non-ICT product development, including
specification, design, development and testing. The goal was to introduce simulation-
based and virtual reality testing at all stages of assistive technologies product design
and development into the automotive, smart living spaces, (buildings & construction,
domotics), workplace and infotainment applications areas. VERITAS aimed to
ensure that future products and services are being systematically designed for all
people including those with disabilities and functional limitations as well as older
people. Delivering to product/software developers generic instructions - embedded
in an empowering virtual reality platform, for exploring new concepts, designing new
interfaces and testing interactive prototypes that will inherit universal accessibility
features, including compatibility with established assistive technologies is VERITAS
ultimate goal.
Without VERITAS it is very difficult if not impossible to perform accessibility
evaluation of a product unless a prototype and real disabled users are available. On
the contrary, with VERITAS it is possible to perform simulated accessibility
evaluation in all steps of product development even in the design phase with
virtual disabled users. The main VERITAS innovation lies in the fact that, even if
there have been some limited and isolated attempts to support accessibility testing of
novel products and applications, there is a clear lack of a holistic framework that
supports comprehensively virtual user modeling, simulation and testing at all
development stages and realistic/immersive experience of the simulation.
VERITAS aimed to revolutionize accessible product development by providing novel
means to perform accessibility evaluation and testing in the design phase, its ultimate
vision can be summarized in the following:
To investigate and develop an open library of various categories of virtual
user models, including VR models, covering a wide range of population
groups and especially focusing on groups in risk of exclusion, e.g. older
people, people with disability (vision, hearing, speech, motor), people with
co-existent condition, etc.
To provide novel virtual reality tools for testing the accessibility of the
environment providing also support for ICT and non-ICT products.

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To capture the personal preferences and interaction-related parameters of the


people with disabilities, the older people as well as people with changing
functional abilities during the day and map them to dynamic virtual user
models.
To research and develop methodologies for introducing simulation and testing
framework, including the virtual user and the simulation models, to a wide
variety of ICT and non-ICT applications.
To include automatic simulation and testing of the interfaces on the portable
devices by taking into account the dynamic and personalized virtual user
models and constraints imposed by the specific application being accessed by
the device.
VERITAS envisions tools for accessibility assessment and prototypes for accessing in
a seamless and personalised way: a) the environment, b) the ICT and non-ICT
products integrated in the environment and c) the information originating from
sensors integrated in the environment. The combination of virtual user modelling
and virtual reality simulation and testing with prototype development and adaptive
interface provision through on the fly accessibility simulation - for operating
devices and products integrated in AmI environments is considered critical for the
emerging AmI and Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) infrastructures. The concept of
the virtual user models should be highly interoperable for providing online and real-
time personalised services to people with disabilities and older people in various
changing environments and conditions.

1.2.1. Project context and objectives


It is important to realise that people with disabilities are not just a tiny minority of the
population of the European Union. The lowest estimate, based on the currently
defined disablement categories, estimates their total number at around 74 Million
persons [1]. However, other estimates that take into account a) people with cognitive
difficulties, and b) those people in the so-called hinterland between fully able bodied
and the classically termed people with disabilities [2], should considerably raise those
numbers [3].
Despite the rapid evolution of ICT over the last years and the increasing
acknowledgment of the importance of accessibility, the developers of mainstream
ICT-based products still act and struggle under total absence of structured guidance
and support for adjusting their envisaged products and services with their users real-
time accessibility needs. As a result, a critical mass market, including that of older
people and people with disabilities-friendly ICT-based products and services
targeting older people and people with disabilities, remains highly locked.
A similar situation is observed in the development of non-ICT products and services,
where developers toil to test and evolve their prototypes in terms of their
functionality, without however being able to systematically test their developments in
terms of their accessibility. Moreover, guidelines, for example in the domain of
building design, are not the ultimate solution; they are often inadequate, sometimes
wrong, not completely understood by designers, and there is no ex post verification
that by following them the result of the design will be accessible. Thus, it is a
technological challenge to provide to disabled and senior citizens with systems that
could support their individual characteristics and increase their quality of life. These

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systems should improve the level of independence, promote the social relationships
and encourage the psychological and physical state of the person.
AmI and AAL spaces could potentially bridge the accessibility gap
While the interest in Ambient Intelligence (AmI) and Ambient Assisted Living
(AAL) has increased exponentially due to the widespread use of portable IT devices
and networked sensors, AmI and AAL spaces could provide the necessary means to
achieve accessible products. Technological advances are making the AmI and AAL
visions a reality, but there still remains a question for designers and developers on
how to effectively develop and deploy smart applications, devices and services to
serve different categories of end users (beneficiaries) demonstrating flexibility,
adaptability and situation adaptability (context awareness). As a result, the support of
accessible solutions and services that can seamlessly operate in various and changing
settings (e.g. home, workplace, etc.) sets new challenges that must be addressed by
both the hardware manufacturers, software developers and designers.
ISTAG (the IST Advisory Group) has proposed Ambient Intelligence Space as a layer
connecting different AmI environments (e.g. home, car, public spaces) in a seamless
and unobtrusive way. Obviously, interoperability and standards are crucial in this
respect. Context awareness is another issue that needs to be looked into more closely,
especially when trying to integrate forms of context that are more sophisticated and
user-oriented than current definitions of context.
AmI and AAL tomorrow
The convergence of pervasive computing, ambient networks and intelligent-user
interfaces has enabled the development of ambient intelligence and associated
services. Human beings and machines will be surrounded by intelligent interfaces
supported by computing and networking technology in everyday objects. This will
lead to situations in which the environment is aware of a human or agent presence,
and in which the agents and devices are aware of their environment, their location and
also the abilities and disabilities of their human operator. Taking into account the
personal preferences, the current activities of the user and the behaviour of machines,
services will be capable of tracking users and responding intelligently to all kinds of
requests. Thus, the intelligent user interaction with systems and services is an
essential aspect for emerging applications and has specific requirements to cope with
peoples abilities.
The technology trends foreseen for the next 20 years as defined in the 2020 roadmap
for the future1 are outlined in the following Figure, which expects an evolution of the
current technological advancements in Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments
that will make key technologies available for the adoption of accessible designs and
services.
It is widely expected that increased interoperability and smart appliances will become
mainstream in the retail industry around 2015. As this scenario will evolve, a vast
amount of objects will be addressable, and could be connected to IP-based networks,
to constitute the very first wave of the Internet of Things. Another very important
aspect that needs to be addressed at this early stage is the one related to interaction
standards, accessibility and personalised objects.

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Figure 1: Extrapolation of technology trends


Accessibility issues
One of the main prerequisites of designers and developers, either designing for AmI
environments/applications or not, is that interactions of end users must be multimodal
and adaptive according to user preferences, disabilities and changing daily
environments. In principle, different modalities can be used concurrently so as to
increase the accessibility of available information or, alternatively, to present the
same information in different contexts, or, redundantly, to address different
interaction channels.
Nevertheless, nowadays many designers and developers suffer from lack of
knowledge about accessibility and interoperability concepts and, as a result, are
unaware of the accessibility barriers that are frequently generated when introducing a
new product, and/or application to the market - or potential future AmI market - and
especially when they are trying to accommodate the seamless use of their components
in different and changing environments. Also, due to time restrictions to delivering
the product/service, the developer has no time to understand and integrate all the new
information he/she gets about accessibility and interoperability.
Existing accessibility assessment tools and packaged solutions (e.g., several CAD
tools or simulation environments like the ones developed within the VERITAS,
VICON and VAALID projects) give developers and designers the possibility of
seeing how the parameters and characteristics of different virtual users with
disabilities (adopted static virtual user models and personas) can affect the simulation
process and its results.
This design paradigm, based on the notion of the Virtual User, could be described as
What You See Is What Other People Get WYSIWOPG-, that is to say, developers
may have a clear view of the interaction perceived the end user with or even without
disabilities when interacting with a product in the development stage. The importance
and significant potential of these approaches via the use of the virtual user models is
obvious, since they can guarantee that the developments will be accessible for a vast
percentage of the disabled population, while also improve the usability of the designs
for all including able-bodied people.

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Moreover, interface or design optimization for each individual is also possible. The
adoption of dynamic virtual user models of end users (people with disabilities and
elderly) could be instrumental in deciding how to use multimodality and interface
adaptation for different users in different contexts and for setting the final design
goals. Furthermore, it is crucial also for physical interaction with non-ICT objects.

1.3. Scientific and Technological objectives


To address the issues described above, the VERITAS project set the following
objectives:
To investigate and develop an open library of various categories of virtual
user models, including VR models, covering a wide range of population
groups and especially focusing on groups in risk of exclusion, e.g. older
people, people with disability (vision, hearing, speech, motor),people with co-
existent condition, etc.
To develop an Open Simulation Platform (OSP) for virtual reality simulation
and testing of new products at all stages of iterative product planning and
development, i.e. specification, design, development, validation and testing.
To develop an extensive list of virtual reality tools for supporting accessibility
testing at all stages of development of existing applications, of partners of the
VERITAS consortium in the following domains: a) automotive, b) smart
living spaces, c) workplace design, d) infotainment and e) personal healthcare
and wellbeing.
To research and develop methodologies for introducing the VERITAS
simulation and testing framework, including the virtual user and the
simulation models, to a wide variety of ICT and non-ICT applications.
To research and develop a framework for immersive virtual user simulation
and testing, i.e. putting the developer in the position of the user through
virtual/augmented reality simulation.
To define measures and metrics for evaluating software accessibility for every
application scenario during design and development through VR simulation
(graphs, statistics, distance metrics in general).
To research and develop innovative concepts for ambient, multi-device,
universally accessible and usable multimodal interfaces through VR
simulation.
The typical development chain without the use of virtual prototyping, and virtual
accessibility testing and accessibility assessment is exemplified by Figure 2. The
designers or developers of new products and ICT solutions, first design their products
and interfaces with little to no regard for accessibility and in some cases, they
retroactively test them against small groups of actual users, mainly with regard to
ergonomics only. This leads to products that are only partially accessible and only
through external assistive devices.
With the advent of VERITAS, we set out to change the design paradigm to one where
the designers proactively simulate their designs and interfaces against a multitude of
virtual user groups representing several different impairments and identify and
quantify issues in their designs that would render them inaccessible, following the
development chain in Figure 3.

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Figure 2: Typical development chain before VERITAS

Figure 3: Typical development chain after VERITAS

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1.3.1. Main Scientific and Technological results/foregrounds


Within the framework of the project, the following stages have been covered
successfully during the 4 years duration of the project, in order to fulfill the objectives
of the project:
1. User requirements gathering
2. User Models development
3. Multisensorial platform implementation & Measurements
4. Task Models development and Use case definition
5. Model Platform development
6. Core & Immersive Simulation Platform development
7. Exportable Toolbox development
8. Simulation Models development and Integration of Veritas Platform into
Application Domains
9. Pilot planning, Pilot development and testing
10. User Evaluation & Feedback
11. Framework and Models Validation
The development of the framework started by performing a thorough research on user
requirements to determine the projects target designer user groups, as well as the
users groups formed by people with disabilities and older people (our beneficiaries).
Extensive surveys were undertaken among experts in the field of the automotive,
smart living, workplace, infotainment and healthcare area resulting in a state of the art
analysis of currently existing models (physical, cognitive, behavioral and
psychological) and simulation software for the different application areas, with focus
on whether they were able to model and/or simulate disabilities, but also whether they
were applicable across the application areas.
The result was a concise UCD methodology in the form of an enhanced waterfall
model (based on the ISO Standard 13407) with formative and summative evaluations
including VERITAS users at each stage of the design and development process. This
process was then mapped onto the different work packages, activities and application
areas of the VERITAS project.
This work was followed by the determination of the accessibility-related parameters
that affect users performance and satisfaction of interaction with products and
subsequent formulation of the abstract physical, cognitive and behavioral user
models. These abstract models aimed at defining and characterizing disabled users by
means of numerical values for specific parameter sets that model the disability. A
literature review was carried out to obtain the data about physical impairments in
motor, vision and hearing while reaction time, attention (selective, divided,
sustained), memory (semantic, episodic, procedural, working), perception (visual,
auditory, haptic), decision making, orientation, and speech and language were
identified as necessary attributes of the cognitive user models while stress, fatigue,
motivation, and emotions were identified as necessary attributes of the behavioral and
psychological user models.
Since the literature did not provide all the required data in order to cover the targeted
parameters of the abstract user models, a Multisensorial measurement platform was
developed to provide the quantifiable data needed to fill the gaps in the literature. The
VERITAS Multisensorial platform enhances the creation, validation and training of
virtual user models through the participation and involvement of designers and real

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users with disabilities by offering an integrated framework for the measurement of


several physical, cognitive and behavioural parameters.
Using the results of the user requirements research and taking into account the
parameters we derived for the assessment for accessibility in physical, cognitive and
psychological aspects, the next step we took was to define the use cases to assess the
frameworks applicability on the targeted application domains. Based upon the UCD
methodology, the Use Cases were iteratively and interactively evaluated by the
partners of the project, the users of VERITAS, (developers/designers) and, finally, the
beneficiaries. We complemented this effort by performing a multidimensional
analysis of the abstract, primitive and complex tasks involved in the performance of
the use cases per application area, thereby creating a standardized Task Model format
to functionally describe a use case scenario as a hierarchical set of primitive tasks in
the form of UsiXML.
The final result of the work carried out in these activities was the development of the
Veritas Model Platform which is used to generate virtual user models ready for the
use in the VERITAS simulation platform. This platform provides several utilities to
customize and parameterize virtual user models with respect to physical, cognitive
and behavioural parameters, generating an intelligent 3D avatar that encompasses
information with respect to user defined physical body dimensions and
sociodemographics as well as customization of physical, cognitive and behavioural
parameters through a virtual user model generator.
The culmination of these efforts was the development of the Veritas Core &
Immersive Simulation Platform. The Core Simulation Platform forms the basis of the
VERITAS platform. More specifically, the Platform is the infrastructure for all
simulations that take place within VERITAS and its purpose is to provide all the
necessary aids and functionality of reproducing realistically the simulation scenarios.
Support of all the intelligent avatar's structures and its interaction with the virtual
objects/products is also part of the Core Simulation Platform. Finally, in order to
identify necessary design changes in the software or hardware setup, the Core
Simulation Platform contains all the needed elements will provide feedback to the
product designer at every simulation step of the application scenario. The Immersive
Simulation Platform extends the capabilities of the Core Simulation Platform by
providing immersive interaction and visualisation modules so as to allow the
developer to immerse within the VR simulation and interact with the environment as
being a user with impairments.
In order to ensure a User Centered approach, the Core Simulation Platform was
complemented with the development of proper software interfaces able to guarantee
adaptability for each application domain addressed by the project. These consist of a
set of adaptors that allow the conversion of designs, tasks, interfaces and user models
into simulatable components within the VERITAS Simulation Platform. These
adaptors include the Virtual User and Simulation Models Adaptor that performs the
tasks of adapting a Humanoid avatar and a 3D design (CAD design) from simple
graphical representations to physical elements of a simulation and the Interaction
Adaptor, which performs the task of adapting the simulation tasks from an abstract
description in the Simulation Model to specific simulation scenarios involving the
objects present in the design and the specific virtual user chosen by the designer.
With regard to Immersive simulation, the Interaction Manager was developed to
perform interfacing and controlling of the Immersive Interaction Tools for designer

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experience developed during the project. The Interaction Adaptor has the dual
function of (1) adaptation and encoding of user model parameters into control
parameters used for the control of Interaction Tools for designer experience and (2)
serving as interface layer from the core simulation platform and the immersive
interaction devices.
The Integrated Core Simulation Platform and Exportable Toolbox constitutes the
main technical achievement of the project. The Core Simulation Platform combined
with the adaptor and interaction tools can be used by a product designer or software
developer in order to simulate virtual user models with or without disabilities and
provides to the end user, designer or developer, various metrics to be used for
accessibility assessment of a product. The Exportable Toolbox adapts the information
of the virtual user and the simulation models and moreover exports it to existing
developer/design platforms that are already used for the design/development of
mainstream ICT and non-ICT products.
In order to evaluate the frameworks performance, we applied the use cases to each
application domain covered (automotive, smart home design, workplace design,
infotainment and healthcare) by integrating them inside the VERITAS Core
Simulation Platform which entailed the identification of the simulation parameters in
each case and providing the adaptation of all the parameters affecting each use case
scenarios simulation. The outcome was the formal definition of simulation models
for each application domain, proposed design and use case scenario, ready to be
tested for accessibility using the Exportable Toolbox, against multiple Virtual User
Models covering several physical, cognitive and behavioural impairments through
both automatic and immersive/interactive simulation of the tested design.
The evaluation of the framework consisted of an extensive pilot plan extending over 2
pilot iterations with designers/developers and 2 pilot iterations with beneficiaries for
each tested design in each domain as well as usability and acceptance testing of the
VERITAS Framework and tools themselves. We researched several evaluation
methodologies and in the end we implemented a pilot methodology that provided
both Formative evaluation, i.e. evaluation carried out during the design and
implementation phase of VERITAS and targeted at collecting information for
improvement and Summative evaluation, i.e. the evaluation process on VERITAS at
the end of the development phase and targeted at collecting information on the
outcomes of the implementation.
Our evaluation strategy included both qualitative as well as quantitative metrics.
Quantitative evaluation focused on measurements providing tangible results and
statistics using indicators such as the time to perform a task versus the number of
errors as a consequence of applying tests to the online interface of an application.
Indicators and measures were collected via log files analysis. Qualitative evaluation,
on the other hand, was directed to the user and considered opinions and values of
users. Indicators and measures concerning this were questionnaires and user
experience reports, interviews etc. Generic questionnaires, which were ethically
approved by the Ethical Advisory Board of the project, pilot ethical committees and
national data protection authorities, have been conducted during VERITAS pilots for
the assessment of projects usability and acceptance level. The questionnaires
addressed all types of users participating and presented useful information regarding
the following parameters:

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o Acceptance, which measures the users willingness to use a system like


VERITAS one and the level of acceptance that the user develops for the
system after its use.
o User Satisfaction, which is measured by direct attitudes towards a system and
provides the investigator with a system evaluation in two dimensions
consisting of a 9-item 5-point rating scale
In the context of usability assessment of the VERITAS framework, the System
Usability Scale (SUS) was utilized in order to get as much reliable results as possible.
It is a low-cost usability scale that can be used for global assessments of systems
usability. The returned comments and suggestions were used towards improving the
attributes of VERITAS Virtual User Models, Simulation Models, Core Simulation
Platform and Exportable Toolbox in order to enhance their effectiveness and
performance prior to market deployment.
Concerning standardisation, since VERITAS includes leading International industrial
partners (CAF, CRF, PIAGGIO, ATOS, INDESIT, LMS) as well as academic
partners/non-profit organisations with very strong links to ongoing standardisation
efforts (FhG/IAO, CERTH, AGE, FORTH, UPM), the Consortium took important
steps to ensure the adoption of existing guidelines and standards for the development
of accessible VERITAS applications, as well as to present its results in the related
standardisation bodies and industrial for as well as to beneficiaries groups and
stakeholders (both at European and International level).
A VUMS cluster was formed with other Virtual User Model-centric projects VICON,
MyUI, VAALID and GUIDE to promote an appropriate Working group for the
development of accessible VR applications. VERITAS participated in the WAI-ARIA
special user group that is coordinated by the W3C. The main outcome of this group
was the preparation of relevant W3C Working Group Notes in order to assist
developers in designing accessible VR applications (e.g. in the metaverses or the
games area) that produce accessible content and also in creating accessible VR
interfaces. These notes should help developers implement the WAI Guidelines; and
give specific details and practical examples of how to meet them.
Great feedback through planning, designing and testing towards their integration in
the final VERITAS framework has been provided by all partners at each of the
fourteen (14) plenary meetings, technical meetings and the annual reviews, that have
taken place during the projects lifespan. Among the most important project outcomes
are the publicly available Virtual User Model repository, the public reports and
deliverables. Specifically, a final and four annual periodic reports along with 94
deliverables in total have been submitted, from which 43 have been made publicly
available, as presented in the following table.
Table 1: List of public deliverables available through project web site

Del. no. Deliverable name Lead bene-


ficiary
(short
name)
D1.1.1 UCD-based user requirements extraction MCA
D1.1.2 UCD design guidelines for applications development UNEW

D1.1.3 UCD based design revision manual UNEW


D1.3.1 Abstract physical models definition UNITN

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Del. no. Deliverable name Lead bene-


ficiary
(short
name)
D1.3.2 Parameterized human physical models LMS
D1.4.1 Abstract Cognitive User models definition COAT
D1.4.2 Parameterized cognitive models UPM
D1.5.1 Abstract Behavioural and Psychological User models definition ITACA
D1.5.2 Parameterized Behavioural and Psychological models ITACA
D1.6.1 Implementation of VERITAS virtual user model platform HS

D1.6.2 UIML/USIXML task modelling definition ITACA


D1.6.3 Intelligent Avatar and User model generator components VRMMP
D1.6.4 User Model Interoperability Requirements CERTH/ITI
D1.6.5 Interfaces between User Models from projects VERITAS, VICON, MyUI, CERTH/ITI
GUIDE

D1.7.1a Final version of VERITAS Use Cases and Application Scenarios CERTH/HIT
D1.7.1b Final version of VERITAS Use Cases and Application Scenarios CERTH/HIT
D1.7.2 Task analysis per application area MCA
D1.7.3 Parameterization of models to the context of use CERTH/HIT
D2.1.1 Core simulation platform CERTH/ITI
D2.2.1 Simulation models for the automotive scenario CRF
D2.3.1 Generation of simulation models Domologic
D2.4.1 Simulation models for the workplace design scenario Hypertech
D2.5.1 Simulation models for the game scenario VRMMP
D2.6.1 Simulation models for the healthcare scenario I+
D2.7.1 VERITAS interaction tools architecture definition PERCRO
D2.8.1 First prototypes of the multimodal interface tool set CERTH/ITI
D2.8.2 Integration of Multimodal Interfaces into the VERITAS Simulation and CERTH/ITI
Testing Framework
D2.8.3 Testing and validation Refinement of the interface tool set CERTH/ITI

D3.4.1 Accessible metaverses and collaborative tools integrated in the VERITAS CERTH/ITI
platform
D3.8.2 Pilot results consolidation UNEW
D4.1.3 Project Presentation and Project Description Leaflet FhG/IAO
D4.1.4 VERITAS Ethics Manual COAT
D4.3.1a Dissemination plans and materials (appendix of PR reports, Report on MCA
raising public participation and awareness) plus leaflets and posters
D4.3.1b Dissemination plans and materials (appendix of PR reports, Report on MCA
raising public participation and awareness) plus leaflets and posters
D4.3.1c Dissemination plans and materials (appendix of PR reports, Report on MCA
raising public participation and awareness) plus leaflets and posters
D4.3.1d Dissemination plans and materials (appendix of PR reports, Report on CERTH/ITI
raising public participation and awareness) plus leaflets and posters
D4.3.2 Proceedings of second VERITAS International Workshop CVUT
D4.3.3a Project video MCA
D4.3.3b Project video FhG/IAO
D4.3.4 Proceedings of the first VERITAS International Conference CERTH/HIT
D4.5.1 Application Guidelines, Research Roadmap, policy and standards FORTH
recommendations
D4.5.2 VERITAS roadmap CERTH/HIT
D4.5.3 VERITAS White Paper VERITAS vision CERTH/ITI

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Each of the main VERITAS scientific and technological achievements, as well as the
VERITAS system integration in each of the demonstrators is briefly presented in the
following sections.
1.3.1.1. The VERITAS User Model Methodology
The generation of VERITAS Virtual User models followed the next steps:
1. Creation of Abstract User Models (AUM), based on: analysis of existing
models (theoretical, computational, biomechanical) and medical literature,
existing practices and guidelines, user needs and international accessibility
standards.
2. Appropriate Task models implementation, common for the three views of the
model: physical, cognitive and psychological & behavioural, based on
UIML/USIXML language that represents users performing specific tasks and
interactions
3. Iterative update and verification of the models with metrics collected with the
help of VERITAS Multisensorial platform.
4. Generation of Generic Virtual User Models (GVUM) per disability/affective
state, by linking the Abstract User Model parameters with the affected tasks.
5. Creation of the Virtual User Models, by instantiating the GVUM, which
represents a specific user with a disability/s or psychological state
Based on these major components a methodology has been synthesized in the first
months of the project that is described in the following sections.

Figure 4: The User Modelling methodology of VERITAS


1.3.1.2. The Abstract User Models
One of the main achievements of the VERITAS project is the development of a
formal definition of Physical, Cognitive, Psychological and Behavioural parameters
that can be used to adequately describe a group of people with similar characteristics
with regard to motor, vision, speech, hearing, and cognitive capabilities and
impairments. By researching the literature on several diseases, their effects and
limitations they incur to a persons capabilities, we derived the abstract data and
parameters that describe functional limitations. These were in turn used for the
production of virtual users, which meant that they must be easy to map onto the
parameters of the specific model implementations. For this reason, the data gathered

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for each disease and impairment was quantitative, objective, and measurable indices.
We also researched medical scales that can be found in the literature, however, these
scales were developed for rating the severity of the disease and are of little usefulness
for developing virtual human beings with modelled disabilities.
We can roughly divide abstract data and parameters into two groups: the first group
collects parameters that can be mapped on the models in a straightforward fashion,
e.g. the range of motion of joints. The second group collects parameters that need
identification methods to be transformed into models, e.g. we devised the spiral test,
which measures performance of people affected by Parkinsons Disease (PD) to
derive measurable parameters that indicate the severity of PD and thus provide a scale
to base a VUM for PD on.
The Abstract User Models refer to a high level description of potential user models.
They are developed with respect to several specific disabilities and are broken down
according to the disability category, i.e. cognitive user models, physical user models,
behavioural & psychological user models. An abstract user model that is stored in
ontologies includes several disability related parameters like disability description,
disability metrics, ICF functional abilities, etc.
The creation of the Abstract User Models was initiated by performing literature
research on Physical, Cognitive, Psychological and Behavioural impairments to
derive the most important impairments and the relevant parameters that affect them.
Physical Impairments
There is a wide spectrum of diseases that can cause some kind of physical impairment
in people. These range from diseases of the nervous system to diseases of the
musculoskeletal system and connective tissues. We organized physical impairments
in four broad categories:
motor impairments
visual impairments
speech impairments
hearing impairments
The World Health Organization (WHO) [1] endorsed a classification of various
diseases and other health problems, called International Classification of Disease
(ICD). From an overview of this classification, it is clear that the number of disability
types is very large. In addition, the category of older people needs to be also
considered. This is a transversal class, which, besides general aging effects, can
include one or more of the above diseases. We focused on a relatively small group of
important pathologies, which have to be considered with priority for the simulations
and hence for the literature review. The review was carried out to obtain the data
about physical and motor impairments (in this manner it was possible to characterize
the disabled users and the relative pathologies). Based on the review, the following
pathologies were prioritized:
Table 2: ICD visual disabilities
VISUAL DISABILITIES
Pathology ICD code
Diabetic retinopathy H36.0
Glaucoma H40
Senile or age related degeneration H35.3

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VISUAL DISABILITIES
Pathology ICD code
Color vision deficiencies H53.5

Table 3: ICD classification for motor


MOTOR DISABILITIES
Pathology ICD code
Rheumatoid arthritis M05-M06
Gout M10
Kyphosis and lordosis M40
Ankilosing spondylitis M45
Hand osteoarthritis M16
Gonarthrosis M17
Coxarthrosis M16
Shoulder adhesive capsulitis M75
Multiple sclerosis G35
Cerebral palsy G80-G83
Hereditary and idiopathic neuropathy G60
Stroke I64
Dystonia G24
Parkinsons disease G20-G22
Elderly Not classified
Table 4: ICD classification for speech
SPEECH DISABILITIES
Pathology ICD code
Stuttering/stammering F98.5
Cluttering F98.6
Dysarthria R47.0
Muteness H91.3
Apraxia R48.2

Table 5: Hearing disabilities


HEARING DISABILITIES
Pathology ICD code
Conductive hearing loss, bilateral, unilateral with unrestricted hearing on H90.0-H90.2
the contralateral side or unspecified.
Sensorineural hearing loss, bilateral, unilateral with unrestricted hearing H90.2-H90.5
on the contralateral side or unspecified.
Mixed hearing loss conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, bilateral, H90.6-H90.8
unilateral with unrestricted hearing on the contralateral side or
unspecified.
Hearing loss, unspecified H91.9
Presbycusis H91

A set of metrics were identified for each of the physical impairments and were used
to define the Abstract User Model to describe functional limitations. For each type of
physical impairment (motor, visual, speech, hearing) the following set of metrics
were considered:

Motor Impairments:
1. Kinematics functional limitations. Reduction in mobility of joints, velocity of
joints, (possibly geometry of joints and bones) and ultimately reach and
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dexterity abilities.
2. Dynamics functional limitations. Reduction in muscle strength and ultimately
the ability to produce useful forces.
3. Control Functional limitation. Neuromuscular deficiencies, which ultimately
results in difficulty of controlling movements.

These were further extended to the following parameters:


Gait parameters;
Upper body kinematic parameters;
Lower body kinematic parameters.
Torso kinematic parameters;
Strength parameters
Dexterity and control, task-related, performance indicators

Vision Impairments:
Visual skills assessment involved the assessment of:
Visual Acuity the ability to perceive details presented with good contrast;
Visual Field the ability to simultaneously perceive visual information from
various parts of the environment.
Contrast Sensitivity the ability to perceive patterns of poor contrast. Loss of
this ability can interfere significantly with many daily activities.
Glare sensitivity, including delayed Glare recovery, Photophobia and reduced
or delayed Light and Dark Adaptation are other functions that may interfere
with proper contrast perception.
Color vision deficiencies

Speech Impairments:
PCC (Percentage of Consonants Correct)
ACI (Articulation Competence Index)

Hearing Impairments:
For hearing impairments the audiogram is a good indicator: it reports the hearing
level in Decibels versus the frequency of the signal. The resulting metric is:
Decibel as function of Frequency

Cognitive, Psychological and Behavioural Impairments


With regard to cognitive impairments, in order to create models of the target users
that can be used within VERITAS accessibility tools, it was necessary to identify
which are the cognitive functions and corresponding parameters (e.g. reaction time,
perception, attention, working memory, etc.) that are related with the defined
VERITAS cognitive impairments and to identify how the cognitive states affect the
cognitive functions (reaction time, memory, attention, etc) in order to extract relevant
quantitative and qualitative metrics, rules and parameters based on the information
obtained in relevant studies.
For Psychological and Behavioural impairments, different theories of human
psychological modelling and interaction were analysed, focusing on those models that
can represent the psychological and behavioural facets of elderly and disabled people.
Stress, fatigue, emotions and (de)motivation were selected as the most relevant P&B

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states that influence elderly and disabled, so qualitative and quantitative metrics and
rules of behaviour were analysed and compiled to create the P&B Abstract User
Model tables.
A review was made to the abstract cognitive, psychological and behavioural user
models in order to create a new table structure that relates the cognitive,
psychological and behavioural disabilities with the affected task models. Two
different approaches were followed in order to define the value of the parameters
(quantitative) that were not included in the definition of the Physical Abstract User
models. The first one was based on a research of existing models of the cognitive
architecture Adaptive Control of Thought-Rational (ACT-R) and existing studies and
their relation with the affected tasks. The second one was based on a virtual simulator
with real users. The selected scenario for this last one was the automotive and the
elderly people were the selected simulation targeted users.
The parameters described above were combined with anthropometric, age-related and
sociodemographic data gathered from the literature to derive minimum and maximum
ranges for each parameter as well as human transfer functions for each and resulted in
the definition of the Extended Abstract User Model that provides a concise
description for each physical disability.
The main information present in the Extended AUM table is:
ICD classification
Short pathology description
Parameters (metrics) based on literature survey for every disability
The figure below shows a resulting AUM table example:

Figure 5: AUM table information


1.3.1.3. The Multisensorial Platform
Most of the (very large) literature related to quantitative metrics has a medical aim
and provides data for diagnosis and/or for monitoring of the disease progress. Even
those papers that provide objective data often have the ultimate goal to provide
objective indicators as a substitution for clinical scales (i.e., again to focus on
diagnosis and monitoring). In other words, data that can be found in the literature
were not collected with the purpose of being useful for modeling virtual users. Thus
data are sometimes incomplete and sometimes of difficult use for the scope of
VERITAS.

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Consequently, one of the main innovations in VERITAS with respect to virtual user
modeling is the introduction and use of a Multisensorial Platform for the training of
parameterized user models based on real user measurements in real testing conditions.
The multisensorial platform is a system of different sensors adapted to the VERITAS
application areas and is able to capture user feedback while executing a number of
tasks that will be mapped in the VERITAS virtual user models.
Special sensors, as presented below, were used for data capturing ranging from trace
monitoring cameras for driver monitoring to wearable sensors for body motion
analysis, to motion trackers and gait analysis sensors for analyzing user kinematic
patterns while executing specific activities and tasks and also environmental sensors
for monitoring the interaction of users with the real environment.
The final list of sensors used in the measurement campaign with the Multisensorial
Platform is given in the following table.
Table 6: List of sensors used in the Multisensorial Platform
Group System Instrument accuracy
Video sensing Omni vision camera set up better than 5 cm
Wearable systems Electrogoniometer standard deviations are
less than 1.5
Human glove Sensor Accuracy: 0.1V /
2.5V
Sensor Non-Linearity: <
2.0%
Sensor Range: > 110
Inertial Platform standard deviation is 3
degrees
Motion tracking Kinect Height ~ 3 cm
Bumblebee Stride length ~ 5 cm
Step length ~ 3 cm
Step width ~ 3 cm
Gait asymm. ~ 5 %
Cadence ~ 2 %
Double sup. ~ 4 %
Body oscill. ~ 4 %
Swing ~ 4 %
Velocity ~ 5 %
Environmental sensors Multi-axes load cell in x direction: 2.3 N,
95% confidence level
in y direction: 2.1 N,
95% confidence level
Force panel spatial resolution of 0.4
mm, accuracy of 1.8 mm
force resolution of 0.05
N, accuracy of 0.1 N
MOCAP position accuracy: 5
mm
angular accuracy: 1.5
Vicon ~ 1 mm

The following table correlates each of the measured parameter with the corresponding
sensor of the Multisensorial Platform.

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Table 7: Parameters and instruments


Parameter groups Parameter Instrument
Gait parameters Weight shift Motion tracking
Step length Motion tracking
Step width Motion tracking
Stride length Motion tracking
Step Asymmetries Motion tracking
Double Support Duration Motion tracking
Gait cycle Motion tracking
Electrogoniometer
Cadence Motion tracking
Electrogoniometer
Velocity Motion tracking
Upper body Neck Extension / Flexion Inertial platform
parameters Neck Lateral Bend Inertial platform
Elbow flexion/extension Garment MOCAP
Inertial platform
Wrist ulnar bend/radial bend Human Glove
Wrist flexion/extension Human Glove
Phalanges ROM Human Glove
Wrist pronation/supination Inertial platform
Video sensing Reach envelope Video Sensing
Lower body Knee flexion/extension Garment MOCAP
parameters Electrogoniometer

Hip flexion/extension Garment MOCAP


Inertial platform
Hip abduction Garment MOCAP
Inertial platform
Joint angular velocity Garment MOCAP
Electrogoniometer
Strength parameters Pull force Multi-axes load cell
Push force Multi-axes load cell
In and Out force Multi-axes load cell
Elbow Joint Torque Multi-Axes load cell +
Inverse dynamic algorithm
Shoulder Joint Torque Multi-Axes load cell +
Inverse dynamic algorithm
Dexterity/control Continuous tracking tasks
Percentage time in target (PTT) Force Panel
Mean Deviation to Trajectory (MD2T) Force Panel
Standard deviation of Deviation to Force Panel
Trajectory (STD_D2T)
Mean Deviation to Path (MD2P) Force Panel
Standard deviation of Deviation to Path Force Panel
(STD_D2P)
Mean Speed Target (MST) Force Panel
Mean Speed (MS) Force Panel
Standard deviation speed (STD_S) Force Panel
Human Transfer Function
tau Force Panel
wZ Force Panel
wP Force Panel
csi Force Panel
wN Force Panel
rms Force Panel
Fittss Law
A Force Panel

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Parameter groups Parameter Instrument


B Force Panel
Torso parameters Sagittal flexion of torso Inertial Platform
Lateral flexion of torso Inertial Platform
The figures below present some of the used sensors and equipment of the
Multisensorial Platform and relevant parameters measured with each.

Figure 6: Knee Flexion/Extension measurements with the Electrogoniometer and Mocap

Figure 7: Elbow flexion/extension and inertial platform

Figure 8: Wrist Ulnar-Radial Bend and Human Glove

Figure 9: Pull/Push force and Multi axes load cell

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Figure 10: Force panel with the vertical line shown on the LCD for transfer-function estimation
procedure
During the measurements, 209 persons were subjected to test campaigns in which the
relevant parameters for elderly people and people with disabilities were measured.
These campaigns took place at 5 test sites: Florence, Trento, Newcastle, Thessaloniki
and Plovdiv. The persons involved covered the majority of physical impairments
targeted by the project and the measured data was processed in order to calculate the
mean and standard deviation for each quantitative metric, and to correlate them with
specific disabilities.
The procedure of data processing was the following:
- The recorded data was introduced into the template tables at each test site.
- Each table with the recorded data was collected in a central sheet. This central
sheet contains all the measured parameters of all the subjects and all the
anthropometric data
- Next step was to sort the measured data by disabilities. Since a unique number
was associated to all the subjects correlated with their disabilities, the data from
the central sheet could be reorganized according to disabilities.
- Assuming a Gaussian distribution the collected data was statistically processed to
derive the mean and standard deviation of the specific parameters for all the
considered disabilities
- The mean and standard deviation values of the specific parameters correlated with
disabilities were imported into the physical VUM table in their correct location
for each disability and affected metric.

Figure 11: Data processing procedure

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1.3.1.4. The Task Models


The actions that are being systematically performed in the context of the five
VERITAS application areas are described within the task model. Moreover, these
tasks are developed using an hierarchical approach. Thus, high level tasks are related
to more complex abstract actions, e.g. driving, and are broken down into simpler
tasks, e.g. steering, and primitive tasks, e.g. grasping.
The following step in the user model methodology of VERITAS was to identify
which impairment affected which task and thus map the effects of each parameter of
the impairments to the affected task parameters during the execution of each task. An
end user of a physical VUM has to be able to set up a virtual model of a disabled or
elderly person and use this virtual human model to simulate different tasks specific to
different application sectors (Automotive, Healthcare, etc.). Consequently a generic
physical virtual user model has to link disability related information to information
related to different tasks within the different sectors.
The task analysis carried out analysed how a task is completed, including a detailed
description of both manual (physical) and mental (cognitive, psychological and
behavioral) activities and (subtasks and primitive) tasks, as well as environmental
conditions (different application areas).The aim of the task analysis was to
decompose the high level tasks and break them down into their constituent subtasks
and primitive tasks. This shows an overall hierarchical structure of the main user
tasks.
This process of task decomposition was represented as a Hierarchical Task Analysis
and therefore tables were defined, sequencing the different tasks, subtasks and
primitive tasks vertically, while detailing them horizontally. In order to break down a
task, the following strategy has been applied:
- First step was to identify the task to be analyzed in the different application
areas, using a hierarchical task analysis.
- Secondly, each task was broken down into sequential subtasks.
- Finally, the level of detail into which to decompose, and define the very
primitive tasks was decided. This decomposition was crucial to ensure the
abstract user models is useable in an environment such as e.g. driving a car
where several controls and switches will be used by people with upper limb
impairments.

An example of such a task analysis table is presented in the following figure for
illustrating the information contained in the task analysis tables.

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Figure 12: Task analysis table information

As it can be noticed in figure above, the task analysis table defines the link between
application sectors, tasks, subtasks, and primitive tasks. One can define a task as a
group of basic actions taken by the user. Entering a car or changing gear can be
examples of tasks for a specific sector (automotive in this case).
With the aim of defining a closer link between the tasks and metrics, every task is
substructured in subtasks: a subtask can be defined as a list of primary physical
actions needed to perform one task. For example for the task of changing gear in a car
the list of subtasks would be: pushing (left foot), reach (left arm), position (left hand),
grasp (right hand), push (right hand) and lift (left foot). Following the red circles and
lines from the figure one can see an example how the task of entering the car is linked
to different subtasks, like opening the left door, further linking to several primitive
tasks, which may consider different impairments, like for example upper limb
impairments.
The primitive tasks define the primitive human actions and are related to the
disability category (physical, cognitive, behavioral). The number of primitive tasks
should be limited but also sufficient so as to efficiently model all systematically
performed actions in the five VERITAS application scenarios. The degree of
primitiveness that was adopted was carefully chosen within VERITAS.
Concerning implementation, each primitive task should contain a name as well as the
category in which it belongs to. The list of primitive tasks that will be defined within
VERITAS will include tasks of different categories such as: motor, cognitive,
perceptual, visual, hearing, speech, etc. The following table lists some indicative
primitive tasks.
In some cases it can happen that the list of metrics affected by some specific
disability will not affect the performance of a specific task. For example if the virtual
dummy is performing a change of gear action, parameters related to human gait and
lower body will not affect the results, in this case the important parameters would be
strength and upper body metrics.
Table 8: Primitive Tasks Example

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The Task Models that were implemented within VERITAS were based on the five
application scenarios. They refer to user actions/interactions with a specific
environment (e.g. car, workplace, user interface) and follow a hierarchical structure
ranging from abstract high-level task to primitive tasks. They support the use of
assistive devices to perform a specific task, through multiple instances of a specific
action. They were developed based on existing relevant stat-of-the-art, standards and
guidelines but also based on domain knowledge and relevant attributes with respect to
the contents of the VERITAS application scenarios such as automotive, smart living
spaces and building, domotics, infotainment, health. The following table lists an
indicative instance of a task model.
Table 9: Task Model Example

The information described in the Task Models was merged in the Generic VUMs
establishing a link between the different tasks, subtasks, primitive tasks and the
information contained in the AUM: disabilities, metrics and parameters. Combining
these two sets of information one will be able to start for example from a task related
to a specific sector, choose a subtask, and for the related primitive tasks find
information regarding the affected metrics and parameters as a function of
disabilities.
1.3.1.5. The Use Cases
Based on the Task Models that were generated, the next step was the development of
a set of Use Cases representative of each Application domain covered by the project,
in order to derive the key aspects of accessibility evaluation parameters, targeted user
groups and expected outcomes.

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A use case defines the interactions between external stakeholders and the system to
be developed, in order for them to achieve a specific goal. As presented before, a
stakeholder is any person or organization who will be affected (either positively or
negatively) by the system to be developed. Use Cases allow capturing the users need
by focusing on a task that the user needs to do. Starting by naming the Use Cases,
value is created since this list of titles-context is the list of goals that announces what
the system will do.
Also, the Use Cases help discovering and gathering requirements for all users and
beneficiaries, and work as a hub that links together different sorts of information. Use
Cases are at the centre of the requirements process, even for many of the non-
functional requirements. Finally, by using the Use Cases methodology we can
achieve both verification and validation of the system under development. With the
verification, we make sure that the system has been well structured and developed
and with the validation we ensure that the system corresponds to the Users needs and
expectations.
The Use Cases, are goals (use cases and goals are used interchangeably) that are
made up of scenarios. Scenarios consist of a sequence of steps to achieve the goal;
each step in a scenario is a sub goal of the use case. As such, each sub-goal represents
either another use case (subordinate use case) or an autonomous action that is at the
lowest level desired by our use case decomposition. This hierarchical relationship is
needed to properly model the requirements of a system being developed. In addition,
it helps avoid the explosion of scenarios that would occur if we were to try to simply
list all possible ways of interacting with the system.
Table 10: Use Cases list

On the basis of the aforementioned methodological framework the Use Cases of


VERITAS were extracted and the extended list is presented in Table 10. It is
important to highlight that in VERITAS, the users are the developers and designers of

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the various application domains of the project, and the beneficiaries are the elderly
and disabled users.
For each Use Case, a number of scenarios were drafted, in order to have a clear vision
of what is the accessibility problem we are targeting in each application domain that
we are dealing with. Using the Use Cases, in the form of problem scenarios, at the
analysis stage, can prevent the occurrence of costly error correction at later stages of
the development cycle. In the following table an example of the Category 1 Use
Cases, drafted to evaluate the VERITAS framework itself is presented.
Table 11: Use Case Eaxmple: UC 1.2: User model generator

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1.3.1.6. The Generic Virtual User Model


A Generic Virtual User Model describes a set of users having a specific set of
disabilities. In a Generic Virtual User Model the description is also augmented with
actions (primitive tasks) that are affected by the specific set of disabilities. For
instance, for users with hemiplegia actions that are affected by the disability could
include gait, grasping, etc.
The VERITAS Generic Virtual User Model (GVUM) is the outcome of the
combination of the Abstract User Model (AUM), the data gathered through the
Multisensorial Platform and the Task definitions of the VERITAS Task Models. It is
a parameterized user model developed in VERITAS, relying on real user
measurements in real testing conditions. Moreover, the generic VUM contains
information related to user tasks, disabilities and metrics with their corresponding
numerical values.

Figure 13: Merging information into the Generic Virtual User Model (in this case Physical)
The following table lists an indicative instance of a Generic Virtual User Model.
Table 12: Generic Virtual User Model example

1.3.1.7. The VERITAS Model Platform


The creation of an intelligent avatar for the VERITAS simulation is conceptually
divided in two steps. First, all the parameters needed to create a virtual user model
must be provided to the software platform. This includes basic information such as
gender and age, to more detailed information about disabilities, each one
characterized by its own parameters. The VERITAS User Model Generator (VerGen)
is able to output a physical representation of the virtual user model whose
characteristics are covering a given percentage of the population. The designer selects
the disability and the desired percentage of the population having the specific

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disability that will be represented by the exported virtual user model. For example,
the designer wants to calculate the gait parameter values corresponding to the 90% of
the stroke patients population. Using the graphical user interface of the VERITAS
User Model Generator, the designer can select the disability and the preferred
population percentage to be covered through the use of regression for each disability
parameter. The available regression types include: a) parametric regression, b) non-
parametric regression and c) hybrid regression. The final result is a virtual user model
generated in UsiXML format, according to the value of each disability parameter.

Figure 14: The Veritas User Model Generator tool


The generation of the abstract user model avatar includes the generation of a basic
geometry and skeletal structure of the avatar, based on socio-demographical and
anthropometrical parameters supporting the following elements:
- Selection of gender (male, female)
- Selection of body dimension classifications with respect to:
Body height (very short, short, medium, tall, very tall)
Waist circumference (slim, medium, large)
Sitting height (short, medium, long)
- Selection of age group (18-29, 30-49, 50-70, 78-70)
- Selection of nation (definition of data source)
- Selection of reference year (definition of secular growth of body dimensions)

Figure 15: The Veritas Model Platform tool

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The abstract avatar model is then converted into a concrete virtual physical avatar
taking into account the parameters of the Virtual User Model. The conversion process
is performed by the VERITAS Model Platform (VerMP) and consists of a translation
from the geometry used by the user generator to the actual (and richer) format needed
by the simulator.

Figure 16: Workflow and components of the VERITAS Model Platform


Finally, the virtual physical avatar is fine-tuned, or customized, for the simulation.
Customization includes fine-tuning the avatar size, weight and height, removal of
limbs and positioning of POIs (Point Of Interests: mandatory for the simulation to
work). The workflow and components of the VERITAS Model Platform are
presented in Figure 16.
The resulting intelligent avatar consists of an inner and an outer model (skeleton and
skin surface). The skeleton defines the supported degrees of freedom for the
kinematic and dynamic properties of the virtual user, while the skin surface provides
the graphical representation, dimensions and volumetric parameters of the virtual
user. Through the Veritas Avatar Editor (VerAE), the designer can further customize
the intelligent avatar to represent a specific group of users including male, female,
elderly, children, amputees etc. as can be seen in the figure below:

Figure 17: Customization of the Intelligent Avatar through the VERITAS Avatar Editor

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1.3.1.8. The VERITAS Core Simulation Platform


The Core Simulation Platform is the basic simulation module of the VERITAS
Framework. It provides the key components to several tools developed within
VERITAS, in order to support the simulated execution of tasks from a corresponding
virtual user in specific scenarios and provides to the end user (designer or developer)
various metrics to be used for accessibility assessment of a product which is under
development. The platform is used for testing at all development stages and provides
automatic simulation feedback for five application areas, such as automotive, smart
living spaces, workplace design, infotainment and personal healthcare, under one
unified simulation environment.
Several modifications and additions had to be applied to the engine to enable all the
needed functionalities in VERITAS. The implementation of additional Inverse
Kinematics algorithms was the first step in order to be able to support adaptation to
the special ranges of motion properties of the loaded Virtual User Model parameters.
Animation synthesis techniques have also been implemented, taking into
consideration the production of as much as realistic motion. For this purpose,
collision avoidance had to be also taken into account. Several motion planners were
developed regarding the avatars upper torso movement, as well as its locomotion and
gait planning with additional support for assistive motor devices such as wheelchairs.
Special treatment has been given in modelling the dynamics of the simulation.
Torques and forces generation via inverse dynamics algorithms have been integrated
into the engine, considering the various constraints of the scene objects and avatars
movements. Due to the many degrees of freedom of the simulated entities, several
instability issues had to be confronted.
Simulation of vision impairment includes the development of several perception
filters. Global (per frame) or local (per pixel) filters have been implemented to
support the needed variety of the visual impairments. Efforts have been also made
regarding the optimisation of the vision simulation filters in order to make them as
fast as possible and to enable real time simulation.
Special audio filtering has been also developed as part of the hearing impairment
simulation. The engine supports audio filtering based on the virtual users audiogram
parameters.
Combining the simulation algorithms under one unified framework, capable of
simulating the motor, vision, hearing and cognitive impairments was the main part of
the work done for the development of the Core Simulation Platform. The simulation
platform architecture had to be as simple as possible to enable easy and organised
integration to other platforms and tools. The implementation also took into
consideration the independent usage of the engines sub -modules.
Studies on using physical and anthropometrical factors were also performed as part of
this activity. Factors from the physics domain such as forces, torques and energy
consumption were studied o increase the quality of the accessibility assessment of the
core simulation platform. Moreover new factors which measure comfort have been
proposed to the research community.
The four core modules of the Core Simulation Platform are:
the Simulation Module, which is responsible for managing the whole
simulation and providing the user feedback.

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the Humanoid Module (or human model module), which is responsible for
simulating the avatar's capabilities and performing its actions.
the Scene Module (or scene model module), which is responsible for
managing the scene objects and theirs functionality.
the Task Manager Module, which has the purpose of managing the tasks
needed to be performed, i.e. the sequence of the avatar's actions and their
results on the scene objects, stemming from the hierarchical task definitions of
the Veritas Task Models.
The overall architecture of the Core Simulation Platform can be seen in Figure 18.

Figure 18: VERITAS Core Simulation Platform Architecture


Humanoid Module
Although the four core modules provide the basic functionality of the core simulation
platform, in order to cope with more specific needs, several secondary modules
needed to be implemented. These secondary modules are part of the Humanoid
Module. The Humanoid Module has the responsibility of managing them and
processing their exchanging of data.
The secondary modules are classified into five categories:
Generic modules: these are several multi-purpose modules needed by the
Humanoid Module but are not related directly to the simulation process, e.g.
graphics representation of the meshes.
Motor simulation modules: these sub-modules provide to the humanoid with
basic or advanced motor functions.
Vision simulation modules: their purpose is to coordinate the vision system of
the avatar to the target and apply advance filtering to the input images.

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Hearing simulation module: its purpose is to calibrate the humanoid auditory


system and apply audio filters to it.
Cognition simulation module: this module has the purpose of applying delays
that emulate the thinking and perceptive processes of the avatar.
The secondary modules architecture for the Motor, Vision, Hearing and Cognition
simulation modules can be seen in the following figures:

Figure 19: VERITAS Core Simulation Motor module Architecture

Figure 20: VERITAS Core Simulation Vision sub-modules Architecture

Figure 21: VERITAS Core Simulation Hearing module Architecture

Figure 22: VERITAS Core Simulation Cognitive module Architecture


The parameters included in the Veritas VUM, are used to parameterize the result of
each of the four simulation modules, while the definition of the tasks in the Task
Models combined with the physical representation of the simulated design, form the
Simulation Models used by the Core Simulation Platform to generate the Simulation
Scenario to be performed by the intelligent virtual avatar.

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The core simulation platform is fully parameterisable. Several parameters can be


altered in order to perform the customized simulation session. The simulation
parameters are split into three categories:
Simulation levels
World time-step
Collision related parameters
There are three possible simulation levels that a session can run at:
Level 0: data comparison based simulation.
Level 1: kinematic simulation.
Level 2: dynamic simulation.
When a simulation session runs at level 0, every task validation is performed by
simple data comparisons. For example, if the avatar has an upper limb length equal to
x meters and the object is unreachable, i.e. its distance from the shoulder is more than
x meters, then the task fails. The level 0 simulation is the fastest one (of the three
levels), but it does not contain any algorithmic computation it just compares
numbers. It can be used only to exclude the feasibility of some basic actions, such as
the reach action.
The Level 1 simulation session can be described as a kinematic session. Every
algorithm that involves kinematic computations can be activated. All the kinematic
parameters of the virtual user models are used, such as the body joint's range of
motion, gait velocities. Regarding the avatar's motor functionality, forward and
inverse kinematics can be applied when performing the accessibility assessment.
However, level 1 does not contain any dynamics algorithm, and thus cannot involve
any kind of forces and torques.
The Level 2 based simulation is the most advanced simulation. It involves both
kinematics and dynamics. It expands the algorithms of level 1, by adding forward and
inverse dynamics. In level 2 simulations, forces and torques are present, thus concepts
such as the avatar's strength capabilities can now be tested. It must be mentioned that
level 2 simulations are slower when compared to kinematic simulations, due to the
extra computation of the dynamics.
Motor Simulation
In order to be able to perform kinematic and dynamic simulations, the intelligent
avatar is represented in the Core Simulation Platform by two triangle meshes:
a mesh that is used for visual representation: this mesh can be a visual
representation of a man, woman or child.
a mesh that is used for representation of the collision rigid bodies. The
collision primitive bodies can be either spheres, capsules or boxes and are
used by Open Dynamics Engine to determine the physical properties of the
avatar.
An example of the graphical and physical meshes is depicted in the figure below:

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Figure 23: Graphical and Physical representations of the Intelligent Avatar in the VERITAS
Core Simulation Platform
The humanoid skeleton used in the Core Simulation Platform consists of 51 bones,
while each bone has a rigid body and is defined by the following attributes:
Mass
Volume
Position
Orientation
Linear Velocity
Angular Velocity
Linear Acceleration
Angular Acceleration
Collision body

There are a total of 50 joints supporting the skeleton each one with distinct Degrees
of Freedom (DoF) with support from 1 to 3 DoFs. Each joint permits its attached
bones to rotate:
a) by either setting the bones' orientations directly (in level-1 simulations)
b) by generating and applying torques (in level-2 simulations) to them

Figure 24: Avatar joints and their degrees of freedom

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Besides the bone and joint elements, in order to properly define some specific regions
on the skeleton, another set of basic elements had to be introduced, the Points of
Interest or PoI. The PoI are special points on the humanoid's body that are needed so
as to properly define the higher level modules' structures. An example of the
supported avatar PoI can be seen in the following figure:

Figure 25: Avatar Points of Interest


The avatars simulated motion is performed depending on the context and level of
simulation using the following algorithms:
Forward Kinematics: the computation process of the position and orientation
of a humanoid's end effector as a function of its joint angles
Inverse Kinematics:
o Numerical IK: Using a Jacobian algorithm to compute the joint angles.
o Analytical IK: Attempts to mathematically solve an exact solution by
directly inverting the forward kinematics Equations This is only
possible on relatively simple chains
Forward dynamics: The torques are applied directly to each joint resulting
to its motion
Inverse Dynamics: computing forces and moments of force (torques) based on
the kinematics (motion) of a body and the body's inertial properties (mass and
moment of inertia).

The Motion Planning algorithms used in the Core Simulation Platform and their
respective classes are part of the Collision Avoidance Manager. The algorithms used
are sampling-based. There are two sampling-based motion planners supported: a
multi-query graph based approach and an exploring-tree based approach.
Furthermore, the Gait Module is responsible for the locomotion of the avatar. Its role
is double: first is responsible for providing the shortest path between two points and
then, it generates the gait data. Examples of the results of these two components can
be seen in the figure below:

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Figure 26: Motion planning and gait cycle simulation examples


For the purposes of grasping objects a special module has been implemented. The
Grasp Module analyses the 3d surface of scene object and produces a valid arm
configuration for the avatar. The figure below shows an example of its application.

Figure 27: Grasp module example


Vision Simulation
The avatar's vision simulation is performed by the cooperation of two main entities:
the lookAt module and the Vision Model. The first is responsible for the avatar's
head and eye coordination, while the second applies various filters on the eye-input
image depending on the avatar's impairments.

The LookAt Module takes into account various parameters in order to achieve natural
head motions. Several restrictions are applied in the computation of each joint
rotation. The parameters that define this behaviour are:
maximum allowable head and neck joint angular velocity,
maximum allowable eyeball angular velocity,
range of motion of the head and neck

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Figure 28: LookAt module example


The Vision Model is responsible for filtering the eye-input for simulating the avatar's
vision impairment. Various vision impairments symptoms are supported. These are:
Protanopia/Protanomaly
Deuteranopia/Deuteranomaly
Tritanopia/Tritanomaly
Macular degeneration
Glaucoma
Glare & Contrast sensitivity
Visual Acuity

Examples of supported impairments and their respective filters can be seen in the
figure below:

Figure 29: From left: Normal vision, Protanopia, Deuteranopia, Tritanopia, Glaucoma, Macular
Degeneration
Hearing Simulation
Hearing simulation is based on the analysis of the virtual user model's audiogram
parameters. An audiogram is a standard way of representing a person's hearing loss.
Initially, the audiogram parameters, stored inside the virtual user model specification,
are passed into the hearing model. Then, the hearing model constructs the audiogram
of the avatar. Using the audiogram, the hearing model generates the audio filter and
applies it on all input sounds. Using the above method, several audio impairment
symptoms can be simulated, such as otitis, otosclerosis, noise induced hearing loss,
presbycusis etc. Audio impairment audiogram examples are presented in the
following figure:

Figure 30: From left: Otitis, Otosclerosis, Presbycusis Mild, Presbycusis severe

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Cognitive-Psychological/Behavioural Simulation
Cognitive simulation is performed by the cognition module. In its current state, the
cognition modules cooperates with the Motion Manager and applies delay to the
avatar motions, based on the avatar's cognitive parameters. There are two kinds of
time delay that are used to emulate the avatar's thinking process:
Pre-action delay: this delay is applied before the avatar's action. It simulates
the thinking process of the task. The complex tasks result in greater durations
than the simple ones. The complexity of one task is given by the path of the
end effector. Long curve paths that avoid lots of obstacles increase the pre-
action delay.
In-action delay factor: the in-action delay factor is applied while the avatar is
in motion. The target time is increased by this factor, and the whole process
takes longer. This is achieved by increasing the interpolating duration between
the key-postures.

Scene Module
The scene module is responsible for creating the scene, managing the objects in it and
defining their special attributes. The scene is modeled by two sets of objects: static
objects and moveable objects. Both objects have geometry (volume) and visual
representation (meshes and textures). Static objects do not have mass and cannot be
moved by the humanoid. On the other hand, moveable objects are modeled as rigid
bodies, having properties like uniformly distributed mass over their volume (constant
density), linear and angular velocity. Complex objects, can be modeled by using a
combination of static and moveable objects, and manually defining the degrees of
freedom of the moveable parts.
Special points of interest (PoI) can be declared on the objects to best define the type
of interaction with the humanoid. These points can be used to help the humanoid to
interaction with the object, but they do not define the interaction. Their only purpose
is to decrease the complexity of the task. The moveable objects can be moved freely
or constrained, by altering their degrees of freedom (DoF).
As an example of a scene object, it will be mentioned the car's storage compartment
shown in Figure 31. Its functionality described by two DoF: one that connects the
handle with the storage compartment and another that connects the storage
compartment with the dashboard. In this example, a scene rule is used to check at
every timestep the state of the handle. If the angle to its parent (i.e. compartment's
door) exceeds the predefined limit, the storage compartment opens by a spring force.
Collision between the objects and properable contact reaction is fully supported by
the scene module. A moveable object can collide with either a moveable/static object
or with the humanoid. Various attributes such as surface object material properties
need to be defined for a realistic friction model. In order to decrease the dynamical
complexity of the scene, gravitational forces can be applied only to the moveable
objects.

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Figure 31: The three states showing the car's storage compartment functionality. The arrows
represent the rotational degrees of freedom. The red box shows the PoI, used for interaction with
the object. Three objects are presented in the screenshots: the handle (moveable), the storage
compartments' door (moveable) and the car's dashboard (static).

Task Manager Module


The task manager module is responsible for managing the actions of the humanoid in
order to provide a solution to a given task. After splitting the complex task to a series
of primitive tasks, the task manager instructs the humanoid model to perform a series
of specific movements in order to accomplish them.
Primitive tasks, like reach, grasp, pull, push, are translated via the task manager
module to series of specific motions and are inserted to the humanoid module for
application. There are several ways of mapping primitive tasks to humanoid
movements. For simple tasks such as reach, the usage of inverse kinematic chains
produces satisfactory results. For more advanced primitive tasks such as grasp-object,
pull-object, specific solvers must be implemented. Currently, solvers for grasping and
push-pull tasks have been constructed. Their input are some predefined PoI.

Figure 32: Block diagram of a motor simulation cycle. The simulation cycle is repeated until
every primitive task is completed. At each step the task manager module tests and reports to the
user if a constraint (i.e. angle/torque limit, collision, etc.) was violated.
At every step, the task manager, as supervisor, checks for task completion and reports
to the system if something went wrong. The motor simulation cycle pattern that is
followed at each simulation step is shown in Figure 32. More precicely, at the start of
the cycle, the task manager module generates a series of movements (i.e. movement
path) for the humanoid to follow. Every state of the generated path must contain

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information about the target configuration of the bones and joints. This target
configuration will be declared as Ctask. Collision avoidance techniques are applied at
this step so that the humanoid geometry does not penetrate its own elements or any
scene object. If a path cannot be found after a number of iterations in search space
then the task manager reports task failure to the system.
After that, the task manager, provides the humanoid model with the generated target
configuration Ctask. The humanoid gets the provided configuration and applies to it a
set of restrictions, such as joint-angle restrictions. Angle-constrained inverse
kinematics methods are used in order to find a new configuration Cconstrain that is
close to the targeted one (Ctask). Cconstrain contains a target angle for each of one of
the joints. If the difference between Ctask and Cconstrain is above a limit then the
Task Manager reports failure. The difference metrics that have been used are: a)
average distance of the joints positions, b) average distance only end effectors
positions, c) average angle absolute difference of each joint angle.
Having a target angle for each joint, the system computes via inverse dynamics the
torques that need to be applied at each joint and set the attached bones in motion. If
the computed torques values exceed the predefined limits, the task will fail. This step
is valid only when simulation is running in dynamic mode. In kinematic mode, this
step is omitted and the targeted angles are set directly.
In order to decrease the complexity of each primitive task and its success/failure
condition, the task manager uses a system of task rules. Each primitive task can have
a set of rules that are checked at each timestep. Following the same rule model as in
the scene module, each rule has two main parts: condition part and result part. When
a condition is met, the rule's result part is applied. Conditions can check various
simulation's elements and states, such as current distance of a specific bone from a
PoI, measure time since task started, count how many times a specific humanoid
action was performed etc.

1.3.1.9. The VERITAS Exportable Toolbox


The VERITAS Exportable Toolbox is a set of applications that have been developed
to allow designers and developers of new products and ICT applications respectively
to adapt the information of the virtual user and the simulation models and export it to
existing developer/design platforms that are already used for the design/development
of mainstream ICT and non -ICT products. They combine all the elements of the Core
Simulation Platform and the Virtual User Mode, Simulation and Interaction adapters
in an integrated solution ready to be deployed in the design cycle.
The work that has been carried out resulted into several tools: ones for adaptation of
external data, others for adaptation of the information that resulted from task models,
user models and the intelligent avatar and others for performing the simulation
sessions and analyzing the assessment reports. The idea behind the implementation is
to gather most of the VERITAS functionality into the Core and Immersive
Simulation Platform engines and then connect these libraries with the VERITAS
tools, creating in such way a very scalable and easily updatable architecture.
The implemented tools are able to handle both automatic and immersive/interactive
simulation of the tested design. Simulation scenarios for five application areas are
supported in a consisted way, without requiring modifications of the tools per
application area. Both virtual 3D products and Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) for

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automotive, healthcare, workplace, infotainment and smart living spaces (domotics)


scenarios can be simulated in a consisted and unified way. This holistic approach is
presented in the diagram below:

Figure 33: The Veritas holistic architecture and the Exportable Toolbox

The Exportable Toolbox comprises the following tools:

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VERITAS Exportable Toolbox


VERITAS Tool Type
Component

Simulation engine
Core Simulation Platform Simulation Runtime Engine
(DLL)

Immersive Simulation Simulation engine


Simulation Runtime Engine
Platform (DLL)

User Model Generator Virtual User and Simulation Model Adaptor, Editor
(VerGen) Adaptor (Executable)

Veritas Model Platform Virtual User and Simulation Model Adaptor, Editor
(VerMP) Adaptor (Executable)

Virtual User and Simulation Model Adaptor, Editor


Avatar Editor (VerAE)
Adaptor (Executable)

Virtual User and Simulation Model


3D Simulation Editor Adaptor, Editor
Adaptor,
(VerSEd-3D) (Executable)
Interaction Adaptor

3D Core Simulation
Simulation Runtime Engine Viewer (Executable)
Viewer (VerSim-3D)

3D Immersive Simulation
Simulation Runtime Engine Viewer (Executable)
Viewer (IVerSim-3D)

Virtual User and Simulation Model


GUI Simulation Editor Adaptor, Editor
Adaptor,
(VerSEd-GUI) (Executable)
Interaction Adaptor

GUI Core Simulation


Simulation Runtime Engine Viewer, (Executable)
Viewer (VerSim-GUI)

Interaction Manager Manager, Interface


Interaction Manager
(VerIM) with Hardware (DLL)

Multimodal Interfaces Manager, Interface


Multimodal Interfaces Manager
Manager with Hardware (DLL)

Other than the Core Simulation Platform, the User Model Generator, the Model
Platform and the Avatar Editor that have been described already, the functionalities
and features of the rest of the tools are described briefly below:
Immersive Simulation Platform
The Immersive Simulation Platform and, provides to the VERITAS framework all the
needed functionality for managing the immersive users simulation in VR
environments. The Immersive Simulation Platform is connected to the Core
Simulation Platform. Thus, impairment simulation is applied to the 3D avatar of the
immersed user the same way as in the 3D automatic avatar case. Cooperation with the
VerIM component ensures proper handling of the devices that receive the user
interactions.

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Immersed VR Interaction
User Tools (Hardware)

Interaction
Manager (DLL)

IVerSim-3D Immersive Simulation Core Simulation


(EXE) Platform (DLL) Platform (DLL)

Figure 34: Immersive Simulation Platform data flow


3D Simulation Editor (VerSEd-3D)
The 3D Simulation Editor (VerSEd-3D) implements the main part of the functionality
regarding the Simulation Models Adaptor and Interaction Adaptor. It is used for the
adaptation of a simulation model and the 3D design to a format that is readable by the
Core Simulation Platform. VerSEd-3D is used only for adaptation of 3D designs
creation of the respective scenarios. Product designers and developers who use the
VERITAS platform may use the VerSEd-3D tool for the adaptation of their designs
and prototypes in order to make them compatible for accessibility assessment
simulation using the VerSim-3D tool. Shortly described, the tool is used to convert a
3D model of a design (e.g. Automotive, Workplace etc.) into a physical simulation
model.
More specifically, regarding the Simulation Model Adaptor part, VerSEd-3D
performs the tasks of adapting a Humanoid avatar and a 3D design (CAD design)
from simple graphical representations to active elements of a simulation. In order to
adapt a 3D design for simulation, each object present in the design that is part of the
simulation must be attributed with certain parameters affecting the simulation,
including mass, ability to move and with what degrees of freedom, resistance to
motion etc. In the end, the adapted design is exported in a simulation scenario file in
XML form that fully describes the adapted 3D scene.
On the other hand, concerning the Interaction Adaptor part, VerSEd-3D performs the
task of adapting the tasks from an abstract description in a Simulation Model
UsiXML task description file to specific simulation scenarios involving the objects
present in the design. This entails matching the elements described in abstract form to
specific objects in the design, matching tasks to specific interactions between the
virtual user and objects within the design, assigning parameters, criteria and outcomes
to these interactions and finally exporting a simulation scenario in XML form that
fully describes all the parameters needed to perform a simulation involving a specific
design and virtual user.
The following functionality is provided:
Converting the 3D meshes to static or moveable rigid objects.
Adding collision meshes to objects.

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Assigning masses to the volumes this process is necessary for the inclusion
of physical quantities such as, velocity, acceleration, force, torque, etc, in the
simulation.
Connecting primitive objects to one another by restricting their motion
degrees of freedom, either in a rotational or translational way.
Adding resistance forces and velocities to the rigid scene bodies.
Adding special rules to the objects, such as when the object-handle is rotated by 30
degrees, the object-door opens.

Figure 35: The VerSEd-3D graphical user interface; a scene with an office desk has been loaded.
The objects of the scene are assigned in the left panel and the properties, such as mass, position,
orientation, etc., of each object may be defined in the right panel.
3D Core Simulation Viewer (VerSim-3D)
The 3D Core Simulation Viewer (VerSim-3D) is a tool that has been developed as
part of the VERITAS activity A2.1.1. It is integrated with the Core Simulation
Platform DLL and is used for running the 3D simulations based on special scenario
xml files.
Product designers and developers who use the VERITAS platform may use the
VerSim-3D tool for assessment of a product prototype against virtual user groups
regarding their ability to effectively make use of the prototype. Existing or future
devices or installations can be such prototypes as soon as their physical model (mesh)
and their properties are adapted for simulation in VerSEd-3D
The tool is used for performing automatic simulations, i.e. all the avatars actions are
generated automatically by the Core Simulation Platforms engine. VerSim-3D
cannot be used for immersive simulation sessions for that purpose the IVerSim-3D
is used. The VerSim-3D tool targets towards the evaluation of the accessibility of
non-ICT products by simulating the functionality of real objects with mass and
volume.
It uses a variety of files in order to perform a simulation session: files regarding the
customization of the avatar model and its physical characteristics (CAL3D and
Virtual User Model); a file for generating the 3D scene and its functionality (adapted

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3D scene file); and a file that describes the scenario that contains the actions of the
avatar (adapted simulation scenario from a simulation model file).
The user loads these files via the VerSim-3Ds GUI and starts the simulation session.
During the simulation the main window of the tool is updated by rendering the
simulation environment and the avatar model. Information is provided to the user,
such as arrows depicting the generated body torques, indications of whether a body
joint has reached its limits, etc. In case of task success or failure, the VerSim-3D tool
informs the user by displaying the respective information.

Figure 36: The graphical user interface of the VerSim-3D tool


Moreover, the tool allows testing of more than one Virtual User Models without
rendering the process, for providing faster the accessibility assessment of the 3D
design. This is performed by using the integrated Simulation Cascade option of the
VerSim-3D tool (Figure 37).

Figure 37: VerSim-3Ds simulation cascade; the user loads a scene file, a scenario file and adds
the Virtual User Models that will be tested sequentially.

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At the end of each simulation session, the Core Simulation Platform engine generates
a simulation report containing various metrics and factors of the avatar actions.
Besides the time duration of the tasks, information about physical and comfort factors
are included in the simulation report. The report is stored inside an xml file that can
be viewed by the VerSim-3D tool and even compared to other simulation report files.

Figure 38: The Simulation Report window, part of VerSim-3D tool, providing information
regarding simulated sessions of different designs.
Immersive Simulation Viewer (IVerSim-3D)
IVerSim-3D provides user interfacing capabilities to the Immersive Simulation
platform. The immersed user can use it to load and provide the 3D scene, the VUM
file, scenario files and avatar models to the Immersive Simulation platform.
IVerSim-3D renders the VR environment using stereoscopic methods (Figure 39) in
order to achieve the users immersion. IVerSim-3D is an application that has
integrated both the Immersive and the Core Simulation Platforms.

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Figure 39: The Immersive 3D Simulation Viewer in action.


GUI Simulation Editor (VerSEd-GUI)
The GUI Simulation Editor (or VerSEd-GUI) implements part of the functionality
regarding the Simulation Models Adaptor and Interaction Adaptor and is used for
adaptation of a simulation model regarding the interaction with 2D Graphical User
Interface (GUI). VerSEd-GUI is used for adaptation of GUI designs and in most of
the cases it refers to ICT products.
Product designers and developers who use the VERITAS platform may use the GUI
Interaction Adaptor to record the users activity over a predefined area of the
computer screen in order to process simulation models. Normally, the work processed
with the current tool is part of a wider pipelined procedure. This tool was designed for
users of 2D graphical user interfaces for Information and Communication
Technologies case studies of VERITAS project. Apart from desktop application,
scenarios for mobile devices can be supported using mobile simulators.

Figure 40: The graphical user interface of the VerSEd-GUI tool; in this example, a capture
project has just been completed. The capture info window and the user activity chart are
depicted.
The VerSEd-GUI tool is used for creating the Simulation Scenario files needed by the
VERITAS GUI Core Simulation Viewer (VerSim-GUI, 0) to perform the

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accessibility assessment of a GUI design. This tool is used to capture the users
activity in a desktop application and process the loaded Simulation Model to produce
the Simulation Scenario File independently of hardware and software characteristics.
VerSEd-GUI can capture mouse and keyboard activity in a specified area of the
screen during the recording phase (Recorder Mode). After loading a Simulation
Model file, the prerecorded user driven events can be directly connected to tasks after
processing in the Editor Mode. The outcome is a scenario file describing users
activity on a simple task.
It should be noted that VerSEd-GUI serves a second important scope in VERITAS
project: It is the logging tool for all other VERITAS software tools which run as
desktop applications (excluding IVerSim-3D, the full immersive real-time simulator).
As an advanced logging and user tracking tool it will be used to create the raw data
(based on scenarios) for the usability evaluation.
GUI Core Simulation Viewer (VerSim-GUI)
The GUI Core Simulation Viewer (or VerSim-GUI) is a tool that has been developed
as part of the VERITAS activity A2.1.1. It is integrated with the Core Simulation
Platform DLL and is used for running the 2D/GUI simulations based on special
scenario xml files.
Application designers and developers who use the VERITAS platform may use the
VerSim-GUI tool for assessment of an application prototype against special user
groups regarding their ability to effectively make use of the prototype. Existing or
future applications can be such prototypes as soon as their interface and their
properties are set in the VerSEd-GUI (Error! Reference source not found.). The
GUI of the tool is depicted in the following figure:

Figure 41: The VerSim-GUI tool interface. A scenario of a healthcare application has been
loaded.
The tool requires two files as input: the scenario file (created using VerSEd-GUI) and
a virtual user model file (created using the Veritas Virtual User Generator Tool).
Also, the application prototype, that is being tested, is required to be running. The
tool can be used to perform either automatic or interactive simulation.
In the case of automatic simulation, the Core Simulation Engine pre-calculates all
necessary actions (mouse movements, mouse clicks, keyboard strikes etc.) according
to the virtual user model that has been loaded, and plays them on the screen.
For the interactive simulation mode, the user has control of the mouse and keyboard
(and any other input device, haptic, voice etc.), and the Core Simulation Engine

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compensates/corrects his/hers actions with respect to the loaded virtual user model
(i.e. decreases/increases mouse speed or accuracy etc).
VerSim-GUI also provides a Multiple-VUM offline simulation mode, called Cascade
Simulation, useful when different levels of an impairment need to be tested in groups
and later compared to against each other or the optimal user recording. Performing a
cascade simulation consists of loading a number of VUMs and one or more
simulation scenarios and running the simulation, as seen in the following Figures.
When the simulation is finished, the Core Simulation Engine creates a report
containing various metrics and factors of the user actions. These metrics and factors
include time duration, mouse movement and click statistics as well as keyboard
strokes statistics. These metrics are also compared with values extracted for a normal
(non-disabled) user.

Figure 42: Running simulation with healthcare application using a visually impaired user model

Figure 43: Setting up and final result of a Multi-VUM simulation

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Figure 44: Report generation for the final outcomeof a simulation by VerSim-GUI
Interaction Tools and Interaction Manager (VerIM)
The Immersive Simulation Platform is equipped with novel interaction tools
developed as part of WP2.7. Such tools are able to simulate the disabilities allowing
the designers/developers to design accessible services and products by getting
conscious of the disability of the Virtual User Model. The Veritas Interaction
Manager (VerIM) supports all the functionality needed for handling the various
interaction tools for simulating the different disabilities. More specifically, the
Interaction Manager is responsible of transmitting to the designer/developer the
sensory feedbacks according to the selected users disabilities and the applications
scenarios.
The interaction tools (IT) aim at simulating or intuitively communicating a specified
disability or impairment to the designer through an immersive experience. This
objective is achieved through the full integration of ITs within the Immersive
Simulation Platform (ISP). The whole set of Interaction Tools include:
Physical IT:
Visual Impairments:
o Visual Field
Motor Functional Limitations:
o Kinematics Functional Limitations
o Dynamics Functional Limitations
o Control Functional Limitations
Cognitive IT:
o Attention Limitations
o Reaction Time Alteration
Behavioural and Psychological IT:
o Stress Level
o Emotional State Alteration
The architecture of the Interaction Tools and the role of the Interaction Manager is
depicted in the following diagram:

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Figure 45: Integrated Interaction Tool Architectural Scheme


The implemented Interaction tools are briefly described below:
Visual Field
The visual field covers additional aspects as gaze and visual perception ranges and is
expressed by cones generated by varying horizontal and vertical opening angles and
fixed to the head orientation, i.e. independent from the vision line. The geometrical
cone constructs are the basis for the visual interaction tool. The cone is generated on
the input parameter eye position, vision line and opening angles. The opening angles
are initially set by the selected virtual user model, while the other position parameters
vary according to the designer head position and are provided by the motion tracking
system integrated in the Immersive Simulation.

Figure 46: Visual Functional Limitation example and corresponding VerIM Control Panel

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Kinematic Functional Limitations


Kinematic functional limitation IT has been implemented in two different ways. The
aim of both the implementations is to provide a warning to the designer involved in
the tests whenever an impeded position for the end-user is reached. The Kinematic
Functional Limitation I uses visual warning while the Kinematic Functional
Limitation II uses haptic vibrotactile warning collocated on the joints of the designer
limbs.
The Kinematic Functional Limitation IT I has been integrated in the Interaction
Manager. The standalone tool has been integrated with the Interaction Manager GUI.
The parameters of the joint limits are set through the interaction manager and
instantiated.

Figure 47: Kinematic Limitation Interaction Tool I example and corresponding VerIM Control
Panel
The second implementation of Kinematic Functional Limitation IT has been achieved
through the hardware prototyping of a novel vibrotactile interface that is integrated on
a suit that can be worn by the designer. The designer receives warning through
vibrations that are generated on his own body. In the context of simulation of
Kinematic Functional Limitation the VERITAS consortium developed a vibrotactile
system for communicating to the designer information regarding limitation of
movements of impaired users. The system is composed by four vibrating motors and
a wireless controlled driving electronics.

Figure 48: Scheme of the vibrotactile KFL IT II left, prototype of the device integrated on the
arm of the user.
The vibration is interpreted as simulation of pain or discomfort felt by the end-user on
one or more specific joints. The four vibrating elements are collocated on each of the
joint of the arm as in Figure 48 (wrist, elbow, shoulder and eventually on shoulder

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blade) on the area that usually affected by pain sensation when joint limits are
overcome.
The definition of the joint limits take place through the Parameter Encoder (included
in the Interaction Manager) that loads a specific user model and applies the
corresponding control parameters for the simulation of the specified visual
impairments. The Parameter Encoder has been developed in order to support the
above presented control mask parameters.

Figure 49: Example of the Kinematic Limitation Interaction Tool II and corresponding VerIM
Control Panel
Dynamic Functional Limitation IT: DFL IT
Dynamic Functional Limitation Interaction Tool (DFL IT) is a system for simulating
functional limitations related with disabilities which cause loss of muscles tone and
reduced muscular mass i.e. typical disabilities associated with aging and with other
specific pathologies like Ulnar Neuropathy or as consequence of Lordosis. DFL IT
supports the VERITAS Immersive Simulation Platform in an Automotive scenario
and the physical interface consists of a Force-Feedback Steering Wheel FFSW.
The FFSW is an example of the so-called Task replica haptic user interfaces. Such
devices are haptic interfaces which are characterised by comprising a reproduction of
the real tool that is handled by the end-user in the real world (a steering wheel in this
case). Within VERITAS the device is exploited for putting designers in the condition
of getting an equivalent perception of force of the disabled user.

Figure 50: Picture of the functional test of the integrated DFL IT system

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The role of the VerIM for this tool is to translate, via the Parameter Encoder, the User
Model data into a related amount of extra force needed by the specified user to
operate the steering wheel. In order to compute the exact force feedback to be applied
to the steering wheel, VerIM needs also some static data (the dynamic model of the
car) and the simulated car speed. VerIM receives from the IT the value of the steering
angle which is communicated to the main application in order to accordingly update
the scenario.
Control Functional Limitation IT: CFL IT
Control Functional Limitation Interaction Tool (CFL IT) is employed within the
VERITAS platform for simulating functional limitations associated with motor
control disabilities alike Essential (postural) and Parkinson (rest) Tremor, as well as
other kinds of Neurodegenerative diseases which may be caused by aging.
In order to simulate such disabilities to the VERITAS end user, a kinesthetic haptic
interface called GRAB (Figure 51) has been purposely equipped with special end-
effector and closed-loop controller. Basically, by imposing harmonic disturbance
forces, the considered CFL IT is capable of inducing on the designer fingertip/wrist
controllable harmonic oscillatory motions (superimposed on the desired designer
movement trajectories) which closely reproduce the impairments experienced by
tremor-affected people.
The GRAB is a 6 DOF device that can be attached to the users finger or wrist, and is
able to exert peak forces in the range of 0N-20N. Grab functionalities are essentially
equivalent to the commercial Phantom device from Sensable Corp., but the
workspace of the device is much larger and covers almost completely the workspace
of the human arm.

Figure 51: GRAB Haptic user interface is able to deliver a force along any wanted orientation in
3d space
The purpose of the CFL IT is to make an able-bodied user feel the effects of the
functional limitations that are experienced by tremor-affected people while moving
objects with their hands. As aforementioned, this objective is accomplished here by
externally perturbing the user wrist with harmonic forces that are provided via the
GRAB device. To achieve high levels of realism and comprehensiveness a specific
closed-loop controller has been implemented on the GRAB device which is able to
accurately regulate the frequency and the amplitude of the artificially-induced tremor
with varying levels that range from high, through moderate to low intensity.

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Figure 52: Control Functional Limitation IT application example


The role of VerIM for this tool is to translate, via the Parameter Encoder, the User
Model data into a set of parameters related to the operational band of frequency,
needed to generate the disturbing forces on the haptic device. This data is used to
control the position of the finger via the haptic device; the same data is sent to the ISP
Avatar Manager in order to update (if needed) the avatar hand posture.
Cognitive interaction tool
The VERITAS cognitive interaction tool provides developers with the capacity to
experience the impact of cognitive impairment in their day-to-day. This allows them
to better understand how these impairments can affect others interaction with new
technologies and better design their systems in response to these issues. The cognitive
interaction tool is a lightweight, voice-reliant system that can be used during other
tasks in order that it might be used whilst interacting with other systems. The tool
relies on a Bluetooth enabled headset that allows the designer to conduct manual
tasks while engaging with cognitive tasks.
The n-back task is widely used as a way of placing a continuous demand on working
memory (WM) in neuroimaging and behavioural dual-task experiments. This task
requires online monitoring, updating of WM and rule-governed as opposed to
familiarity-based decisions, and therefore places a considerable load on the executive
component of WM 8.

Figure 53: N-backer cognitive interaction tool output

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The n-back tool doesnt interact directly with the immersive simulation platform. The
sequence of numbers is translated into speech that the designer listens via a headset.
The vocal responses of the designer are acquired by a microphone and analysed with
a Speech Recognition module in order to verify the correctness of the answer. The
global n-back task performance is eventually logged at the end of the task.
The system initialises the n-back tool with a quantity of Cognitive Load (or a level
of difficulty), whose value is determined by the parameter encoder according to the
User. The cognitive load is mapped to the values of a set of parameters of the n-back
tool, such as the speed at which numbers as exposed to the user and the n value.
The extra cognitive load is a function not only of the model of the simulated user but
also of the cognitive model of the designer; therefore such a characterization of the
specific designer should be made available before using the platform.
The role of the IM for this tool is to translate, via the Parameter Encoder, the User
Model data into a measure of the additional cognitive load to impose to the designer
for the n-back task. If an error is detected by the IT, the IM receives the ID of the
warning which is transmitted to the ISP in order to trigger an opportune audio/visual
signaling.
Behavioural & psychological interaction tools
Behavioural & Psychological IT is devoted to let the designer experience the
expected psychological reactions of VERITAS end-user while performing tasks that
are considered in the VERITAS scenarios via the VERITAS Immersive Simulation
Viewer. Stress, fatigue, motivation, and emotions are closely related to cognition and
influence cognitive performance. Therefore, behavioural and psychological
interaction tools are closely related to the cognitive interaction tools developed.
Prior to performing the VERITAS tasks in the immersive environment, stress
induction (pre-stressing the user) can be realised with a GUI, e.g. using the Montreal
Imaging Stress Task, the Trier Social Stress Test or the Trier Mental Challenge Test.
During the VERITAS tasks in the immersive environment, the presentation of the
arithmetic task can be either:
Auditory using headphones, or
Visual via superimposing the text of the arithmetic task over the graphic
output generated by the immersive platform.
The software begins with a main start menu (Figure 5.2). The user can access other
menus by using as input device: mouse or speech recognition system (by reading and
pronouncing the key word for example: Stress , Neutral , Fear , Sadness, or
number 1,2,3). The use of such a system (limit the range of answers) can
reduce the errors. It is recommended to use relatively short speech inputs shorten the
time it takes to train the users voice and can allow the user to enter speech inputs
quickly and easily.

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Figure 54: Behavioural & psychological interaction tools examples


The integration of the behavioural & psychological interaction tools makes distinction
between an off-line usage, to induce emotional state or stress before the beginning of
the VERITAS tasks, and an on-line usage, if the induction and the elicitation are
performed during executing the task.
In the on-line setup, the Trier mental Challenge Test is initialised to a certain level of
difficulty (based on parameters computed from the User Model data). The math
formula is generated and transformed in an audio message via a Text To Speech
module. The vocal responses of the designer are acquired by a microphone and
analysed with a Speech Recognition module in order to verify the correctness of the
mathematical performance. If a mistake is recognised, an appropriate audio-visual
warning is generated on the IVerSim. If made possible by the IverSim, an optional
visual variant consists in visualizing the formula over imposed on the Virtual
Environment, leaving the auditory channel free for sound-based stimuli.
The tool assumes the existence of a purposely developed Visual Warning Manager
module in the ISP, in order to visualise a warning and/or to visualise the formula in
the alternative visual version. Optional audio warnings can be provided via the ISP
audio manager. The required level of stress can be induced through the use of the
music option of the Emotion Elicitation tool. The initialization of the system doesnt
require user interaction.
The off-line version of the induction and elicitation is not based on the interaction
with the IVerSim. Making the designer use offline tool prior to have the immersive
experience can induce the required level of stress and emotional state. In this case the
tool is self -standing and a typical desktop setup is used; the interaction takes place
with standard tools like a visual GUI and the use of mouse, keyboard and a monitor.
VerIM is used only to encode parameters and to log relevant data.
In all configurations the role of VerIM for this tool is to translate, via the Parameter
Encoder, the User Model data into a measure of the additional level of difficulty for
the stress induction stimuli, and to the proper kind of emotion for the emotion
elicitation tool. VerIm receives the ID of the warning which is transmitted to IVerSim
in order to trigger an opportune audio/visual signaling.
Multimodal Interfaces Manager (VerMIM)
The Multimodal Interfaces Manager can be considered an add-on to the Core
Simulation Platform that enables multimodal interfaces functionality to it. The
Multimodal Interfaces Manager cooperates with several 3rd party open source and
proprietary software modules and adds speech, haptic and visual interfaces to the

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platform. The Multimodal Interfaces Manager is also responsible for selecting and
applying the multimodal interfaces models in order to perform the modality
compensation when needed. The Modality Compensation GUI is depicted in Figure
55.

Figure 55: The graphical user interface of the Modality Compensation and Replacement Module,
as part of the Multimodal Interfaces Manager tool.
The Multimodal Interfaces Manager module is a C++ dynamic link library that
provides to the VERITAS framework a two-fold functionality:
First, management of the Multimodal Interfaces models and proper task
analysis of the simulation model based on them, and
Second, management of the external modules/libraries that implement
modality interfaces, e.g. speech synthesizers.
The modality compensation process is the main functionality of the module. More
specifically, the Multimodal Interaction Manager cooperates with the Core
Simulation Platform and it intervenes when needed in order to replace a modality
with another which is more appropriate for the capabilities of the selected Virtual
User Model.
The Multimodal Interfaces Manager library supports the following functionality:
Parsing the Multimodal Interfaces Models files,
Organizing them and selecting the appropriate model for each situation,
Replacing the current task flow with other task that are based on modalities
more appropriate to the Virtual User Model capabilities.

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In immersive environment, where a real person is present, the Manager


provides alternative unimodal or multimodal interfaces. The currently
supported interfaces are:
o Speech Recognition
o Speech Synthesis
o Haptics
o Sign Language Synthesis
o Symbolic, i.e. support of sounds, icons and text.
With the above files the Multimodal Interfaces Manager performs an analysis of the
tasks and provides an alternative task sequence (if it exists) to the Core Simulation
Platform engine. The Multimodal Interface Manager is implemented as a DLL, just as
the Core Simulation Platform and they communicate via the used simulation viewer
tool, supporting the following scenarios:
3D Automatic Simulation, using the VerSim-3D tool.
GUI Simulation, either interactive of automatic, using the VerSim-GUI tool.
3D Immersive Simulation, using the IVerSim-3D tool.
The modality interfaces and the input/output pairs supported by VerMIM are the
following:
Table 13: Interface modalities and input / output data format.

Interface Input Data Format Output Data Format

Speech recognition Voice data. Text string.

Speech synthesis Text string. Voice data.

Haptics (2 modes) Orientation and translation vectors Force/Torque (the


of the haptic devices end effector. feedback is applied via
the haptic device to the
users hand).

Movement of the haptics end Orientation and


effector. translation vectors.

Sign language Annotated text string. Virtual Character


synthesis animation rendering.

Symbolic Text string Text Signals

Image File Visual Signals

Sound File Sound Signals

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1.3.1.10. Simulation Models development and Integration of Veritas Platform


into Application Domains
Apart from the core simulation platform and the exportable toolbox of VERITAS, a
key activity performed to integrate the Veritas accessibility assessment methodology
to the five targeted application domains was the development of the simulation
models and the specific adaptation methodologies for each domain.
All the application domains followed the same methodology, adapted, however, to the
specific requirements of the specific domain targeted. To achieve this, extensive work
in these domains was conducted consisting of the following steps:
- Identification of the application area interface simulation aspects: This task
involves the analysis of the interfaces of the specific application area and the
identification of specific functionalities and parameters which should be supported by
the interface in the simulation.
- Generation of simulation models for the application interfaces: Based on the
identified interface aspects a set of simulation models (tasks, workflows, sequences of
actions, etc.) will be designed. This simulation model repository formed the basis for
the simulation tests for the specific application areas within VERITAS.
- Integration to the VERITAS core simulation environment: This task involved the
integration of the developed simulation models to the core simulation environment
and the provision of support for running the simulation models within the VERITAS
core simulation platform.
- Integration in external application-specific simulation environments: This involved
the development of required adaptors and plug-ins for the integration of the
simulation models for the specific application area to existing simulation
environments (e.g. the RAMSIS simulation environment for the automotive area).
For each application area, a brief description of the simulation aspects, the generation
of the simulation models and the integration with the VERITAS framework is
presented.
Automotive Solutions
Starting from results of task analysis and performed for the Automotive solutions
domain and the virtual user model file generated by the VERITAS model platform,
the requirements of end-users and of technology providers for ergonomic design with
respect to humans with limited functionalities were analyzed.
An overview of the automotive (i.e. car and motorcycle) needs and requirements was
performed resulting in a description of the methodologies and related software for
human physical modeling which are expected to be used for the simulation of the
functional impairments.
Based on these requirements, the simulation models for the two application domains
of passenger car and motorcycle were created, in terms of:
An overall simulation task table, which for each use case, describes the
primitive task used to perform a use-case level task (subtask in the Use Case
language)
A table reporting for each use case / subtask the parameters identified as
descriptive of the performance of the subtask

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A table reporting for each use case the subtask success criteria, which are one
basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the accessible solutions developed
with VERITAS tools
A table describing the transfer of simulation models in the target simulation
environments.
Finally, the integration of each identified VERITAS tool was performed starting with
a review of the requirements for these tools, followed by integration specifications
and finally with the integrations implementation and documentation.
The review of the requirements indicated the following ergonomic aspects as key to
the accessibility simulation using the VERITAS framework:
Visibility: Can the target user see all necessary visual information? This
includes the recognition of ICTs as well as classical aspects as sight limits
inside and outside the vehicle.
Clearance and accessibility: Does the vehicle have the sufficient room and
solutions so that the target user can carry out all necessary movements freely
without collision and in comfort conditions?
Ease of use: Can the target user reach and manipulate the controls easily
within his/her physical capacity (strength, joint maximum range of motion,
equilibrium keeping)?
Another key functional performance aspect in automotive design and ergonomics
analysis was identified as the the assessment of the vibrational comfort. Since the
exposition to vibrations may have adverse effects on the human health, the comfort
performance of the final product must be carefully evaluated and optimized in the
virtual engineering process, in order to guarantee the comfort performance of the final
product that hits the road.
Based on the findings of the review, the integration methodology with VERITAS was
formulated as shown in Figure 56.

Figure 56: Integration of VERITAS tools in the Automotive Solutions domain

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The process of identification of each use case requirements was applied for four
different subjects (car interior design, motorcycle riding posture, ADAS-IVIS
systems, ORAS-OBIS systems) and related specific scenarios were identified both for
a desktop based accessibility assessment as for immersive accessibility assessment.
The use case scenarios selected can be seen in the following tables:
Table 14: Use case analysis results (desktop application)

Table 15: Use case analysis results (immersive application)

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Based on the use case analysis, the simulation models were developed based on the
following methodology:
1. Generation of overall task table
All necessary data were collected from the use cases, task models and interaction
modalities. Finally they were structured in table as illustrated in Figure 57.

Figure 57: Generation of overall simulation task table


2. Identification of object parameters and simulation variables
For all relevant task objects the variable parameters are identified. E.g. a hand brake
contains the parameters rotation angle and resistance force.
3. Definition of success criteria for each task
For each primitive task a measurable success criterion was defined. In addition to the
criterion a corresponding (quantitative) threshold is specified, which indicates when a
criterion is fulfilled or not. The criteria and thresholds were integrated in new
columns in the table of Figure 57 addressing the tasks as well as the alternative tasks
as illustrated in Figure 58.

Figure 58: Success Criteria in task table


4. Generation of corresponding simulation scenario files (Figure 4-3)
The final simulation scenarios in the form of UsiXML files for the simulation model,
task model and multimodal interaction model file were created from the overall
simulation task table.

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Figure 59: Generation of Simulation scenario files


5. Transfer of simulation models into RAMSIS tasks (Figure 4-4)
Finally all simulation models were transferred into the RAMSIS-specific task
description environment. In a first level the primitive task descriptions are modeled in
specific RAMSIS task files (extension *.tsk). From each task file a posture of the
manikin will be calculated. In a second level these task files are ordered to represent a
sequence of primitive tasks in the sub task. This ordering is modeled in specific
RAMSIS simulation model / use case files (extension *.aan). These files contain
references to the task files and can be loaded by RAMSIS to generate a sequence of
manikin postures through the automatic analysis function.
The following external tools were integrated with the Veritas Framework in order to
perform the simulations for the Car Interior and Motorcycle simulation scenarios:
Ramsis Ergonomics Simulator: The Virtual User Models were integrated into
Ramsis to provide impairment parameters affecting the posture capabilities, comfort
factors and ergonomics of the Ramsis-specific avatar.
LMS Virtual.Lab vibration analysis tool: In the framework of VERITAS, the LMS
Virtual Dummy can be characterized to reproduce different disabilities by tuning
specific parameters, such as the joint rotational stiffness. The results of the simulation
will provide simple and relevant indications about how much a vehicle is accessible
in terms of ergonomics and vibrational comfort. This is really innovative for such a
field since there is a good experience at experimental level but we are quite at the
ground floor at simulation level. The LMS Virtual Dummy integrated with the
VERITAS User Models provided a complementarity aspect to the VERITAS core
simulation engine, since it addressed an additional aspect compared to the VERITAS
simulation engine.
Lightning VR Engine: The VERITAS simulation core was included into Lightning.
The simulation core is wrapped into Lightning. Doing so, an immersive Virtual
Reality platform was developed based on Lightning and VERITAS simulation cores.

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This platform allows the designer or developer to experience a virtual simulation of


her design and to interact with the environment as being a user with disabilities.
The ADAS/IVIS and ARAS/OBIS use cases, focusing on the interfaces of ICT
solutions for Driver and Rider assistance via visual and oral information systems
respectively, are similar to a number of other use cases from different domains in that
they are considered GUI-based designs and thus have the same simulation aspects and
integration requirements which are handled globally using the same methodology for
UI-based designs by the VERITAS platform. This methodology will be described in
greater detail in the Infotainment Application domain section. The simulation models
generation for these use cases also follows the same methodology presented earlier.
Smart Living Spaces
The objectives of Smart Living Spaces domain with regard to the integration with
VERITAS for accessibility assessment and the subsequent generation of simulation
models were the following:
1. To provide a comprehensive toolset to support the planning and evaluation of
smart living spaces for users with disabilities. Smart living spaces are considered in
private homes as well as in public spaces.
2. To provide an integrated solution for the evaluation of user interfaces of smart
living spaces in their architectural context, by means of immersive systems.
3. To develop a support system, allowing the design, simulation and evaluation of
smart living spaces for handicapped persons, including the following:
a graphical planning tool, supporting the design and 3D view of rooms
a real-time simulator, allowing to simulate smart devices installed in the
rooms (graphical animation and behavior simulation)
a comprehensive library of smart products to be installed in the rooms
The overall Smart Living Spaces system was implemented including interfaces to
existing systems as AutoCAD, 3D StudioMax, Cinema4D, etc. through the inherent
import capabilities for those formats by the underlying OpenSceneGraph (OSG)
platform. As main exchange format, the standardized VRML97/X3D was used. As
the system is based on the IVerSIm3D framework, it is able to be operated in
immersive systems, scalable in architecture, in order to be able to run on desktop
computers, small-size stereo display devices, monoscopic and stereoscopic projection
walls and in CAVE-like systems as well. The integrated system allows for an
immersive experience of the building and its infrastructure. It combines a freely
navigable digital building with real-time interfaces or interface prototypes for built-in
domotic components. It provides tools to take the perspective of people with special
needs to optimize designs. It integrates also simulation tools to detect accessibility
deficiencies.
Based on IVerSim-3D, two modes were considered in the immersive viewing
condition for the SLS module and will be repeated here for completeness:
First person perspective: The user sees and acts through the eyes of the
impaired person. This is specifically interesting for the visual impairments
which can be simulated by filtering the images according to the impairments.
If motion impairments should be simulated, it is more advanced to impose the
limitations to the actual user. Two principal paths are possible: a) Quantitative

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feedback with haptic devices which has its own limitations and necessitates
more involved set up and specialized hardware. b) Qualitative feedback which
indicates the limitations as warnings but does not inhibit the performed
motion.
Third person perspective: The user observes the impaired person acting on the
design. This mode is comparable with the experience of the VerSim3D
desktop tool but with greater spatial navigation flexibility. The core
simulation provides the avatar representation in the virtual environment.
Based on the use case definition for the Domotics use case, common simulation
models for the core simulation of Smart Living Spaces were derived. With regard to
The tasks were combined to multi-task scenarios, shown in the substructures below.
Walk form main door to the kitchen
1. Walk path
2. Open all doors on path with handle
3. Switch on all lights in all passing rooms
Operate dishwasher
1. Open dishwasher
2. Reach in dishwasher
3. Open dishwasher drawer
Operate fridge
1. Open fridge door
2. Reach in
Operate toilette
1. Open door
2. Switch on light
3. Open toilette lid
4. Reach flushing
The integration with the VERITAS Exportable Toolbox was implemented following
the methodology depicted in Figure 60:
The SLS Simulation systems integration with other subsystems is further enhanced
by the use of extensions, consisting of three modules:
1. SLS UI Plugin: UI tab for the specifics of the SLS control UI
2. SLS Behavior: Here the dynamic and trigger objects of the SLS modules are
managed
3. Domotic Connector: Network link to the Domologic Server
The SLS UI Plugin extends the web interface with an additional tab where
control events are sent to the IVerSim-3D application. This includes
specifically the control of the connection to the domotic server which can be
started and stopped.

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Figure 60: Smart Living Spaces Simulation System integration methodology


The Smart Living Spaces Use Cases also include the following:
- the Scholtes oven model S3, with a touch GUI interface;
- two different models of gas hobs, both with a TUI interface, which differentiate
for the position of the knobs: One model has horizontal knobs; the other model
has vertical knobs.
- Smart Home Controller Remote control application for home devices
The first and last use cases fall under the category of GUI-based design assessment
and thus follow the same simulation aspects, integration and simulation model
generation methodology as all GUI-based use cases.
The choice of the gas hob models, instead, took a different approach. A traditional
TUI interface with knobs to experiment with upper limbs movement impairment,
such as hand tremors due to Essential Tremor disease or Parkinson disease has been
selected. The gas hob models that were chosen are all operated by tangible knobs. In
one model the knobs are placed horizontally and in the other one are placed
vertically. Another difference between the two is that the model with vertical knobs
has an additional button that needs to be pushed when rotating the knobs in order to
release the sparkle and light the stove up. The use of the gas hobs is really dependant
from users hand movement ability, this meaning that all those persons suffering
either from Essential Tremor disease or from Parkinson, in the early stage of the
illness, may encounter several obstacles using them. In order to keep an independent
life at home, it is essential to provide Essential Tremor patients and Parkinson ones
(the latter during the early stage of the illness when they are still able to be at home
and take care of themselves) with an enabling environment which would allow them
to continue cooking. This motivation led Indesit Company to experience with the
simulation of hand tremors during the use of gas hobs using Control Functionality
Limitation Interaction Tool, with the aim of coming up with insights to improve the
design, and thus also the accessibility, of the gas hob models.

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Since CFL_IT is haptic interface, this integration was a physical integration among
each gas hob and the CFL_IT, which in turn needed to be connected to a computer
running the VerIM software. This meant that the CFL_IT was moved to Indesit lab
and a particular experiment set-up was built, in order for the designer to be able to
wear the CFL_IT haptic interface while using the gas hob.
Workplace Design & Collaborative Tools
Starting from results of task analysis and use cases and the virtual user model files
relevant to workplace, the requirements of end-users and of technology providers for
ergonomic design with respect to humans with limited functionalities were analysed
first. Then this analysis was used to derive specific tasks to be performed in
simulation scenarios that follow the use cases. The tasks were in turn analysed to
describe the interactions, objects, success criteria and thresholds that fully describe
the simulation modeling. Finally, the simulation models were formulated into
UsiXML form, in order to abstractly describe the simulation models in a form that
can be then adapted by the Veritas Tools in order to match specific designs and users.
We started the work to create the simulation models by first performing a study of the
workplace (workplace design and collaborative tools) needs, requirements, guidelines
and standards which govern usability and accessibility in the workplace domain. The
work carried out during this activity revolved around literature research,
questionnaires and expert interviews, in order to provide a compendium of
requirements with regards to accessibility assessment in the workplace.
Based, on the Use Cases and multidimensional task analysis, we derived the
specific simulation models in table forms, from which, the resulting UsiXML files
were generated. In total, 6 Simulation Models were created, 3 for workplace design
and 3 for Collaborative tools sub-domains, while also 39 task models (20 for
Workplace and 19 for Collaborative tools) and 98 Multimodal Interaction Models (72
in the Workplace and 26 in the Collaborative tools) were created and the
corresponding UsiXML files were generated.
Workplace design using VERITAS Core Simulation Platform (CSP) makes use of
existing CAD environments, so the main effort behind the simulation aspects is
similar to those of the Automotive domain while the integration follows a similar
methodology as that of Ramsis but instead, in this domain the integration deals with
the inclusion of the CSP into an existing Workplace design-oriented CAD
environment. The external design environment serves as a carrier of the simulation
preparation and simulation performing functionality. The chosen CAD environment is
VrDeco ver.2.0 and its Graphical User Interface was extended in order to contain the
necessary functionalities of exportable toolbox.
With designers developing concepts for accessible workplaces, the VERITAS toolbox
is introduced in the design environment to connect the design stored in computer
memory with simulation editing and performing software. As a result, the toolbox
was equipped with a minimal set of loaders, parameterizations of simulation scenes,
virtual user models, avatars and simulation scenarios. Cycles of testing using virtual
user models and optimization of the workplace design were integrated to the design
process activities. The integration API, followed methodology, the architecture of
VERITAS Tools Message Interchange System (V-TOMIS) and the way of its use
with system calls between different tools (internal or external) completed the modular
structure of the system. The use case analysis methodology to derive simulation

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models while the generation of the simulation models followed the methodology
presented in the Automotive domain. An example of a simulation model produced
can be seen in the following table while the integration methodology is exemplified in
Figure 61.
Table 16: Workplace Design Simulation task table example

Figure 61: Workplace Design integration methodology


The Collaborative Tools subdomain followed the same methodology with regard to
simulation aspects, integration and simulation model generation as all GUI-based use
cases.
Metaverses and Games for the Elderly
For integrating VERITAS simulation platform with games and metaverses, there are
several key components of interfacing the simulation with the game:
Simulating the activation of the game controls
This part of the simulation iscarried out by simulating physical motor controls of the
user interacting with the control device such as keyboard, mouse, or 3D interaction
device. Thus the simulation will use the VERITAS virtual user to perform the desired
task such as pressing the key.
Simulating sensory limitations
This part of the simulation will be carried out by modifying the output of the game to
simulate the sensory limitations of the user. For example the colors of the game

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output image can be desaturated to simulate the color blindness or the audio channel
can be muted to simulate hearing problems.
The implementation of the sensory limitations is linked to the virtual user models and
has to be directly integrated into the game or metaverse application. The integration is
performed by feeding the outputs of the game/metaverse engine to the core simulation
platform. The platform will then post-process the output and it will embed it into the
virtual scene, which models the particular workplace configuration (monitor,
keyboard, mouse, and tablet). In order to allow the developer to primarily focus on
accessibility of the game instead of solving the workplace issues. The platform should
also support an ideal workplace mode in which the limitations given by the particular
workplace configuration will be minimized. In particular in this mode we assume that
the user can focus on the whole screen without any restrictions.
Simulating cognitive and behavioral limitations
In order to simulate cognitive and behavioral limitations we need to extract relevant
indicators of cognitive load and behavioral requirements from the game engine. This
is in general very difficult problem, which has not yet been sufficiently solved and
understood for more complex scenarios. In VERITAS we assume that we can obtain
aggregate information indicating a cognitive load of the user by either analyzing the
game output image using certain image complexity metrics or by additional explicit
hints from the game/metaverse engine. These values are passed to the cognitive user
model and in turn will affect reaction times of the users in the simulation of other
tasks.
The simulation aspects described above are not exclusive to games and metaverses,
but cover any ICT application with a GUI and typical interaction devices (mouse,
keyboard and joystick). Therefore, this methodology can be used in all other domains
that feature GUI-based designs.
Infotainment applications, as all ICT software applications to some extent, consist of
a user interface to specific interactions in either a Game or a Virtual Metaverse
Environment. As such, the accessibility assessment through simulation, consists of a
set of steps taken by the designer/developer, which are outlined in Figure 62.
The general approach consists of 5 steps:
Record Interaction Session: The designer records a session where a minimum
number of events in order to perform a task specified in a simulation model is
logged. The recording performed in the previous step contains only raw
information on the basic input events (mouse motion and button clicks,
keyboard entry, joystick motion etc.) The events recorded do not dictate
specific motion paths or keyboard entry typing rates. Mouse or Joystick
motion events are only described by source and destination positions, while
timestamped mouse button presses/releases and keyboard key presses/releases
indicate the minimum time required to perform the events and the event
targets.

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Figure 62: Veritas GUI-based simulation integration

Adapt Session for Veritas Simulation: In order to attribute these events to the
generic simulation model specified in a UsiXML file, the designer must match
each event or sequence of events to a specific task. Each UI has different
characteristics such as screen resolution and windows size, UI element types,
sizes and locations and functionalities of these elements. For example, the
generic task defined in a UsiXML simulation model may be Enter a
username. This task can be applied to various applications, but the specific
parameters for the execution of this task in each application are unique. For a
given application, this task may consist of moving the mouse to the password
entry field, clicking in the field, entering a variable set of characters using the
keyboard and finally pressing Enter or clicking on a button to submit the
username. When all the events are attributed to tasks, the final outcome is a
simulation scenario, adapted specifically to that particular application and
ready to be simulated with virtual user models of impaired users, using the
Veritas GUI Simulation framework. For each event, the designer can modify
the strictness of the evaluation of the events outcome when it is simulated, by
indicating if a failure to perform the task should be considered a failure of
performing the entire task or if the event can be performed until the outcome
is the desired one.
Apply Virtual User Model Parameters: The next step to the accessibility
assessment of an ICT application, in general, consists of applying the
parameters of a VUM that affect the accuracy, speed and sensory output of an
interaction event. Using the algorithms that were defined in SP1 and
implemented in WP2.1, each event described in the adapted simulation
scenario of the previous step is filtered using the virtual user model
parameters affecting the outcome of this event. E.g. motor impairments on the

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upper body and specifically the upper limbs in a virtual user model are applied
to the mouse motion, mouse button, joystick motion, joystick button and
keyboard entry events, modifying the optimal paths, times and target positions
recorded accordingly. Vision impairment parameters are used to generate
simulated visual output of the UI, again affecting the ability to locate and
interact with UI elements, while hearing impairments are use to provide
simulated audio output, again affecting the capability of the virtual user to
identify, comprehend and locate sound events in a 3D spatial context.
Simulate Session: When these parameters described in the previous step are
applied to the simulation scenario, the outcome of the simulated interaction
session may or may not be successful, may take an inordinate amount of time
to complete, or may be very difficult to perform altogether. The Veritas GUI
Simulation framework provides two modes of Simulation, automatic and
interactive.
o In automatic mode, the core simulation platform takes over the entire
execution of the simulation scenario, by injecting simulated input
events, in effect controlling the mouse and joystick motion,
performing mouse button and joystick button presses and releases and
keyboard entries, filtered by the parameters of the VUM. This filtering
affects the motion paths, times taken between events, accuracy of
target location, etc, based on the motor and cognitive parameters of the
VUM. At the same time the visual and audio outputs of the system are
also filtered, to provide a realistic simulation of the interface for a user
with the impairments defined in the virtual user model. The outcome
of the simulation depends on the strictness defined in the adapted
simulation scenario for each event and the overall of the simulated
virtual users ability to perform the tasks defined in the simulation
model.
o In interactive mode, the core simulation platform again simulates the
effects of the impairments on motor, visual and hearing modalities, but
the designer has control of the input. In this case accessibility
assessment is performed directly by the application
designers/developers, by placing themselves in the position of an
impaired user, trying to interact with an application.
Report Accessibility Assessment: After the simulation session is over,
depending on the outcome of the simulation in performing the tasks defined in
the simulation model, the Veritas GUI Simulation framework reports on
screen both on the success or failure or the session and each task involved,
individually. When a task fails, the reason is reported (e.g. wrong key pressed,
mouse click outside of a UI elements area etc.). Furthermore, the entire
simulated session is recorded in a similar manner to the initial session
recording of the first step, in order to quantitatively evaluate the simulated
session against the optimal one. Through this quantitative analysis, useful
insights can be extracted, such as error rates, path deviations, speed of
execution per task, among others.
Due to the varying software platforms, UI sub-systems and other factors specific to
each application (e.g. 3D content and UI elements), several approaches were

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researched and developed to integrate the Veritas Core Simulation. The three main
integration methods researched and developed were:
Internal Integration using Core Simulation Library: The direct software
integration of the Veritas Simulation Core DLL library in the applications code,
to facilitate interactive and automatic 2D UI accessibility assessment.
Internal Integration using Event Logging/Playback: The direct software
implementation of capturing and playback of close-coupled application events
and their outcomes within the pilot application, to facilitate interactive
accessibility assessment for 3D UI elements
External Integration using the Veritas GUI tools: The indirect adaptation of
simulation scenarios for 2D UI-based accessibility assessment, providing generic
event logging, adaptation of logged events to simulation tasks and playback of
these tasks using the Veritas GUI accessibility assessment tools (VerSEd-GUI
and VerSim-GUI). This is the integration method used in the majority of GUI-
based designs throughout the targeted application domains of VERITAS.
An example of the simulation models produced for the Metaverses and Games
domain are presented in the tables below:

Figure 63: Metaverse Simulation Model table example


Healthcare
The simulation aspects for the Healthcare domain are for the main part similar to the
aspects presented in the Metaverses and Games domain, since all three use cases are
based on GUI-centric designs. They only thing differentiating the Healthcare domain
use cases is their criticality factor, since their accessibility is much more important
due to their intended users.
The research approached different aspects about the design of a usable graphical
interface for elderly and disabled people:
Disability or impairment focus Physical/mobility; Cognition; Vision.

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Methodology focus Observation of users, often around case studies;


Surveys;
Focus groups, but not tasks oriented; Expert opinion, sometimes based on a
review of previous works.
Web interface design aspects Strong involvement of users throughout the
whole design and development process, both for the creation of mockups and
evaluation of the interface.
Based on the results, it was determined that the methodology to integrate general
GUI-based applications with VERITAS, is adequate for Healthcare applications as
well, as long as success criteria and thresholds are stricter to reflect the criticality of
the designs. The methodology has been extensively covered in the Metaverses and
Games section.
The simulation models produced covered three areas of interest in the Healthcare
domain, namely:
Remote Monitoring
Health Advisor
Personal Care at Home
An example of the Simulation Models produced in table form can be seen in the
following figure.

Figure 64: Healthcare Simulation Model table example


1.3.1.11. Pilot planning, Pilot development and testing
A Pilot planning and Evaluation Framework was engaged to develop and elaborate a
benchmarking framework and guidelines that build a sound basis for the evaluation of
VERITAS outcomes, while two sets of end-user tests, one with developers and
designers targeted by VERITAS and one with beneficiaries to evaluate the
accessibility of pilot designs were planned.
An evaluation is required for each application area, namely automotive, smart living,
workplace, infotainment and healthcare and for each disability group namely

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physically, cognitive, visual and hearing. For the immersive simulation environment,
only the automotive, smart living and workplace application areas were targeted.
The main outcome was the definition and implementation of a pilot planning scheme
and the appropriate benchmarking platforms for software testing in the VERITAS
environment.
Both formative and summative evaluations were put forward for use in the project.
These two phases can be defined as:
Formative evaluation, i.e. evaluation carried out during the design and
implementation phase of VERITAS and targeted at collecting information for
improvement.
Summative evaluation, i.e. the evaluation process on VERITAS at the end of
the development phase and targeted at collecting information on the outcomes
of the implementation.
The overall pilot plan methodology can be seen in the following figure:

Figure 65: VERITAS Overall pilot plan methodology


Pilots with Designers/Developers
Different stakeholder groups exist which are related to each application area. Part of
the main evaluation is the evaluation by an expert group, which would obviously
mean the inclusion of evaluation personnel competent in that field. Typically
stakeholders may be classified according to the list below:
End users
o Designers and Developers
o Beneficiaries
Professionals automotive, Building, infotainment
Product manufacturers
Service providers
Marketers
Business investment groups
The methodology used for the planning and evaluation of the pilot results was based
on the SMART principle shown below:
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Table 17: SMART goal settings for VERITAS

In total, a number of 140 test-users were used to test the VERITAS tools, chosen in
each application domain so as to be directly targeted by the relevant tools they were
asked to test. The pilot tests were held over two iterations, in order to provide
feedback for the improvement of the VERITAS platform during the development
phase. The overall plan follows the diagram shown below:

Figure 66: General Pilot plan with Designers/Developers


Table 18: Pilot Site Plan per Application Area

The pilot plans main aim with regard to stakeholders was to evaluate 4 main aspects
of the VERITAS Platform:
Usability

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Reliability
Accuracy
Response
Suitability
User Acceptance
To that end both qualitative and quantitative metrics were chosen for the evaluation.
The tools used to measure the aspects of the evaluation indicated above were the
following:
Interview
Focus Groups
Questionnaires
Observation
System Log Data
The questionnaires the test users filled in the pilots were the following:
Demographic Questionnaire
TAM Technology Acceptance Model
System Usability Scale SUS
The quantitative data from the pilots with designers/developers was captured using
interaction logging, actually using the same VERITAS tools developed for GUI-
oriented accessibility assessment.
Pilots with Beneficiaries
Pilots for beneficiaries constitute demonstration pilots and were aimed for summative
evaluation as defined. It provided the opportunity to gather feedback based on the
users first-hand experiences with the applications of the VERITAS tools, i.e. the
VERITAS simulation models.
Therefore, these pilots were planned and organized so as to assess the tools through
the examination of the accessibility of their applications (products and services). The
pilots were held in two iterations in order to provide valuable insight into the
improvement of the tools and deliver evidence on how well the goal of VERITAS has
been achieved, which is to ensure that future products and services are being
systematically designed for all people, including those with disabilities, functional
limitations and older people. The pilots also identified any limitation and adjustment
of the existing use cases and the simulation platform to assess and verify the
accessibility of an application. Furthermore, they helped define under what
circumstances a real user should be required instead of a virtual one.
Table 19: Pilot Site Plan per Application Area
Application
Pilot site Country Title of the pilot
domain
CRF IT Car Interior
Continental DE ADAS/IVIS
CRF ADAS/IVIS
Automotive
PIAAGIO IT
Motorbike handling, posture and use of OBIS
RELAB
BAUUNION
Smart Living DE Interior Design
FhG/IAO
Space
INDESIT IT Home Appliances

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RELAB
BYTE GR Collaborative Tools
Workplace
CERTH/ITI GR Workplace design
CERTH/ITI GR Metaverse
Infotainment UNEW UK Metaverse, Collaborative Games
AIJU ES Collaborative Games
CERTH/HIT GR Remote Patient Monitoring
Healthcare Mobile device solution
I+ IT Health coach

In total, 380 beneficiaries participated in the pilots. The beneficiaries that participated
in each application domain pilot and the group of impairment the belong to can be
seen in the following table:
Table 20: Summary of beneficiary groups in each application domain

Application domain Beneficiary group Participants

People with mild disabilities including older people


Automotive Visually impaired people 60

Hearing impaired people


Wheelchair users (lower limb impairments)

Parkinsons
Smart Living Space 90
Older people

Visually impaired people

Older people

People with mobility impairment

Older people with hearing impairment


Workplace 90
Older people with cognitive impairment

Visually impaired people

Cognitively impaired people

Visually impaired people

Infotainment Hearing impaired people 90

Older people

Older people with upper limb impairments

People with low vision


Healthcare 50
People with disabilities due to Parkinsons

People with disabilities due to stroke

The following Pilot applications were developed to be used in the pilot tests of each
Application domain:

Automotive
o Use of the car interior storage compartment
o Program the on-board navigation system and activate the functionality
o Handle a powered two wheeler (PTW)
o Receive audible alerts from the device while riding a PTW
Smart Living Space
o Get in and move around inside a house

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o Use kitchen appliances


Workplace
o Navigate and interact with furniture and devices in a Work
environment
o Use ICT collaborative tools at work
Infotainment
o Use Metaverses
o Play a collaborative game
o Play a multi-user game aimed at the Elderly
Healthcare
o Use remote patient monitoring solution
o Use mobile Nutritional Advisor application
o Use health coach tool
The tests conducted on each pilot application to determine their accessibility,
involved both simulations with virtual users using the VERITAS tools, as well as the
pilots with actual users. The goal was to evaluate both the design of each application
but also to validate the VERITAS virtual accessibility simulation approach. To that
end, an initial version of each application was tested in the first iteration of pilots by
both virtual and actual users.
The initial versions of each application during tests with virtual and actual users
(where applicable) can be seen in the figures below:

Figure 67: Use of the car interior storage compartment

Figure 68: Handle a powered two wheeler

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Figure 69: Program the on-board navigation system and activate the functionality

Figure 70: Receive audible alerts from the device while riding a PTW

Figure 71: Get in and move around inside a house (immersive simulation)

Figure 72: Use kitchen appliances (interactive control limitation applied in simulation)

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Figure 73: Navigate and interact with furniture and devices in a Work environment

Figure 74: Use ICT collaborative tools at work

Figure 75: Use Metaverses

Figure 76: Play a collaborative game

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Figure 77: Play a multi-user game aimed at the Elderly

Figure 78: Use remote patient monitoring solution

Figure 79: Use mobile Nutritional Advice application

Figure 80: Use Health Coach application

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1.3.1.12. User Evaluation & Feedback - Framework and Models Validation

Pilots with Designers/Developers


The results of the first iteration of pilots with designers were analysed both
qualitatively and quantitatively in order to evaluate usability, the acceptance and user
satisfaction of the tools and the results were propagated to the partners of the
VERITAS project responsible for the development of each VERITAS tool tested
during the pilot session.
According to the results of the 1st iteration the following recommendations were made
to improve the VERITAS tools:
In general, the VERITAS toolset was well-received across the five application areas.
Of the 1620 sentiments coded using the common themes identified in the data, 63%
were of a positive or neutral nature. Typically, such comments endorsed: the clarity
of the goal of the tools; the potential outcomes that can be achieved with the help of
the tools; and the ease of common tasks, such as loading or saving different scenarios.
However, a substantial amount of feedback was provided that highlighted
opportunities to enhance the toolset. These fell into four key themes: (1)
comprehensibility within the tools, largely focusing on how designers interpreted the
disability models and the reports generated from the simulations as many participants
did not have clinical expertise or previous experience with simulation tools; (2) the
workflow, as many designers were unclear on how to complete tasks and there were
many calls to automate laborious tasks; (3) requirements and expected features, as
many expected features such as undo and autosave were missing, while different
application areas held different concepts of how to use the tool in their areas; and (4)
the quality of the feedback, as many error messages could not be understood by the
designers. As such, these aspects of usability were addressed in more detail in the
updated versions of the tools.
The second iteration of the pilots with designers was held after further training in the
use of the tools, improvements in key functionalities of the tools and with more
automated features, as requested. Feedback to the user was improved and usability
was enhanced throughout all the tools. The results of the second iteration of the pilot
with designers reflect this improvement both in the qualitative evaluation results as
well as the quantitative.
For example, in the following table, the comparison in time taken to perform tasks
using the Veritas tools as well as number of clicks required to complete a task show a
definite improvement between the 1st and 2nd iterations:
Table 21: Summary of quantitative results comparison in all domains

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Pilots with Beneficiaries


After the first iteration of pilots both with virtual and actual users, the results of the
simulations were analysed by the developers using the Veritas tools, while the
qualitative and quantitative results from the the pilot applications with designers and
beneficiaries in all domains, were analysed separately and the cumulative insights
were propagated to the designers and developers of the pilots.
The results of the first pilot session were compared to the results generated by the
simulated accessibility tests using the VERITAS platform providing a high
correlation into accessibility issues identified in both cases but also indicating specific
situations where virtual design and user simulation does not match findings with an
actual user. These discrepancies were also fed back to the developers of the
VERITAS platform and were used to optimize the user models and the platform
itself.
Below, you can see an example of the correlation between quantifiable data from the
1st iteration of pilots with beneficiaries to the results of the simulations, as well as
cases where the deviation is high enough to indicate an issue with the methodology.
Table 22: Summary correlations between results with VUMs and actual users in task completion
times in the Workplace design scenarios

The cases marked with an asterisk indicate the durations of tasks where certain
assumptions made during the simulation were not matched in the tests with actual
users. In particular, in these cases, the actual users took much longer to perform the
task than anticipated which upon observation, in most cases can be attributed ti the
fact that comprehension of the exact manner to complete the task took more time than
the perfect case of the virtual user who is programmed to just perform the task with
little time spent on cognitively figure out the way on how to perform it.

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This is a theme that was witnessed along most of the application domains. The actual
task completion times once the user initiates the action is highly correlated to the time
expected by the simulation system, but there was no provision for the time taken by
the users to accustom themselves to the situation or the time taken by the users to
figure out how to perform the action in the first place.
This indicated problems on both end the simulation methodology and the
methodology of the pilots with beneficiaries in that comparison of what is in reality a
dry run on an unknown task by the actual users cannot be compared directly to a
simulated task performed by a virtual user that is programmed to know beforehand
how to complete the task. This means that both the training and preparation on using
the pilot applications must be more extensive, but also, that the simulation models
should be expanded to include configurable virtual users expertise levels on the
completion of tasks parameters.
Another issue identified was that it was not always possible to include the same
persons in both iterations, so the results could be directly compared on per user case.
Furthermore, the levels of impairment and characteristics of users in some cases did
not match the virtual users used in the simulations in all cases exactly, leading to
minor deviations from the average expected.
The 2nd iteration of the pilots was performed on updated versions of the pilot
applications that were redesigned in key areas where the simulations indicated
accessibility issues. In most cases, as described earlier, these areas were the same as
those indicated by actual user tests.
Examples if the updated versions of the pilot application designs can be seen in the
following figures in comparison to the initial ones:

Figure 81: Use of the car interior storage compartment: With handle (initial) and push spring
mechanism (final)

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Figure 82: Handle a powered two wheeler: Normal and lowered layout overlapped Seat lines of
the two layouts highlighted in red

Figure 83: Program the on-board navigation system and activate the functionality: Initial and
Optimal interaction areas and final implemented gestures

Figure 84: Receive audible alerts from the device while riding a PTW (initial and final)

Figure 85: Get in and move around inside a house (initial and final designs)

Figure 86: Use kitchen appliances (initial and final designs)

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Figure 87: Navigate and interact with furniture and devices in a Work environment (initial and
final designs)

Figure 88: Use ICT collaborative tools at work(initial and final designs)

Figure 89: Use Metaverses (initial and final designs)

Figure 90: Play a collaborative game (initial and final designs)

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Figure 91: Play a multi-user game aimed at the Elderly (initial and final designs)

Figure 92: Use remote patient monitoring solution (initial and final designs)

Figure 93: Use mobile Nutritional Advice application (initial and final designs)

Figure 94: Use Health Coach application (initial and final designs)

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The results of the 2nd pilot in the majority of cases and scenarios confirmed the
improvement expected by the results of the simulations with the VERITAS platform.
This result also validates to a large extent, barring the few deviations described
earlier, the correlation of the virtual user models and the simulation engines
capabilities with regard to physical and cognitive simulation.
These results were confirmed both by the analysis of the qualitative data (user
satisfaction, comfort and performance) and the quantitative analysis of the logs
recorded during pilot sessions (task durations and error rates). Overall,
Therefore, the VUMs created using the VERITAS tools were found to be consistent
with the impairments of the beneficiaries and were proven effective and useful to
redesign a fully accessible application. In fact, after the redesign, the beneficiaries
could perform the tasks between 10% and 30% faster on average and make as much
as 45% less errors on average.
The outcome of the pilots does not mean that VERITAS is a perfect catch-all
solution. On the contrary, several areas for improvement were identified that can lead
to further research on more robust and realistic simulation-based accessibility.
Among the areas of improvement the following were found to be the most important:
Better and more refined Cognitive simulation
Better correlation of cognitive aspects to physical actions simulation
Improved Immersive functionalities support
Expansion of the multisensorial tests with actual users to derive better
statistical models of targeted impairments and expansion of the models to
cover more impairments
Inclusion of virtual model expertise level parameter to cater for lack of
experience of actual users in the interaction with designs
Full dynamic musculoskeletal simulation of motor tasks
More research into the effects of visual and hearing impairments to the
quantitative performance of user tasks is required

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1.4. Potential Impact


1.4.1. Socio-economic impact

People with disabilities is a continuously increasing population, estimated to over 74


million persons in the European Union, which significantly raises if elderly and
people with cognitive disabilities are also taken into account1. Despite the significant
improvements towards eInclusion that have evolved over the last decades, it is
evident that in their everyday life people with disabilities still have a lot of barriers to
overcome to reach the level of full participation in their social, professional and
private activities.
Especially in the case of ICT products, despite their impressive evolution in the last
decade, they are still partly accessible or accessible only with the use of special
assistive devices to people with disabilities. Even though the importance and
usefulness of designing ICT products accessible for everyone is now recognized and
highlighted in the designers community, there remains lack of specific guidelines
and standards for their products to accommodate with potential accessibility needs of
their users.
The situation is not much better to what concerns non-ICT products and services.
Designers and developers are not able to test the efficiency of their products
regarding accessibility, while existing guidelines are not always appropriate and do
not guarantee the accessibility level that a specific product or service may require.
Thus, it is a technological challenge to provide senior and disabled citizens with
systems that could foster the different facets in the perception of quality of life. These
systems should improve the level of independence, promote the social relationships,
leverage the immersion in the environments and encourage the psychological and
physical state of the person.
Aiming to alter and improve this situation, VERITAS provides the
designers/developers with the possibility to achieve realistic and iterative user testing
at all development stages and thus, to offer mainstream ICT products/services
compatible with assistive devices and adjusted to visual, hearing, cognitive and
mobility impairments. By covering a wide variety of disabilities, it offers the
verification of the products through VR simulation of the end-users impairments,
focussing on the accessibility and usability issues in order to increase the productivity
of designers along with the accessibility and the associated quality of their products.
More specifically:
VERITAS has defined a holistic, modular architecture, to its aim of creating
new tools and methods that facilitate and streamline the process of creation,
design, construction and seamless deployment of accessible technological
solutions and services for persons with disabilities in various daily life
environments. This includes the definition and creation of virtual user models,
the design and implementation of an open simulation platform (the
multisensorial platform), providing the possibility of simulated accessibility
evaluation of products in virtual reality and immersive virtual reality
environments.

1
Europe in figures - Eurostat yearbook 2008, ISBN: 978-92-79-06607-8, Eurostat 2008.

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VERITAS has proposed a set of application guidelines, as emerged from the


project findings, towards the optimal application of the VERITAS tools and
the overall enhancement of the design-for-all concept in the design and
development of mainstream products.
By focussing on five emerging application areas, i.e. automotive, smart living
spaces, infotainment, work environment and personal health, VERITAS
covers a wide range of everyday activities and its outcomes are significantly
contributing to facilitating the design of products related to these five areas
following an accessible for everybody concept which, consecutively, will
enhance the quality of everyday life for people with disabilities and eliminate
discrimination by making the same products usable by everyone.
VERITAS partners, also within the framework of VUMS cluster, has initiated
and actively participated in standardisation activities related to the project
results, which are still ongoing and their involvement continues also after the
end of the project.
Regarding the economic development and further deployment, VERITAS has:
Investigated the willingness-to-pay of the end-users (designers/developers) for
the developed tools that enhance the development of accessible for all
products and services. This was taken into account in the formulation of
exploitation and business plans.
Defined 16 exploitable assets (see section Exploitation of Results) and
performed CBA/CEA as well as defined separate business models for each
one of them.
Defined a concrete exploitation plan and exploitation agreement on the further
deployment of these products after the completion of the project.
By encompassing devices and applications the ability to compensate in every
situation and environment for motor, sensory, or cognitive difficulties, VERITAS will
enable people with disabilities and older people to live independently, at home and
elsewhere. Thus, VERITAS will enable the older people and people with disabilities
to remain in their familiar home environment, rather than become dependent on
institutional care. Conclusively, as access to good quality of life is a fundamental
need and right for every human, VERITAS is indirectly supporting every policy and
strategy towards social protection and social inclusion, with special emphasis on the
design and development process of new mainstream products.

1.4.2. Ethical Implications


Two basic ethical issues were related to the project conduct.
1. The performance and set up of the pilots, and the training of different end user
groups, as well as the preliminary user feedback in, the comfort and safety of
all participants has to be guaranteed, as well as the security and legal issues of
their personal data (e.g. related to their special needs and preferences).
Specific guidelines from the EFGCP (the European Forum for Good Clinical
Practice) to the ethical and legal issues for vulnerable users (such as elderly
and people with disabilities) have been followed. For this, a specific guideline
related to VERITAS Ethics control at the pilot and training sites has been

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defined and followed. During the project the pilot plans they have been
checked by the Ethics Advisory Board, which has been set up. The board
members reported their comments and these were included, together with
partners feedback, and the emanating Deliverable changes were added in the
project pilot plans Deliverable (final version).

2. That the project developments as a whole, have been conducted in a way that
guarantees that future products and services are ethically designed for all
people, including those with disabilities and avoid the creation of barriers, as
well as the protection of their personal data (health status, capacities, abilities,
location, routing, etc.).
A Deliverable on the ethical, legal and privacy issues relating to the technologies has
been developed by the VERITAS project and a dedicated Activity has been devoted
to address ethical and privacy issues raised by the project and the biometric in
general. A depth analysis has been provided within VERITAS for the ethical issues
that may rise throughout the lifetime of the project and its activities. These were
included in the VERITAS Ethics Manual.
Within this VERITAS Ethics Manual, background information concerning the
recognition of key ethical and legal issues is provided. A relevant project policy has
been developed (ethics code of conduct). It is specified which data are essential for
the project and which will be excluded from retention (especially any information
which could be linked with the identity of a participant, as well as any religious or
philosophical beliefs, political opinions or experience). All relevant national and
international European conventions (i.e. Helsinki Declaration) are fully integrated.
With the aid of the Template on ethical and legal issues, national standards and the
norms of Local Ethics Research Committees are gathered. Within the Ethics manual,
the ethical frame for the conduct of the pilots and various trainings is also justified on
scientific and legal basis in depth.
All national legal and ethical requirements of the Member States where the research
is performed were fulfilled. Personal data of participants has been strictly held
confidential at any time of the research.
This means in detail that:
All the test subjects had the ability to give informed written consent to
participate.
All the test subjects were strictly volunteers and preserved the right for to
withdraw at any time from the trials, without prior notification.
The personal data gathered during the tests or the iterative development phase
were strictly protected and unlinked anonymised. No genetic information was
collected. No user personal data was centrally stored, nor sent around in the
Network, nor was available to any third party (i.e. for advertisement,
marketing or even research outside VERITAS objectives). Only one person
per site (relevant Ethics issues responsible) had access to the relation between
test participants' code and identity, in order to administer the tests. One month
after the pilots end, this reference was deleted, thus safeguarding fully

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anonymisation of results. Identifiers kept were related to age, nationality,


gender and similar issues.
The use of photographs, audio and video material was agreed with volunteers
in advance.
All test volunteers received detailed oral information. In addition, they received in
their own language:
a commonly understandable written description of the project;
the project goals;
the planned project progress;
the related testing and examination procedures;
advice on unrestricted disclaimer rights on their agreement.
On the other hand, the Ethics Advisory Board have scrutinised the research, to
guarantee that no undue risk for the user, whether technically, nor related to the
breach of privacy, was possible
During the pilots the data collection has been divided in the following parts:
questionnaire on ethical and legal issues
the documents for the informed consent ,
questionnaire about organizational and insurance issues
questionnaire on personal information
The questionnaire on ethical and legal issues was filled in by the investigator who
conducted pilots, trainings or any kind of data collection. It has also served as a sort
of preliminary checklist, in which the researcher was reminded to take into account
all the relevant ethical aspects before conducting any experiment. This questionnaire
on ethical and legal issues is divided into different subsections (informed consent,
ethical control instruments, privacy, safety, risk assessment).
The main target user group of VERITAS is the healthy older people who
experience natural cognitive and physical decline due to ageing as well as people with
disabilities. Participants should have the competence to understand the informed
consent information. In the unlikely case that they were unable to do so, no
experiment has been conducted. Equally, participating end-users should be able to
make a distinction between the VR world and reality. Not being able to do so has
exempt them from participating in the scenarios and pilots targeted in VERITAS.
All questionnaires were filled in and sent to the Ethics Advisory Board for approval.
It should also be highlighted that in all tests sites, a detailed description of the test
procedures and the relevant questionnaires were also provided to the partners local
ethical committees and tests were executed only upon approval.

1.4.3. Market impact


As already mentioned above, the VERITAS results mainly address five application
areas: Automotive, Smart Living Spaces, Infotainment, Work Environment, Personal
Health. Each of them constitutes a potential market for the VERITAS project results,
to what concerns accessible design of their products. This variety of application areas
provides the VERITAS products the possibility to be highly marketable. In specific,

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The VERITAS exploitable results follow one or more of the following three types of
employability in business activity:
Open Source Solution (OSS)
The complete source code of the open source applications will be available and freely
redistributable. The community will benefit from these solutions, producing new
knowledge and applications. The partners will use these solutions and knowledge as
stepping stones in novel research efforts in the future. Additionally, specific services
could be offered for the implementation and customization of this OSS for a fee (see
ER02 as an example).
Proprietary Solutions
Some of the developed technologies are partially or totally composed of copyright
code. The source code for the proprietary applications could be delivered through
commercial license. Additionally, specific consultancy services based on these assets
could be offered for a fee (see ER01 as an example).
Services to third parties
The planned business model for VERITAS is either based on OSS, Copyright code or
the so-called dual licensing model. This last approach permits a customer to choose
one of the two licenses: either the GNU General Public License (GPL) or the
commercial licenses. The exploitation model of several ERs also considers the offer
of technical solutions together with implementation guidelines, as well as training and
consultancy services: the VERITAS as a Service model.
There are four groups of potential customers, with a different impact on the business
model VERITAS as a SERVICE. The way to address to each segment will be
different, as well as the benefits obtained from them.

Figure 95: VERITAS as a Service Business Model


Table 23: VERITAS products/services customer segments
Group Benefit Financial Strategic Kind of
Impact Impact Client
Professional end Money by selling the software Revenue Core - high Top Class
users and services. enhancer - high
Channel partners, Money by selling the software Revenue Core - high Self-
Technical end and specific professional enhancer - Implementatio
users services. medium n and Turn
Market information and Key
references for other buyers.

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Group Benefit Financial Strategic Kind of


Impact Impact Client
Open source Software contribution, product Cost savings - High - Do it yourself
developers feedback, community medium Medium
influence.

Moreover, apart from the developers/designers to whom they mainly address, the
development of VERITAS results implies several impacts to the other addressed
stakeholders, indicatively mentioning the following:
European industrial players: VERITAS built-in accessibility support will incite for
more systematic usage of VR simulation in the design and development of
commercial products accessible for all, mainly for the handicapped.
ICT and non-ICT companies with specialized departments in human factors may be
attracted by the VERITAS concept which proposes virtual reality accessibility testing
as an alternative to testing in the real environment, in order to develop fully
accessible products as close as possible to the particular needs of the handicapped
persons.
Software companies and SMEs may use by the VERITAS VR Open Simulation
Platform in order to achieve the optimum result in design and development of
software accessibility. VERITAS tools could also be the starting point for the research
and development of innovative concepts for ambient, multi-device, universally
accessible and usable multimodal interfaces through VR simulation. Conclusively,
VERITAS will support the software industry in its objective of producing better,
universally accessible software products /services at a lower cost.

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1.5. Contact Details


1.5.1. Project Website
A publicly available website was launched early in the first year of the project. Its
primary aim has been to (a) disseminate projects concept, objectives, outcomes,
innovations and activities, (b) share documents and resources, as well as (c) help in
co-ordination of ongoing project work. Thus, public documents deriving from the
project work (e.g. deliverables) are included, which have been regularly updated,
while links to other relevant sites such as partners websites have been offered. In
addition, news, public deliverables as well as participation to major events have been
included in the corresponding sections, in order to address both the general public and
the potential stakeholders for the results of the project.
The website is hosted by CERTH/ITI and is available at the following address:
http://www.veritas-project.eu. It is planned that the VERITAS website will be
maintained for at least 1 year after the end of the project.

1.5.2. List of Beneficiaries / Consortium Composition


The Consortium includes 32 participants, representing in good balance all key actors
in the field of Accessible ICT, namely industries (s/w houses and manufacturers),
industrial SMEs, Research centres, Universities, and end-users organisations. All of
them, as a whole are in an ideal position to embed accessibility Everywhere, since
they provide highly complementary input with respect to:
End users representation (MCA, AGE); they will make sure that the end-user
stays central during the whole project.
Scientific and technological development workin all the fields required by
research partners (CERTH, FhG/IAO, PERCRO, UNEW, ITACA, UPM-LST,
UNITN) and innovative SMEs (HS, ReLab, Hypertech, I+, SMARTEX, Byte,
Domologic).
Infrastructure (pilots sites) enabling the validation and demonstration of the
VERITAS solutions (CRF, Piaggio, Baunion, UNEW, CERTH).
Wide dissemination and exploitationof the project outcomes and promotion to
third parties such as other industrial fora, Policy makers and Public
Administrations (notably in the Social Security and Education / Work
Domains) at national and trans-national level (AGE, MCA, all industrial
partners, large academic partners).
Many industrial partners function both as industrial users and strong software
developers
in the Consortium: CRF, LMS, ATOS, Smartex for example have large research and
development activities in accessibility of mainstream ICT. All these industrial
partners together are extremely knowledgeable in:
stakeholder requirements(from all end-users, application providers, content
providers, sensor and softwaremanufacturers perspectives);

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technical requirements for the VERITAS Open Simulation Platform and


applications (including integration on all platforms and devices addressed in
the project).
VERITAS-related hardware and platforms including multisensorial platform,
assistive devices, the core and the immersive simulation platforms;
development, integration and testing of external applications software linked
with either the core of the immersive simulation platform of VERITAS.
All this industrial knowledge is combined with strong expertise of research
institutes, universities and industrial SMEsin research and development of:
user centered design and evaluation: UNEW, CERTH, FhG/IAO, UoS.
open high-level simulation frameworks for buil-in accessibility in mainstream
ICT and non-ICT applications: FhG/IAO, CERTH, , VRMMP, ITACA.
immersive simulation frameworks:: FhG/IAO, CERTH, VRMMP
innovative multisensorial platform developmentfor virtual user model testing
and training: SMARTEX, CAF, CERTH, UNEW
innovative, user-friendly user interfaces design: FhG/IAO, ReLab
innovative applications in various sectors: HS, FhG/IAO, CRF, Piaggio,
Baunion, AIJU, I+, CERTH, Hypertech.
The full list of participants in the VERITAS consortium, along with the roles of each
one performed during the course of the project are listed in the table below:
Table 24: List of Beneficiaries

Participant Type Country Main Function/Role in VERITAS


Fraunhofer RES Germany Project Manager
R&D on the core and immersive simulation platforms
R&D on the interaction manager
Development of the smart living spaces and workplace design
applications of VERITAS
Organiser of the pilots for the designers
Centre for Research & RES Greece Project Technical Coordinator
Technology Hellas / Hellenic R&D on gait analysis and motion tracking for the
Institute of Transport multisensorial platform
R&D on the virtual user model generator module
R&D on the core simulation platform of VERITAS
R&D on the multimodal interfaces components
Technical requirements and development of the metaverses
application
System technical verification
Centre for Research & Project Quality Manager
Technology Hellas / Technical requirements, development and pilot site for the
Informatics & Telematics domotics applications of the Smart Living Spaces area of
Institute VERITAS
Development and pilot site (HIT research car) for the
automotive applications of the Smart Living Spaces area of
VERITAS

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Participant Type Country Main Function/Role in VERITAS


Organiser of the pilots for the end-users
Risk assessment
Asociacin Instituto de RES Spain R&D on the virtual older people and people with disabilities
Aplicaciones de las Tecnologs virtual user modelling
de la Informacin y de las Development of the personal healthcare applications of
Comunicaciones Avanzadas VERITAS
Centro Ricerche Fiat Societ IND Italy Technical requirements and development for the car (interior
Consortile per Azioni design and IVIS) demonstrator of VERITAS
User and technical requirements and pilot site for the
automotive applications of VERITAS
Foundation for Research and RES Greece R&D on personal health and wellbeing solutions
Technology Hellas Guidelines, policies and standardisation efforts
University of Newcastle Upon RES UK R&D on the motion tracking sensors of the multisensorial
Tyne platform
Development of the UCD methodology of VERITAS
Pilot planning for the end-users and evaluation
Continental Automotive France IND France R&D on the video sensors for the multisensorial platform
SAS Technical requirements and development of the ICT
applications in the automotive area
Scuola Superiore SantAnna RES Italy R&D on new interaction devices in virtual reality
AGE USER Belgium Older users representative
End users involvement in requirements and testing
Dissemination to the end-users
BYTE Computer S.A. IND Greece R&D on the collaborative tools in the workplace design area
Royal National Institute of USER UK Blind user representative
Blind People End users involvement in requirements and testing
Dissemination to the end-users
RES Spain R&D on the cognitive user models of the older people and
Universidad Politcnica de
people with disabilities
Madrid / Life Supporting
Technologies Development of the personal healthcare applications of
VERITAS
RE:Lab SME Italy R&D on UI and task modelling per application area
Universit degli Studi di Trento RES Italy R&D on themultisensorial platform
Virtual Reality & Multi Media IND Italy R&D on the core simulation platform
Park R&D on the infotainment application solutions
USER Bulgaria End users involvement in requirements and testing
Marie Curie Association
Dissemination to the end-users
Czech Technical University in RES Czech Development of the infotainment applications of VERITAS
Prague Republic
Universitaet Basel, Department RES Switzerland R&D on cognitive virtual user modelling
of Psychiatry, Centre of Ethical issues expert
Applied Technologies in
Neuroscience

Indesit Company SpA IND Italy Technical requirements and pilot site of the Smart Living
Spaces application scenarios of VERITAS
DOMOLOGIC SME Germany Technical requirements and development of the Smart Living

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Participant Type Country Main Function/Role in VERITAS


Spaces application scenarios of VERITAS in the domotics area
LMS IND Belgium R&D on physical virtual user modelling
Atos Origin Sociedad Annima IND Spain R&D on the development of the intelligent avatar of VERITAS
Espaol Responsible for the training activities in VERITAS
Asociacin de Investigacin de RES Spain Technical requirements and development of the elder games
la Industria de juguete, conexas applications of VERITAS
y afines
IND Italy Technical requirements and development for the motorcycle
demonstrator of VERITAS
PIAGGIO
User and technical requirements and pilot site for the
automotive applications of VERITAS
SMARTEX s.r.l. SME Italy R&D on the development of wearables for the multisensorial
platform of VERITAS
SME Germany R&D on the virtual user modelling platform
Human Solutions Technical requirements and development on their tool
RAMSIS for the automotive applications of VERITAS
Bauunion 1905 IND Germany Technical requirements and pilot site for the Smart Living
Spaces and Workspace Design applications of VERITAS
Hypertech S.A. SME Greece Technical requirements and development on their tool
VR_DECO for the workplace applications of VERITAS
SME Italy Developer of the personal healthcare and wellbeing
applications of VERITAS
I+
R&D on personal health and wellbeing applications
System Integrator
RES Austria R&D on virtual user modelling
University of Salzburg
Pilot planning
RES UK R&D on virtual user modelling
BRUNEL University
Evaluation of the results of the pilots for the end-users
Universitt Stuttgart RES Germany R&D on the immersive simulation platforms
Integration work of SP2 applications into VR environment
Development process integration

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2. Use and Dissemination of Foreground


Hereby, a plan for use and dissemination of foreground (including socio-economic
impact and target groups for the results of the research) is established, which takes
into account the valuable feedback got from the realization of the pilots. Next section
outlines the activities undertaken by the consortium during the project lifetime to
diffuse project objectives and the main results to various stakeholders such as the
research community, stakeholders and finally end-users. It also provides an overview
for the dissemination strategy followed to guarantee that the respective stakeholders
and general public have access to the knowledge and results of the project.
Furthermore, the final section of this report describes the actions made by the partners
to deliver their final individual exploitation and business plans along with a credible
way to further disseminate and potential commercialize its prototypes.

Section A. Dissemination measures


Dissemination activities are always fundamental for a European Research Project
since the awareness about the results of EU funded projects is one of the major
concerns of EC. Specifically for an accessibility related project such as VERITAS,
dissemination activities are a demand not only due to the need for iterative design of
the proposed system but also for the general acceptance of the proposed methods and
concepts.
Throughout its entire lifespan, the VERITAS partners spent a considerable amount of
time, efforts, and resources on the dissemination of foreground, both towards the
scientific community and relevant target groups in the industry. Main target of these
efforts has been the encouragement of the dissemination and exploitation of the
projects developed technologies, gained knowledge and derived results, which was
one of VERITAS most important term objectives.
VERITAS project activities were active for 48 months and the project diffused its
results and outcomes to the extent of this timeframe, through a wide range of
dissemination tools and in an effective manner. In order to effectively implement in
the market exploitable results produced by the VERITAS project, it was agreed by the
project consortium to extend dissemination efforts over the period of the project
lifespan. Specifically during the period immediately following the termination,
opportunities were planned for the partners to promote the final project results
encouraging their uptake.
Since the consortium consisted of both industry partners and research institutions, the
project was able to establish access to all relevant constituencies, and thus its
dissemination tools have been used in the most effective manner. The dissemination
and exploitation of the results materials produced within VERITAS will be preserved
for at least another year after the projects end via its website.

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A.01 Dissemination Strategy and Consortium Activities


During the lifespan of the project, emphasis has been put on the dissemination
strategy and methodology in order to encourage the use of foreground and the uptake
of the projects outcomes and consequently to maximize industrial and societal
impact. The following critical points were defined to achieve these goals:
Awareness of the projects objectives and results to the wider public
Presentation and discussion of the projects results with its main
constituencies
Implementation of project findings in standards
Publication and discussion of results in the scientific community
It should be noted that VERITAS dissemination plan was not static. On the contrary,
it has been often updated as new opportunities for dissemination appeared.
The dissemination strategy of the project focused on the following target groups:
Industrys and SMEs providers: mainstream ICT and non ICT products
software developers, applications and services providers, telecom companies,
automotive and digital content providers, home and health care industries
especially in the emerging growing field of older people and people with
disabilities care. This target group is very large as it encompasses family
members, disability groups, forums and associations but it can be effectively
reached through the joint forces of the Consortiums large industrial players
and the participating SMEs.
Scientific Community: research and academic organisations, scientific
journals, Committees, Internet Fora and other working groups in fields related
to the VERITAS work. This target group was effectively reached by the
Consortiums prestigious academic organisations.
End-user groups and their Associations: some examples are AGE, which
acts as an umbrella organisation of numerous European and National end-user
Associations and MCA with its established network of related Associations in
the Balkan area. Both of them provided a very wide coverage of this target
group and will act as catalyst for the dissemination of the VERITAS results to
end-users, thus enhancing the projects commercial viability. Certain members
of the Scientific Advisory Board, also assisted the Consortium in reaching this
target group effectively.
Public and Private Insurance Organisations and other Governmental
bodies: these are key actors for the uptake of the VERITAS results, especially
the resulting applications, since in many cases the related service delivery
costs cannot be borne by people with disabilities themselves; on the other
hand these organisations can largely benefit (both in financial and social
terms) from the uptake and financing of VERITAS ICT and non ICT
applications and services. The influence and prestige of the members of the
VERITAS Scientific Advisory Board in combination with their support to the
project, as well as the influence and connections of the Consortiums large
industrial players reached this target group effectively.

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General Public/Public and Opinion Makers: all of the projects


dissemination activities targeted this group as well as the more VERITAS -
specific target groups.
Standards Fora and Open Source Fora: this target group was covered
through the activities of Standardization and Concertation of research actions,
primarily through the creation of the VUMS cluster but also individually as a
project on many occasions.

A.01.1 Raising awareness to a wider public


In order to create and keep alive the awareness of the wider public, the following
dissemination means were used: a web portal, newsletters, user forums, presence in
social networks, a YouTube channel, mailing lists, publications to scientific journals
and books, press releases, printing and dissemination of flyers and posters and of
course participation at major scientific conferences as well as at international
exhibitions with stands or kiosks.
The main communication tool throughout the lifespan of the project has been its
constantly updated website (http://www.veritas-project.eu), whereby the general
public had and will continue having access to all public deliverables, as well as to
presentations, publications, brochures, magazine articles, press releases, and other
relevant information on the projects work, activities and results.
In this respect, the current web portal managed to increase the use and impact of the
projects results, by communicating the various VERITAS dissemination events,
listing all relevant news items, and providing access to up-to-date information on its
results.
It should be noted that the VERITAS website will remain active for at least one year
after the projects completion (December 2014). Thus, the website will continue to be
one of the main diffusion tools for the projects results, outcomes and potential
commercial achievements also in the future.

Figure 96: Screenshots of VERITAS dissemination material (Newsletters, Posters, Leaflets, etc/)
As seen in Figure 96, a number of different dissemination material have been
produced during the project, such as the project logo, leaflets, posters and electronic
newsletters towards diffusing VERITAS progress and achievements to society and
relevant stakeholders.

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Figure 97: Screenshots of the VERITAS website


Furthermore, during the projects lifetime, the consortium dedicated to the
participation in biometric events where regularly organized at well-known exhibition
events such as the ICT events of 2010 and 2013, the JVRC of 2011 where VERITAS
held its 2nd Pan-European workshop and at the ICCHP 2012, where the VUMS
Special Thematic Session was held , whereby VERITAS had the significant
opportunity to promote its innovation to potential users and stakeholders in general
and to establish cooperation with scientific communities
More specifically, the following events were organized for each of the years of the
projects duration:
VERITAS participated in the ICT 2010 networking session Built-in
accessibility assessment and interoperability architectures in products of the
future, which took place on 28 September 2010 at Brussels Expo in Brussels,
Belgium.
The first Pan-European Workshop, User Forum and SAB meeting of
VERITAS took place on 29-30 November 2010 at the Technical University of
Prague (Czech Republic). The first Workshop focused on the more technical
approach/explanation of the aims and objectives of the project. Apart from the
invited end-user groups (both developers/designers, and people with
disabilities and older people), a wider group of stakeholders participated.
The 2nd Pan-European VERITAS User Forum Defining simulation task
models for everyday solutions, designed for all took place on the 20th of
September 2011, and was hosted at the Crown Plaza Hotel, in Nottingham,
UK.
The 2nd Pan-European VERITAS workshop Accessibility Engineering with
User Models, Simulation and VR was organized in the context of the 2011
Joint Virtual Reality Conference on 21 September 2011, Nottingham, UK.

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The second SAB meeting was organised in the forenoon of the 20th September
2011 in Nottingham UK. The SAB members also participated in the User
forum in the afternoon of the same day.
A VUMS Special Thematic Session (STS) was organised at the 13th
International Conference on Computers Helping People with Special Needs,
on July 11-13, 2012 at the University of Linz in Austria.
The 3rd VERITAS User Forum Accessibility design at the service of age-
friendly environments took place on 16 May 2013 hosted at the HUSA
President Park, in Brussels, Belgium.
VERITAS participated in the ICT 2013 Exhibition Event, which took place on
6th to 8th of November, 2013 at LitExpo in Vilnius, Lithuania.
CRF organised a 1-day workshop focused on high-accessibility solutions for
automotive interiors, on 13th December 2013. This event was held in CRF
site, in Orbassano, Italy and included 2 presentations on the achievements of
Veritas in the Automotive sector by CRF and Piaggio. The target audience
comprised 30 engineers and designers that work on present and future
solutions for car interior and motorcycle ergonomics design.
On the 28th November 2013, UPM organized a dissemination workshop to
present VERITAS concepts and tools at the Smart House Living Lab in
Madrid. The mission of the Smart House Living Lab is the research and
development in the Ambient Intelligence context of technology and services
to prevent, care and promote the health and welfare of people, support for
social inclusion and the independent living of fragile and dependent groups, in
all stages of the value chain: training, experimental research, technological
development and technology transfer.
At the 2013 LMS Automotive User Conference held in Munich, Germany on
October 29-30, besides a joint presentation regarding the use of VERITAS on
CAE for motorcycle rider comfort evaluation with Piaggio, a booth dedicated
to Veritas was set up, where the interested attendees have had the opportunity
to take a deep dive into the technology, and to discuss the technical details.
A workshop on cognitive simulation was organized by CERTH/HIT and
CERTH/ITI in cooperation with the project INTERSTRESS. The main topic
was the influence of stress in driving and ways, simulation of stress in HCI
accessibility assessment and techniques to overcome it or mitigate its
consequences, also with the help of ICT. The workshop was performed in
Greek as it addressed an exclusively greek audience (about 20 participants,
mainly doctors and engineers.

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Figure 98: VERITAS participation at major exhibition events


Regarding the scientific exposure of the project, an important part of the
dissemination effort of the project was to make the technical results of the project
known to the wider research community via scientific publications in journals,
magazines or conference proceedings. These articles aimed and managed to raise
awareness for the projects work in the scientific society, which is expressed via a lot
of citations of the VERITAS work and contacts for potential cooperations.
Among the indicators that show the effective dissemination actions of the project
were the leaflets and posters that were produced. These, as an additional
communication channel, aimed at the promotion of project concepts, objectives and
expected outcomes.
In the following Table 25, the summarized dissemination activities are presented in
numbers.
Table 25: Overview of VERITAS dissemination activities

Dissemination action Number/Type

Conference Papers/Posters 52

Articles published in Journals 14

Chapters in books 2

VERITAS Workshops 6

Press releases 9

Summarizing, it must be highlighted that significant efforts have been made by all
participants to disseminate their work towards the finalization of each single
prototypes, but also of the whole VERITAS system. This, in combination with the
dissemination of the 4th years main achievements (i.e. the systems final integration,
the realization of the pilots, the finalization of the individual exploitation plans and
the development of the common business plan) does not only significantly increase
the potential commercialization success of the VERITAS prototypes, but affects the
users acceptance towards the system as well.

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Figure 99: Percentage of project results dissemination via different communication channels

A.01.2 Direct Communication and knowledge management


Additional communication channels of disseminating VERITAS objectives and
scenarios was the member forum and the newsletters, available online at the website
(http://www.veritas-project.eu.) and the deployment of multimedia presentations (e.g.
video) in press, in the website and on both a dedicated YouTube channel as well as
the VUMS Youtube channel.
The biggest dissemination opportunity for the project was undoubtedly the inclusion
of a segment on the project by the Euronews TV Channel On November 2012 on an
episode of the Futuris Science and Technology programme on European science,
research and innovation. Futuris showcases bleeding edge of research and technology
throughout Europe and Euronews is one of the most prominent globally accessed
news channels with viewers in 155 countries in Euronews' eleven broadcasting
languages (English, German, French, Italian, Russian, Spanish, Portuguese, Arabic,
Turkish, Persian and Ukrainian). The report, produced in cooperation with European
Commission, aired for a whole week (22 times) on Euronews during the week
between 13 and 20 November 2012 and is also available in the Futuris segment on the
Euronews website (http://www.euronews.com/2012/11/13/a-world-without-limits/).
The online version of the video has 362 Facebook Likes, 84 Tweets and 38 Google
+1s.
A Twitter account was also created and updated for the better part of the projects
duration. This direct distribution of VERITAS news kept a strong dissemination and
advertisement frame around the project.
The transferring of knowledge via multiple outlets permitted the expansion of this
knowledge providing simultaneously feedback on the projects progress. All the
aforementioned actions had a main aim: to diffuse the project outcomes and
achievements via a constantly updating dissemination tool. This direct
communication mean will be remained in order to ensure that the knowledge
generated by the project will also be diffused in the future.
Furthermore, during the projects lifespan, a series of direct communication among
stakeholders in the accessibility assessment domain has also taken place, in which the

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foreground and knowledge obtained within project have been diffused to the
respective target groups:
Description Date, Place Aim and Outcomes
UniversAAL Open Day 19 January 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Thessaloniki, GR
inCASA Ethical Board 02 February 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Chorleywood, UK
First face-to-face meeting of 09-10 February, 2012 Dissemination to Researchers/
the Model-Based User Kaiserslautern, Germany Developers/ Industry/
Interfaces (MBUI) W3C Standardisation organisations
Working Group.

AGE Council of 14-15 March 2012 and 20- Dissemination to beneficiaries


Administration: 21 November 2012 (both
Brussels)
COFACE Seminar - e- 19 April 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Health: Challenges and Brussels, BE
opportunities for families
AGE General Assembly 10-11 May 2012 Brussels, Dissemination to beneficiaries
BE
ICOST 2012 Conference 12-14 June 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Florence, IT
AGE UAIL expert group 13 June 2012 (Trieste, Dissemination to beneficiaries
Italy) /19 November
2012(Brussels)
Goldenworkers Workshop, 25 June 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
EESC, Brussels Brussels, BE
ICCHP 2012, Linz 09-11 July 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Linz, AT
ERA-AGE Final Conference 11 September 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Brussels, BE
DAEI- Mission Europe 25 September 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Conseil gnral du Val-de-
Marne
DAEI- Mission Europe
Goldenworkers' 3rd 02 October 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Workshop Rome, IT
EIP AHA Conference 06 November 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Brussels, BE
eHealth Acceptance 5-6 November 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Conference - ICT for Health Brussels, BE
Project
AGE thematic seminar on 20 November 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
impact of the crisis Brussels, BE
Closing conference of the 3 December 12 Dissemination to stakeholders
European Year of Active Brussels, BE
Ageing and Solidarity
between Generations 2012
From Visions to Actions: 10 December 12 Dissemination to stakeholders

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Description Date, Place Aim and Outcomes


Closing Conference for the Nicosia, CY
EY 2012
Vodafone Smart 17 December 2012 Dissemination to wide public
Accessibility Awards Brussels, BE and designers, developers of
accessible apps
Kick-off Meeting: Social 21.02.2013 ; Brussels VERITAS brochures presented
Innovations in Active and Healthy during the Kick-off meeting of the
Ageing King Badouin Foundations led
project on Social Innovation
AgeingWell newsletter n.2 25.02.2013, EU VERITAS introduced at
http://www.ict-ageingwell.net/
APSIS4all Advisory Board 11-12.03.2013 Barcelona Building synergies with the activities
meeting of the APSIS4all project, in particular
in terms of beneficiaries views, links
with policymaking on accessibility
and standardization.
Seminar on Seniors entrepreneurs 30.05.2013 Brussels VERITAS brochures presented at the
in support of youth employment seminar
Active and Healthy Ageing 13-14.06.2013 Dublin Dissemination the VERITAS solution
Summit in high level event on active and
healthy ageing
GOACT Conference 16-17.06.2013 Brussels VERITAS brochures presented at the
seminar
GSMA Mobile Meeting Series 26.06.2013 Brussels VERITAS project and brochures
Breakfast Personalised Health presented at the seminar
ICT Standardisation Platform 13.06.2013 Brussels Ensure links with the activities of the
ICT Standardisation Platform, in
particular initiatives related to
accessibility
Digital Agenda for Europe 20.07.2013- Brussels VERITAS brochures presented at the
event
Confrontation Europe, eHealth 09.07.2013 Brussels VERITAS brochures presented at the
Task Force event
ENGAGED User Empowerment 23.10.2013 Eindhoven VERITAS brochures presented at the
Mutual Learning Workshop workshop
Giving Smart Seniors Access to 12.11.2013 Brussels VERITAS brochures presented at the
Smart Technologies event
WIDER Innovation Fair 20.11.2013 Barcelona Establish VERITAS as a good
practice example in the area of age-
friendly innovation, for SMEs.

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A.01.3 Standardization and International Impact


International standardisation is a complex and difficult undertaking. Much of the
VUMS cluster work was targeted towards the active contribution to international
standardisation. In order to better understand the remarkable achievements of the
VUMS standardisation activities, it is necessary to understand the major challenges
and pitfalls of standardisation within research projects:
Time consuming
. Most relevant working groups work on the basis of two official meeting per year.
All standardisation activities rely on a process of sometimes hard-earned consensus.
Starting and finalizing a new standardisation project often takes about five years. The
VUMS cluster, however, started with an expected lifetime of less than three years.
For this reason, it was clear that starting and finalizing a new own initiative is not
feasible and that contributing to an already running standardisation activity will be
much more efficient.
Consensus with other experts
The VUMS cluster was clearly a European initiative. Despite the many researchers
and working groups in the world who deal with user modelling, the strong emphasis
on user models for simulation of accessibility problems during design-time (as
addressed by VUMS) is not that big topic in current international research and
development. Moreover, the VUMS combination of user models for simulation and
UI adaptation was unique world- wide. This made it difficult for the VUMS cluster to
find relevant existing standardisation groups to approve our approaches and results.
As a consequence, our standardisation activities can be regarded as subdivided into
two subsequent stages of a longer process with changing objectives and priorities:
1. The first stage is marked by intense and focused effort to develop a strong
position for VUMS models and approaches as a basis for later discussions
with standardisation stakeholders. The result of this first stage was the
VUMS White Paper .
2. In the second stage, it is important to broadly spread the results and to make
compromises in order to influence on-going standardisation activities. In this
stage, publications have been prepared; demonstrations have been
implemented at conferences and contacts have been established. We took a
broad strategy with more than one target in order to minimize the risk of dead
ends.
Figure 100 provides an overview of the most important standardization efforts of the
VUMS cluster. ISO and W3C have been targeted as they have been identified as the
most promising platforms for VUMS standardization. VUMS documents, especially
the VUMS White Paper serve as the major input and basis for discussions with
relevant standardisation bodies. In order to assure sustainability after the VUMS
projects lifetimes, liaisons with other projects- especially the Cloud4All project
have been established. The details of this figure are described in the following
sections.

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Figure 100: Standardization efforts of the VUMS cluster

A.02 Community added value and contribution to EU policies


objective
The main policy issues that are related to the work performed in VERITAS have been
identified and followed throughout the duration of the project. Here some brief
information is presented regarding the main legal instruments, the ongoing and
upcoming EU policy developments, the general challenges and the issues that are of
particular interest for VERITAS.

(i) Main legal instruments


1. The Charter of Fundamental Rights which ensures both protection in
decision making and its implementation at the national level

2. The Employment Directive prohibits discrimination as well as harassment


and instruction to discriminate. All employers must provide reasonable
accommodation for people with disabilities, which means that disabled
people have a right to get adaptations to the workplace in order to be able to
fulfil their job. Many Member States have had to substantially amend their
national law to comply with employment regulations.

3. The UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities also ratified


by the European Union, makes it compulsory for all EU actions to mainstream
the needs of persons with disabilities including older people. The Convention
places obligations on member states and European institutions to apply it in
practice. The rights recognised by the Convention cover almost all policy
fields from justice to transport, from employment to information technology,
from social to health policy. Accordingly implementation of the Convention
needs to be part of a strategic approach to disability.

(ii) European policy developments


1. The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP

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AHA) will seek to create the supportive environment needed to promote


healthy and active ageing and to develop innovative solutions for the ageing
population. It will set an excellent framework to engage a wider range of
stakeholders across the EU to work together on the promotion of active and
healthy ageing, a key objective of the Europe 2020 Strategy and the theme of
the recently announced European Year 2012.

2. The European Year 2012 on Active Ageing (EY 2012) shares the same
objective as the EIP AHA: it will seek to engage a wide range of stakeholders
(public authorities, the business sector, social actors, civil society
organisations) to commit to supporting active ageing. The EY 2012 and the
EIP AHA will play very complementary roles: while the objectives of the EY
2012 are to get all relevant stakeholders to take a political commitment to act,
the EIP AHA should provide the means and resources to translate these
commitments into reality in a coherent and sustainable way. These two EU
processes should be mutually reinforcing to avoid a waste of energies and
resources.

3. The European Disability Strategy (2010-2020) is meant to eliminate barriers


in everyday life (accessibility, participation, equality, employment, education
and training, social protection, health, external relations) and encourage
member governments to work together in removing obstacles to inclusion. It
will also fulfil the EU's commitment to the UN Convention on the Rights of
Persons with Disabilities. The strategy's targets for the first five years include:

devising policies for inclusive, high-quality education;

ensuring the European Platform Against Poverty includes a special


focus on people with disabilities. The forum brings together experts
who share best practices and experience;

working towards the recognition of disability cards throughout the EU


to ensure equal treatment when working, living or travelling in the EU;

developing accessibility standards for voting premises and campaign


material;

taking the rights of people with disabilities into account in external


development programmes and for EU candidate countries.

4. The European Digital Agenda acknowledges accessibility as a major


challenge for European citizens and proposes among others to review current
legislatives initiatives under this spectrum.

5. The Urban mobility Action Plan can be used to improve accessibility of the
urban built environment and transport.

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(iii) Upcoming policy developments


The commission intends to establish a "European Accessibility Act", which
would set EU Ilegislative measures for goods and services. In 2012 a
consultation was closed. The European Accessibility Act is expected
according to the background document of the consultation2 a proposal for a
Directive to improve the market of goods and services that are accessible for
persons with disabilities and elderly persons, based on a design for al
approach. This business friendly initiative will include binding measures to
promote procurement and harmonisation of accessibility standards.

Negotiations and work on Mandate 376 related to accessibility standards for


ICT goods and services are almost finished.

Ongoing effort of the European Standardisation Bodies (CEN-CENELEC and


ETSI)to implement Standardisation Mandate 420 on accessibility to the built
environment

The work on Mandate 473 has begun. This mandate aims at including
accessibility following "Design for all" (or Universal Design) in relevant
mainstream standards and to develop process standards for manufactures and
services providers on how to include accessibility in their product
development cycle and service provision. This Mandate addresses
accessibility in the sense of article 4 (f) of the UNCRPD. The work is just at
the beginning.

Technical Specification on Interoperability - Persons with reduced mobility


(TSI PRM)
From beginning 2011, the European Railway Agency is running a working
group to review the TSI PRM. The group is composed of representatives of
national safety agencies for railway, railway companies, industries providing
coaches and other rolling stock material and societal stakeholders. A first draft
was issued in December 2012 and submitted to a public consultation.
The ICT Standardisation Platform: The decision to set up this platform was
taken by the European Commission on November 28h, 2011. The tasks of the
platform are to advise the Commission on all matters related to European ICT
standardisation policy, on ICT standardisation work programme, on possible
standardisation mandates, on technical specifications in the field of ICT, on
cooperation between standards development organisations and European
standardisation bodies to improve the integration of their work in European
ICT standardisation and ensure availability of ICT standards supporting
interoperability, on other initiatives that may be taken at European level to
address barriers to ICT interoperability, including the need for interoperability
testing. The Platform is composed of Member States and EFTA countries
representatives, standards setting organizations representatives and Industry

2
http://ec.europa.eu/justice/discrimination/files/2011-12-13_consultation_background_document.pdf

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and Societal stakeholders representatives.

The Commission proposed rules to make public sector websites accessible for
all.

A.03 Societal Implications of the project


VERITAS provides methods and tools to design accessible or inclusive products. The
resources are open and freely available. How can industry be motivated to use those
resources? Shall and can their application be politically enforced?
It does not fit into current legal and standardisation frameworks to prescribe the
development tools for industry. Since the provision with software tools is a business
of the software industries such an approach would also lead to conflicts with
competition regulations. Moreover Europe strives for business friendly accessibility
regulations.
In consequence more incentive- or added-value-oriented ways need to be found.
Certification or self-certification could be a solution. This would help the actors on
the market to communicate more efficiently. However this will only have an effect if
a common standard is introduced which gains an appropriate awareness.
Fragmentation has to be avoided.
VERITAS allows for optimising products for a wide variety of special needs and
disabilities. Design for user groups with special needs might however not be
economically reasonable. This is in particular the case, if development expenses and
costs per piece will reduce the profit or increase the price to an extent not accepted by
the (mass) market. How can these economic needs be considered in Design for All
policy? Shall this be left to the manufacturer or be regulated? How can a
manufacturer be assisted by standards and guidelines or other means to act
appropriately? Which could be potential and effective incentives?
The Design for All approach looks helpful for all. Manufacturers increase their
potential markets and more users will find appropriate products on the market.
However, it is only a general principle, which will not lead to covering everybodys
needs with every product. Designing for all is not designing for everybody. Design
conflicts will occur and products which adapt to really everybody will result in
extremely high costs and prices. VERITAS tools will allow telling precisely who will
be excluded from using a product under development. But what is acceptable and
what is necessary? A kind of ethically acceptable cost-benefit analysis is needed for
the manufacturer.
But from the political point of view there exists a legitimate interest also of small
minorities to find appropriate products on the markets. On the other hand industry is
interested only in profitable business. As long as additional costs do not occur for the
manufacturers or these additional costs can be expected to be balanced by the margin
of the additional turnover generated from those minorities, investment in design for
special needs is economically justified.
In this case the burden on a European enterprise can be accepted without reducing
competitiveness compared to other global actors. But this is only true if not other
economic key factors such as longer time-to-market are influenced negatively.

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Politically there is an interest to exploit all self-financing measures, even if they do


not seem attractive, because they do not generate additional profit. Therefore an
appropriate incentive system with monetary or additional benefits is needed. The
latter could include a better public image of the company or a contribution to ethical
claims such as corporate social responsibility.
The following tables provide a) list of peer reviewed publications (A1) that are
related to the foreground of the VERITAS project, the papers/posters/demos in
Conferences and the other events and dissemination activities performed within
VERITAS, respectively. The purpose of these templates is to demonstrate all the
activities of the project from the beginning until the end of it.

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Table 26: List of Conferences/User Forums/Workshops/Event participation


Presentation title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact (high / medium / low) Dissemination event:
(if applicable) beneficiaries / end- Key (K) or regular (R)
users /
stakeholders
Already attended Reach Reach Reach to Reach
to end- to developers to
users researc applic
hers ation
domai
ns/ind
ustry
Poster presentation 27-28-29 October IX Congresso Nazionale Ergonomia, Designers X X X R
(Caterina Calefato, 2010 valore sociale e sostenibilit developers,
Luca Minin, Rome, Italy Poster presentation researchers,
Francesco Tesauri, industry players
A design
framework for
accessibility
based upon
virtual reality:
the VERITAS
project)
VERITAS 27-29 September ICT 2010 Designers X X X K
networking session 2010 developers,
Brussels Expo, researchers,
Brussels, Belgium industry players
Poster presentation 4-7 October 2010 SIAMOC 2010 X X R
by UNITN Ferrara, Italy
Manfred 29th June 1st July pHealth 2011 (8th International Designers X X X K
Dangelmaier, 2011 Conference on Wearable Micro and developers,
Human Models Lyon, France Nano Technologies for Personal researchers,
for Accessible Health) industry players
and Personalized

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Presentation title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact (high / medium / low) Dissemination event:
(if applicable) beneficiaries / end- Key (K) or regular (R)
users /
stakeholders
Already attended Reach Reach Reach to Reach
to end- to developers to
users researc applic
hers ation
domai
ns/ind
ustry
Products: The
VUMS Project
Cluster and
VERITAS
Human Solutions 20 September 2011 RAMSIS (user conference) Researchers X X K
presented progress Kaiserslautern, Developers
and relevant tools Germany Industry
VERITAS.
VERITAS User 20 September 2011 VERITAS User forum Researchers X X X R
forum Nottingham, United Developers
Kingdom Beneficiaries
VERITAS 21 September 2011 JVRC 2011 Researchers X X X R
workshop Nottingham, United Developers
Kingdom Industry
VERITAS virtual 09-10 February, First face-to-face meeting of the Researchers X X K
user model 2012 Model-Based User Interfaces (MBUI) Developers
structure has been Kaiserslautern, W3C Working Group. Industry
presented Germany Through the activities of the MBUI Standardisation
W3C group, the VERITAS project will organisations
try to standardize the structure of the
virtual user model. Further refinements
that will be proposed by the MBUI
group will be integrated in the virtual
user model.

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Table 27: List of Other Event participation


Description Date, Place Aim and Outcomes
UniversAAL Open Day 19 January 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Thessaloniki, GR
inCASA Ethical Board 02 February 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Chorleywood, UK
First face-to-face meeting of 09-10 February, 2012 Dissemination to Researchers/ Developers/ Industry/
the Model-Based User Kaiserslautern, Germany Standardisation organisations
Interfaces (MBUI) W3C
Working Group.

AGE Council of 14-15 March 2012 and 20-21 Dissemination to beneficiaries


Administration: November 2012 (both Brussels)

COFACE Seminar - e- 19 April 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders


Health: Challenges and Brussels, BE
opportunities for families
AGE General Assembly 10-11 May 2012 Brussels, BE Dissemination to beneficiaries
ICOST 2012 Conference 12-14 June 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Florence, IT
AGE UAIL expert group 13 June 2012 (Trieste, Italy) /19 Dissemination to beneficiaries
November 2012(Brussels)
Goldenworkers Workshop, 25 June 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
EESC, Brussels Brussels, BE
ICCHP 2012, Linz 09-11 July 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Linz, AT
ERA-AGE Final Conference 11 September 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Brussels, BE

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Description Date, Place Aim and Outcomes


DAEI- Mission Europe 25 September 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Conseil gnral du Val-de-Marne
DAEI- Mission Europe
Goldenworkers' 3rd 02 October 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Workshop Rome, IT
EIP AHA Conference 06 November 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Brussels, BE
eHealth Acceptance 5-6 November 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
Conference - ICT for Health Brussels, BE
Project
AGE thematic seminar on 20 November 2012 Dissemination to stakeholders
impact of the crisis Brussels, BE
Closing conference of the 3 December 12 Dissemination to stakeholders
European Year of Active Brussels, BE
Ageing and Solidarity
between Generations 2012
From Visions to Actions: 10 December 12 Dissemination to stakeholders
Closing Conference for the Nicosia, CY
EY 2012
Vodafone Smart 17 December 2012 Dissemination to wide public and designers, developers of accessible apps
Accessibility Awards Brussels, BE
Kick-off Meeting: Social 21.02.2013 ; Brussels VERITAS brochures presented during the Kick-off meeting of the King Badouin Foundations led
Innovations in Active and Healthy project on Social Innovation
Ageing
AgeingWell newsletter n.2 25.02.2013, EU VERITAS introduced at http://www.ict-ageingwell.net/
APSIS4all Advisory Board 11-12.03.2013 Barcelona Building synergies with the activities of the APSIS4all project, in particular in terms of
meeting beneficiaries views, links with policymaking on accessibility and standardization.

Seminar on Seniors entrepreneurs 30.05.2013 Brussels VERITAS brochures presented at the seminar
in support of youth employment

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Description Date, Place Aim and Outcomes


Active and Healthy Ageing 13-14.06.2013 Dublin Dissemination the VERITAS solution in high level event on active and healthy ageing
Summit
GOACT Conference 16-17.06.2013 Brussels VERITAS brochures presented at the seminar
GSMA Mobile Meeting Series 26.06.2013 Brussels VERITAS project and brochures presented at the seminar
Breakfast Personalised Health
ICT Standardisation Platform 13.06.2013 Brussels Ensure links with the activities of the ICT Standardisation Platform, in particular initiatives related
to accessibility
Digital Agenda for Europe 20.07.2013- Brussels VERITAS brochures presented at the event
Confrontation Europe, eHealth 09.07.2013 Brussels VERITAS brochures presented at the event
Task Force
ENGAGED User Empowerment 23.10.2013 Eindhoven VERITAS brochures presented at the workshop
Mutual Learning Workshop
Giving Smart Seniors Access to 12.11.2013 Brussels VERITAS brochures presented at the event
Smart Technologies
WIDER Innovation Fair 20.11.2013 Barcelona Establish VERITAS as a good practice example in the area of age-friendly innovation, for SMEs.

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Table 28: List of Conference Papers/Posters


Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to
stakeholders conferences and workshops innovation in the area
Added value
(technological - T,
social - S,
methodological issues -
M)
Already attended High Medium Low
Ivo Maly, Michal 15-17 February In Proceedings of the IASTED International Developers X T
Hapala, Jiri Bittner 2012. Innsbruck, Conference Assistive Technologies (AT 2012), pp. Researchers
and Pavel Slavik, Austria 835-841, Acta Press, 2012, DOI: Beneficiaries
On Tools for Game 10.2316/P.2012.766-008
Interaction
Analysis
Anne-Sophie Parent, 12-15 June 2012 10th International Conference On Smart X S
Nena Georgantzi, Artimino, Italy homes and health Telematics, ICOST 2012
Ilenia Gheno,
Ensuring A
Fruitful Future to
Innovation And
Research: Practical
Guidance for the
Involvement of
Older People in
Research
Athanasios Tsakiris, 12-15 June 2012 10th International Conference On Smart X S
Panagiotis Artimino, Italy homes and health Telematics, ICOST 2012
Moschonas,
Konstantinos
Moustakas and
Dimitrios Tzovaras,
An Open
Framework For

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to
stakeholders conferences and workshops innovation in the area
Added value
(technological - T,
social - S,
methodological issues -
M)
Already attended High Medium Low
Immersive And
Non-Immersive
Accessibility
Simulation For
Smart Living
Spaces
Michele 26-28 June 2012 pHealth 2012, 9th International Conference on Developers X T, M
Confalonieri, Porto, Portugal Wearable Micro and Nano Technologies for Researchers
Giovanni Personalized Health Industry
Guandalini, Mauro
Da Lio, Mariolino
De Cecco, Force
And Touch Make
Video Games
Serious For
Dexterity
Rehabilitation
Polek O., Mkovec Innsbruck, Austria, IASTED International Conference Assistive 100+ X
Z., Slavk P. 2012. Technologies (AT 2012)
Predictive Scanning
Keyboard
Oparated by
Hissing
Polek O., Sporka Linz, Austria, 2012. Computers Helping People with Special Needs. 100+ X
A., Mkovec Z.
Measuring
Performance of a

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to
stakeholders conferences and workshops innovation in the area
Added value
(technological - T,
social - S,
methodological issues -
M)
Already attended High Medium Low
Predictive
Keyboard
Operated by
Humming
Mal I., Bittner J., Linz, Austria, 2012. Computers Helping People with Special Needs. 100+ X
and Slavk P., Using
Annotated Task
Models for
Accessibility
Evaluation
Nikolaos Kaklanis, 11-13July 2012 ICCHP 2012 Researchers X T, M
Konstantinos Linz, Austria Developers
Moustakas and Beneficiaries
Dimitrios Tzovaras,
A methodology for
generating virtual
user models of
elderly and
disabled for the
accessibility
assessment of new
products
Eleni Chalkia, 17-20 July 2012 IMETI 2012 X M
Evangelos Bekiaris, Orlando, Florida,
Virtual and USA
augmented
environments and

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to
stakeholders conferences and workshops innovation in the area
Added value
(technological - T,
social - S,
methodological issues -
M)
Already attended High Medium Low
realistic user
interactions to
achieve embedded
accessibility
designs, the
VERITAS project
Use Cases
methodological
framework and
outcomes
Hunor Erdelyi, 17-19 September The biennial ISMA conference on Noise and X T, M
Matteo Kirchner, 2012, Leuven, Vibration Engineering ISMA2012 in conjunction
Simone Manzato, Belgium, with USD2012
Stijn Donders,
Multibody
simulation with a
virtual dummy for
motorcycle
vibration comfort
assessment
Sulzmann, Frank; 21-25 July 2012, International Conference on Applied Human Factors 100+ X T
Melcher, Vivien; San Francisco, and Ergonomics, AHFE 2012. CD-ROM
Diederichs, Frederik; California
Sayar, Rafael,
Modular
dashboard for
flexible in car HMI

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to
stakeholders conferences and workshops innovation in the area
Added value
(technological - T,
social - S,
methodological issues -
M)
Already attended High Medium Low
testing
P. Moschonas, A. 20th conference on User Modeling, Adaptation, and 100+ X T, M
Tsakiris, N. Personalization, UMAP, 2012.
Kaklanis, G.
Stavropoulos, and D.
Tzovaras, Holistic
accessibility
evaluation using
VR simulation of
users with special
needs
Panagiotis October 17th, 2012 International Workshop on Personalisable Media 50+ X T, M
Moschonas, in Istanbul, Turkey Systems & Smart Accessibility
Athanasios Tsakiris,
Ioannis Paliokas, and
Dimitrios Tzovaras,
User Interfaces
Accessibility
Assessment Using
Virtual User
Models
N. Biasi, F. Setti, M. Lugano, 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on 3D 100+ X T, M
Tavernini, A. Switzerland, 16-17 Body Scanning Technologies
Fornaser, M. October 2012
Lunardelli, M. Da
Lio, M. De Cecco,
Low-cost garment-

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to
stakeholders conferences and workshops innovation in the area
Added value
(technological - T,
social - S,
methodological issues -
M)
Already attended High Medium Low
based 3D body
scanner
Carlo Mancuso, Toledo, Spain, 14- International Conference on Neurorehabilitation 100+ X T, M
Gianluca De Toma 16 November 2012 2012
and Rita Paradiso, http://www.icnr2012.org/
Wearable
Electrogoniometer
for Knee Joint
Parameters
Capture"

P. Moschonas, A. Vilamoura, Association for the Advancement of Assistive 100+ X T, M


Tsakiris, D. Algarve, Portugal, Technology in Europe, 12th European AAATE
Tzovaras, 19-22 September Conference, AAATE 2013
"Automatic 2013
Kinodynamic
Wheelchair
Modelling for
Architectural
Design Accessibility
Assessment"
Frank Sulzmann, 21 - 26 July HCI International 2013 100+ X T, M
Roland Blach, 2013, Las
Manfred
Dangelmaier, An
Vegas, Nevada,
Integration USA
Framework for

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to
stakeholders conferences and workshops innovation in the area
Added value
(technological - T,
social - S,
methodological issues -
M)
Already attended High Medium Low
motion and visually
impaired virtual
humans in
interactive
immersive
environments
Laura Boffi, Monica 6-10 March 2013, AD/PD 2013 - The 11th International Conference +100 X S
Milani and Romina Florence , Italy on Alzheimer's & Parkinson's disease, Beneficiaries
Catani (Indesit) http://www2.kenes.com/adpd2013/Pages/Home.aspx /Practitioners
Marco Fontana
(Percro),
Supporting the
Design of Products
Accessible by
Parkinson People
through Physical
Simulation of
Tremor: An
Experiment with
Gas Hob
Manzato, S., Sesimbra, Portugal, ICEDyn 2013, International Conference on +100 X T, M
Kirchner, M., 17-19 June 2013 Structural Engineering Dynamics,
Erdlyi, H., Baglini,
G., Pieve, M.,
Numerical and
Operational
Identification and

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to
stakeholders conferences and workshops innovation in the area
Added value
(technological - T,
social - S,
methodological issues -
M)
Already attended High Medium Low
Assessment of
Motorcycle
Dynamics and
Comfort
A. Tsakiris, P. Vilamoura, Association for the Advancement of Assistive +100 X T,M
Moschonas, N. Algarve, Portugal, Technology in Europe, 12th European AAATE
Kaklanis, I. Paliokas, 19-22 September Conference, AAATE 2013
G. Stavropoulos, D. 2013
Tzovaras, Cognitive
Impairments
Simulation in a
Holistic GUI
Accessibility
Assessment
Framework
Kaklanis, N., Votis, 15 July 2013, RDWG Symposium on User Modeling for +100 X T, M
K., Tzovaras, D. Online Symposium Accessibility, 2013
Personalised web
accessibility
assessment using
virtual user models,
Guidotti, Calefato, October 16-18, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe +50 X M
Landini, Minin, 2013, Torino, Italy Chapter 2013
Catani, & Milani,
User requirements
for supporting the
accessible design

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to
stakeholders conferences and workshops innovation in the area
Added value
(technological - T,
social - S,
methodological issues -
M)
Already attended High Medium Low
process: Survey &
user test results in
the framework of
VERITAS project

Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to innovation
stakeholders conferences and workshops in the area
Added value (technological
- T, social - S,
methodological issues - M)
Sceduled/To present papers/publications High Medium Low
Dangelmaier, M., 3-6 June 2014, The R&D Management Conference +50 X T, M
Tzovaras, D. Blach, Stuttgart, Germany 2014 (accepted)
R., C. and Tsakiris,
T., Accessibility
Engineering
Simulation and User
Experience Tools
for Designing
Products for All
Panagiotis Oldenburg, Germany, 2nd Patient Rehabilitation Research +100 ,
Moschonas, Ioannis 20-23 May, 2014 Technologies Workshop,
Paliokas, Dimitrios PervasiveHealth 2014 (submitted)
Tzovaras, Automatic
Accessibility

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to innovation
stakeholders conferences and workshops in the area
Added value (technological
- T, social - S,
methodological issues - M)
Sceduled/To present papers/publications High Medium Low
Assessment using
Virtual User Models
for Office
Environments
Athanasios Tsakiris, 22 - 27 June 2014, HCI International 2014 (accepted) +100 X M, T
Ioannis Paliokas, Crete, Greece
Dimitrios Tzovaras ,
Simulation-Based
Accessibility
Evaluation of
Graphical User
Interfaces using
Virtual User Models
Ioannis Paliokas, 22 - 27 June 2014, HCI International 2014 (accepted) +100 X M, T
Athanasios Tsakiris, Crete, Greece
Athanasios Vidalis,
Dimitrios Tzovaras
Sense of Presence
and Metacognition
Enhancement in
Virtual Reality
Exposure Therapy
in the Treatment of
Social Phobias and
the Fear of Flying

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to innovation
stakeholders conferences and workshops in the area
Added value (technological
- T, social - S,
methodological issues - M)
Sceduled/To present papers/publications High Medium Low
Ioannis Paliokas, 22 - 27 June 2014, HCI International 2014 (accepted) +100 X M, T
Panagiotis Crete, Greece
Moschonas,
Athanasios Tsakiris,
Dimitrios Tzovaras,
Evaluation of a
Virtual User
Modeling
Framework on
Automatic
Accessibility
Assessment: a Case
Study on Workplace
Design

Panagiotis Aalborg, Denmark, 7- 22nd Conference on User Modeling, +100 X M, T


Moschonas, Ioannis 11 July 2014 Adaptation and Personalization,
Paliokas, Thanos UMAP2014 (accepted)
Tsakiris and
Dimitrios Tzovaras,
Evaluation of the
VERITAS
Framework on
Automatic
Accessibility
Assessment of
Workplace Designs

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to innovation
stakeholders conferences and workshops in the area
Added value (technological
- T, social - S,
methodological issues - M)
Sceduled/To present papers/publications High Medium Low
Using Virtual User
Models
Ioannis Paliokas, Aalborg, Denmark, 7- 22nd Conference on User Modeling, +100 X M, T
Athanasios Tsakiris, 11 July 2014 Adaptation and Personalization,
Dimitrios Tzovaras, UMAP2014 (accepted)
Automatic
Accessibility
Assessment Using
Virtual User Models
for Infotainment
User Interfaces
Spyridonis, F., Como, Italy, 27-29 12th International Working +100 X T, M
Moschonas, P., May 2014 Conference on Advanced Visual
Touliou, K., Tsakiris, Interfaces (ACM AVI 14) (accepted)
A., Ghinea, G.
Erdelyi, H., Manzato, Budapest, Hungary, Tenth International Symposium on +100 X T,M
S., Donders, S., Van May 19-23, 2014 Tools and Methods of Competitive
der Auweraer, H. Engineering (TMCE 2014) (accepted)
Pieve, M., An
integrated CAE
solution for
motorcycle rider
comfort evaluation
considering Virtual
User Models
P. Moschonas, A. 29th March 2014, IEEEVR 2014 (accepted) +100 X T,M
Tsakiris, D. Minneapolis,
Tzovaras, Product Minnesota, USA
Accessibility

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Paper title Date, Place Event and other data Targeted Impact and importance of Contribution to innovation
stakeholders conferences and workshops in the area
Added value (technological
- T, social - S,
methodological issues - M)
Sceduled/To present papers/publications High Medium Low
Evaluation using
Virtual User
Models, research
demo, (to appear)

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Table 29: List of Journal/Book Publications


Author(s) Title of paper Journal details (Vol. Date Impact and importance of journals
no./Page ref.)
Already published High Medium Low
M. De Cecco, M. Joint Measurement Of Computer Standards 2012 X
Confalonieri, G. Force And Position For & Interfaces
Guandalini, M. Da Lio Accessibility
Quantification
N. Kaklanis, P. Virtual User Modeling EIDD / Fundacion 2012 X
Moschonas, K. Moustakas, for Simulated ONCE Book Project
D. Tzovaras Accessibility and Design for All in
Ergonomy Evaluation Action The
for Inclusive Products European
of the Future Experience
Nikolaos Kaklanis, Virtual User Models Special Issue of 2012 X
Panagiotis Moschonas, for the elderly and IJUAIS
Konstantinos Moustakas disabled for automatic "Accessibility aspects
and Dimitrios Tzovaras simulated accessibility in UIDLs"
and ergonomy International Journal
evaluation of designs, "Universal Access in
the Information
Society", Springer
(http://www.springer.
com/computer/hci/jou
rnal/10209)
M. De Cecco, M. Joint Measurement Of Computer Standards 2012 X
Confalonieri, G. Force And Position For & Interfaces Journal
Guandalini, K. Van Accessibility
Isacker, M. Da Lio Quantification

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Author(s) Title of paper Journal details (Vol. Date Impact and importance of journals
no./Page ref.)
Miroslav Macik, Do temporary SIGCHI Bulletin, 2012 X
Adam J. Sporka, disabilities require May 2012
Pavel Slavk, specific UI design?

Dangelmaier, M. Immersive Chapter XVI in 2013 X


Accessibility Engineering
Engineering - Management
Designing Inclusive Challenges for the
Products Future, pp. 273-283,
H.-J. Bullinger & D.
Spath (Eds.),
published by Faculty
of Technical Sciences
(Novi Sad, Serbia),
Fraunhofer IAO
(Stuttgart, Germany)
and DAAAM
International (Vienna,
Austria), ISBN 978-
3-902734-01-3
Biswas, P., Kaklanis, N., An Interoperable and A Multimodal End-2- 2013 X
Mohamad, Y., Peissner, Inclusive User End Approach to
M., Langdon, P., Tzovaras, Modeling concept for Accessible
D., Jung, C. Simulation and Computing, Human
Adaptation Computer Interaction
Series 2013, pp. 195-
236, Springer 2013
(Book)
http://link.springer.co
m/chapter/10.1007%
2F978-1-4471-5082-
4_10#

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Author(s) Title of paper Journal details (Vol. Date Impact and importance of journals
no./Page ref.)
Kaklanis, N., Biswas, P., Towards Journal: Universal Under review X
Mohamad, Y., Gonzalez, Standardization of User Access in the
M.F., Peissner, M., Models for Simulation Information Society,
Langdon, P., Tzovaras, D., and Adaptation Special Issue: 3rd
Jung, C, Purposes generation
accessibility:
Information and
Communication
Technologies towards
universal access,
Springer (under
review)
Kaklanis, N., Modeling motor Journal: User Under review X
Stavropoulos, G., disabilities of people Modeling and User-
Tzovaras, D. through regression Adapted Interaction,
analysis for the The Journal of
development of Personalization
accurate virtual user Research (under
models review)
Segouli, S., Paliokas, I., Exploring the Influence Journal: American Under review X
Tzovaras, D., Tsakiris, A., of MCI and Journal of
Tsolaki, M., Related Diseases on Alzheimer's Disease
Karagiannidis, C. Robust Cognitive & Other
Virtual User Model Dementias (under
Development review)
Planned journal and book publications
S. Segouli, I. Paliokas, A. Enabling accessibility Book: IGI Topic Accepted, to appear X
Tsakiris, M. Tsolaki, K. features in enhanced Selections (accepted,
Votis, D. Tzovaras, VR environments for to appear)
supporting spatial
abilities and social
interaction in elderly
and MCI patients

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Author(s) Title of paper Journal details (Vol. Date Impact and importance of journals
no./Page ref.)
Panagiotis Moschonas, Virtual Human Factors Journal: Transactions submitted X
Dimitrios Tzovaras for Product on Occupational
Ergonomics Evaluation Ergonomics and
Human Factors
(Taylor & Francis)
journal
Georgios Stavropoylos, A Multi-Sensorial Journal: Medical submitted X
Dimitrios Tzovaras, Platform framework, Engineering and
Andrea Cesarini, for measuring Physics
Mariolino De Cecco, physiological human
Mauro Da Lio parameters
A. Tsakiris, P. Moschonas, Cognitive Impairments Journal: Technology submitted X
N. Kaklanis, I. Paliokas, Simulation in GUI and Disability
G. Stavropoulos, D. Accessibility
Tzovaras, Assessment using
Virtual User Models

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Section B. Exploitation of results


B.01 Exploitation of results
Regarding the exploitation of the results, the individual exploitation plans of each
partner and product, along with the framework for the collaborative use of foreground
have been included in the final version of the Exploitation and business plans and
CBA&CEA Deliverables as well as in the VERITAS Final Exploitation Agreement,
as they have been defined and agreed upon between the Consortiums partners. Thus,
the ownership of the project results, outline potential exploitation scenarios defined,
along with the scope of the separate commercial exploitation agreements that will
need to take place have been identified.
The following sections outline the actual exploitable foreground that composes the
final VERITAS products, present in details the plan for further exploiting the project
achievements and a credible strategy based on a common business plan towards
potential commercialization of the results. Moreover, a set of further activities
foreseen beyond the lifetime of the project in terms of research and standardization
priorities have been identified, aiming among others to further promote the project
foreground.

B.01.1 Exploitation foreground


The business exploitation of VERITAS outcomes that is considered by the
Consortium as the most realistic one and the most potentially rich of effects on the
economic and business level is to use the pieces of knowledge, the software, the
hardware, and the human expertise cumulated during the VERITAS project
(foreground), or in some cases previously (background), as resources to organize and
offer to the market a complete consultancy service for designing products that are
accessible to older people and people with disabilities.
This is thought to be the most realistic and impacting exploitation of VERITAS assets
because it permits to offer to the market a value proposition combining two strong
points of VERITAS research outputs. The strengths are the availability of some tools
that are market- ready or almost market- ready, so having a value that is relatively
easy to demonstrate to customers, and the availability of a large and complete set of
basic technologies that can be used to study and answer new complex needs that
manufacturers could have when facing the objective of designing accessible products.
The consultancy service is thought to be the right way to deliver value to customers,
instead of the one-shot sale of a mere software/handbook/hardware tool because of the
complexity of the problems of accessible design and because of the complexity of use
of the tools that the VERITAS consortium can offer the market to cope with these
problems. The provided consultancy services will be:
Table 30:VERITAS main exploitable services

Services/Solutions How Why


Technical solution and By offering an easily implementable The use of VERITAS at early
Guidelines software architecture embedded in design and development
Provide and help the use of the design and development stage, when costs are
VERITAS toolkits in the environments used by compatible and accessibility

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Services/Solutions How Why


design process. designers/developers. Support is also solutions by design can be
provided by means of guides and found, is much more cost
process handbook. effective than adopting after
market or through
adaptations. Lessons learnt
allow overcoming
implementation difficulties.

Organisational and By offering a set of theoretical and Cover an universal potential


Technical consultancy practical tools that can be adopted by market. The constantly
Provide counselling to designers and developers from increasing number of people
improve the accessibility of several fields to increase the quality with disabilities is creating
ICT and non-ICT Products and coverage of the accessibility P/S new opportunities.
and Services (P/S). that are offered. Indirect benefits in the
Design for All (mainly
through governmental
measures).
Additional challenges and
applications developed
according to client needs.
Training and diffusion The system can be adopted by Technical components
Customised trainings (on-line corporations adding value to their installed and evaluated by
and face to face) according to design process. VERITAS training clients. Personalised training
client background about allows an easy integration of the on how to adopt and
VERITAS Toolkit. toolkit in the design routine. implement VERITAS
Diffusion of alternative services: smooth, easy and
services offered by VERITAS. quick acceptance of the tools.

Potential customers of such a consultancy service should be businesses that design


and build products in the automotive sector, motorcycle sector, living spaces sector,
software apps sector. The value potentially generated for product manufacturers by
the VERITAS consultancy service consists in:
saving time and effort in the process of designing accessible products
the opportunity for product manufacturers to cover a market segment
(consisting of older people and people with disabilities) that was not previously
covered by any offer, so generating a growth of potential market size.

If VERITAS consultancy services are bought by businesses and successfully


employed in the process of product design, it will result in a production process
innovation, as VERITAS tools will make the process of designing accessible products
easier and more effective. This process innovation could also finally generate product
innovation because it could become possible to imagine and offer to the market
products that are accessible to older people and people with disabilities. This would
mean to offer new products compared to existing and not accessible products.

B.01.2 Business and exploitation plans


The sixteen VERITAS Exploitable Results (ERs, see next section for details) can be
classified into three groups, according to their positioning in business stages,
distinguishing between basic technologies, VERITAS tools and applications.

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1. Basic Technologies are the hardware/software tools and the pieces of knowledge
useful to measure and study the movements of older people and people with
disabilities and their interaction with the objects and the environment. They were
used to design and develop the VERITAS tools. The Exploitable Results belonging to
this group are 1, 2, 10, 11 and 14.
2. VERITAS tools are the solutions that can be directly employed in the
design/production process of accessible products. They can be classified according
to the business sector where they could be profitably employed: applications
oriented to automotive industry, to motorcycle industry, to smart living spaces
industry, to software industry. They have been tested and evaluated in the pilots
with designers (WP3.7). The applications developed with these tools have been
evaluated in the pilots with beneficiaries (WP3.8). The ERs belonging to this group
are 4-9 and 14-16.
3. Finally, Applications are the products or final solutions designed within VERITAS,
including embedded accessibility for older people and people with disabilities. They
have been tested and evaluated in the pilot with beneficiaries (WP3.8). The ERs
belonging to this group are the 12 and 13.

An overview of the VERITAS exploitable foreground can be seen in the table below:

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Table 31: VERITAS Exploitable foreground


EXPLOITABLE FOREGROUND
Type of Description of Confidential Foreseen Exploitable Sectors of Timetable, Patents or other IPR exploitation (licences) Owner & Other
Exploitable exploitable Click YES/NO embargo products or application commercial Beneficiaries
Foreground foreground date measures or any other involved
use Lead Other
Partner involved
Partners
1 Commercial Multisensorial YES - Multisensorial Other December The Multi-Sensorial platform applications were CERTH/ SMARTE
exploitation of platform for platform for information 2016 developed by CERTH/ITI (Greece). Sensors ITI X, CAF,
R&D results, measuring a set the capture of technology and integration was performed by: CERTH/ITI UNITN
of human motion the actions of computer (Greece), SMARTEX s.r.l. (Italy) , Universita degli
parameters such people with service activities studi di Trento (Italy) , Continental Automotive
as gait, joints disabilities for (J62.0.9) France SAS (France). About the IP generated
range of motion, modeling the jointly: the background is protected; the foreground
etc. virtual user can be protected by Copyrights. The software is
model written in C++, there are no software licences to
consider. The involved partner will set up a Joint
Venture to exploit this product (see Exploitation
Agreement).
2 Commercial Set of tools to be NO - VERITAS Other December The VERITAS Simulation Framework tools were CERTH/
exploitation of used for the Simulation information 2016 (Beta developed by CERTH/ITI (Greece). It is set up the ITI
R&D results, accessibility Framework technology and version-June Core Simulation Platform, the Virtual User Models
assessment of computer 2015) (VUMs) and the several tools. In all cases is open
both prototype service activities source code, and therefore, no protected.
products and (J62.0.9)
user interfaces
designs in virtual
environment.
3 Commercial Software tool that NO - Software tool Other January 2015 The toolkit is based on the Core Simulation CERTH/ CVUT
exploitation of helps the GUI for designing information platform of VERITAS (see ER02), which comprises ITI,
R&D results, designer of GAMES & technology and several open source libraries in combination with
Games and GAMES computer proprietary algorithms and relevant code. As such,
Games interfaces INTERFACES service activities the licencing terms will reflect the Open Source
on effective and with (J62.0.9) aspects with regard to the Simulation Core library,
faster GUI embedded but the toolkit itself will be proprietary and the
development accessibility intellectual property of CERTH/ITI. CERTH/ITI is
taking into the main developer of the VERITAS GUI Simulation
account Toolkit. VRMMP and CVUT assisted in the
extensive types development of Simulation Models for the
of constraints that Infotainment sector, as well as generate simulation
fit embedded scenarios for pilot testing the VERITAS GUI
accessibility Simulation toolkit.

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EXPLOITABLE FOREGROUND
Type of Description of Confidential Foreseen Exploitable Sectors of Timetable, Patents or other IPR exploitation (licences) Owner & Other
Exploitable exploitable Click YES/NO embargo products or application commercial Beneficiaries
Foreground foreground date measures or any other involved
use Lead Other
Partner involved
Partners
4 Commercial Software tool and NO - Software tool Other January 2015 I+, CERTH and UPM are the owners of the IPRs I+ UPM,
exploitation of methodology for for designing information (background and foreground). They have achieved CERTH/
R&D results, design of HEALTHCAR technology and a license agreement (see Exploitation Agreement). HIT
accessible and E & computer UPM and CERTH will license out it to I+. CERTH &
usable products WELLBEING service activities UPM could exploit this technology with research
and solutions in APPLICATIO (J62.0.9) aims and to provide consultancy. The three
the personal NS with partners want to collaborate again to continue the
healthcare and embedded development of this technology. I+ is in charge of
wellbeing accessibility managing the IPRs. I+ plans to use this
domain. methodology in the development of its own e-
healthcare and Ambient Assisted Living (AAL)
applications
5 Commercial Software tool for NO - Software tool Other July 2015 The methodology (know-how) has been developed BYTE
exploitation of supporting for designing information by BYTE based on VSF (see ER02). BYTE is
R&D results, developers and COLLABORA technology and implementing this methodology in its development
s/w engineers in TIVE TOOLS computer process. The 3 developed tools are the intellectual
designing APPLICATIO service activities property of BYTE and will be available to its
accessible GUI NS with (J62.0.9) customers as software licences.
for software embedded
applications. accessibility
6 General New YES - Simulation Other Available The technology is based on ER02 plus Proprietary LMS Piaggio
advancement of methodology and Methods to information Code owned by LMS. LMS used standard products
knowledge, workflow to assess and technology and to develop the methodology, and put in place a
predict and optimize the computer workflow for motorcycle comfort assessment.
optimize the rider comfort of service activities Piaggio has tested the technology within its design
comfort based on powered two- (J62.0.9) and development process. No opportunity for
virtual prototyping wheeler riders protecting/patenting the results is seen. Therefore,
Manufacture of LMS and Piaggio have opted for an open
motorcycles publication strategy, where LMS has published the
(C30.9.1) methodology highlights and results in international
publications.
7 Commercial Software desktop YES - Software Other December All intellectual property rights on the technology HS
exploitation of tool for designing desktop tool information 2014 belong to Human Solutions, commercial vendor,
R&D results, AUTOMOTIVE for designing technology and and will be protected by software licenses.
solutions with AUTOMOTIV computer
embedded E solutions service activities
accessibility with (J62.0.9)

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EXPLOITABLE FOREGROUND
Type of Description of Confidential Foreseen Exploitable Sectors of Timetable, Patents or other IPR exploitation (licences) Owner & Other
Exploitable exploitable Click YES/NO embargo products or application commercial Beneficiaries
Foreground foreground date measures or any other involved
use Lead Other
Partner involved
Partners
(plug-in in embedded
commercial tool accessibility Manufacture of
RAMSIS) (plug-in in motor vehicles
commercial (C29.1)
tool RAMSIS)
8 Commercial Immersive YES - ltDomoDesign Other January 2017 The software is property of FhG/IAO, USUTT, FhG/IAO USUTT,
exploitation of software solution / information Domologic and includes background software from Domologi
R&D results, for planning Bauherrenkin technology and the developing partners. Bauherrenkino++ is also c
smart living o++ computer related to 3rd party IP in case calculation functions
spaces including service activities have to be included. ISE/Domotics is a software
architectural and (J62.0.9) product by DOMOLOGIC and hence it is protected
domotic aspects by Copyright (Software License). The final vendor
according to the Architectural is Domologic, partner that will be the licensee and
needs of users and engineering FhG/IAO and USUTT will license their part to
with special activities; Domologic
needs. technical testing
and analysis
(M71)

9 Commercial Software Virtual YES - ltRAMSIS Other January 2015 This solution is based on proprietary code. The FhG/IAO HS
exploitation of Reality tool for information software is based on other software belonging to
R&D results, designing technology and consortium partners HS and FhG/IAO. Intellectual
automotive computer property originated in the projects is owned by both
solutions with service activities partners, and they have achieved a joint ownership
embedded (J62.0.9) agreement to exploit it.
accessibility (plug
in to Manufacture of
commercial tools motor vehicles
Lightning and (C29.1)
RAMSIS)
10 Commercial System able to YES - GaMoCap - Other research December All the background and foreground belongs to UNITN
exploitation of measure human Garment and 2018 UNITN. The background is protected. The
R&D results, shape in motion Based human experimental foreground can be protected by Copyrights. The
and extract its Motion development on software is written in C++, there are no software
kinematics, Capture natural sciences licences to consider.
dynamics and system and engineering
anthropometric (M72.1.9)

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EXPLOITABLE FOREGROUND
Type of Description of Confidential Foreseen Exploitable Sectors of Timetable, Patents or other IPR exploitation (licences) Owner & Other
Exploitable exploitable Click YES/NO embargo products or application commercial Beneficiaries
Foreground foreground date measures or any other involved
use Lead Other
Partner involved
Partners
parameters.
11 Commercial Touch force YES - Force Panel Other research Available Universit degli studi di Trento (Italy) is the only UNITN
exploitation of interface for and partner involved in this technology. The foreground
R&D results, interaction, able experimental can be protected by Copyrights. The software is
to measure both development on written in C++, there are no software licences to
finger position on natural sciences consider.
the screen and and engineering
the exerted force. (M72.1.9)
12 Commercial Software YES - Pc@Home Other December I+ has the intellectual property of PC@Home. I+
exploitation of instrument that (final solution) information 2015 PC@Home is a proprietary code in Java protected
R&D results, helps elderly and technology and by copyright.
patient with computer
disability such as service activities
mild dementia, (J62.0.9)
Parkinson, stoke,
physical
impairments to
structure their
day and to help
him/her with
remembering
13 Commercial Collaborative YES - PrismIX (final Other September AIJU. Toy Research Institute is the only partner AIJU CERTH,
exploitation of game for older solution) information 2015 involved in the game development (programming FORTH
R&D results, people combining technology and and graphic issues). No patents are expected. The
the development computer entire developed Code and 3D Engine used in
of a game classic service activities Game is intellectual property of AIJU, and is
board and the (J62.0.9) protected by Copyright.
new technologies
14 General Structures of how N/R - Indepth task Other research Available CERTH/HIT is the only owner of this knowledge CERTH/
advancement of a task is analysis of and (know-how). Part of this methodology has been HIT
knowledge, completed, various man- experimental disclosed in scientific publications.
including a performed development on
detailed tasks in natural sciences
description of various and engineering
both manual application (M72.1.9)
(physical) and domains
mental (cognitive,

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EXPLOITABLE FOREGROUND
Type of Description of Confidential Foreseen Exploitable Sectors of Timetable, Patents or other IPR exploitation (licences) Owner & Other
Exploitable exploitable Click YES/NO embargo products or application commercial Beneficiaries
Foreground foreground date measures or any other involved
use Lead Other
Partner involved
Partners
psychological
and behavioural)
activities and
tasks, as well as
environmental
conditions
(different
application areas)
15 exploitation of Design insights YES - Guidelines for Manufacture of June 2014 Indesit collaborated with PERCRO during the pilots, INDESIT PERCRO
results through related to the the design of domestic but the Guidelines and the gallery sketches were
(social) accessibility of accessible appliances developed only by Indesit Design Center, and all
kitchen gas hobs kitchen gas (C27.5) the generated foreground belongs to Indesit.
innovation
from the hobs and
perspective of gallery of new
Parkinson people design
whose hands possibilities
shake and touch
panel for smart
oven from the
perspective of
people with visual
impairments
16 exploitation of On line tool YES - Multimedia Educational Available The training environment is an Open Source asset ATOS The
results through based on course for support and can be used under GPL license. ATOS has entire
(social) interactive developers activities customised the platform and has designed the consortiu
learning (P85.6) methodology according to VERITAS requirements. m
innovation
environment 2.0 The contents of training materials were designed by
providing access the different Pilots coordinators and Tool
to a group of developers. Consequently, they are responsible for
materials which the decision on which can be the most appropriated
allow a dynamic license to use. Part of the materials have Common
preparation for Creative by share-alike (SA) license, since it is the
using each usual Open source license used for sharing general
component of the advancements of knowledge. In other cases they
tool developed by are under copyright license. Further extensions or
the project improvement in the training services are possible,
and would belong to specific partners

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B.01.3 Exploitable products description


Below follows a short description of each of the 16 VERITAS exploitable results
1. ER01: Multisensorial platform for the capture of the actions of people with
disabilities for modeling the virtual user model

This system can accurately record data to measure a set of human motion parameters
such as gait, joints range of motion, torso flexibility etc. Currently, it integrates a
number of sensors that include 3D cameras, electrogoniometers, force sensors and
more.
Characteristics / Advantages:
API for sensor integration: An API is available so that almost any new sensor
can be integrated and used with the system without much effort.
Distributed/modular architecture: the system can be used with any sub-set of
the available/integrated sensors, depending on the current recording needs.
With the current VERITAS sensor set, the system can measure most of the
human body joints range of motion.
Recorded data is automatically annotated for easier retrieval.
User-friendly Graphical User Interface.
Distributed architecture: The system can be set-up using multiple computers,
communicating over TCP/IP.

The expected date to launch the product is December 2016.

2. ER02: VERITAS Simulation Framework

The VERITAS Simulation Framework consists of several tools which can be used
for the accessibility assessment of both prototype products and user interfaces
designs. For the assessment process, a simulation takes place in a virtual
environment. In this virtual environment, the behavioural characteristics of virtual
elderly and impaired users are simulated. The simulation is based on Virtual User
Models which contain parameters of vision, hearing, cognitive and motor
characteristics of people with special needs. The Framework is consisted of several
tools which: a) create the Virtual User Models, b) define the simulation scenarios and
c) perform the simulation and evaluate the virtual products. Lots of tests in the
automotive, workplace, smart living, infotainment and healthcare application
domains, depicted that the VERITAS Simulation Framework can be considered as a
valuable asset for the developer, designer and of course, any individual with special
needs.
The expected date to launch the product is December 2016. A beta version
will be available by June 2015.

3. ER03: Software tool for designing GAMES & GAMES INTERFACES with embedded
accessibility

This software tool is focused on designing GAMES & GAMES INTERFACES with
embedded accessibility with its two modules, the VerSEd-GUI and the VerSim-GUI

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that helps the GUI designer on effective and faster GUI developing and taking into
account extensive types of constraints that fit embedded accessibility.
This is a pilot application toolkit, functional to a great extent with the basic
functionality implemented and tested. It requires some polishing, debugging and
extension of several features to become a commercial product, but other than that, it
is functional and was tested in the pilots.
The expected date to launch the product is January 2015

4. ER04: Software tool for designing HEALTHCARE & WELLBEING APPLICATIONS with
embedded accessibility

This ER presents the methodology proposed by VERITAS to design accessible and


usable products and solutions in the personal healthcare and wellbeing domain. Based
on the G-OD methodology, it introduces additional steps in the framework and
support phases to include accessibility aspects.
In the current point of the way, the success of these systems relies mainly in the user
acceptance. This acceptance will occur only when the technology, the systems and the
interaction are designed for the real patients and other stakeholders.
The methodology proposed is focused on the improvement of the accessibility and
usability, minimizing the interaction requirements and increasing the contextual
awareness.
The expected date to launch the product is January 2015

5. ER05: Software tool for designing COLLABORATIVE TOOLS APPLICATIONS with


embedded accessibility

Thanks to the availability of the VSF and of other software, the partners can offer
ready to use tools for supporting developers and SW engineers in designing
accessible GUI for software applications. In addition, thanks to the availability of
basic technologies to monitor, measure and study human-software interaction,
VERITAS consortium can also face new and complex problems of accessible
software design, offering designers a tailor made and complete consultancy service.
The value delivered by such a consultancy service is not simply the solution to
accessibility problems for older people and people with disabilities, but it is the
opportunity for software builders to enlarge their potential market including potential
customers who are not reached nowadays by an offer of products suitable for older
people and people with disabilities.
Within the project, three collaborative tools applications with embedded accessibility
have been developed, a discussion application, an ftp application and a teleconference
application. The tools have been developed in Java. Java was selected because it is
OS independent due to the availability of a run time environment and due to the lower
development cost and more convenient integration with the VERITAS Core platform.
The methodology to develop these collaborative tools is based on Asset 02, although
also includes proprietary code.
The methodology is already implemented within the Byte Computer
development process. The expected date to launch product developed through
this methodology is July 2015.

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6. ER06: Simulation Methods to assess and optimize the comfort of powered two-
wheeler riders

The aim of the collaboration between PIAGGIO and LMS has been to develop a new
methodology and workflow to predict and optimize the rider comfort based on virtual
prototyping. At present, Powered Two-Wheeler (PTW) rider comfort optimization
relies on subjective experimental data, due to a lack of methods and data for vertical
transmissibility analysis in the frequency domain. This is overcome with the new
objective methodology for PTW rider comfort assessment in the time domain,
involving Virtual Prototypes of a PTW and a human rider. Virtual tests can be done
for objective comfort assessment of a PTW rider, enabling comfort assessment for
both able-bodied riders and riders with different disabilities. This allows PTW
manufacturers to achieve a PTW design for optimal rider comfort without the need to
produce physical prototypes.
The targeted valorisation of this asset is through consultancy projects for
automotive/motorcycle manufactures faced with comfort design challenges in
their product design. LMS is already reaching out for possible customers
through publications and through its marketing organisation.

7. ER07: Software desktop tool for designing AUTOMOTIVE solutions with embedded
accessibility

The commercial design tool and digital human model RAMSIS provides technologies
and solutions to analyse and ensure the ergonomic accessibility of products and
environments with respect to average and healthy customers. The human model
simulation technologies and data resources are extended to non-standard customer
groups as disabled and elderly people. Hence these groups can be addressed in the
digital main stream vehicle development in the same way as average and healthy
people. As a result vehicle designs can be efficiently tested and optimized with
respect to ergonomics of a wide range of potential customers.
The technology will be ready for the market after another year of refinement
at the end of 2014.

8. ER08: ltDomoDesign / Bauherrenkino++

ltDomoDesign / Bauherrenkino++ is an immersive software solution for planning


smart living spaces including architectural and domotic aspects according to the
needs of users with special needs. It is an application based on the IVERSIM tool
developed in VERITAS, the Software Virtuelle Bemusterung by Fraunhofer and a
ISE/Domotics by DOMOLOGIC.
The expected date to launch the product is January 2017

9. ER09: ltRAMSIS

Software Virtual Reality tool for designing AUTOMOTIVE solutions with embedded
accessibility (plug-in in commercial tools Lightning & RAMSIS). The software uses
VERITAS user model parameters in automotive VR design process through the tools
Lightning/RAMSIS. This technology integrates elderly and disabled customers in
digital main stream vehicle development.

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The expected date to launch the product is January 2015

10. ER10: Garment Based human Motion Capture system (GaMoCap)

This system is able to measure human shape in motion and therefore extract its
kinematics, dynamics and anthropometric parameters based on multi-camera passive
vision and a special wearable garment.
The expected date to launch the product is December 2018.

11. ER11: Force Panel

The Force Panel, touch force interface for interaction, exer-games and diagnostics, is
an instrument based on a touch screen and a force sensor able to measure both finger
position on the screen and the exerted force. It allows to create a virtual environment
where to control devices (e.g. in a domotics context), exercise dexterity by means of
serious games for health and concurrently diagnose the user health state.

12. ER12: Pc@Home

PC@Home is an instrument that helps elderly and patient with disability (PwD) such
as mild dementia, Parkinson, stoke, physical impairments to structure their day and to
help him/her with remembering.
The functionalities of the application are:
Agenda and reminders
Questionnaire

All the services are easily accessible and each one is designed to require the minimum
interaction with the end user. Accessibility and usability of this application arise from
the integration of different user profiles to whom the product refers. A particular
attention was dedicated to the UI design, this is the key element of this application.
The aim of acceptability, accessibility and usability was achieved thanks to the use of
VERITAS Tools and the relative methodology.
The benefits that this technology can bring are a support for health coach,
maintenance of memory and sense of reality for elderly people. PC@Home has been
developed using the ER04.
The expected date to launch the product is December 2015.

13. ER13: PrismIX

PrismIX is a collaborative game for older people combining the development of a


game classic board and the new technologies.
Collaborative Games Features:

Those who take part aspire to a common aim.


All the people win it the purpose is fulfilled and in the otherwise case all loose.
Each player is responsible for the safety and welfare of the other players.
All the players will have the responsibility of taking part or not at any time of the
game.
Each person takes part according to his/her capability.

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The emphasis relies not on the effort but on the enjoyment.

PrismIX has been developed using ER03.

The expected date to launch the product is September 2015

14. ER14: In-depth Task Analysis of various man-performed tasks in various


application domains

The Task Analysis in VERITAS structures how a task is completed, including a


detailed description of both manual (physical) and mental (cognitive, psychological
and behavioural) activities and tasks, as well as environmental conditions (different
application areas). For this reason, tables are defined, sequencing the different tasks,
subtasks and primitive tasks vertically, while detailing them horizontally. While
current approaches in task analysis are more descriptive, this one is structured and
also captured in an xml format. It provides detailed understanding of a task, its
subtasks and primitive tasks, which can be further detailed, if so desired. Thus, its
results are able to be directly uptaken by the programming and development team.
Already ready to be commercialised.

15. ER15: Guidelines for the design of accessible domestic appliances

The guidelines present design insights related to the accessibility of kitchen gas hobs
from the perspective of Parkinson people whose hands shake and touch panel for
smart oven from the perspective of people with visual impairments. The associated
gallery of new design possibilities consists of a series of sketches derived from the
insights which explore new solutions for gas hobs and kitchen environments that can
be used also by Parkinson or visual impairments users. Both the guidelines and the
gallery represent an inspiration for designers to come up with new possible solutions
for the gas hobs and kitchen environment in line with the principles of Design for All.
The expected date to launch the Guidelines is June 2014

16. ER16: Multimedia course for developers

The training in VERITAS is supported by a set of services based on interactive


learning environment 2.0 and provides access to a group of materials which allow a
dynamic preparation for using each component of the tool framework defined and
developed by the project. This is an online environment which allows the
development of learning/training activities in a distributed and collaborative fashion:
each participant can carry out his/her training tasks according to his/her own pace and
time schedule always considering the structure of collaborative teams and time limits
defined in the training material or/and by his/her tutor. This set of services has been
used during the test pilots deployed during the project lifespan and it will be available
to be packed, distributed and exploited according to the exploitation strategy of the
project.
Already available

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B.01.4 Further research beyond VERITAS


The accomplishments of VERITAS have been thoroughly presented in the project
Deliverables. As also highlighted in the previous section, most of the project results
are already ready to enter the market or their launch is foreseen within the next few
years. However, what has also been of major interest for the VERITAS Consortium
was the day after the finalization of the project, i.e. what would be the next steps in
research and development in the area. Moreover, significant standardization activities
have taken place throughout the duration of the project also in cooperation with
other relevant projects participating in the VUMS cluster many of which are
planned to continue and be finalized after the end of VERITAS project. These have
been documented in D4.5.2 VERITAS Roadmap. The main research priorities, as
identified within VERITAS, are briefly presented below.
Table 32: Research priorities
Research priority Description Relevant Applicability to Priority
VERITAS other areas level
domain
Generalisation of The VUM optimization loop procedure, Automotive, Any domain that can Essential
use and will result to dynamic up-to-date virtual Smart living benefit from
standardization of user models that will be subsequently spaces, simulated
Virtual User used whenever required. Moreover, , Workspaces, accessibility
Models for there has been identified the need to Infotainment, assessment would be
Accessibility proceed to standardization of the Healthcare applicable for this
Assessment in contents, scope, format and initiative since it
multiple domains interoperability of Virtual User Models so would facilitate the
that they can be cross-compatible among Design 4 All initiative
different domains, applications and
research activities
Iterative on-the-go Introduction of a mobile simulation Automotive, Any other domain can Essential
optimisation platform, which could be potentially a Smart living benefit as it linked to
sub-set of the core simulation platform spaces, virtual user models
that will automatically and without user Workspaces,
intervention perform automatic interface Infotainment,
accessibility assessment tests, interface Healthcare
optimization and iterative adaptation,
based on the dynamic virtual user
models, the environmental
measurements and contextual
information
Smart adaptive Smart adaptive User Interfaces (UI) that Automotive, Any other domain can Essential
interfaces will be provided in different portable Smart living benefit
devices will be able to adapt themselves spaces,
to the changing habits, preferences and Workspaces,
requirements of the user in terms of the Infotainment,
presentation and interaction modes, and Healthcare
based on the past choices made by the
user within changing daily environments.
The foreseen smart adaptive user
interfaces should provide the possibility
for manual individualization.
Seamlessly Provide seamless roaming of the Automotive, Any other domain can Essential
operating individuals between different domains of Smart living benefit
products daily life, by retaining dynamic time- spaces,
varying needs, temporal habits and Workspaces,
accessibility constraints. Infotainment,

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Research priority Description Relevant Applicability to Priority


VERITAS other areas level
domain
Healthcare
Holistic cognitive- Produce some kind of copy of human Automotive, Any other domain can Important
behavioural-motor beings that reproduces cognition, Smart living benefit
modeling decision, motion planning, motor control spaces,
and physical movement. Such kind of Workspaces,
model would be able, for example, to Infotainment,
produce itself the task tree to achieve a Healthcare
goal, to plan primitive movements, to
execute and adjust them, and to
ultimately interact in a realistic humanlike
way with objects and interfaces. Such
kind of virtual user (call it a digital human)
will produce motion primitives and
solution strategies that are influenced by
its own capabilities.
Incorporate The virtual user models should include Automotive, Any other domain can Essential
psychological other aspects of the users and not only Smart living benefit
aspects to physical characteristics, but also spaces,
address other psychological ones e.g. expand the Workspaces,
categories spectrum to include other DSM-V Infotainment,
categories, such as Neurodevelopmental Healthcare
disorders, Depressive disorders, Anxiety
disorders, Trauma- and stressor-related
disorders, Sleepwake disorders, etc.
Inclusion of other Apart from the application areas that N/R This is exactly the Important
application areas have already been identified and point of this priority.
researched within VERITAS, more Many different areas
application areas should be included in can be included,
the design for all concept of the
VERITAS tools. Such areas could be:
travelling, e-commerce, leisure (not only
infotainment and games), social
networks, etc.
Establish a The aim is to develop an evaluation Automotive, Any other domain can Essential
flexible, reliable framework that could transfer findings Smart living benefit
and valid from virtual users to real users with no spaces,
evaluation loss in reliability and validity; because Workspaces,
framework these two aspects are important in Infotainment,
(Virtual-User generalizing findings. In the end of the Healthcare
Centered Design) day, we want to do in the virtual
environments what we do in real life
Methodology for The methodology defined in VERITAS, Healthcare No Important
the assessment of which has been tested and validated with
accessibility of 3 applications in the healthcare domain
healthcare during the project, will be applied and
applications using validated with more applications and
VERITAS tools: tools. Specifically, several p-health
application and applications for the management of
validation for p- chronic diseases will be assessed
health (including Parkinson disease,
applications and cardiovascular diseases and diabetes).
tools
Further Continuation of the work on the definition Healthcare Automotive, Smart Important
development and of virtual user models with cognitive living spaces,
applications of disabilities and explore usefulness for the Workspaces,

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Research priority Description Relevant Applicability to Priority


VERITAS other areas level
domain
virtual user field of cognitive rehabilitation Infotainment,
models for Healthcare
cognitive
disabilities
Definition of To define a methodology (recognized at Automotive No Important
European European level) to be applied for the
ergonomic ergonomic assessment in car interiors
constrains for
impaired drivers
Continuation of VUMS cluster representatives will Automotive, Any other domain can Essential
standardization continue their ISO and respective Smart living benefit
efforts through DIN/BSI engagements. Especially, the spaces,
VUMS cluster in Workspaces,
active contribution to new work proposals
Infotainment,
ISO & W3C in ISO TC 159/SC4 WG 10 are Healthcare
considered to offer good opportunities for
disseminating the VUMS cluster results.
Moreover, VUMS cluster experts will
continue their active membership in the
two W3C working groups MBUI, UAD
and RDWG. They have agreed to
represent the concepts and interests of
the VUMS cluster in future
standardisation activities, projects and
workshops.
Further research Current and future GPII projects like Automotive, Any other domain can Essential
and promotion of Cloud4All will be a great platform for Smart living benefit
standardization VERITAS (and the rest of VUMS spaces,
efforts through Workspaces,
members) to disseminate and further
Cloud4All project Infotainment,
develop their research results. Currently, Healthcare
with Fraunhofer IAO and CERTH are also
involved in Cloud4All. Cloud4All and
future GPII projects will also aim at
international standardization in the field of
accessibility.
Prosperity4All: A The Prosperity4All project aims at Automotive, Any other domain can Essential
holistic ecosystem delivering fully functional key elements of Smart living benefit
infrastructure for a holistic infrastructure that will entice, spaces,
the provision of Workspaces,
engage, and enable stakeholders and
services and Infotainment,
applications that individuals to create or deliver accessible Healthcare
are accessible for solutions and/or services. It will also
all deliver numerous real-life
implementations of services and
applications that are accessible for all,
thus proving the feasibility and
applicability of the proposed ecosystem
infrastructure across technology and user
domains. Its work is highly based on the
findings of previous research projects
(among which VERITAS and Cloud4All)
while the participation of VERITAS
Consortium members in it, guarantees
the further deployment of the VERITAS
findings through the work performed in
Prosperity4All.

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Section C. Report on societal implications

A General Information (completed automatically when Grant Agreement number is


entered.
247765
Grant Agreement Number:
VERITAS Virtual and Augmented Environments and Realistic
Title of Project:
User Interactions To achieve Embedded Accessibility Designs
Dr. Manfred Dangelmaier -
Name and Title of Coordinator:

B Ethics
1. Did your project undergo an Ethics Review (and/or Screening)?

If Yes: have you described the progress of compliance with the relevant Ethics No
Review/Screening Requirements in the frame of the periodic/final project reports?

Special Reminder: the progress of compliance with the Ethics Review/Screening


Requirements should be described in the Period/Final Project Reports under the Section
3.2.2 'Work Progress and Achievements'

2. Please indicate whether your project involved any of the following


issues (tick box) :
Research on Humans
Did the project involve children? No
Did the project involve patients? No
Did the project involve persons not able to give consent? No (even in the case of some
cognitive impaired users, the
consent was given by them
with the assistance of their
care-givers)
Did the project involve adult healthy volunteers? Yes
Did the project involve Human genetic material? No
Did the project involve Human biological samples? No
Did the project involve Human data collection? Yes
Research on Human embryo/foetus
Did the project involve Human Embryos? No
Did the project involve Human Foetal Tissue / Cells? No
Did the project involve Human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESCs)? No
Did the project on human Embryonic Stem Cells involve cells in culture? No
Did the project on human Embryonic Stem Cells involve the derivation of cells from Embryos? No
Privacy
Did the project involve processing of genetic information or personal data (eg. health, sexual Yes, but
lifestyle, ethnicity, political opinion, religious or philosophical conviction)? anonymised
Did the project involve tracking the location or observation of people? Yes, but upon
consent
Research on Animals

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Did the project involve research on animals? No


Were those animals transgenic small laboratory animals? -
Were those animals transgenic farm animals? -
Were those animals cloned farm animals? -
Were those animals non-human primates? -
Research Involving Developing Countries
Did the project involve the use of local resources (genetic, animal, plant etc)? No
Was the project of benefit to local community (capacity building, access to healthcare, education etc)? -
Dual Use
Research having direct military use No
Research having the potential for terrorist abuse No
C Workforce Statistics

3. Workforce statistics for the project: Please indicate in the table below the number of
people who worked on the project (on a headcount basis).

Type of Position Number of Women Number of Men


Scientific Coordinator 1 2
Work package leaders 9 15
Experienced researchers (i.e. PhD holders) 17 52
PhD Students 5 9
Other 25 37

4. How many additional researchers (in companies and universities) were 15


recruited specifically for this project?
Of which, indicate the number of men: 10

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D Gender Aspects
5. Did you carry out specific Gender Equality Actions under the project? Yes

6. Which of the following actions did you carry out and how effective were they?
Not at all Very
effective effective
x Design and implement an equal opportunity policy x
x Set targets to achieve a gender balance in the workforce x
Organise conferences and workshops on gender
Actions to improve work-life balance
Other:

7. Was there a gender dimension associated with the research content i.e. wherever people were
the focus of the research as, for example, consumers, users, patients or in trials, was the issue of gender
considered and addressed?
Yes Specific recruitment criteria have been set for both tests with designers/developers and beneficiaries. One
of the criteria was gender equality.
E Synergies with Science Education
8. Did your project involve working with students and/or school pupils (e.g. open days,
participation in science festivals and events, prizes/competitions or joint projects)?
Yes A series of demonstration activities did take place involving universities.

9. Did the project generate any science education material (e.g. kits, websites, explanatory
booklets, DVDs)?
Yes We have produced a web site, leaflets and other type of printed material as well as an e-learning
platform that can be accessed from the web site of the project, which contains training material in the
form of user manuals and tutorial videos.

F Interdisciplinarity
10. Which disciplines (see list below) are involved in your project?
Main discipline3: Electrical engineering, electronics [electrical engineering, electronics, communication
engineering and systems, computer engineering (hardware only) and other allied subjects]
Associated discipline: Civil engineering Associated discipline: Mathematics and computer
(architecture engineering, building sciences [mathematics and other allied fields:
science and engineering, construction computer sciences and other
engineering, municipal and structural allied subjects (software development only; hardware
engineering and other allied subjects) development should be classified in the
engineering fields)]

G Engaging with Civil society and policy makers


11a Did your project engage with societal actors beyond the research Yes
community? (if 'No', go to Question 14)
11b If yes, did you engage with citizens (citizens' panels / juries) or organised civil society
(NGOs, patients' groups etc.)?
No
x Yes- in determining what research should be performed

3
Insert number from list below (Frascati Manual).

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x Yes - in implementing the research


x Yes, in communicating /disseminating / using the results of the project
x Yes
11c In doing so, did your project involve actors whose role is mainly to No
organise the dialogue with citizens and organised civil society (e.g.
professional mediator; communication company, science museums)?
12. Did you engage with government / public bodies or policy makers (including international
organisations)

No
Yes- in framing the research agenda
Yes - in implementing the research agenda
x Yes, in communicating /disseminating / using the results of the project

13a Will the project generate outputs (expertise or scientific advice) which could be used by
policy makers?
x Yes as a primary objective (please indicate areas below- multiple answers possible)
Yes as a secondary objective (please indicate areas below - multiple answer possible)
No
13b If Yes, in which fields?
Agriculture Energy Human rights
Audiovisual and Media Enlargement Information Society
Budget Enterprise Institutional affairs
Competition Environment Internal Market
Consumers External Relations Justice, freedom and security
Culture External Trade Public Health
Customs Fisheries and Maritime Affairs Regional Policy
Development Economic and Food Safety Research and Innovation
Monetary Affairs Foreign and Security Policy Space
Education, Training, Youth Fraud Taxation
Employment and Social Affairs Humanitarian aid Transport

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Grant Agreement #
Veritas D4.1.13 Dissemination Level (PU)
247765

13c If Yes, at which level?


Local / regional levels
x National level
x European level
x International level

H Use and dissemination


14. How many Articles were published/accepted for publication in peer- 14 ( realised and planned)
reviewed journals?
To how many of these is open access4 provided? 5
To how many of these is open access not provided? 9
Please check all applicable reasons for not providing open access:
X publisher's licensing agreement would not permit publishing in a repository
X no suitable repository available
X no suitable open access journal available
no funds available to publish in an open access journal
lack of time and resources
lack of information on open access
other5:

15. How many new patent applications (priority filings) have been made? N/R
("Technologically unique": multiple applications for the same invention in different
jurisdictions should be counted as just one application of grant).

16. Indicate how many of the following Intellectual Trademark


Property Rights were applied for (give number in
Registered design
each box).
Other
None at the moment.
17. How many spin-off companies were created / are planned as a direct But 3 spin-offs are
result of the project? planned in near
future.

18. Please indicate whether your project has a potential impact on employment, in comparison
with the situation before your project:
x Increase in employment, or x In small & medium-sized enterprises
x Safeguard employment, or x In large companies
Decrease in employment, None of the above / not relevant to the project
Difficult to estimate / not possible to quantify
19. For your project partnership please estimate the employment effect Cannot be estimated.
resulting directly from your participation in Full Time Equivalent (FTE =
one person working fulltime for a year) jobs:

4
Open Access is defined as free of charge access for anyone via Internet.
5
For instance: classification for security project.

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Grant Agreement #
Veritas D4.1.13 Dissemination Level (PU)
247765

I Media and Communication to the general public


20. As part of the project, were any of the beneficiaries professionals in communication or
media relations?
Yes No
21. As part of the project, have any beneficiaries received professional media / communication
training / advice to improve communication with the general public?
Yes No
22 Which of the following have been used to communicate information about your project to
the general public, or have resulted from your project?
Press Release Coverage in specialist press
Media briefing Coverage in general (non-specialist) press
TV coverage / report Coverage in national press
Radio coverage / report Coverage in international press
Brochures /posters / flyers Website for the general public / internet
DVD /Film /Multimedia Event targeting general public (festival, conference,
exhibition, science caf)

23 In which languages are the information products for the general public produced?
Language of the coordinator English
Other language(s)

Question F-10: Classification of Scientific Disciplines according to the Frascati Manual 2002
(Proposed Standard Practice for Surveys on Research and Experimental Development, OECD 2002):

FIELDS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

1. NATURAL SCIENCES
1.1 Mathematics and computer sciences [mathematics and other allied fields: computer sciences
and other allied subjects (software development only; hardware development should be
classified in the engineering fields)]
1.2 Physical sciences (astronomy and space sciences, physics and other allied subjects)
1.3 Chemical sciences (chemistry, other allied subjects)
1.4 Earth and related environmental sciences (geology, geophysics, mineralogy, physical
geography and other geosciences, meteorology and other atmospheric sciences including
climatic research, oceanography, vulcanology, palaeoecology, other allied sciences)
1.5 Biological sciences (biology, botany, bacteriology, microbiology, zoology, entomology,
genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, other allied sciences, excluding clinical and veterinary
sciences)

2 ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY


2.1 Civil engineering (architecture engineering, building science and engineering, construction
engineering, municipal and structural engineering and other allied subjects)
2.2 Electrical engineering, electronics [electrical engineering, electronics, communication
engineering and systems, computer engineering (hardware only) and other allied subjects]
2.3. Other engineering sciences (such as chemical, aeronautical and space, mechanical,
metallurgical and materials engineering, and their specialised subdivisions; forest products;
applied sciences such as geodesy, industrial chemistry, etc.; the science and technology of
food production; specialised technologies of interdisciplinary fields, e.g. systems analysis,
metallurgy, mining, textile technology and other applied subjects)

3. MEDICAL SCIENCES

March 2014 169 CERTH/ITI


Grant Agreement #
Veritas D4.1.13 Dissemination Level (PU)
247765

3.1 Basic medicine (anatomy, cytology, physiology, genetics, pharmacy, pharmacology,


toxicology, immunology and immunohaematology, clinical chemistry, clinical microbiology,
pathology)
3.2 Clinical medicine (anaesthesiology, paediatrics, obstetrics and gynaecology, internal
medicine, surgery, dentistry, neurology, psychiatry, radiology, therapeutics,
otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology)
3.3 Health sciences (public health services, social medicine, hygiene, nursing, epidemiology)

4. AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
4.1 Agriculture, forestry, fisheries and allied sciences (agronomy, animal husbandry, fisheries,
forestry, horticulture, other allied subjects)
4.2 Veterinary medicine

5. SOCIAL SCIENCES
5.1 Psychology
5.2 Economics
5.3 Educational sciences (education and training and other allied subjects)
5.4 Other social sciences [anthropology (social and cultural) and ethnology, demography,
geography (human, economic and social), town and country planning, management, law,
linguistics, political sciences, sociology, organisation and methods, miscellaneous social
sciences and interdisciplinary , methodological and historical S1T activities relating to
subjects in this group. Physical anthropology, physical geography and psychophysiology
should normally be classified with the natural sciences].

6. HUMANITIES
6.1 History (history, prehistory and history, together with auxiliary historical disciplines such as
archaeology, numismatics, palaeography, genealogy, etc.)
6.2 Languages and literature (ancient and modern)
6.3 Other humanities [philosophy (including the history of science and technology) arts, history
of art, art criticism, painting, sculpture, musicology, dramatic art excluding artistic "research"
of any kind, religion, theology, other fields and subjects pertaining to the humanities,
methodological, historical and other S1T activities relating to the subjects in this group]

March 2014 170 CERTH/ITI


Grant Agreement #
Veritas D4.1.13 Dissemination Level (PU)
247765

References
1. WHO-World Health Organization [Online] http://www.who.int

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