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Article 1723.

The engineer or architect who drew up the plans and specifications for a building is liable
for damages if within fifteen years from the completion of the structure, the same should collapse by
reason of a defect in those plans and specifications, or due to the defects in the ground. The contractor
is likewise responsible for the damages if the edifice falls, within the same period, on account of defects
in the construction or the use of materials of inferior quality furnished by him, or due to any violation of
the terms of the contract. If the engineer or architect supervises the construction, he shall be solidarily
liable with the contractor. Acceptance of the building, after completion, does not imply waiver of any of
the cause of action by reason of any defect mentioned in the preceding paragraph. The action must be
brought within ten years following the collapse of the building. (n)

SR Dam was finished 2003

Damage and defect to the design was reported 2015

Within 15 yrs provided by Art. 1723

Acceptance of the building, after completion, does not imply waiver of any of the cause of action by
reason of any defect mentioned

NPC has until 2025 to file an action for damages

Article 1561. The vendor shall be responsible for warranty against the hidden defects which the thing
sold may have, should they render it unfit for the use for which it is intended, or should they diminish its
fitness for such use to such an extent that, had the vendee been aware thereof, he would not have
acquired it or would have given a lower price for it; but said vendor shall not be answerable for patent
defects or those which may be visible, or for those which are not visible if the vendee is an expert who,
by reason of his trade or profession, should have known them. (1484a)

Article 1562. In a sale of goods, there is an implied warranty or condition as to the quality or fitness of
the goods, as follows: (1) Where the buyer, expressly or by implication, makes known to the seller the
particular purpose for which the goods are acquired, and it appears that the buyer relies on the seller's
skill or judgment (whether he be the grower or manufacturer or not), there is an implied warranty that
the goods shall be reasonably fit for such purpose; (2) Where the goods are brought by description from
a seller who deals in goods of that description (whether he be the grower or manufacturer or not), there
is an implied warranty that the goods shall be of merchantable quality. (n)

Article 1563. In the case of contract of sale of a specified article under its patent or other trade name,
there is no warranty as to its fitness for any particular purpose, unless there is a stipulation to the
contrary. (n)
Article 1564. An implied warranty or condition as to the quality or fitness for a particular purpose may
be annexed by the usage of trade. (n)

Article 1565. In the case of a contract of sale by sample, if the seller is a dealer in goods of that kind,
there is an implied warranty that the goods shall be free from any defect rendering them
unmerchantable which would not be apparent on reasonable examination of the sample. (n)

Article 1566. The vendor is responsible to the vendee for any hidden faults or defects in the thing sold,
even though he was not aware thereof. This provision shall not apply if the contrary has been stipulated,
and the vendor was not aware of the hidden faults or defects in the thing sold. (1485)

Article 1567. In the cases of articles 1561, 1562, 1564, 1565 and 1566, the vendee may elect between
withdrawing from the contract and demanding a proportionate reduction of the price, with damages in
either case. (1486a)

http://www.lawphil.net/judjuris/juri1986/oct1986/gr_47851_1986.html