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MENGJIA LONGSHAN TEMPLE

TAIWAN CONFUCIAN TEMPLE


CHIANG KAI-SHEK MEMORIAL HALL

CHUNG SHAN BUILDING


CHOSON TEMPLES

MIREUKSA PAGODA
BUHNWANGSA TEMPLE

SHINTO SHRINE
KITANO SHRINE

FUK TAK CHI TEMPLE


THIAN HOCK KENG TEMPLE

MARINA BAY TOWER


GARDENS BY THE BAY

ONE RAFFLES PLACE


MOYA
In Japanese architecture moya is the core of a building. Originally the central part of a residential building
was called moya. After the introduction of Buddhism to Japan in the 6th century, moya has been used to
denote the sacred central area of a temple building. It is generally surrounded by aisle like areas
called hisashi. In temples constructed in the hip-and-gable style (irimoya-zukuri), the gabled part usually
covers the moya while the hipped part covers the aisles.
TORIL

DAITO
A Japanese sword (nihont?) is one of several types of traditionally made swords from Japan. Swords
have been made from Kofun period and generally Japanese swords are the ones after the Heian period
having curves, and there are many types of Japanese swords that differ by size, shape, field of
application and method of manufacture. Some of the more commonly known types of Japanese swords
are the katana, wakizashi, and tachi.
TARUKI
Taruki - there are taruki of varying dimensions, where the term taruki is preceded by a noun that
describes the kind of taruki - such as yane-daruki, which means roofing joist. Roofing joists are typically
45 by 45 mm spaced a shaku apart, though spacing may vary depending on joist cross section and roof
slope. Confusingly, they can also be large 45 by 200 millimeter rafters, in cases where there is no further
framing, and plywood is nailed directly to them.
NOYANE
Noyane is a type of roof widely used in Japan both at Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines. It is
composed of a true roof above and a second roof beneath, permitting an outer roof of steep pitch to
have eaves of shallow pitch, jutting widely from the walls but without overhanging them. The second roof
is visible only from under the eaves and is therefore called a "hidden roof" (giving its name to the whole
structure) while the first roof is externally visible and is called an "exposed roof" in English and "cosmetic
roof" (keshyane?) in Japanese. Invented in Japan during the 10th century, its earliest extant example
is Hry-ji's Daik-d, rebuilt after a fire in 990.
MOKOSHI
In Japanese architecture a mokoshi (also pronounced shkai?), literally "skirt storey" or "cuff storey", is a
decorative pent roof surrounding a building below the true roof. Since it does not correspond to any
internal division, the mokoshi gives the impression of there being more floors than there really are. It is
usually a ken deep and is most commonly seen in Buddhist temples and pagodas (see for example the
article taht). The mokoshi normally covers a hisashi, a walled aisle surrounding a building on one or
more sides, but can be attached directly to the core of the structure (the moya), in which case there is
no hisashi. The roofing material for the mokoshi can be the same or different (see for example's Hry-
ji's kon-d) as in the main roof.
HISASHI
In Japanese architecture the term hisashi has two meanings:
As more commonly used, the term indicates the eaves of a roof, that is, the part along the edge of
a roof projecting beyond the side of the building to provide protection against the weather.
The term is however also used in a more specialized sense to indicate the area surrounding
the moya (the core of a building) either completely or on one, two, or three sides.
NAIKU
The Naiku (inner shrine) is dedicated to the Sun Goddess Amaterasu Omikami (Heaven-Illuminating
Great Deity)
SHIRIN

KENTOZUKA
Kentozuka is a decorative intercolumnar struts that is composed of a short post and a bearing block
installed in the intervals between bracket complexes (toky) at Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines in
Japan.