THE CITIZEN LAKE LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2017 | C3

GUEST COLUMN

Shedding light on a family Bible
H
istoric preservation is a
challenge for every com-
munity. Leading the way is
the city of Stamford, Connecti-
cut. Recently, I had the pleasure
of visiting the Hoyt-Barnum
House, the oldest residential
structure of that place. My an-
cestor Samuel Hait (or Hoyt), a
descendant of one of the town
founders, built the house in
about 1699 using braced frame
construction (post and beam).
Until November 2016, the house
was located at 713
Bedford St. Due to
the home’s limited
access and the
expansion of the PROVIDED BY MOORE ALLEN & INNOCENT, AUCTIONEERS & VALUERS, CIRENCESTER,
neighboring police UNITED KINGDOM
department, a de- An auction Bible that matches the Bell Bible at the Stamford History
DAWN ROE cision was made to Center.
relocate the home
to 1508 High Ride
Road, on the same grounds as
the Stamford History Center,
the present owners. The city
of Stamford, the SHC, several
organizations and countless vol-
unteers succeeded in giving the
home a bright future for many
generations to come.
Our visit also provided the
opportunity to see the Bell fam-
ily Bible, which contains the PROVIDED
names of the children born to
Dawn Roe holds the Bell Bible that contains the birth of her ancestor
Francis and Rebecca Bell. Their
Mary Bell Hoyt. It is the oldest Bible she has researched to date. The last
son Jonathan, born 1641, was the
Bible she researched belonged to President Abraham Lincoln.
first child born at Stamford. Sur-
prisingly, it also listed the birth
of Mare (or Mary), in 1646; she
married Joshua Hoyt, father of
Samuel. Much of what is known PROVIDED
about this artifact comes from
an article written in 1966 by The Stamford History Center, which holds the Bell family Bible in its
Marie Updegraff that described collection and owns the Hoyt-Barnum House.
plans to protect it by inserting
the book into a metal container the 1599 edition contains this
with light-filtering glass and page,” said Samantha Gibson
sealing it with a gas, similar to with the London Library Enqui-
the method used to preserve the ries Desk at St. James’s Square.
Declaration of Independence The book is known as the
at the Library of Congress. The Geneva Bible, named after the
book was passed down within location of its early composers
the line of Jonathan Bell for sev- who fled from England to Ge-
eral generations, and used to be neva, Switzerland, during the
on display at the First Stamford reign of Mary Tudor (“Bloody”
National Bank, where Clarence Mary) due to her persecution
W. Bell served as bank president. of Protestants. It wasn’t un- PROVIDED
The Bible was then transferred til the succession of Elizabeth Built in 1699 by Samuel Hoyt, the Hoyt-Barnum House was recently
to the SHC. The article claims I that the Geneva Bible was moved to its new location on the site of the Stamford History Center.
the book made the journey with again favored in England, where
Francis Bell from Yorkshire, Christopher Barker became her LEFT: An auction Bible that matches the Bell Bible at the Stamford
England, in 1630. With only a printer. The Barkers were a dy- History Center.
single page displayed, could I nasty, holding exclusive patents PROVIDED BY MOORE ALLEN & INNOCENT, AUCTIONEERS & VALUERS, CIRENCESTER,
UNITED KINGDOM
confirm the source of this an- for Bible printing. Complicating
cient Bible? The answer turned matters, the 1599 Old Testament
out to be more complicated than was paired with later versions son of verses. There are hundred for Jonathan showed he owned including Abner Hoyt, an old
expected. of the New Testament. Review- of editions, each with their own a Great Bible (which predates undertaker from Weedsport,
The case shows the title page ing various auction websites, I unique differences. However, the Geneva) and two old Bibles. and former Port Byron elemen-
to the second division of the Old found the page seen in the Bell opening the case could result in The answer lies inside the case. tary physical education teacher
Testament. I was able to find an Bible printed with New Testa- further damage to its delicate Pending on what is discovered, Jean Woodcock, to name a few.
exact match from an auction ments dated 1608, and again as pages. I would confidently date we will never know fore sure if One has to wonder what became
listing in England. The auc- late as 1640 by Robert Barker, the Bell Bible as being published Francis carried the Bible to the of the multiple Bibles that be-
tioneer’s bible was intact and son of Christopher. The Geneva between 1599 and 1644, when colony. Further examination is longed to Jonathan Bell. Perhaps
provided the opportunity to see Bible is historically significant the Geneva was last published. required. they will surface someday and
the main cover page; their book because it was the first to num- Did Francis Bell bring the book While I have not conducted yield new surprises.
was published in London by the ber verses, and is credited to be with him from England in 1630? extensive research on Bell de-
deputies of Christopher Barker, the first study Bible for home We don’t know for certain, but scendants, I have for the Hoyts. Dawn Roe is a state registered
printer to the queen in 1599. use. it is possible. While the estate A line of the Hoyts came to historian and an associate
Then I wondered if this page To properly date the Bell Bible papers for Francis didn’t contain Cayuga County in the 1790s, member of the Association of
appeared in any earlier editions. would require opening the case a detailed inventory list, there is some marrying into the prom- Public Historians of New York
“I have checked our 1585, 1685, to confirm if it has the New Tes- a list for his son Jonathan, who inent Webb family. There are State. She can be reached at
1589 and 1599 editions, and only tament, or to make a compari- died in 1699. The inventory list many Hoyt descendants here, portbyronhistory.com.

IN BRIEF
Benefit in Savarese’s of the Cayuga Community Health pastels, watercolors, mixed me- supports up to 80 percent of The bus will first stop at the
Network. dia, oils, acrylics, photography, project costs, with the applicants Corning museum, where partic-
name to be held For more information, visit in- sculpture, woodworking, fabric matching 20 percent. ipants can take self-guided tours
A memorial benefit for Joe Sa- digocny.com. art, pottery, jewelry, weaving For more information, visit or a two-hour group tour. The
varese will be held from 1 to 5 p.m. and basketmaking. Ribbons will sewardhouse.org or call (315) 252- current exhibit there focuses on
Saturday, Nov. 11, at Falcon Lanes, be awarded in each category, and 1283. the glass mosaics of Louis Com-
75 Pulaski St., Auburn. Schweinfurth seeks people’s choice ribbons will be fort Tiffany, and the mosaics of
The event will include a ziti din-
ner, a 50/50, baked goods, raffles,
10-by-10 art for awarded at each location.
The registration deadline is Oct. Auburn college the Auburn chapel are featured
prominently there.
door prizes and music by Motley auction 17, and there is a $5 fee per entry
organizing NYC bus There will also be a 20-minute
Crouton, Bad Water, Sean Mul- (maximum six entries, three per live glass demonstration.
doon and Level VII. The Schweinfurth Art Center category). Dropoff is 4 to 7 pm. trip Participants will then have time
Admission is $10. Proceeds will is seeking donations of artwork Thursday, Oct. 19. to explore the Gaffer District and
be donated in Savarese’s name to measuring 10 by 10 inches for its For more information, or to The Cayuga Community Col- its local shops, or visit the Rock-
the Wounded Warrior Project and second annual community exhibit register, visit fairhavenarts.org lege Alumni Association is ac- well Museum, which tells the
the Burn Foundation of CNY. and fundraiser, “10x10=ART.” or email fairhavenart@gmail.com. cepting reservations for a week- story of America through fine art.
For more information, or to The work will be sold at a silent end bus trip to New York City Sat- It is the only Smithsonian affiliate
make a donation, call Penny at auction Oct. 19 at the center, 205 urday and Sunday, Nov. 11 and 12. in upstate New York.
(315) 209-8975 or Tracy at (315) Genesee St., Auburn. Revenue Seward House wins The group will stay at the The bus will leave Corning at
224-5993. will support the center and its
exhibits, classes, scholarships and
$10K grant Hampton Inn near Times Square.
The trip will leave via deluxe mo-
about 4:30 p.m. to return to the
chapel, 17 Nelson St., Auburn.
Local musician community programs. The auc- for studies torcoach at 6 a.m. Saturday from For more information, includ-
tion event will also feature local the college’s Auburn campus, 197 ing pricing, visit willard-chapel.
Lyons nominated for food, wine and live music by Diana
Jacobs. Tickets are $25-$40.
The Seward House Museum
has received a $10,000 Preserve
Franklin St., Auburn, and arrive
before noon. The motorcoach
org or call (315) 252-0339.

award Donations will be accepted New York grant, which was an- will depart at 3 p.m. Sunday, and
Port Byron Seniors
through Oct. 14. Three donating nounced Sept. 11 by the New York return to Auburn by 9 p.m.
Area musician Irv Lyons Jr. artists will be selected for an ex-
has been nominated for a Native hibit in the center’s Gallery Julius
State Council on the Arts, Preser-
vation League of New York State
The trip is open to the public
and includes room (two people
announce trips
American Music Award in the in 2018. and Robert David Lion Gardiner per room), transportation, snacks The Port Byron Seniors group
Best Pop category for his newest For more information, call (315) Foundation. and complimentary breakfast at has announced its 2017 bus trips:
album, “Doing it All.” 255-1553 or visit myartcenter.org. The grant will support a build- the hotel.  Oct. 17: “A Taste of Ger-
A left-handed guitarist whose ing condition report on the Au- For more information, includ- many” (Blackhead Mountain
style is a cross between San- burn museum’s stone barn and ing cost, call (315) 294-8524 or Lodge, German meal at Maas-
tana, John Mayer and Stevie Ray Fair Haven Arts carriage house by Crawford & email alumni@cayuga-cc.edu. smann’s, Five State View Point
Vaughan, Lyons has released three
albums and previously been nom-
Center seeks entries Stearns, of Syracuse. The cur-
rently vacant barns were built in
Lookout and Catskill Mountain
Country Store)
inated for the award, also known for show 1860, and the report will inform Corning trip from  Dec. 17: Buffalo (“John Mor-
as the NAMMY. He has also been
nominated for a Syracuse Area Entries are sought for an up-
their rehabilitation so they can be
used by the museum.
Auburn to visit ris Russell’s Holiday Pops,” “The
Polar Express,” dinner at Salva-
Music Award. coming exhibition at the Fair Ha- A total of 30 applicants in 21 museums tore’s Italian Gardens)
Lyons is also a member of the ven Arts Center, 562 Main St., Fair counties received $239,634 in For more information, includ-
NAMMY-nominated group The Haven. Preserve New York funding. Ap- A trip to the Corning Museum of ing pricing or RSVPs, call (315)
Ripcords. Both frequently per- Amateur and professional art- plicants must be units of govern- Glass and Rockwell Museum will 730-2007.
form in the Auburn area. Lyons is ists from the greater Sterling area ment or nonprofit groups with leave Willard Memorial Chapel in
also the former executive director are welcome to submit drawings, tax-exempt status. The program Auburn at 9 a.m. Monday, Oct. 16. — From staff reports
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