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REVIEW
the richmond
A whimsical bike rack 5
by Rebekah Hammond
Contributor
Westminster apartment fire vic-
tim Debbie Caliz got out with only the
clothes she was wearing, a couple pairs
of jeans and whatever she could grab
and fit into one bag.
Since the fire Caliz has been staying
with a friend.
“Ron took us into his home,” Caliz
said. “He’s been very wonderful to help
us with whatever we need. He assisted
us as promptly as possible.”
Yesterday, Caliz and the other 93 dis-
placed tenants were finally able to go
back to their apartments and take what
they could salvage from their apart-
ments.
One man died and nine were hospital-
ized in the Aug. 7 fire.
Caliz said she’s received a lot of help
and encouragement from the com-
munity and organizations, including
gift cards from the Tzu Chi Bhuddist
Foundation and food from the Salvation
Army.
“The community has been helping,”
Caliz said. “They’ve been willingly
donating stuff. A lot of people have
been helping me and I have to thank
them very much for that.”
While Caliz is grateful for the help
she’s gotten from friends and commu-
nity members, she wishes the building’s
management had worked to assist the
residents more.
“I asked for my rent to be refunded,”
she said. “I wasn’t refunded, I’ve only
be refunded back our damage deposit.
I think our rent should be refunded
back to us because they haven’t helped
me in any way.”
Building management onsite was
refusing comment, but according to
press releases the owner of the build-
ing has offered to rent suites in its other
apartments to displaced residents at
comparable prices.
Many of the residents were low-
income and didn’t have home insur-
ance. While the province’s emergency
social services provided short-term
assistance, long-term help comes
through community groups.
“In terms of the provincial assistance,
they’re provided with a couple nights
of hotel accommodation which gives
them a chance to make phone calls
to insurance companies, friends and
families for assistance,” said Cynthia
Lockrey, city spokesperson.
City service staff have connected the
victims with community organizations
such as the Salvation Army, SUCCESS
and the Tzu Chi Foundation.
About $3,100-worth of Salvation
Army Thrift Store vouchers were given
to seventeen of the families.
“A lot of them got out with just the
clothes in on their back so we gave
them vouchers,” said Major Brad Smith,
pastor for the Richmond Salvation
Army Community Church. “They were
for $100 per person to get clothes from
our Salvation Army Thrift stores.”
Though the Salvation Army doesn’t
have room to store donated items,
they’re also taking calls and co-ordinat-
ing donations.
“There have been people in the com-
munity who’ve phoned in who want to
donate furniture to the victims,” Smith
said. “We take their names and what
furniture they have. Victims of the fire
will phone in and we’ll go over our
donor list and they get in contact with
the donators.”
Smith has been encouraged by the
community’s willingness to help.
“The sense I’ve gotten is that [the
tenants] are being well-looked after,”
he said. “The people in Richmond are
great at reaching out. I think they’re
being taken care of.”
SUCCESS, another local social service
agency, has set up a trust fund through
TD Canada Trust for residents of the
Westminster apartment fire.
They’ve also taken requests from resi-
dents about what they need and have
created a donation wish list.
As of yet, the cause of the fire is still
unknown, but the Fire-Rescue depart-
ment has turned the care of the build-
ing back to the owners.
“The investigation is on-going,”
said Richmond Fire-Rescue chief John
McGowan. “We haven’t finalized the
report yet and the cause of the fire is
still undetermined.”
Fire investigators take interviews,
photographs and samples of evidence
from the fire scene and analyze them to
determine the origin and cause.
“Fire patterns often tell you where
the fire started,” said Richmond Fire-
Rescue deputy chief Kim Howell. “But
it takes a little more investigation to
determine the cause. It really depends
on the size and extent of the fire.”
Lee Buckley photo/www.leebuckley.com
The cause of an apartment fire that claimed one life continues to be investigated.
Community helping apartment fire victims
How to help
•Salvation Army: Call
604.277.2424
SUCCESS: Wire money or pay
a visit to a local TD Bank branch
and donate to account number
44-5223931 or call Richmond’s
Caring Place: 604.279.7180
Steveston
Sockeye
Spin a
success
Steveston’s population
swelled briefly Sunday,
as the historic fishing vil-
lage hosted the inaugural
Sockeye Spin.
Spectators lined the
course to watch the series
of criterium bike races,
sanctioned by Cycling B.C.
The riders raced along
a course that wound its
way through the village
core west on Moncton
Street starting at Second
Avenue, south on Third
Avenue, east on Bayview
Street and returning to
Moncton via No. 1 Road.
Various ages and ability,
from teens to seniors and
novice to experienced rid-
ers, participated.
The event was orga-
nized by the Steveston
Community Society.
Volunteer race organizer
Johanna Stewart said
most of the early feedback
has been positive. She
said riders were pleased
with most aspects of the
race and overwhelmed by
the show of support and
friendliness of the volun-
teers, which numbered
close to 100.
•See story, Page 20.
The Sockeye Spin debuted
last weekend.
P a g e 2 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
Whether you are an experienced meditator or just beginning, His Holiness
Sant Rajinder Singh Ji Maharaj can help you take the next step in your inner
growth. Come see why he is revered by seekers and respected by spiritual
leaders as one of the great spiritual Masters of our time.
H. H. Sant Rajinder Singh Ji Maharaj
in Richmond, BC, August 22, 2010
4VOEBZ"VHVTUrOPPO
Public Talk: Healthy Living; Healthy Spirit
Science of Spirituality Meditation and Ecology Centre
11011 Shell Road
(Shell Rd and Steveston Highway)
Richmond, BC V7A 3W7
For more information:
English: 604.985.5840
Hindi/Punjabi: 778.896.1483
Spanish: 778.839.3090
www.sos.org
This event is free and open to all.
Science of Spirituality is an international, nonproft, multi-
faith organization dedicated to love, unity and peace, under
the direction of H.H. Sant Rajinder Singh Ji Maharaj.
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 3
by Rebekah Hammond
Contributor
“There’s a hero in everybody.”
That was the theme of J.N. Burnett Secondary’s
student-driven summer program for 52 South
Korean exchange students who visited Canada
to learn the language and culture.
The 17 student volunteers learned about
leadership and made new friends when they
stepped up to the plate and welcomed the
international students into the community.
“It wasn’t just about ESL and learning anoth-
er language,” said Chantel Cheng who volun-
teered for fun. “It was also built on getting to
know other people from across the world.”
The Korean students, ages 13 to 18, were in
Richmond from July 28 until Aug. 13 and par-
ticipated in largely student-driven language
classes and leadership-building activities dur-
ing the week.
Inspiration for many of the events that taught
leadership skills came from the super hero
theme that was introduced at the beginning of
the students’ stay.
“We had a theme day,” Cheng said. “We
taught that there is a super hero in each and
everyone of us and you have to find it through
good leadership and activities.”
Team-building games included activities at
the Richmond Centre and a scavenger hunt in
Steveston.
There were also ESL classes that helped
improve the Korean students’ vocabulary and
speaking skills.
“In the morning we helped them with their
English reading, writing, and journaling,”
Cheng said.
“In the beginning, the language barrier was
really hard and challenging,” she said. “But
once we got to know each other the body
language helped and it was easier the rest of
the week.”
Another Burnett volunteer, Blossom Ko,
originally from Korea herself, used her Korean
language skills to help.
“[Ko] did an amazing job,” said Herj Ghaug,
one of the facilitating teachers. “She was run-
ning around to the various groups and she’d
help translate to those who weren’t getting
the concept.”
Ko also got updated with what was new in
Korea.
“I’ve been living here for a long time so I got
to connect with the Koreans and see what stuff
has changed.”
This was the first year Burnett ran the pro-
gram and initially it was going to be run solely
by teachers Ghaug and Leslie Cain.
Both teachers, believe the program was a
great success and are pleased the school has
been approved to have another Korean class
come next year.
“As a teacher, I’m very proud and honoured
to be a part of the team,” Ghaug said. “Both
Leslie and myself were amazed how these kids
came together and did an outstanding job for
Korean students.”
At first Ghaug wasn’t sure how well the sum-
mer would go.
“Realistically, we thought we were in for it,”
he said. “We were scared and nervous, but
once the seventeen individuals jumped on
board, it helped ease the tensions we were
feeling about it.”
“Our role was to facilitate the learning of
the Korean students,” Ghaug said. “[But] sev-
enteen heads are better than two heads. We
told [the students] that even though we’re
teachers, we would be going to them for their
feedback as well.”
During the first few days language skills were
an issue.
“There were a few days when the commu-
nication was hard,” Ghaug said. “But our stu-
dents came together to discuss the problems
that arose and solved them.”
Students used games like charades, hand
gestures and drawings to supplement verbal
instruction and discussion.
The Korean teachers were amazed to see
Canadian students were willing to volunteer
their summer hours towards the program, said
Ghaug.
Saturday morning marked the end of the
Korean students’ time in Richmond.
Ko and Cheng couldn’t specify a favorite
moment, saying each day was different and
fun, but by the end of the program both said
they made new friends and strengthened their
leadership skills.
“When you reach out to other people you find
that leader within you,” Cheng said. “There were
a lot of fun moments, but I’ll never forget saying
goodbye on the last day, it was hard for all of
us.”
Sockeye
numbers
surging as
run strength
builds
Set to top 14.5 million if
late stocks keep up pace
by Jeff Nagel
Black Press
Fraser River sockeye salmon are coming
in at an astonishing rate that’s surpassing
even the rosy forecast of fishery managers.
The Pacific Salmon Commission has steadi-
ly increased its estimate of the number of
incoming sockeye, now on track to exceed
14.5 million in total.
That’s more than the 11 million sockeye
projected in pre-season forecasts and far
better than the less than two million sock-
eye that returned in each of the past few
disastrous years.
“Overall, the run is looking quite good,”
said Barry Rosenberger, the federal fisher-
ies department’s area director for the B.C.
Interior. “Our test fishing is looking very
strong in the approach areas.”
Managers have okayed more commercial
fishery openings, including a yesterday’s
five-hour opening for gillnetters on the
Fraser River.
That’s in addition to ongoing catches
of sockeye by First Nations and sports
anglers.
Rosenberger said the aim is to catch
roughly another million fish in Canada with
the new openings, on top of the 1.7 mil-
lion sockeye already harvested by both
Canadian and U.S. fishermen.
The revised in-season forecasts issued
Tuesday afternoon by the Pacific Salmon
Commission upgraded the early summer-
run sockeye to 2.6 million—the largest
return on record for that component of the
Fraser run.
Just 800,000 early summer sockeye had
been forecast to come back.
Summer-run sockeye are also higher than
anticipated, at 3.3 million.
There’s still no in-season estimate of the
number of late-run sockeye returning to the
Fraser.
They’re expected to make up the bulk of
this year’s run and were projected at 8.5
million.
Rosenberger noted conservation measures
will be needed to protect weaker stocks,
such as the Cultus Lake sockeye, which
arrive at the same time as other stronger
late-run sockeye.
B.C. Fisheries Survival Coalition spokes-
man Phil Eidsvik said he’s still concerned
the Department of Fisheries and Oceans
isn’t allowing enough fishing given the large
run now underway.
If too many returning sockeye are let
through to spawn, he said, over-competition
on the spawning grounds could hurt future
stocks.
He said a “happy medium” number of
spawners would be three to five million,
noting that “much more than that and we’ve
got trouble.”
A J.N. Burnett student (right) helps a Korean visitor. Seventeen Burnett students worked with 52 South Korean exchange students who
visited Canada to learn the language and culture.
Students teach students and
build leadership skills
Seventeen student volunteers learned about
leadership and made new friends when they
stepped up to the plate and welcomed the in-
ternational students into the community.
P a g e 4 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
City of Richmond • 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 • Tel: 604-276-4000
www. ri chmond. ca
Please Don’t Cycle
on Sidewalks
Riding on Sidewalks is
Illegal unless Specifically
Directed by a Sign
Bicycles belong on the
roads. Sidewalks are
reserved for pedestrians
only and are intended to provide
a safe walking environment that
is separate from moving vehicles,
both cars and bicycles.
As a cyclist, you might feel safer
on sidewalks than on busy roads,
but research has proven that
cyclists are far more likely to
be involved in a collision with a
vehicle when using a sidewalk,
especially in the wrong direction
of travel, than on the roadway.
Riding on the sidewalk makes a
cyclist less noticeable and less
predictable to drivers, thereby
increasing the risk of crashes at
driveways and intersections.
Riding on sidewalks is also a
hazard to pedestrians. Cyclists
travel faster than walking speeds
and can startle pedestrians when
approaching without warning
from behind, which can lead
to a collision. Pedestrians can
change their direction and speed
instantaneously, which leaves a
cyclist with insufficient time to
react to avoid a collision.
Cyclists are much safer in the
street, following the rules of
the road for drivers of vehicles.
When riding on off-street
trails, always use a bell to
let pedestrians know you are
approaching.
Development Permit
Panel Meeting
Wednesday, August 25,
3:30 p.m. in Council
Chambers
Agenda Items:
1. 8228 Westminster
Highway – General
Compliance with DP 05-297678 –
Fortune Venture Enterprises Ltd.
– That plans involving changes to
the parking layout and building
elevations at 8228 Westminster
Highway be considered in
General Compliance with
Development Permit 05-297678.
2. 8171 and 8191 Leslie Road -
DP 09-457354 - Johnny Leung
– To (1) permit the construction
of a commercial complex
including retail spaces and
carwash services at 8171 and
8191 Leslie Road on a site zoned
Auto-Oriented Commercial (CA);
and (2) vary the provisions of
Richmond Zoning Bylaw 8500 to:
(a) reduce the exterior (east) side
yard setback from 3.0 m (9.8 ft.)
to 0.0 m (0.0 ft.); (b) reduce the
interior (west) side yard setback
from 3.0 m (9.8 ft.) to 0.0 m
(0.0 ft.); (c) reduce the front
(south) yard setback from 3.0 m
(9.8 ft.) to 2.2 m (7.2 ft.) to allow
an overhead gateway structure
be erected along the Leslie Road
frontage; (d) reduce the width
of three (3) standard parking
stalls from 2.65 m (8.7 ft.) to 2.5
m (8.2 ft.) and the width of one
(1) handicap parking stall from
3.7 m (12.1 ft.) to 3.5 m (11.5
ft.); and (e) reduce the on-site
parking requirement from eight
(8) stalls to six (6) stalls.
3. 10780 Cambie Rd. –
DV 10-535569 - Abbarch
Architecture Inc. – To vary the
provisions of Richmond Zoning
Bylaw 8500 to: (a) increase the
maximum height for accessory
structures from 12.0 m to
17.0 m; and (b) reduce the
minimum interior side yard
setback for buildings from
3.0 m to 0.25 m to permit the
construction of a 70.35m2
(approximate) recycling facility
and a wind turbine tower
at 10780 Cambie Road on
a site zoned Auto-Oriented
Commercial (CA).
Please call 604-276-4395 for
further information.
2011 City Grant
Program Open
Applications accepted
until October 15, 2010
The City of Richmond
supports the
enhancement of a
positive quality of life for all
its residents, and City Council
recognizes that one means of
helping to achieve this goal
is through an annual Grant
Program to support the work of
community service groups.
The City Grant Program and
Application Form are available
online through the City’s
website at www.richmond.
ca, or from the Information
Counter at City Hall,
6911 No. 3 Road, 604-276-
4000.
Applications will be considered
from non-profit organizations
meeting the program criteria.
Completed applications must
be received at the Richmond
City Hall Information Counter
by 5:00 p.m. on Friday,
October 15, 2010.
If you have any questions
regarding the program or your
application, please contact
Lesley Sherlock, Social Planner,
at 604-276-4220.
Grow Up!
Activities for the whole
family – Saturday,
August 28
In conjunction with the
exhibition Strange Nature,
Richmond Art Gallery, in
partnership with Richmond Food
Security Society, presents Grow
Up!, with activities for the whole
family.
Visit Minoru Plaza (7700 Minoru
Gate) at the Richmond Cultural
Centre on Saturday, August 28
between 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Plant Exchange: bring a plant to
get a plant; Food Bank: bring a
non-perishable food item to get
an extra ticket for the door prize
draw.
There will be an artist talk with
Robin Ripley, a seed bomb
workshop for teens, a bee hive
demo, children’s art activities,
and a Bannock making demo.
There will also be a City of
Richmond Natural Yard Care
and GREENCAN program info
session, music, door prizes, sale
items (500 winter vegetable
seedlings) and more.
For more information, please call
the Richmond Art Gallery at
604-247-8300.
Accepting 2011
City Grant Program
applications until
October 15.
Community news covering August 19 – August 26, 2010
CI T Y PAGE

Richmond
Calendar
Development Permit Panel
Wednesday, August 25, 2010
Council Chambers, City Hall
3:30 p.m.
All other regular meetings
for the month of August
have been cancelled
25
Bike rack is
shaped like
a...bicycle
by Rebekah Hammond
Contributor
There’s a new bike
rack in town and it’s got
wheels of its own.
Functionality meets
art when it comes to
the bicycle-shaped bike
rack recently installed
in front of Village Bikes
in Steveston.
“We had it made up
awhile ago and the
city just came by and
installed it,” said Brett
Martyniuk, owner of the
bike shop. “It definitely
worked with the theme
of things.”
The rack’s design is
original to the Lower
Mainland and has
already attracted a lot
of attention from visi-
tors passing by.
“People are always
taking pictures of
it,” Martyniuk said.
“There’s lots of interest
in it.”
Not only is it a unique
shape, but it’s been
whimsically painted by
local artist Raymond
Chow.
Dr. Seuss-inspired fish
swim along the bright
blue, red and gold
frame.
Chow was originally
given the idea to paint
salmon and whales on
the bike, but he wanted
something more basic.
Inspiration came from
a book in the window
of Gerry’s Books in
Steveston.
“Dr. Seuss came to
the rescue, I liked the
humour of it,” Chow
said. “It was simple to
do little fish chasing
each other so it could be
seen from a distance.”
The idea for the bike
rack was inspired by a
similar one Martyniuk’s
father, Ray, saw while
travelling in Portland,
Ore. a couple of years
ago.
Ray saw the design
and snapped a picture
of it. Back in Canada,
the Martyniuks sent the
picture to a local welder
who recreated it for
them.
Artistic, yet functional,
the design went over
well with the city and
there may be plans to
install similarly cre-
ative bike racks around
Richmond.
“We’re seeing what’s
happening with this
one and then we’ll
go from there,” said
Dave Semple, general
manager for parks and
recreation.
“It’s a whimsical way
to look at the needs
of the community,”
Semple said. “I think
it’s great to have peo-
ple biking and I think
it makes sense they
should have something
fun to attach to it.”
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 5
Better Grades Happier Kids
Grade 1 - 12
It can start happening today! With Oxford’s personalized programs
and low teacher-student ratio, your child will see results
almost immediately.
- Improved ConÀdence
- Higher Self-Esteem
Half Day Phonics Program
(Ages 3-6 yrs)
Oxford’s Little Readers® half day programs offer
an enriched, individualized curriculum introducing
three to six year olds to reading.
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The Richmond Review is
publishing an Arts and
Culture Overview
this fall and we’re looking
for someone to help
put it together.
If you have an interest in the Arts
or Culture, let us know in 150
words or less why you would be
a good choice to help us put this
edition together.
The winner will sit in on story meetings
and help decide content for our special
edition on September 18.
Win a chance to be
Editor
for a
day
For your chance to win,
email your entry to
Editor for a Day at
contests@
richmondreview.com.
Entry deadline is
Friday, August 20. REVIEW
the richmond
Information importante: traduisez s’il vous plaît. ࡌ࠱௢Ѿçቁӗʆᙲᜃé
Mahalagang Pag-uulat: Pakisalin lamang. zrUrI sUcnw ikrpw krky Anuvwd kr.
Ba»noe oõ+xn¬enne: Ho»a¬vnc1a nepenenn1e.
SCHOOL DI STRI CT NO. 38 ( RI CHMOND)
1. Under the student placement policy, newly arriving students (new Richmond residents or residents
moving within Richmond and changing schools) to the Richmond School District should register as soon
as possible: Monday, July 12 – Wednesday, August 25, 2010 at the District Registration Center,
7811 Granville Avenue, 9 A.M.–12 NOON (Mon/Wed/Fri only).
After Monday, August 30, 2010, 1 P.M., students register at the neighbourhood school.
2. A parent or legal guardian must personally attend when registering their son or daughter and present
original documents for proof of residence (one of the following: mortgage document, rental or lease
agreement, property tax notice or unconditional contract of purchase and sale with possession date),
proof of Canadian citizenship or Landed Immigrant Status for child and parents, birth certificate,
immunization record, if available, and last report card, if available.
3. Late Returning Students: Parents of a child who is currently enrolled in a Richmond school and is
returning to school later than 12 NOON on Wednesday, September 8, 2010 but before Thursday,
September 30, 2010 must advise the school in writing by July 2, 2010 of the late return date to hold
the student’s place in the school.
For further information please contact the district office,
at 604-668-6000 or 604-668-6087.

R I C H MO N D S C H O O L D I S T R I C T
Student Placement Policy
New to Richmond? Moving within Richmond?
Register NOW for School!
Rebekah Hammond photo
Brett Martyniuk with a bike rack painted by local artist Raymond Chow.
Whimsical bike rack rolls into Steveston
P a g e 6 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
Bylaws 8619 and 8598 are scheduled for adoption on
September 13, 2010.
Business Licence Bylaw 7360
Amendment Bylaw 8619
The proposed amendment will establish definitions, regulations and permit fee
for professional dog walkers.
Animal Control Regulation Bylaw 7932
Amendment Bylaw 8598
The proposed amendment will amend the regulations for dog designated off-
leash areas.
Written submissions may be made to Council on the proposed bylaw
amendments by writing to the City Clerk c/o 6911 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C.,
V6Y 2C1 or by sending a fax to 604-278-5139.
Arrangements may also be made for oral submissions to Council by calling
604-276-4163. All submissions received prior to the adoption of the bylaws
will be forwarded to Council for consideration. Complete copies of the
reports are available on the City Website at www.richmond.ca (Home>City
Hall>City Council>Agendas & Minutes>Council Meetings>2010 Agenda &
Minutes>(Tuesday, July 27, 2010) or by calling the Parks Division at
604-244-1275.
Environmental sustainability workshops
Register for free classes
This series of workshops will show you ways to reduce pesticide use and create
a more sustainable community. The workshops are part of the City’s Pesticide
Risk Reduction Policy and sustainability, waste reduction and water conservation
initiatives. The workshops are free, however, registration is required.
There are two ways to register:
• Online at www.richmond.ca/register
• Through the registration call centre from Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. –
5:30 p.m. at 604-276-4300 (press “2” at the prompt)
If you register but cannot attend, please contact the registration call centre to
make your space available for someone else.
Harvesting compost
Saturday, August 21:
10:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Reg #38010, Free, 16+years
Terra Nova Rural Park,
2631 Westminster Hwy
Pesticide free gardening
Saturday, August 29: 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Reg #38401, Free, 16+years
Thompson Community Centre,
5151 Granville Ave
Saturday, September 25:
9:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Reg #62802, Free, 16+ years
Nature Park, 11851 Westminster Hwy
Growing in small spaces
Saturday, September 25:
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Reg #62801, Free, 16+ years
Nature Park, 11851 Westminster Hwy
Organic fall vegetable gardening
Wednesday, September 15:
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Reg #46151, Free, 16+ years
West Richmond Community Centre,
9180 No. 1 Rd
Organic winter vegetable gardening
Wednesday, September 29:
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Reg #61951, Free, 16+ years
Hamilton Community Centre,
5140 Smith Drive
Safe & sensible fall lawn care
Saturday, September 25:
12:30 – 2:00 p.m.
Reg #55924, Free, 16+ years
Richmond Nature Park, 11851
Westminster Hwy
For more information on the workshops, email ESOutreach@richmond.ca or call
604-233-3318.
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Inter-Faith
Bridging
discussion
to be held
tonight
by Jessica Tieszen
Contributor
The Ri chmond
Multicultural Concerns
Society will host a
forum on its Inter-Faith
Bridging project on
Thursday from 7 to 9
p.m. at the Richmond
Cultural Centre Lecture
Hall.
The discussion fol-
lows a tour earlier this
month of temples and a
mosque, giving attend-
ees a basic understand-
ing of Hinduism, Islam
and Sikhism.
Some of the questions
to be asked include:
•Explain the signifi-
cance of idol worship/
dieties in Hinduism,
perceived association of
violence with Sikhism,
and perceived associa-
tion terrorism in Islam.
How will you tell a lay-
person and how can
these misconceptions
be addressed for the
public at large?
•What is the role of
women in your faith?
Are males treated differ-
ently?
•What does your reli-
gion say about interfaith
marriages?
“This is a good follow
up from what we have
previously done with the
religious walk,” explains
organizer Balwant
Sanghera. “Our main pur-
pose is to create aware-
ness and understanding
about faith. I believe
the public will signifi-
cantly benefit from these
forums.”
Feedback and support
from previous events has
been far greater than
expected. The original
75 registered for the
Inter-Faith Bridging tour
grew to 200 people at
the event. Participants
credited the event as
extremely worthwhile
and informative.
For information and
registration contact
Richmond Multicultural
Concerts Society at 604-
279-7160 or e-mail laila@
rmcs.bc.ca.
Richmondites have an opportu-
nity to get up-close and personal
with birds of prey at a Falconry
Show that’s being held at Terra
Nova Rural Park.
The Pacific Northwest Raptors
group from Cowichan, which
specializes in rescuing, training
and working with birds of prey
will be in Richmond with their
feathered friends all day on
Sunday, Aug. 22.
Hawks, eagles and a turkey
vulture will be featured at the
event showing off their hunting
skills.
The demonstration begins at 11
a.m. and goes until 4 p.m. and is
free of charge.
Call Richmond Nature Park at
604-718-6188 for more info.
Birds of prey land at Terra Nova Sunday
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 7
FR
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&

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REVIEW
the richmond
FAMILY
FUN FOR
ALL!
NEXT MARKET
SUNDAY, AUG. 29
TH
10 am - 4 pm
Meet with friends and neighbours while
you shop locally and eat seasonally!
More produce and plants are arriving weekly!
Every market – Children’s Tent.
Come make a craft for FREE!
Book Swap: Bring a children’s book
and swap it for a different one.
For further information visit www.sfam.ca
or call Paula at 604-729-7326
or email marketmanager@shaw.ca
Located at the corner
Chatham St.and 4th Ave.
Title Sponsor
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Prepay your registration online at
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Pre-registration
5pm – 8pm Friday August 27th
Ride day registration
7AM – 8:30AM Saturday August 28th
South Delta Baptist Church
1988 56th Street, Tsawwassen
Join hundreds
of motorcycle
enthusiasts for a
police escorted
parade through the
city followed by a
scenic country
poker tour.
First 500 riders
to register get a
FREE meal
and a gift.
Do you know someone who could benefit from a
Style Rx makeover?
Send your nominations to StyleRx@live.ca.
Please include your full name, contact information, the nominee's
full name, a recent photo and why they require a makeover.
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REVIEW
the richmond
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Richmond
Maritime
Festival,
dragon boat
race coming
this weekend
The seventh annual
Richmond Maritime
Festival and the
inaugural Steveston
Dragon Boat Festi-
val are being held at
Britannia Heritage
Shipyard this Saturday
and Sunday.
The Steveston Dragon
Boat Festival will give
dragon boat enthusi-
asts a chance to test
their skill. Special
attractions include an
Adventure Race pitting
dragon boat, canoe,
kayak and inflatable
boat. Newcomers can
also try their hand at
dragon boating or take
it a step further by
training Saturday and
competing in a race on
Sunday.
A special fundrais-
ing barbecue will
take place at 5 p.m.
Saturday with pro-
ceeds to the Richmond
Food Bank and the
Steveston Museum’s
“Japanese Hospital”
project. Site admission
is free to the general
public. To take part or
for more details visit
www.dragonboatbc.ca.
The Richmond
Maritime Festival offers
free fun for the whole
family, including live
entertainment, hands-
on nautical displays
and activities, and a
floating showcase of
historic and unique
boats. Other highlights
include face painting,
pirate hat making and
pirate tattoos, roaming
pirates and mascots,
maritime exhibitors
and demonstrations
including knot tying,
rope making, model
boat building and net
mending. Tasty food
and beverages will also
be available.
by Tom Fletcher
Black Press
MLAs will wait for a judge to rule on
the validity of Bill Vander Zalm’s peti-
tion to kill the harmonized sales tax,
Kamloops-North Thompson MLA Terry
Lake said.
Lake is the convenor of the legislative
committee that is preparing to meet for
the first time ever to deal with Canada’s
first successful citizen initiative. But in a
letter to Vander Zalm, Lake said the leg-
islation requires him to wait to receive
the 700,000-name petition from Elec-
tions BC before calling the committee
together.
Legal arguments began Monday in B.C.
Supreme Court on two court challenges
related to the imposition of the HST on
July 1. A business group represented by
former attorney-general Geoff Plant is
arguing that the petition is invalid be-
cause it calls on the legislature to repeal
a federal law.
Vander Zalm has sponsored his own
court challenge of the HST, with lawyer
Joe Arvay saying the tax isn’t lawful be-
cause the B.C. legislature didn’t pass a
motion to explicitly endorse it, as other
provinces did.
The power to sponsor citizen initia-
tives or recall elected officials was first
proposed when Vander Zalm was pre-
mier in the late 1980s, then enacted by
the NDP government of Mike Harcourt in
the early 1990s. It has never been suc-
cessfully used.
In addition to Lake, the standing
committee includes B.C. Liberal MLAs
Eric Foster (Vernon-Monashee), Dave
S. Hayer (Surrey-Tynehead), Richard
Lee (Burnaby North), Pat Pimm (Peace
River North), and John Slater (Boundary-
Similkameen).
NDP MLAs on the committee are Mike
Farnworth (Port Coquitlam), Katrine
Conroy (Kootenay West), Rob Fleming
(Victoria-Swan Lake) and Jenny Kwan
(Vancouver-Mount Pleasant).
If the petition reaches that stage, the
committee must decide whether to sub-
mit a bill to the legislature that would
“extinguish” the HST and pay back all
the extra money collected under it, or
stage a province-wide referendum on
the measure.
NDP attorney-general critic Leonard
Krog also wrote to Elections BC on Mon-
day, urging acting Chief Electoral Officer
Craig James to forward the 700,000-
name petition to the legislative com-
mittee immediately, or at least explain
why he has refused to do so.
If the business groups challenging the
anti-HST petition want the court to stop
the process while their arguments are
heard, they can apply for an injunction,
Krog said.
Krog wrote that his reading of the Re-
call and Initiative Act is that it requires
Elections BC to forward to the commit-
tee any petition that gathers enough
support, “but at a minimum, the public
should be provided with a clear expla-
nation, including any legal opinions or
Legislative committee
awaits HST petition
P a g e 8 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
Why pour water on the grass
when others are thirsty?
I
had the pleasure
of taking my family
camping to Galiano
this summer.
Apart from the few taps
dotted around the camp
ground, there was no running
water.
After our second day on
the site, when I had just fin-
ished a long hike, I decided
that going to bed sticky and
stinky just wasn’t an option.
So, I bathed myself, using
the corner of a clean t-shirt
as a sponge, with one cup
of water. Yup, soaped and
rinsed with one cup. It was
kind of fun to demonstrate
the technique to the girls.
My eldest kind of just
rolled her eyes, wondering
when she’d ever need to use
that skill. To her, water is
a resource that is in abun-
dance. Turn on the tap, and
it gushes out. But what will
happen if that’s not always
the case?
After grad school, my
husband and I spent a year
conducting research in
Gujarat, India. After finding
an apartment in the capital,
Ahmedabad, we went about
scrubbing the place top to
bottom with the water that
the landlord had left us in a
barrel. By evening, there was
just half a bucket left so we
turned on the tap to refill. No
such luck. The landlord had
failed to inform us that that
water was only on for one
hour every day—from 6 to
7 a.m.
Neil and I were covered in
grime and we only then real-
ized that no running water
also meant no water to flush
the toilets! That night, we
perfected our one-cup self-
scrub and for the rest of the
year, we were extremely con-
scious of how much water
we used and made sure we
always filled our barrel up
whenever the water did come
on.
Fast forward 15 years and
I’m back in Richmond, living
in what was once a temper-
ate rain forest. I use the term
was because I can’t recall
ever seeing a series of sum-
mers like the ones we’ve just
been through. I remember
summer rains, throughout
June, July and August when
I was growing up here. I
don’t recall seeing lawns go
brown. How can I be so sure?
Because it was my job to
rake up the lawn clippings
every week and I still recall
the blisters all summer long
from grass that refused to
stop growing.
We seem to now be moving
into a more Mediterranean
climate with long stretches
of no precipitation and then
heavy rains in certain months
(remember last November?).
And while the summer got off
to a late start, the tomatoes,
basil and zucchini seem to
be loving this heat. And the
lawn? It’s gone dormant. As it
should be. Grass is an amaz-
ingly resilient plant. Come
fall, when the rains do come
back, it will green up again
nicely. In the meantime, I no
longer have to mow it. Now
that’s a perk!
Knowing how resilient
lawns are and having spent
time in the Third World where
people hardly have enough
water to drink let alone bathe
in, you can imagine what
happens when I come upon
a lawn that’s lush and green
right now. Instead of swear-
ing out loud, I look at it as a
teachable moment.
“So girls”, I ask, “What do
you think about this lawn?”
“Looks nice,” they reply, “soft
and green.” “You saw the
news, right, that Russia is
burning because of a drought
and that Pakistanis are now
dying because of a lack of
clean drinking water? What
do you think about our soci-
ety pouring drinking water
on grass?” The penny drops
and we have a discussion on
how brown is beautiful and
that we wear our brown lawn
with pride.
So, what’ll it be Richmond?
Do we have a contest to see
how many brown lawns we
have versus other municipali-
ties? What’ll it take for us to
stop wasting such a precious
resource?

Arzeena Hamir is co-ordi-
nator of the Richmond Food
Security Society. She writes
weekly on environmental
issues.
140-5671 NO. 3 RD., RICHMOND, B.C. V6X 2C7
604-247-3700 • FAX: 604-606-8752 • WWW.RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
Interfaith
bridging
T
onight the Richmond Multicultural
Concerns Society will hold a discus-
sion as part of its Inter-Faith Bridg-
ing Project, focussing on three religions:
Hinduism, Islam and Sikhism.
The discussion follows a successful tour of
temples and a mosque on No. 5 Road recently that
attracted 200 people.
The Inter-Faith Bridging project is a tremendous
initiative that helps bring about a greater under-
standing of three religions. They happen to be reli-
gions that often get noticed by major media for the
actions of some of their more violent followers. It is
nice to see an initiative that instead looks at build-
ing an understanding of and between Hinduism,
Islam and Sikhism.
While Richmond recently made the news for the
actions of a couple of punks with a penchant for
racist graffiti, the reality is the city is a model of
multiculturism. It’s a place where people of differ-
ent religions often portrayed as being at odds with
each other get along with each other. It’s interest-
ing to note that the Inter-Faith Bridging tour was
a walking one since the temples and mosque are
neighbours on No. 5 Road. This is also a city that
saw a basketball game played between a Muslim
school and a Jewish school. Again the message is
people of different faiths do get along.
The Richmond Multicultural Concerns Society
deserves a lot of credit for helping organize the
Inter-Faith Bridging Project. It’s been a great suc-
cess and hopefully in future Richmond residents
can look forward to similar projects involving other
religions.
Tonight’s forum is 7 to 9 p.m. at the Richmond
Cultural Centre Lecture Hall.
The Richmond Reviewis a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body gov-
erning the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints fromthe public about
the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input
fromboth the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not
resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council.
Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201
Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2.
REVIEW
the richmond
Published in Richmond every Thursday and Saturday by Black Press Ltd.
PUBLISHER
MARY KEMMIS, 604-247-3702
PUBLISHER@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
CIRCULATION MANAGER
RACHAEL FINKELSTEIN, 604-247-3710
CIRCULATION@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER
JAANA BJORK, 604-247-3716
JAANA@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
EDITOR
BHREANDAIN CLUGSTON, 604-247-3730
EDITOR@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
opinion
Shades of Green
Arzeena Hamir
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 9
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When not at Ironwood Dental Centre my husband,
three children, and I enjoy playing soccer, skiing on
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love the fresh foods at our local farmers' markets
and doing my part to make Richmond cleaner and
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sen Dr. Alison Fransen
letters
Editor:
The other day I said goodbye
to a long-time fishermen friend
of mine at his celebration of life
and I got to reflecting of all he
had meant to me.
It was during the fishermen
and shoreworker’s retraining
program almost a decade ago
that I met Danny Gordon, who
became in charge of the crew
who were to restore the Murchi-
son houses, two historic homes
that I had saved. It was a project
that the entire crew had taken
on with pride and enthusiasm,
and as the restoration went on
they helped prove the heritage
value of the houses, which a
couple of us had known from
the beginning.
From time to time a problem
would have arisen, but it was
always Danny who would look at
how worried I was and say “We’ll
get ’er done, me son” This would
be followed by that broad smile
of his and laughter as well, and I
was never sure just how he was
going to solve the problem. But
I knew that if he wasn’t going to
solve the problem, his cohort,
and another good friend, Randy
was. Between the two of them
any bump in the restoration road
was always well taken care of
and I was always very relieved
and indebted to them.
The pride and professional-
ism that Danny instilled in the
crew was very well reflected
when some very important
artefacts were found in the attic
of the house. The location of
the artefacts were immediately
catalogued as was each indi-
vidual artefact. I was impressed
and delighted with the in-depth
notations and drawings of the
location and artefacts and I knew
that this crew, like all the other
crews working on the waterfront,
were putting their heart and
souls into the projects they were
assigned and to this day I am
very proud of them.
I also got to know Danny as a
friend as well and always loved
his free spirited sense of humour
and his positive outlook on life.
Being with him and his beloved
missy on the boat, or on the
project was always a joy as he’d
regularly begin telling fishing
stories at the drop of a hat, or in
his case hook.
When the need arose though,
Danny was indeed one to call a
spade a spade and a sockeye a
sockeye, informing people that
the fishery was in trouble and
that something should be done.
He cared about the industry he
was a part of and wanted to help
repair the damage that had been
done over the years. The sea and
the fishery were in his blood.
I guess part of that came
from when he was in the Royal
Canadian Navy. And as I thought
how the navy was celebrating
it 100th anniversary this year,
I thought of how Danny in
his own stint in the force, had
helped keep alive the traditions
to which the navy is so proud
of today. Seeing photographs
of him in uniform and hearing
about his navy days again, a
part of me wanted to stand to
attention and salute. Danny’s
response would most likely
have been, “Why would want to
salute an old bugger like me.”
Again true to form of his free
spirited sense of humour.
But I salute him never the less,
for never could you find a truer,
more happy-go-lucky and saltier
friend and of that I am indebted.
I am reminded of something
another true friend of mine
said at a celebration of life for
another Steveston fisherman,
when she said, “He’s making
one more trip; he’s gone for the
big one.”
And so I say so long my friend,
and may you have a true course,
always a star to guide you, a
hold full of fish, and may the
memory we all have of you
never sail over the horizon of
our lives. Anchor’s away my
friend.
Gordon Kibble
Richmond
Remembering Danny Gordon
P a g e 1 0 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
7th annual Richmond Maritime Festival
Celebrate our maritime heritage with a free family festival,
including live entertainment, food from around the world,
hands-on nautical displays and activities, children’s activities
and a floating showcase of historic and unique boats.
Friday, August 20, 12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m., Saturday
and Sunday, August 21 and 22, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Britannia Heritage Shipyard, 5180 Westwater Drive
Steveston Dragon Boat Festival
Watch more than 30 teams compete in exciting dragon boat
races. Try your hand at dragon boating or watch the Adventure
Race pitting dragon boat, canoe, kayak and inflatable boat.
Dance the night away at a special free concert on Saturday
night featuring the rollicking, Celtic-flavoured music of
Wheat In The Barley; the rhythmic African beats of Rwandan
multi-instrumentalist and singer Ezra Kwizera; and bluegrass
favourites Redgrass.
Saturday, August 21, 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Sunday, August 22, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Britannia Heritage Shipyard, 5180 Westwater Drive
Musical Expressions Summer Concert Series
Popular local performers Bruce Coughlan, Bob Kemmis and
Cherelle Jardine perform at the Britannia Heritage Shipyard.
Admission is $25. Tickets are available at the Shipyard.
Friday, August, 20, 6:30 p.m.
Britannia Heritage Shipyard, 5180 Westwater Drive
www.richmond.ca
Float.
Paddle.
Eat.
Dance.
Find your way to Steveston
for free summertime fun
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 1 1
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FRESH BLUEBERRI ES ARE NOW I N
CORNER OF BLUNDELL AND SI DAWAY
(look for the red barn)
Editor:
Re: “Steveston trees
will be replaced,”
Richmond Review,
Aug. 14.
A familiar cry from
Steveston regarding
the cutting of trees. We
hear the same thing
every time: the trees
were in poor health,
just like the 19 or 20
trees cut in front of
where the oval is now
or the trees cut on the
property next to me.
A beautiful tree was
cut about 14 inches
across at the butt. It
to was supposed to be
in poor health. I took
a picture of it just to
show the city arborist.
But the decision stood.
Truth is the developers
pay to cut these trees
and handsomely.
Wander in to city hall
sometime and take a
look at their donors list.
You will quickly find out
why develeopers can
do anything they want.
Pay close attention to
Mr. Towsend’s state-
ment “Trees will be
replaced, space permit-
ting.”
City bylaws regarding
trees are powerless.
Developement is about
money and nothing
else.
Mayor and council will
continue to allow this
practice as long as they
are allowed to do it.
I actually spoke with
the city arborist and
asked what qualified
this person to deem
the trees unhealthy.
The response: “I have
been doing this for
many years.” I’ve been
driving for 45 years but
by no means consider
myself an expert.
Dean Beauvais
Richmond
letters
Editor:
I am disgusted with
dog owners who do not
pick up after their dogs.
I own a small dog that
I walk at least twice a
day around the Garrett
Wellness Centre. Not
only does the centre
have a community gar-
den but also a playing
field for the neighbour-
hood.
I am aware of the
signs that tell you to
keep your dog on a
leash and clean up
after it.
Every morning I see
so much dog poop on
the grass and sidewalk
that I wonder where
and how these dog
owners live. Do they
appear like ghosts after
dark because I don’t
see them when I am
walking.
Everyone that I meet
on my walk seems to be
carrying a “poop bag.”
It is disgusting that
children have to watch
where they play in the
Garrett field but more
disgusting is the fact
that dog owners are so
filthy. Smarten up, you
give dog walkers who
take care to clean up
after their dog a bad
name.
Wilma Poirier
Richmond
Trees cut and a familiar refrain
Please clean up after your dog
P a g e 1 2 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
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letters
Editor:
I believe vandalism is
getting out of control.
Hooligans tore down
a sign from the No.
1 Road pumping sta-
tion about a boundary
regarding fishing areas
for First Nations. I think
it would cost $200 to
replace it.
I telephoned the
RCMP about the sign
being in the river. The
RCMP told the City of
Richmond about it.
Nearby, I saw a bench
that had carvings on
it. I told two big, 200-
pound men it was not
nice to sit with their
dirty shoes on the
bench. If the backboard
should break with their
combined 400-pound
weight, they could pos-
sibly hurt themselves.
I saw several people
sitting with their shoes
on the benches. I told
them to sit properly on
the benches and that
I scrub the bench in
memory of my wife.
In the same area I
saw people barbecuing
on a table. The char-
coal from the barbecue
burned the table badly.
It would cost hundreds
of dollars to repair it.
The bench in memory
of my wife has been
hit three times by care-
less motorists. Another
time unprintable words
and a swastika were
carved on the bench. I
was pleased that city
employees cleaned it
up and made it like
new.
One day I saw man
sleeping on the bench.
I saw tins of salmon,
coffee cups and ciga-
rette butts beside him.
He refused to clean up
the rubbish. The same
man rides an electric
bicycle and receives
workers compensa-
tion. People who ride
electric bicycles should
carry liability insur-
ance.
Norman Wrigglesworth
Richmond
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Letters to the
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•Send letters to
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taste. No poems,
essays or epics.
I
t took Bill
Vander Zalm
about an hour
to whip up a new
conspiracy theory
after the decision
by Elections B.C. to
wait for the courts
to rule on his peti-
tion against the
harmonized sales
tax.
The dapper Delta
shrub merchant
squinted through his
shades at the media
arrayed around him in
Vancouver and insinu-
ated that the Chief
Electoral Officer is in
the tank for Premier
Gordon Campbell and
his business buddies.
Not in so many words,
of course. That could
cause Vander Zalm’s
already impressive
legal bills to grow fur-
ther. So his statements
were carefully calculat-
ed to trash an indepen-
dent office on the level
of the auditor-general,
and its interim occu-
pant, veteran legislative
clerk Craig James.
“James is opening
the door for any group
opposed to a citizen
initiative to thwart
the democratic will of
the people simply by
launching a challenge to
that petition in court,”
Vander Zalm proclaimed
in a press release from
his anti-HST boiler room.
“It is outrageous, and
reeks of political interfer-
ence by the government
and their friends in big
business, and we are not
going to allow it.”
A later press release
adopts the tone of roy-
alty: “We have lost con-
fidence that the Chief
Electoral Officer can be
relied upon to carry out
his duties faithfully and
impartially.”
Zalm then tried to
elbow aside this fallen
angel and proceed on
behalf of Her Majesty
himself, presenting
Canada’s first success-
ful initiative petition to
the designated commit-
tee of the B.C. legisla-
ture. Alas, Zalm’s legal
advice is off the mark
once again: there is
no time limit specified
to submit the petition.
Elections B.C. is pro-
ceeding cautiously in
uncharted legal waters
while the B.C. Supreme
Court considers two
HST cases, including
one from Zalm himself.
Here’s one obvi-
ous point to illustrate
that this corruption
allegation is insulting
nonsense. If Campbell
wanted to stall the peti-
tion, he could simply do
it in the legislature. No
need to subvert trusted
officials of the provin-
cial Crown.
Of course this is just
the latest addition to
Zalm’s overstuffed
clown car of conspira-
cies. Stumping against
the HST, he claimed
that world-government
plotters invented global
warming to advance
their vast scheme, and
now they’re doing the
same thing with con-
sumption taxes and
(gasp) a trade agree-
ment between Canada
and the European Union.
This all plays well with
hardcore Zalmoids,
who would have been
pleased to hear of
Campbell’s invitation to
the secretive Bilderberg
conference, held this
year in Spain. Other
Canadian invitees were
former New Brunswick
premier Frank McKenna
and CBC anchorman
Peter Mansbridge, so
clearly there’s a planet-
wide conspiracy.
This is all entertain-
ing, and chants of
“recall, recall” will be
heard for months to
come. Zalm’s field gen-
erals first issued and
then retreated from
a deadline of Nov. 15
to start “total recall.”
Now they’re looking at
springtime. This is a
sign that the clown car
is running low on gas.
There are people,
some in the media, who
long to see B.C. politics
get back to “normal.”
Normal in this case
means a sickening lurch
from one bush-league
humiliation to the next,
with premiers resigning
in disgrace before vot-
ers even have a chance
to throw them out.
But voters should
remember what Zalm
is really demanding.
Repeal a federal law,
reinstate the provincial
sales tax bureaucracy
and repay every addi-
tional dime collected
under the HST. A night-
mare of service cuts
would surely ensue.
The costs of this lunacy
haven’t even been cal-
culated, since everyone,
even the supposedly
anti-tax NDP, knows it’s a
fantasy garden.
Tom Fletcher is a leg-
islative reporter and col-
umnist for The Richmond
Review and other Black
Press newspapers.
He may be reached at
tfletcher@blackpress.ca.
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 1 3
each
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The Commission will hold a hearing commencing on 20 September 2010, at 9:00 a.m., to consider the
following applications. Deadline for submission of interventions/comments: 23 August 2010.
• Shaw Cablesystems Limited – renewal of the Class 1 licence for its terrestrial broadcasting
distribution undertaking (BDU) serving Chilliwack, Coquitlam, Courtenay, Comox, Powell River,
Duncan, Kamloops, Kelowna, Nanaimo, New Westminster, Penticton, Prince George, Vancouver,
Richmond, Victoria, White Rock, British Columbia
• Novus Entertainment Inc. – renewal of the Class 1 licence for its terrestrial broadcasting distribution
undertaking (BDU) serving Metro Vancouver, British Columbia
For further information, please consult Notice of Consultation CRTC 2010-497 on the CRTC website at
www.crtc.gc.ca under “Public Proceedings” or call our toll free number 1-877-249-CRTC.
Broadcasting
Notice of Consultation
CRTC 2010-497
#
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opinion
More shadows in fantasy garden
B.C. Views
Tom Fletcher
P a g e 1 4 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
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AUGUST 20 - AUGUST 23
Specials valid while stock lasts and are subject to change.
China World Supermarket
8777 Odlin Road
Richmond
Sun.-Thurs. 10am-8pm
Fri.-Sat. 10am-9pm
Fresh Values in Store This Week!
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1 kg
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Cob oven at Terra Nova
Playing in the mud and sun. Mary Gazeta (Left), Jen
Gobbi, Kimi Hendess, Laurie McEwan, and Kareno
Hawbolt built a cob oven at the Terra Nova Sharing
Farm over the weekend. A cob oven is domed and
made from a mixture of sand, straw and clay. Mem-
bers of Richmond’s Fruit Tree Sharing Farm invited
the Mudgirls, a collective of women from the Gulf
Islands who teach sustainable building techniques,
to the Terra Nova Sharing Farm to hold a three-day
community workshop on how to build a cob oven out
of clay.
Rebekah Hammond photo
Film takes viewers
deep into roots
of Pakistan
On Thursday, Aug. 19, New York filmmaker Sarah
Singh will present her award-winning film The Sky
Below in council chambers at Richmond City Hall.
The film is a contemporary exploration of the
creation of Pakistan and the 1947 partition of the
Indian subcontinent, waving together 5,000 years
of culture while investigating the lingering after-
effects of this six-decade-old political divide.
The evening will begin with a screening of the
75-minute film, followed by a question-and-answer
session with Singh. It begins at 7 p.m. Admission
is free; reserve seats by e-mailing skybelow@rich-
mond.ca or call 604-276-4304.
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 1 5
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M
y Italian
friend Rosa-
nna asked
me about the spice
sumac.
“Are you familiar with
it—apparently it has
a citrus flavour and is
good for many uses.”
Sumac spice is made
from red berries picked
fresh from the fields in
Galilee, then dried and
crushed. (It is not made
from the poisonous
North American variety.)
The sumac tree also
grows wild in the Middle
East and in certain areas
of Italy.
The sweet/sour-
flavoured spice is used
in Middle Eastern and
Arabic cuisines as a
condiment, much like
vinegar, lemon juice,
salt, and ground pep-
per. It has a tanginess
that compares to tart
apples. Sumac, dark red
in colour, goes back to
Roman days and was
once used to settle the
stomach.
Sprinkle on rice, pop-
corn; toss with roasted
veggies; use in a mari-
nade for chicken or fish;
mix a couple of table-
spoons with enough
olive oil to make a runny
paste and spread on
flatbread and grill or
spread sautéed onions,
sumac, and pine nuts on
flatbread and grill. For an
intriguing flavour, add to
apple pie.
I place fresh pita bread
in the bottom of an
oiled baking dish and
sprinkle the pita with
more olive oil, a couple
tablespoons of sumac,
salt, a sliced onion, and
finally, a whole chicken
(or pieces), coating the
chicken with olive oil and
a few more tablespoons
of sumac. Then into a
450°F oven for an hour.
Sumac is an essen-
tial component in a
savory spice called
zatar (rhymes with “bat-
ter”). Zatar is a blend of
sumac, toasted white
sesame seeds, thyme,
and salt. Some blends
use cumin and fennel
seed. In Lebanon, there
is a belief that the partic-
ular spice mixture makes
the mind alert and the
body strong.
Again, use zatar as
you would sumac: on
everything from veg-
etables, freshly grilled
flatbread, tortilla wraps,
Indian naan bread, lamb
kebabs, and dips to
popcorn. Try sprinkling
zatar liberally on fresh
sliced tomatoes, layered
on flabread. Or make a
salad of finely chopped
cucumbers, tomatoes,
and red pepper, tossed
with olive oil, lemon
juice, salt, and zatar.
Have fun experiment-
ing with these spices.
Both can be found at
specialty stores.
Sumac and
Pomegranate Steak
2 cups bottled pome-
granate juice
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp sumac
1 tsp black pepper
2 lb flank steak
3 tbsp finely chopped
garlic
3 tbsp unsalted butter
1/4 cup red wine
1 tsp fresh lemon juice
Bring pomegranate
juice, sugar, and 1/4
teaspoon salt to a boil
in a saucepan over mod-
erately high heat, then
boil until reduced to
about 1/3 cup, 20 to 30
minutes.
Meanwhile, stir togeth-
er sumac, pepper, and
remaining 3/4 teaspoon
salt. Sprinkle mixture
evenly over steak and let
stand about 10 minutes.
Grill steak 3 to 4 min-
utes per side. Transfer
steaks with any pan
juices to a large plate and
let stand, loosely covered
with foil, 10 minutes.
While steak stands,
sauté garlic in 1 table-
spoon butter until
golden, 3 to 5 minutes.
Add wine and simmer
until reduced to a glaze,
2 to 3 minutes. Add meat
juices accumulated on
plate and bring to a sim-
mer. Whisk in pomegran-
ate reduction and lemon
juice. Remove from heat
and whisk in remaining 2
tablespoons butter until
blended.
Holding knife at a
45-degree angle, thinly
slice steak diagonally and
serve with sauce.
food
Spice it up with sumac
Food for Thought
Arlene Kroeker
P a g e 1 6 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
arts & entertainment
by Rebekah
Hammond
Contributor
B
.C. singer-
songwriter
Bob Kemmis
will be testing out
brand new songs at
the upcoming Mu-
sical Expressions
Concert Series.
“I’m looking forward to
trying out a new song or
two,” he said. “See how
they work, see how the
response is.”
The new songs Kemmis
plans on playing will be
a part of his upcoming
album, a follow-up to
2004’s Arena Ready.
Kemmis will be playing
his acoustic set at the
singer showcase being
held at the intimate
setting of the Britannia
Heritage Shipyard on
Friday, Aug. 20.
Smaller artist show-
cases are always more
personable, in Kemmis’
opinion. They give him a
chance to connect with
the audience.
“They’re much more
intimate settings for
the audience,” he said.
“They’re just naturally
set up so the performers
can talk about the songs
a little more.”
Such small events give
audiences an opportuni-
ty they don’t usually get.
“These shows attract
people who love music
and look for something
a little unique,” Kemmis
said.
While some of Kemmis’
favorite reviews have
compared his music
style to artists like Nick
Lowe, Elvis Costello and
bands like Wilco, he’s
a unique songwriter all
unto himself.
“People tend to find
humour in some of what
I write,” Kemmis said.
“I’ll create a different
situation.”
“Freak Love” from
Arena Ready is one such
fresh example. The toe-
tapping pop song tells
the story of a purse
snatcher who gets hit
by a car while on the
get-away and ends up
falling in love with the
driver.
“Not your standard
songwriting fare, but
at the same time it’s
still a love song,” said
Kemmis.
Kemmis is about two-
thirds through record-
ing his new album and
a release date can be
expected sometime dur-
ing the winter or spring
of 2011.
New additions to antic-
ipate on the upcoming
album will be more
horns and a men’s choir.
“It’s maybe a little bit
more ambitious than
the last record I made,”
Kemmis said. “Inevitably
it’s going to sound dif-
ferent, but I don’t know
if there are any true
departures.”
Though Kemmis
lives just across from
Richmond, in Ladner,
he hasn’t played in
Richmond for a few
years and has never
played at the Britannia
Heritage Shipyard
before. He’s looking for-
ward to introducing him-
self to a new audience.
“These shows attract
people who love music
and are looking for
something a little
unique,” he said. “The
whole purpose of get-
ting up on stage is to
get people to stop, look
and listen.”
Also performing on
Friday are multi-instru-
mentalist Bob Coughlan
and Musical Expressions
founder and organizer
Cherelle Jardine.
The Friday show
begins at 6:15 p.m.
at the shipyard, 5180
Westwater Dr. Concert
is rain or shine. Tickets,
$25, include appetizers
from M&M Meat Shops,
and are available at the
shipyard or by calling
604-276-4300.
Kat Arnett photo
Bob Kemmis plays Britannia Heritage Shipyard on Friday, Aug. 20.
Bob Kemmis trying out new
songs at Musical Expressions
E
ven though I
haven’t owned
a dog since I
was eleven, I find
myself inexplicably
drawn to them and
wonder whether
I was ever a dog
owner in another life.
So enthralled am I with
everything canine, that
I’ve become a devotee of
The Dog Whisperer, and I
regularly read dog books.
Like this one. When a
dog-loving friend of mine
recommended a novel
called The Art of Racing in
the Rain by Garth Stein,
which is written from the
dog’s perspective, I was
hooked then and there.
Enzo, a lab-terrier mix
who seems more like a
human than some of the
humans in the story, is a
much-loved member of
the Swift family, and es-
pecially fond of his owner,
Denny, a semi-profes-
sional race car driver. In
fact, he idolizes him. Enzo
has a hard time warming
up to Denny’s wife Eve
at first, but he gets on
famously with their little
daughter Zoe.
Enzo is basically a
four-legged philosopher,
having spent his life
watching television and
learning about life and
race car driving from
Denny. While the art of
race car driving is merely
a metaphor for life, it
works well here. Exhibit
A: “There is no dishonor
in losing the race…There
is only dishonor in not
racing because you are
afraid to lose.”
Enzo isn’t your ordinary
dog – he understands ev-
erything and is convinced
that in his next life he’ll
come back as a human.
But for now, “Gestures
are all that I have,” muses
the oft-misunderstood
Enzo. With that sixth
sense that animals pos-
ses, he knows that Eve is
sick and when she dies,
her parents battle Denny
for custody of Zoe. Enzo
watches as the drama
unfolds and knows that
someday, Denny will be
the successful racecar
driver he’s always dreamt
of being, and that he
and Zoe will be together,
despite the horrific chal-
lenges Denny faces. With
a sense of humour that
had me laughing till tears
ran down my face, Enzo
makes his way through
life deciphering the
human world as best he
can. He learns the value
of paying good deeds
forward and of standing
up to bullies.
Bottom line: This de-
lightful novel deserves to
be read by anyone with a
heart. I give it two barks!
For other popular reading
suggestions check out
www.yourlibrary.ca/
goodbooks/.
Two paws up for dog book
Book Club
Shelley Civkin
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 1 7
Come see over 3500 local performers
showcase their talent and skills.
Festival Square is a great place to take
a seat, enjoy a bite to eat and support
some of the Lower Mainland’s best
established and emerging talent.
www.pne.ca
Shows Daily:
12:30pm, 2pm,
3:30pm, 5pm,
& 6:30pm
The completed oven.
Richmond Community Foundation salutes
The Richmond Fruit Tree Sharing Farm Society which, for many years, has
been building the Community Gardens at Terra Nova Rural Park.
This August, the volunteers and workshop participants built an old fashioned
cob oven at the Terra Nova Sharing Farm.
The new cob oven will be a community resource as part of the farm’s healing
garden that was built in 2009. The garden serves as a gathering place for many
volunteers who come out to help grow food for the Richmond Food Bank.
Growing and harvesting food together is an excellent example of “building
community.” For more information about the Sharing Farm please visit
www.richmondfruittree.com
Congratulations to the Richmond Fruit Tree Sharing Society, which had the vision
and foresight to establish a permanent endowment fund with the Richmond
Community Foundation.
If you would like more information on how you or your organization can
establish such a fund, please call 604-270-4483, or go to our website at
richmondfoundation.org.
Visit us at richmondfoundation.org
Working to make Richmond a better place to Live, Work, LEARN and Play.
book your reservations online
www.bluecanoerestaurant.com
604 275 7811
#140 - 3866 bayview street
steveston village
see you at the canoe!
r
patio • food • wine
GENERAL INQUIRIES
moreinfo@tapenade.ca
FOR RESERVATIONS
604.275.5188
www.tapenadebistro.ca
arts & entertainment
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604.266.2340 Open Daily 11:00am-9:00pm
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Jessica Tieszen photo
Manager Michael Shirley and Margaret Stephens stand inside the Artisans’
Galleria in its last few days of existence.
Provincial
cutbacks
blamed in
gallery’s
demise
by Jessica Tieszen
Contributor
A non-profit gal-
lery operated by the
Community Arts Council
of Richmond has fallen
victim to government
cuts in funding the arts
and culture.
The Artisans’ Galleria in
Steveston showcases the
work of artist members
and exhibitions, and
is free for the public to
attend.
The Community Arts
Council of Richmond,
which raised significant
funds to help build
Richmond’s Gateway
Theatre, issued scholar-
ships to promising artists
and gave grants to many
of Richmond’s art and
culture groups to assist
in their endeavors.
“The cuts by the pro-
vincial government to
funding the arts is the
largest contributor (to the
gallery closing),” explains
treasurer and primary
administrator Margaret
Stephens.
“These cuts have had
a domino effect on all
other grantors, increasing
the number of non-profit
groups seeking grant
funding and far exceed-
ing the funds available.”
Government cuts to
funding for the arts
have made it impos-
sible for the Artisans’
Galleria to survive.
The 1,500-square-foot
building will close its
doors before the end of
summer. The group will
continue to operate as a
non-profit arts council,
but will have to produce
exhibitions at other
expensive locations.
“As with all non-profit
organizations, we are
dependent upon grants,
sponsorships and dona-
tions to keep operating
and to supplement
our income from other
sources,” says Stephens.
“Money is tight and the
economic climate is not
conducive to impulse
purchases. Even with our
reasonable prices, sales
continue to drop.
“The artists will lose
the income they receive
from the sale of their
work and the public loses
a wonderful location to
view works of art and
exhibitions at no cost,”
she continues.
“Art makes a difference
in everyone’s life, the
ability to view something
that touches you is a
special kind of thing that
separates us from the
rest of creation.”
The Community Arts
Council of Richmond
will continue to seek
out grants in order to
maintain art exhibits in
and around Richmond.
It also plans to re-struc-
ture the way it operates
and will use its website
at www.richmondart-
scouncil.org to promote
artists and events.
Artisans’ Galleria is closing
P a g e 1 8 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
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13171 Smallwood Place
Richmond, 604-606-9033
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13171 Smallwood Place, Richmond, 604-606-9033
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 1 9
sports
SPORTS EDITOR: Don Fennell
Phone: 604 247 3732
E-mail: sports@richmondreview.com
Baseball nationals at Brighouse
Richmond ready to host Bantam girls championship Aug. 26-30
by Don Fennell
Sports Editor
A
promotional
poster is circu-
lating around
town with the catch
phrase “You wish you
could throw like a
girl.”
It’s intended to bring
awareness to the Bantam
Girls National Baseball
Championship next week
(Aug. 26-30) at Brighouse
Park. (Two games are also
scheduled to be played at
Blundell field).
Pat Weatherill, president
of the host Richmond City
Baseball Association, ex-
pects the games to be well
attended and hopes the
event inspires young girls to
pick up the sport.
“Not having a national
youth baseball tournament
in Richmond before, or
for quite some time, this
should help bring aware-
ness of baseball in the
community—and the fact
girls do play baseball,”
Weatherill says.
An average of 250 fans are
expected at every game.
That, he says, is also good
for the local economy.
Females playing base-
ball is not new. From the
1890s to the mid-1930s the
“Bloomer Girls” clubs were
hugely popular and trav-
elled extensively through-
out the U.S., often playing
men’s teams.
Several countries,
includling Canada, cur-
rently have strong women’s
programs. And the game
is continuing to grow in
places like the Netherlands,
Pakistan and India.
There were more than
8,500 girls playing orga-
nized baseball in Canada in
2009. And Baseball Canada
expects the numbers to
continue to increase.
The Bantam national
tournament began in 1999
and has been held annually
since 2003. Adam Morris-
sette, coordinator of media/
public relations for Baseball
Canada, says the goal of the
tournament is to continue
to increase the profile of
girls’ baseball which, will in
turn, attract more females
to the sport.
“We run several success-
ful girls’ clinics or skills
camps and we see these
expanding as interest grows
in the game,” he says.
Morrissette acknowledges
girls’ baseball initially drew
some players from soft-
ball. But now most of the
athletes start in baseball
and progress through the
system just the same as
the boys—from Rally Cap
(a program that intro-
duces youth to the sport)
to senior. The pinnacle is to
earn a roster spot with the
Canadian women’s national
team that competes at
World Cups and other inter-
national events.
“There was a demand for
a national championship
because there were enough
girls playing the game at
a high level,” Morrissette
says.
Currently, the girls’ teams
play other girls-only teams,
boys’ teams and teams of
girls and boys—depending
on the number of players in
a particular community.
Women are eligible to play
in a senior division which
has no age restriction.
There is a women’s national
championship held every
year, featuring the best
players in the country.
David Laing, executive
director of Baseball BC, is
a keen supporter of girls’
baseball. He says while the
growth has already been
impressive, there’s plenty of
room for expansion.
“It’s very much in its in-
fancy stage,” Laing says.
The heart of girls’ baseball
in B.C. is in the Okanagan.
The Okanagan Halos Girls
Baseball Club is a girls-only
association based out of
Kelowna. From a single
all-girls Mosquito Division
team four years ago, the
program now sports four
teams in three age groups.
As a testament to how
Baseball BC views girls’
baseball, it has established
a girls’ baseball commit-
tee. Baseball BC held skill
development sessions, for
Peewee and Bantam players
aged 11 to 16, at locations
around the province in
preparation for the Bantam
girls championships. This
year Baseball BC will be
fielding two teams in the
tournament—a provincial
select team and a host
squad.
As with many sports, and
regardless of gender, base-
ball begins to experience a
drop off in players around
the Peewee age group.
Many girls also transfer to
play softball to be with their
friends. Laing, however, is
confident if there were more
all-girls baseball teams and
leagues, baseball would be
able to retain more of those
players.
Need to know
•The Bantam National Girls Championship is being host-
ed Aug. 26-30 by the Richmond City Baseball Association.
•THURSDAY, AUG. 26
9 a.m.—Saskatchewan (Pool B) vs.
Nova Scotia (Pool A)
Noon—Ontario (Pool A) vs.
Quebec (Pool B)
Noon—Host (Pool A) vs. Alberta (Pool B)
at Blundell Field
3 p.m.—Saskatchewan (Pool B)
vs. B.C. (Pool B)
•FRIDAY, AUG. 27
9 a.m.—Alberta (Pool A) vs.
Quebec (Pool A)
Noon—B.C. (Pool B) vs. Nova
Scotia (Pool B)
3 p.m.—Host (Pool A) vs. Ontario (Pool A)
6 p.m.—B.C. (Pool B) vs. Saskatchewan (Pool B)
SATURDAY, AUG. 28
9 a.m.—Nova Scotia (Pool B) vs.
B.C. (Pool B)
Noon—Alberta (Pool A) vs.
Ontario (Pool A)
3 p.m.—Nova Scotia (Pool B) vs.
Saskatchewan (Pool B)
6 p.m.—Quebec (Pool A) vs. Host (Pool A)
SUNDAY, AUG. 29
9 a.m.—Second in Pool B vs. First
in Pool A
9 a.m.—Second in Pool A vs. First in
Pool B (Blundell Field)
Noon—Third in Pool B vs. Third in Pool A
3 p.m.—Bronze medal game
6 p.m.—Gold medal championship game
•All games at Brighouse Park unless
otherwise noted.
“Not having a na-
tional youth base-
ball tournament in
Richmond before,
or for quite some
time, this should
help bring aware-
ness of baseball in
the community—
and the fact girls
do play baseball.”
- Pat Weatherill
Baseball Canada photo
Like pitcher Vanessa Riopel, many young girls playing baseball in Canada aspire to suit up for
the national women’s team.
P a g e 2 0 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
Summer Runway
Operations at YVR
As part of our ongoing commitment to safety, Vancouver
Airport Authority is conducting a mandatory runway lighting upgrade.
This requires nightly closures of the south runway from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m.
from July 4 to Augst 28. During this time, the north runway will be
used for departures and arrivals as required.

We appreciate your support as we continue to maintain the
highest safety standards at Vancouver International Airport (YVR).

For further information on summer runway operations
and maintenance projects, visit www.yvr.ca,
email community_relations@yvr.ca or phone 604.207.7097.
Vancouver Airport Authority is a community-based,
not-for-profit organization that operates YVR.
WWW.YVR.CA
WWW.YVR.CA
ust 28. During this time, the north runway will be
6
th Annual Rosewood M
ano
r
G
a
rden Party Extravaganza
Sunday, September 12, 2010 • 3:00 - 8:00 p.m.
STEP BACK IN TIME, FEATURING THE ’50S
Don’t miss your opportunity to enjoy an extraordinary afternoon and help
raise money for seniors through the Rosewood Manor Care Foundation.
You’ll enjoy an afternoon of live music and tantalizing food amidst an
array of one of Canada’s best collections of: Classic Automobiles and
memorabilia from around the world. Gather friends and colleagues
to join your table at a private estate in Richmond and create some
fabulous memories at this exceptional event.
Proceeds go toward continuing to renovate our 28 year old facility,
replace furniture and enhance recreation programs.
With the support of our sponsors and
community partners, we are moving
forward in addressing our capital needs
and challenges in providing senior’s care.
For more information or to reserve your table,
call 604-271-3590 ext.123.
RICHMOND MINOR
HOCKEY ASSOCIATION
Are you interested in playing
hockey but have never tried it?
August 21
|
10am-noon
|
Forum
Note: RMHA will also be hosting an open registration for
people interesting in dropping off their registration papers.
For further information, or to register, please
check our website www.richmondminorhockey.com
or call the Hockey Hotline at 604-241-4192.
We are hosting a
TRY HOCKEY
EVENT.
Kids aged four
years and older
are invited to
come out, try
hockey and have
some fun.
There is
NO COST,
and equipment
is provided.
sports
by Don Fennell
Sports Editor
It was the kind of Sun-
day locals dream about.
Clear skies and warm
weather made Steveston
Village an ideal destina-
tion. For many residents
and visitors, the chance
to see competitive cy-
cling was an unexpected
added bonus.
The Steveston Sockeye
Spin, a criterium series
of races, made its debut.
And by most accounts it
was a roaring success.
“We’ve already had
several businesses call-
ing wanting to become
sponsors,” said vol-
unteer chair Johanna
Stewart.
Cycling B.C. officials
also gave organizers the
thumbs up, describing
the Sockeye Spin as “a
very professionally or-
ganized event.”
What’s more, many
riders from throughout
the Pacific Northwest
were thrilled with condi-
tions—from the course
layout to the way they
were supported. Several
racing teams have indi-
cated not only a willing-
ness to compete again,
should the Sockeye Spin
continue, but even to
increase the number of
participants.
•Jenny Lehmann of the
Mighty Riders team won
the women’s elite cate-
gory, edging out Shailie
Sanbrooks (Russ Hays
Cycling Club) and Sarah
Coney (Stevens Racing)
in the process. Shawn
Wenger of Interior Grass-
lands Cycling edged out
teammate Jenny Gayfer
for top spot in the wom-
en’s 3/4 category.
Tim Abercrombie of the
Garneau Evolution rac-
ing team took top hon-
ours in the men’s cat-
egory 1/2 event. Jacob
Schwingboth (Team H&R
Block Cycling) and Mar-
vin Guzmanan (Glotman
Simpson) were second
and third respectively.
Cid Martinez-Arroyo was
best in the men’s category
3/4 event, with Raphael
Lalumiere (Russ Hay’s
Bike Shop) and James
Cameron (Pro City Racing)
second and third.
David Groves of Rich-
mond’s Bikram Yoga
topped the novice com-
bined standings.
Riders give thumbs up
to inaugural Sockeye Spin
Rebekah Hammond photo
James Cameron raced to a second-place finish in the men’s category 3/4.
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 2 1
Seafair
Minor Hockey Association
“Great Hockey — Great People”
COME TRY HOCKEY EVENT
For more information please call 604-271-3702 or just show up ready to go!
No need to pre-register. Come and see what it’s all about, meet the coaches,
get more information – is this the sport for your child? Let them give it a try!
ALL AGES WELCOME.
If you’ve been wondering about joining and have some questions this is the perfect time
to check it out. Get all the answers while your child is on the ice with the professionals.
Minimum gear requirements: skates, approved helmet and gloves (preferably hockey
gloves) and hockey stick.
Sunday, August 22 | 10:00 a.m. – Noon
Richmond Ice Centre | Garage Rink
At the Richmond Maritime Festival,
at Britannia Heritage Shipyard
fffbcTeTbc^]SaPV^]Q^PcUTbcXeP[RP °Helpìng You Communìcate"
Things to do on Saturday!
Been meaning to try Dragon Boating or Kayaking? Now is your chance!
Drop in sessions from 12 pm to 5 pm.All ages welcome. By donation.
Proceeds go to the Richmond Food Bank. Registration starts at 11 am.
Support the Food Bank at the Saturday Night BBQ 5 pm to 8 pm.
FREE SATURDAY NIGHT CONCERTS
Saturday, 5:30 pm – Redgrass – Bluegrass music
Saturday, 7:00 pm – Ezra Kwizera – Exciting African Dance Band
Saturday, 8:30 pm – The Wheat In the Barley – Celtic Music
Don’t miss the fabulous Dragon Boat Races on Sunday!
At the Richmond Maritime Festival,
at Britannia Heritage Shipyard
fffbcTeTbc^]SaPV^]Q^PcUTbcXeP[RP °Helpìng You Communìcate"
Things to do on Saturday!
Been meaning to try Dragon Boating or Kayaking? Now is your chance!
Drop in sessions from 12 pm to 5 pm.All ages welcome. By donation.
Proceeds go to the Richmond Food Bank. Registration starts at 11 am.
Support the Food Bank at the Saturday Night BBQ 5 pm to 8 pm.
FREE SATURDAY NIGHT CONCERTS
Saturday, 5:30 pm – Redgrass – Bluegrass music
Saturday, 7:00 pm – Ezra Kwizera – Exciting African Dance Band
Saturday, 8:30 pm – The Wheat In the Barley – Celtic Music
Don’t miss the fabulous Dragon Boat Races on Sunday!
www.stevestondragonboatfestival.ca REVIEW
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(Garden City Shopping Centre, Garden City & Blundell)
778-297-1414
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BACK TO
SCHOOL
SALE
& More
sports
by Jessica Tieszen
Contributor
The stars are back in
town.
The Richmond Road-
runners alumni team will
play an exhibition field
lacrosse game against
the newly-formed U19
Richmond lacrosse team
this Saturday (Aug. 21)
at Minoru Park.
The alumni team will
feature a number of pro-
fessional and collegiate
athletes all on the same
court.
The game ,scheduled
to start at 11:30 a.m.,
isn’t the only fun event
taking place however.
The Richmond Lacrosse
Association will be host-
ing a camp filled with
events for people of all
ages starting at 9 a.m..
The camp will highlight
a skills clinic for new and
returning lacrosse play-
ers, with coaching from
some of Richmond’s
most decorated players.
“The game and clinic
will prove to be a re-
minder of all the past
successes that Rich-
mond players have
achieved and to forecast
the successes to come,”
explains Richmond la-
crosse’s Scott Jensen.
Among those return-
ing to play for Rich-
mond’s alumni is Chris
Seller, who played for
Team Canada in 2002
and 2004, as well as
professionally for three
different teams. Shaun
Dhaliwal, who last sea-
son was the youngest
player in the National
Lacrosse League will
also be representing the
alumni along with Chris
Manwaring who plays
for the Burnaby Lakers
in the B.C. senior A la-
crosse league.
“These boys have been
great ambassadors of
the sport. They have
represented Richmond
on so many levels,” ex-
plains Jensen. “Hopeful-
ly the younger kids will
get inspired and see the
future that lies ahead in
field lacrosse.”
Lacrosse is the fast-
est growing sport in the
U.S. and one of the few
sports where getting a
scholarship is a real pos-
sibility. Lacrosse offers
endless opportunities
for teens, one being here
in the Lower Mainland
with the Burnaby Moun-
tain Selects, a develop-
ment team under the
Simon Fraser University
lacrosse program. Paul
Sahota, vice-president of
Richmond Field Lacrosse
says “as coaches, the
development of lacrosse
players capitulates sec-
ondary. Primarily, we are
bringing to being soci-
ety’s future leaders.”
The Burnaby Moun-
tain Selects summer
team, with talent from
four Richmond players,
recently returned home
from the nationally-re-
nowned invitation only
Champ Camp in Balti-
more, Maryland. Burn-
aby Mountain is the first
program to be selected
from Western Canada in
the tournament’s 21 year
history. The Selects fin-
ished the camp with a
4-4 (.500) record.
“Selection and consid-
eration into the program
is reserved for a select
group of elite student
athletes, who possess
the desire to work hard
and learn in a competi-
tive team environment,
while demonstrating
the ability to prioritize
their academics goal, in
the highest regard,” ex-
plains Burnaby Mountain
media relations’ director
William Howard.
Trenton Matsuzaki,
Danny McDermott and
Parker Sahota played
for the Selects and are
all have developed their
skills trough the Rich-
mond Lacrosse Associa-
tion. Quinton Bradley,
who currently plays for
Burnaby is also a Rich-
mond resident.
Bradley Hoffman is an-
other Richmond player
who competed in la-
crosse this summer for
Team B.C.
“These guys are get-
ting a lot of recognition
from top U.S. schools,
“ explains Paul Sahota.
“Through the alumni
game and skills camp,
we want parents and
players to realize the
different opportunities
through field lacrosse.”
Richmond Lacrosse As-
sociation continues to
produce top performing
teams, bringing home
provincial medals in ev-
ery age group.
“There is a lot of talent
budding in Richmond,”
says Sahota. “We want
everyone to get in-
volved.”
All players, new and
returning are welcome
to attend. For info go to
Wade Galbraith, Parker Sahota and Tyler Nett are captains of the U16 Richmond
field lacrosse team.
Stars come out to play
alumni lacrosse game
P a g e 2 2 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
sports
Evan Dunfee has a marathon walk ahead of
him. The 20 kilometre race walk at the upcom-
ing Commonwealth Games in Delhi, India to be
exact.
The 19-year-old Richmondite qualified in im-
pressive fashion at the recent Canadian senior
track and field championships in Toronto, win-
ning the men’s title in a personal-best one hour,
25 minutes, 57.7 seconds. The race walk at the
Commonwealth Games will be contested Oct.
9—just 12 days after Dunfee’s 20th birthday.
Dunfee’s teammates with the Richmond Kajaks
also made it onto the podium at the Canadian
championships.
Chantel Spies won the women’s one kilogram
discus throw, beating out her nearest competitor
by more than a metre. After completing a long
and gruelling season at the University of Cali-
fornia-Los Angeles,Trey Henderson was second
in the men’s 7.26 kilogram hammer throw. And
Yvonne Mensah, after a two-year absence from
competition to nurse injuries, was second in the
women’s 400 metre hurdles.
Another up-and-comer in the race walk, Heath-
er Warwick, placed fourth at her first senior na-
tionals.
Kajaks’ head coach Richard Collier was further
delighted by the progress of the club’s young
athletes at the Canadian youth championships in
Ottawa. All five athletes that competed reached
the podium.
Samantha Kennedy won the women’s under-18
hammer throw for the second straight year; Serena
Graf won the silver in the under-18 javelin throw,
just 46 centimetres back of the winning throw; Ha-
ley Stewart won bronze in the under-18 long jump;
Nicholas Fyffe won a silver as a member of the four-
by-100-metre men’s relay team and bronze in the tri-
ple jump; and Asianna Covington won the under-16
discus throw and was second in the shot put.
Kajaks glow at Canadian track
and field championships
UNITED
Community Worship
SOUTH ARM UNITED CHURCH
11051 No. 3 Road, Richmond 604-277-4020
sauc@telus.net www.southarmunitedchurch.ca
Minister of the Congregation - Rev. Dr. Gary Gaudin
Children & Youth Team Ministry
Music Ministry - Ron Stevenson
Worship Service & Church School - 10:00 am
ALL ARE WELCOME!
STEVESTON UNITED CHURCH
3720 Broadway Street (at 2nd Ave.)
Rev. Rick Taylor
Please join us at 10am Sunday, August 22 for
Worship Service and Sunday School
604-277-0508 • www.stevestonunitedchurch.ca
A caring and friendly village church
Meeting in the Historic Pioneer Chapel
No. 3 Road and Steveston Highway
11:00 am Sunday
Call (604) 644-5073 for information
Visit our website at
www.richmondbiblebaptist.com
Bible Baptist Church
BRIGHOUSE UNITED CHURCH
an evangelical congregation
8151 Bennett Road, Richmond, 604-278-7188
www.brighouseunitedchurch.org
10 a.m. Worship
Nursery and Sunday School
Rev. Stuart Appenheimer - Minister
Visitors Always Welcome
Come home to RBC. There are no perfect people here.
We’re all in the process, by the grace of God, of becoming all we can be.
We’d love to have you walk with us on our journey towards the heart of God.
Worship Service: 10:30 am Relevant, biblical preaching
that touches the heart
Uplifting worship
Call Church office for more info: 604-277-1939
Richmond Baptist Church
Love God…Love People
6640 Blundell Road, Richmond BC • 604-277-1939
office@richmondbaptist.com
www.richmondbaptist.com
Richmond United Church
8711 Cambie Rd. (near Garden City Rd.) 604-278-5622
Come for 10am Worship and
Children’s Sunday School
and after-service coffee and fellowship.
Founded 1888. Richmond’s Oldest Church
ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA
ST. EDWARDS ANGLICAN
10111 Bird Road, Richmond V6X 1N4
Phone/Fax: 273-1335
Priest-in-charge: Rev. Gord Dominey
Sunday Service: 8:30 &10:30 am
Sunday School
St. Alban
an Anglican parish in the heart of Richmond
Services at 8:30 and 10:00 am
Sunday School 10:00 am
The Reverend Margaret Cornish
7260 St. Albans Road, Richmond
604-278-2770 • www.stalbansrichmond.org
ADVENTIST
Richmond Seventh-Day ADVENTIST Church
Worship Location and Time:
Sat. 9:15 a.m.
8711 Cambie Road, Richmond
www.richmondsda.org
778-230-9714
INTERDENOMINATIONAL
10351 |o. 1 Road
i1 o|oc| Sou|| ol w||||arº Road)
Surda] Ce|eora||or. S|ar|rç & T|e word · 10:00 a.r.
www.myecc.org 604-270-4685
Kids Sunday School
Youth Activities
Everyone Welcome
St. Anne’s - Steveston Anglican Church
4071 Francis Road, Richmond, BC
604-277-9626
The Rev. Brian Vickers, Rector
Sunday 8:30 a.m. - Contemplative Eucharist
10:00 a.m. Family Eucharist with Church School
Sanctuary open for quiet prayer 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. weekdays
• www.stannessteveston.ca
PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. Frances Savill, Minister • www.richpres.com
Come and worship — All are welcome
TWO SERVICES EVERY SUNDAY
9:00 AM – Contemporary Worship • 11:00 AM – Traditional Worship
Coffee and fellowship after each service.
Nursery, Preschool, Kindergarten at Traditional Services
Richmond Presbyterian Church
7111 No. 2 Road 604-277-5410
FOURSQUARE GOSPEL CHURCH OF CANADA
www.rcfonline.com
phone: 604-270-6594
6611 No. 4 Rd., Richmond
10:30 am
Friendly, family fellowship.
Pastor George Donovan
Sermon series – ‘The Power of Spiritual Gifts’
BAPTIST
8140 Saunders Road, Richmond, BC
604-277-8012 www.bbchurch.ca
Worship Service - 10:30 a.m.
Sonshine Adventures for Kids
Senior Pastor - Dr. Tom Mei
Broadmoor Baptist Church
A safe place to connect with God and fellow
travellers on your spiritual journey
LUTHERAN
OUR SAVIOUR LUTHERAN
6340 No. 4 Road, 604-270-0085
Pastor Tim Le Drew
SUNDAY
10:00 Worship with Holy Communion
www.oursaviour.ca
OU
10
CHRIST-CENTERED CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Filipino Congregation)
COME AND JOIN US
IN OUR CELEBRATION OF REDEMPTION!
Worship Service 12:20 p.m.
Sunday School 2:00 p.m.
8151 Bennett Road, Richmond tel: 604-271-6491
FILIPINO CHRISTIAN CHURCH
CHRISTIAN REFORMED
Immanuel Christian Reformed Church
7600 No. 4 Road, Richmond, B.C. V6Y 2T5
604-276-8250 immanuelcrc@hotmail.com
Sunday service 11.30am.
Preachers: Rev. David Cheung & Rev. Peter Lim
by Jessica Tieszen
Contributor
Richmond Kajaks couldn’t have asked
for a better day to host their 10k oval
race Sunday.
Competitors, numbering 247 in all,
lined up at the starting gates with their
shoes and sunscreen, ready to compete
in the fundraiser for the Kajaks Junior
Track and Field Development Program.
“The event (concluding the 10-race
Steve Nash Sports Club Lower Main-
land Road Race Series) was extremely
successful this year,” explains Media
Director Susan Bernardino.
“We wanted a bigger turnout and got at
least 100 more people (than in 2009).”
The race began at 8:30 a.m. and par-
ticipants were divided up into age cat-
egories.
The top three runners in each category
received gifts from Forerunners.
The following were first in their respec-
tive age groups (times included):
1-19 Female, Kimberley Doerksen 45:32;
Male, James Lamers 36:26; 20-24 Female,
Tara Berry 45:38; Male, Tom Michie 34:42;
25-29 Female, Martina Wan 40:07; Male,
Michael Osborne 33:00; Female 30-34,
Angela Yap 45:31; Male, James Richard-
son 33:27; Female 35-39, Rachel Ruus
38:40; Male, Greg Hockley 35:31; Female
40-44, Lara Penno 40:32; Male, Kevin
O’Connor 33:02; Female 45-49, Carmen
Rempel 49:13; Male 45-49, Kevin McGin-
nis 34:31; Female 50-54, Janice McCaffrey
42:37; Male 50-54, Phil Nicholls 36:44;
Female 55-59, Marsha Thompson 55:17;
Male, Mark Fields 40:57; Female 60-64,
Irene Wingate 51:11; Male, Jean-Pierre
Poggioli 44:38; Female 65-69, Phyllis
D’Entremont 1:15:06; Male, Herb Phil-
lips 41:00; Female 70-74, Wendy Brown
1:12:08; Male, Adam Butler 43:34; and
Male 75-99, Lionel Edwards 53:39.
Oval 10k was sunny success
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 2 3
The Award-Winning North Shore Outlook newspaper has
an outstanding opportunity for a full-time Advertising Sales
Consultant.
The candidate must have the ability to build relationships
with clients and ofer superior customer service. The winning
candidate will be a team player and will be called upon to
aggressively grow an existing account list. The ability to
work in an extremely fast-paced environment with a positive
attitude is a must.
The successful candidate will have sales experience -
preferably in the advertising or retail industry. The position
ofers a great work environment with a competitive salary,
commission plan and strong benefts package.
The Outlook is part of Black Press, Canada’s largest
independent print media company with more than 170
community, daily and urban newspapers across Canada
and the United States.
Please submit your resume with cover letter by
Friday August 27th, 2010.
To: Ad Manager, North Shore Outlook
admanager@northshoreoutlook.com
fax 604 903-1001
#104 – 980 West 1st Street
North Vancouver, B.C.
V7P 3N4
Advertising Sales Consultant Advertising Sales Consultant
Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either!
Deliver 2x week, Thursdays and Saturdays, right in your
neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.
Call Brian 604-247-3710
or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com
Kids and Adults Needed
Route Boundaries Number of Papers
14703662 Jones Rd (8051-8560), No 3 Rd (7000 Blk) 46
15102647 Harrison Ave, Jensen Dr/ Gate, McNeely Dr 116
14500432 McBurney Crt/ Dr 78
15101023 Bryson Bay, Crt, Dr, Pl, Cambie Rd, Hall Ave, Pl 220
14701365 7000 Blk No 4 Rd, Keefer Ave 105
15101018 Capstan Way, Regina Ave, Stolberg St 56
14701362 Bridge St, General Currie, Shields Ave 87
15101024 9000blk Cambie, 4000-4600 Garden City, 8700blk Odlin 56
15101030 Beckwith Rd, Charles St, Douglas St, Sexsmith Rd, Smith St 47
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15101021 Cambie Rd, Patterson Rd, Sexsmith Rd 65
Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers
either! Deliver 2x week, Thursdays and Saturdays, right in your
neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.
Call JR 604-247-3712
or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com
Kids and Adults Needed
Route Boundaries Number of Papers
14903089 4000 blk River Rd (between No 1 Rd & McCallen) 23
14901173 Langton Rd 91
14100220 7th Ave, 6th Ave (Steveston) 63
14903077 Richards Dr, Semlin Dr,Trutch Ave (Terra Nova) 54
14100243 3000 Blk Garry St (Steveston) 77
14903050 5000 and 6000 Blk No 1 Rd (Terra Nova) 64
14903070 Cornwall Dr, Crt, Pl, Dewdney Crt (Terra Nova) 115
14902140 Montana Rd 57
14201126 Cornerbrook Cres, St Brides, St Vincents 63
14100253 4000 Block Garry St (Steveston) 122
14201121 Gander Crt, St Johns 64
14201135 Argentia Dr,Trepassey Dr 46
14201125 Fortune Ave 67
14901172 Langtree Ave, Laurelwood Crt, Lynnwood Dr 63
14901116 Ledway Rd 91
14201124 Cavendish Dr, Pugwash Pl 70
Universal
Learning
Institute
Richmond Campus: #200-6760 No. 3 Rd.
604-248-1242 (across from Richmond Centre Mall)
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Office Administration Diploma
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Microsoft Office Specialist
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JACOBSON: Andrew
1924-2010
Andrew Edward Jacobson of
Richmond passed away on
August 9, 2010 at 86 years of
age. He is survived by his
loving children James (Barb)
Jacobson of Maple Ridge BC,
and Kate (Charles) Molloy of
Kamloops, and sister Eva
Wagner of Richmond.
He was predeceased by his
wife Nora, his parents Henry
and Ina Jacobson and his
brother Walter.
Andrew was born in 1924 in
Richmond BC when it was
known as Lulu Island. He grew
up to become a Commercial
Gillnet Fisherman like his
father. Unlike many fishermen,
Andrew was an expert at net
mending. After serving in the
Army during WWII, he settled
down and married his English
bride Nora and raised two
children James and Kate.
Andrew was an avid stamp
collector and devoted fan of
the Toronto Blue Jays. In Feb-
ruary of 2008, Andrew moved
to Kamloops to live with his
daughter due to failing health.
Andrew passed away at Royal
Inland Hospital after a brief
illness.
A Memorial Tea will be held
from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm on
Saturday, August 21 in the
Richmond Funeral Home,
8420 Cambie Rd., Richmond
BC.
Condolences may be emailed
to the family from
kamloopsfuneralhome.com
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DENIED CANADA PENSION PLAN
DISABILITY BENEFITS? The
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can help. Call Allison Schmidt at
1-877-793-3222. www.dcac.ca.
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PAPER
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See www.123yoursuccess.com
BEAUTY Consultants req’d, training
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Mattress Cleaning & Sanitizing
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1-888-999-9030
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PARTNER SOUGHT for new 40’
cruising catamaran arriving Fall
2010. Professional maintenance.
Optional revenue from charter.
604-669-2248 ext 2
www.one4yacht.com
Star Fleet Inc. HIRING! DRIVERS,
FARMERS, RANCHERS & RETIR-
EES needed with 3/4 Ton or 1-Ton
pick up trucks to deliver new travel
trailers & fifth wheels from US
manufacturers to dealers through-
out Canada. Pref. Class 1 Lic. or
3yrs towing exp. Top Pay!
Call Craig 1-877-890-4523.
www.starfleettrucking.com
Class 1 O/Ops &
Highway Drivers
Linehaul position, steady
regular miles running BC/AB
Send resume: jobs
@bstmanagement.net
or Fax 1.888.778.3563
Become a Psychiatric Nurse -
train locally via distance education,
local and/or regional clinical place-
ments, and some regional class-
room delivery. Wages start at
$29/hour. This 23 month program is
recognized by the CRPNBC. Gov’t
funding may be available.
Toll-free: 1-87-STENBERG
www.stenbergcollege.com
INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT
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Train on full-size Excavators, Doz-
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safety tickets. Provincially certified
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1-866-399-3853
DGS CANADA
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tance. Everyone Approved.
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FLAGGERS NEEDED
If not certified, training available for
a fee. Call 604-575-3944
FOREST FIRE MEDICS OFA 3
Medics. alphasafety.net Fax re-
sumes to 250-787-8839, or e-mail
them to info@alphasafety.net
MR. COOL ICE CREAM requires
F/T & P/T Drivers. Cash paid daily.
$100 average/day. (604)580-2665
HOUSEKEEPER
(F/T, P/T)
Are required at the new Holiday
Inn Express Hotel & Suites
Riverport, (Richmond.)
Send resume to:
hr@hierichmond.com
Fax 604-241-1840
604-248-8203
HOUSEKEEPING/RoomAttendant
needed for the Ramada Hotel. Pref-
erably with experience. Apply in
person, mail or fax resumes. 7188
Westminster Hwy, Richmond, BC,
V6X 1A1 604-207-9466.
LIVE-IN CAREGIVER, F/T req’d
w/exp to look after 1 child; Supervi-
sion of child’s activities; taking care
of general hygiene; preparing &
providing timely meals. Sal: $11/hr
Knowledge of English, Punjabi an
asset. Contact Mr. Meharban at
Email: ranautamehar@yahoo.ca
Fax: 604-270-9374 Location: 10100
River Drive, Richmond, BC
SEEKING care for 2 children in our
Richmond home, from 3:00 -
6:00pm, twice a week, starting Sept
13. Position requires supervision of
homework & activities, housekeep-
ing and meal prep. Valid BC’s
Driver’s licence required. 604-244-
0970.
FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS
7 OBITUARIES
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
33 INFORMATION
041 PERSONALS
TRAVEL
61 ADVENTURES
74 TIMESHARE
75 TRAVEL
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
114 DRIVERS/COURIER/
TRUCKING
115 EDUCATION
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
115 EDUCATION
130 HELP WANTED
21 COMING EVENTS
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
130 HELP WANTED
131 HOME CARE/SUPPORT
21 COMING EVENTS
115 EDUCATION
130 HELP WANTED
115 EDUCATION
130 HELP WANTED
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604-581-0101
w w w. b c c o l l e g e o f o p t i c s . c a
* 6 month days...
begins Sept. 13
th
* 12 month eve
begins Oct. 19
th
Exceptional Career
Opportunity in Sales
and Marketing.
Excellent Opportunity to earn above-average income
and to develop a rewarding career.
One of Canada’s largest private media companies,
Black Press, has an opening for an Assistant Sales
Manager with The Richmond Review.
The ideal candidate will have strong interpersonal
skills and a superior knowledge of sales and
marketing. While experience in community
newspapers is an asset, it is not a prerequisite.
Prerequisites include a minimum four years sales and
marketing experience, a willingness to learn and
embrace change and a desire to succeed.
Black press is a multi-platform media organization
that encompasses community-based newspapers and
websites as well as flyerland.ca and used.com.
To apply, please forward your resume with a cover
letter by August 31, 2010 to:
Mary Kemmis
publisher@richmondreview.com
The Richmond Review
#140-5671 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC
V6X 2C7
REVIEW
the richmond
www.blackpress.ca
Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers
either! Deliver 2x week, Thursdays and Saturdays, right in your
neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.
Call Roya 604-247-3710
or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com
Kids and Adults Needed
14401714 9500-10800 blk Shell 64
14600550 Anahim Dr, Aragon Rd 90
14302277 8000 blk Railway Ave 24
14600511 Kingcome Ave,Pl,Kingsbridge Dr, Kingsbrook Rd 185
14600513 King Rd, Kingsgrove Ave, Kingswood Dr 129
14600810 6000-8000 blk No 5 Rd 126
14304040 5000 blk Maple Rd. 92
14301212 10000 blk No 2 Rd 79
14304056 6000 blk Woodwards Rd 99
14002278 Andrews Rd, 12000 blk No 2 Rd 180
14002273 11000-12000 blk No 2 Rd 95
14002276 Swallow Dr,Wagtail Ave 39
14002284 Plover Crt, Plover Dr 36
Route Boundaries Number of Papers
FOOD & BEVERAGE SERVER
reqd. Sal: $11.50 /hr Duties: Take
orders & relay to kitchen, prepare
food for customers, portion or wrap
food; Order & maintain inventory;
stock refrigerators; may receive
payments. Contact Sam Bath:
email: Sbath@marquise.ca Fax:
604-214-8526
0852061 B.C Ltd O/A Dead
Sea Spa - Richmond Center,
Richmond is looking for 5 retail
sales reps, $14.60 hr. Email
resume: mk.tb@hotmail.com
PENTICTON Toyota is now
accepting applications for a
career oriented sales person.
Must be able to be licensed
with “Vehicle Sales Authority.”
Self motivated and goal orient-
ed team player, mature and
energetic with good verbal and
written communication skills.
Customer service and pros-
pecting potential new custom-
ers is a definite requirement
along with a professional ap-
pearance, strong work ethic
and computer proficiency. All
potential applicants will be
considered and reviewed in
strict confidence for interviews.
We welcome female appli-
cants. Resumes with a cover
letter can be emailed to cmar-
tins@pentictontoyota.com or
dropped off to the Sales Man-
ager.
REINFORCING PLACERS
Experienced Reinforcing
Steel Installers Required.
We are now hiring for
various jobs in the
Greater Vancouver District
*Competitive Rates dependant on
experience. *Medical Benefits.
Please visit: www.lmsgroup.ca
and fill out the online application
Volunteer Training
For Hospice /
Palliative Care
starts Sept. 21st.
Call 604-279-7140
or email:
rha.volunteer@telus.net
Richmond Hospice Assn.
AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.Fi-
nancial aid if qualified- Housing
available. CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (877)818-0783
APARTMENT / CONDOMINIUM
MANAGERS (CRM) home study
course. Many jobs registered with
us across Canada! Thousands of
grads working! Government certi-
fied. 30 years of success!
www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-665-8339,
604-681-5456.
DOG LOVERS! Enjoy a healthy,
profitable career as a professional
dog trainer. Government accredited
program - student loans and grants.
Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs.
www.wonderdogs.bc.ca.
1-800-961-6616.
LEARN at home, then earn
and save money. Be a
certified tax consultant or
bookkeeper. Risk-free, start
anytime. See www.knowledge
bureau.com or call toll free
1-866-953-4769.
MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION is
rated #2 for at-home jobs. Train
from home with the only industry
approved school in Canada.
Contact CanScribe today!
1-800-466-1535
www.canscribe.com
info@canscribe.com
ONLINE, ACCREDITED, WEB-DE-
SIGN TRAINING, available for
persons facing challenges to
employment, administered by the
Canadian Society for Social Devel-
opment. Visit: www.ibde.ca. Space
is limited - Apply today!
$500$ LOAN SERVICE, by phone,
no credit refused, quick and easy,
payable over 6 or 12 installments.
Toll Free: 1-877-776-1660
www.moneyprovider.com.
AVOID BANKRUPTCY - SAVE UP
TO 70% Of Your Debt. One af-
fordable monthly payment, interest
free. For debt restructuring on
YOUR terms, not your creditors.
Call 1-866-690-3328 or see web
site: www.4pillars.ca
DEBT CONSOLIDATION
PROGRAM Helping Canadians
repay debts, reduce or eliminate
interest, regardless of your credit.
Steady Income? You may qualify
for instant help. Considering
Bankruptcy? Call 1-877-220-3328
FREE Consultation Government
Approved, BBB Member
DEBT STRESS? Debts got you
worried? End those phone calls.
Avoid bankruptcy. Contact us for a
no-cost consultation. Online:
www.mydebtsolution.com or toll-
free 1-877-556-3500.
GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad cred-
it? Bills? Unemployed? Need Mon-
ey? We Lend! If you own your own
home - you qualify. Pioneer Accep-
tance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-
987-1420.
www.pioneerwest.com
If you own a home or real estate,
ALPINE CREDITS will lend you
money: It’s That Simple. Your Cred-
it / Age / Income is NOT an issue.
1.800.587.2161.
BEST HOUSE CLEANERS. Prof.
touch. Move in/out. Spring Cleaning
Special. Ref’s. Call 604-727-2955
CAROLINE’S CLEANING
Mother/daughter team. Non toxic
products. Bonded. 778-233-7712

PLACING & Finishing * Forming
* Site Prep, old concrete removal
* Excavation & Reinforcing
* Re-Re Specialists
30 Years Exp. Free Estimates.
Call: Rick (604) 202-5184
AAA SIHOTA ELECTRICAL
Comm., Industrial & Res. Services.
Licensed/bonded. 604-999-4573
SCOTGUARD
ELECTRICAL LTD.
Expert in electrical repairs
& troubleshooting
Panel upgrades,
Renovations Guart. work.
Licensed/bonded
BBB app. No job too small
6 0 4 - 7 2 0 - 9 2 4 4
YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service
Call Lic #89402 Same day guarn’td
We love small jobs! 604-568-1899
S & S CEDAR FENCING
Factory Direct Cedar Fence Panels
for Sale & Installation. 8291 No. 5
Road, Richmond. 604 275-3158
Gardening Services 21 yrs exp.
Tree topping, pruning, trimming,
power raking, aeration, clean-up.
Free est. Michael 604-240-2881
Soil, bark, Sand, Gravel etc. $25/yd
+ $50 del. Also, Property Maint.
Services avail.Simon 604-230-0627
ADD YOUR business on
www.BCLocalBiz.com directo-
ry for province wide exposure!
Call 1-877-645-7704
BILL CHRISTIE Architect MAIBC
Additions/Renos Houses/Offices
604 603-6462 anytime
COMPLETE HOME
RENOVATIONS
Interior / Exterior repairs,
kitchens, bathrooms, suites
upgraded. Carpentry,
plumbing, electrical & tiling.
All work guaranteed!
6 0 4 - 2 0 9 - 8 2 6 5
NEW & REPAIR. Bath & KItch, flrs,
tiles, moulding, dry-wall, painting,
plumbing, wiring. Job guaranteed.
WCB ins. Patrick 778-863-7100.
PAINTING, HOME RENOVA-
TIONS, tile setting, sundecks,
stairs. Free est. 778-686-0866.
TOBIAS & LAIRD
EXCAVATION INC.
Yard Re-Development
Sewer, Drain Tile, Water Main,
Pool Excavation, Fill, Turf,
Ponds, Demo & Haul Away.
778-885-5009, 604-782-4322
2guyswithatruck.ca
Moving & Storage
Visa OK. 604-628-7136
AAA ADVANCE MOVING
Experts in all kinds of moving/pack-
ing. Excellent Service. Reas. rates!
Different from the rest. 604-861-8885
www.advancemovingbc.com
AFFORDABLE MOVING
Local & Long Distance
From $45/Hr
1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10 Ton Trucks
Insured ~ Licenced ~ 1 to 3 Men
Free estimate/Seniors discount
Residential~Commercial~Pianos
604-537-4140
SPARTAN Moving Ltd.
Fast & Reliable. Insured
Competitive rates. Wknd Specials.
Call Frank: (604) 435-8240
A-TECH Services 604-230-3539
PAINT SPECIAL
3 rooms for $269, 2 coats
(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls
Cloverdale Premium quality paint.
NO PAYMENT until Job is
completed. Ask us about our
Laminate Flooring &
Maid Service!
www.paintspecial.com
MILANO PAINTING
604 - 551- 6510
Interior & Exterior
S Professional Painters
S Free Estimates
S Written Guaranteed
S Bonded & Insured
ALLAN CONST. & Asphalt. Brick,
concrete, drainage, foundation &
membrane repair. (604)618-2304 ~
604-820-2187.
10% OFF if you Mention this AD!
AMAN’S PLUMBING SERVICES
Lic.gas fitter. Reas $. 778-895-2005
1ST CALL Plumbing, heating, gas,
licensed, insured, bonded. Local,
Prompt and Prof. 604-868-7062
MIN. EXPRESS PAGING
SYSTEM
Reasonable Rates
604-270-6338
POWER WASHING
GUTTER CLEANING
Same day serv. avail 604-724-6373
A & G ROOFING Ltd., all kinds of
new and re-roofing. Fully insured.
Free estimate. 604-537-3841
EAST WEST ROOFING & SIDING
CO. Roofs & re-roofs. BBB &
WCB. 10% Discount, Insured.
Call 604-812-9721, 604-783-6437
JASON’S ROOFING
All kinds of re-roofing & repairs.
Free est. Reasonable rates.
(604)961-7505, 278-0375
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
134 HOTEL, RESTAURANT,
FOOD SERVICES
156 SALES
115 EDUCATION
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
160 TRADES, TECHNICAL
163 VOLUNTEERS
PERSONAL SERVICES
171 ALTERNATIVE HEALTH
115 EDUCATION
PERSONAL SERVICES
180 EDUCATION/TUTORING
182 FINANCIAL SERVICES
115 EDUCATION
PERSONAL SERVICES
182 FINANCIAL SERVICES
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
236 CLEANING SERVICES
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
236 CLEANING SERVICES
242 CONCRETE & PLACING
260 ELECTRICAL
130 HELP WANTED
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
269 FENCING
281 GARDENING
287 HOME IMPROVEMENTS
300 LANDSCAPING
320 MOVING & STORAGE
156 SALES
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
329 PAINTING & DECORATING
332 PAVING/SEAL COATING
338 PLUMBING
341 PRESSURE WASHING
353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS
156 SALES
LOOKING FOR A NEW JOB?
Use bcclassified.com - Employment Section 100’s

CHECK CLASSIFIEDS
bcclassified.com 604-575-5555
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 2 5
PROUD TO SUPPORT THE LOCAL SPCA
REVIEW
the richmond
PET WEEK
OF
THE
SPCA
Thriftmart
5400 MINORU BLVD • 604-276-2477
TO ADOPT CALL 604-277-3100
“SARAH” NEEDS A GOOD HOME WITH YOU!
5431 NO. 3 RD. 604-276-2254
#200079, 3 yrs, SF, DSH
Sarah is a beautiful, playful and affectionate girl who makes herself
at home right away! She will be the first one to come and see you
for cuddles and will give you an affectionate head-bonk. She is good
with other friendly cats, but no dogs please. Sarah has a face you
just can’t say no to... so the faster you come see her the better, so
that you can say YES to making her your new best friend.
RICHMOND
WATERSTONE
Bright ★ Quiet ★ Spacious
1 & 2 Bdrm Apt Suites
3 Appliances, balcony,
swimming pool,
heat & hot water.
Also 2 & 3 Bdrm
Townhomes
6 Appliances
Close to schools &
stores. N/P.
Call 604-275-4849
or 604-830-8246
www.aptrentals.net
HAUL - AWAY
Rubbish Removal
House-Garden-Garage
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimate or Appointment
Mike: 604-241-7141
#1 AAA Rubbish
Removal
21 Years Serving Rmd.
Residential & Commercial
Clean Courteous Service
FREE ESTIMATES
Joe 604-250-5481
DISPOSAL BINS. 4 - 40 yards.
From $179 - $565 incl’s dump fees.
Call Disposal King. 604-306-8599.
RECYCLE-IT!
#1 EARTH FRIENDLY
JUNK REMOVAL
Make us your first call!
Reasonable Rates. Fast,
Friendly & Uniformed Staff.
604.587.5865
www.recycle-it-now.com
A FREE TELEPHONE SERVICE -
Get Your First Month Free. Bad
Credit, Don’t Sweat It. No Deposits.
No Credit Checks. Call Freedom
Phone Lines Today Toll-Free
1-866-884-7464.
DISCONNECTED? Need cheap,
reliable phone service? Great low
rates? High-speed internet, calling
features & long distance available.
First month $24.95 + connection
fee. Phone Factory Reconnect
1-877-336-2274;
www.phonefactory.ca
**HOME PHONE RECONNECT**
Call 1-866-287-1348. Prepaid Long
Distance Specials! Feature Pack-
age Specials! Referral Program!
Don’t be without a home phone!
Call to Connect! 1-866-287-1348.
AMERICAN Bulldog. 12 wks. P/B
Female. Beautifully marked. Brindle
eye patch, 1st shots. To good home
$600. 604-796-2227 (Harrison)
AMERICAN BULLDOG X Staffor-
shire. 2males, 1 female, dewormed,
great family dog. Ready in 1 week.
$400. 778-885-8756
Bengal Lap Leopard kittens. Tica
reg. Top blood lines. Shots & de-
wormed. Free shipping to lower
mainland.$700&up.1-250-395-2464
BERNESE Mountain Dog Pups.
Champion line, training. $1500.
604-740-0832 or 604-740-2986.
CATS & KITTENS GALORE, TLC
has for adoption spayed & neutered
adult cats.604-309-5388 / 856-4866
COCKER SPANIELS, 8 wks, 1st
shts, tails docked, black with white
chest & feet, $400. (604)240-4601.
FILA / MASTIFF GUARD DOGS.
Excellent Loyal Family Pet, all shots
Great Protectors! Ph 604-817-5957.
Golden Retriever P/B, vet & shots,
ready Aug. 9. Pics avail., $600
Rosedale (604)845-7434
timbur6@telus.net
LAB Pups CKC.Reg’d Champ.lines
dewrmd/tattooed 1blk.2yellow, vet✓
1
st
shots $800. Ready 604-857-9192
LAB Retriever pups, yellow/blck,
$650; chocolate, $750. Vet check,
quality lineage, dew claws, 1st
shots, dewormed. (604)702-0217
LAB X GERMAN SHEPHERD pup-
pies. Good temporment. Ready to
go $250 each 778-319-8143
MIN Schnauzer 4F/1M, tails
docked, 1st shots, dewormed,
hypo-allergic. $550. (604) 761-1994
MOSKOVY DUCKLINGS, day old
$3.50 & up. 3/mo old $15. Please
call: (604)463-4367 Maple Ridge.
NEED A GOOD HOME for a good
dog or a good dog for a good
home? We adopt dogs!
www.856-dogs.com or call: 604-
856-3647.
RAT TERRIER, great looking male
neut. micro. Friendly healthy, AKC
reg. Needs active family. Good on
& off leash. Neg. to approved
home. 604-941-2494 l/msg.
SHELTIE PUPS P.B. Reg. Micro-
chipped, all shots. Vet chk’d. 4 mos.
1/2 price. M-$500. F-$600.
(778)549-3646.
St Bernard pups, m/f, unreg., gentle
giants, 1st shots, puppy pack, can
email pics, $1000. 1 (604)462-8605
Yellow lab puppies ready to go call
to view $600.00. Vet checked, 1st
shots, dewormed. 778-885-9066
Estate Sale. 100+ year old an-
tiques and memorabilia. By
appointment only. Call 250-
442-3384.
1 ROUND TABLE with 4 chairs, 2
carpets 9X11, 10X13 (brand new),
2 double beds (used) Call
(604)220-1764
#1A STEEL BUILDING SALE! Save
up to 60% on your new garage,
shop, warehouse. 6 colors
available! 40 year warranty! Free
shipping, the first 20 callers!
1-800-457-2206
www.crownsteelbuildings.ca
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
CAN’T GET UP YOUR Stairs?
Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn
Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and
get 10% off your new Stairlift. Call
1-866-981-6591.
Can’t Get Up Your Stairs? Acorn
Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stair-
lifts now! Mention this ad and get
10% off your new Stairlift! Call
1-866-981-6591
FUTURE STEEL BUILDINGS
CLEARANCE - Pre-engineered and
custom-sized to your requirements.
Factory-direct pricing. Some mod-
els discounted to half-price to clear.
CALL FOR FREE BROCHURE
AND QUOTE 1-800-668-5111 ext.
170.
HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best
price. Best quality. All shapes &
colours available. 1-866-652-6837
www.thecoverguy.com
NEW Norwood SAWMILLS - Lum-
berMate-Pro handles logs 34”
diameter, mills boards 28” wide.
Automated quick-cycle-sawing
increases efficiency up to 40%.
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT
- FREE Information:
1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT.
STEEL BUILDING SALE..
SPECIALS from $4 to $11/sq.ft.
Great pricing on ABSOLUTELY
every model, width and length.
Example: 30x40x14 NOW $8995.
Pioneer Steel Manufacturers 1-800-
668-5422.
Canadian made Willis. Walnut up-
right piano. New in 1972. Exc cond.
well tuned. $1,250. 604-266-7353.
SAXOPHONE: Yamaha Jr in excel-
lent condition; nice case; fully
serviced. $650. Call 604-853-5060.
TRUMPET, nickel plated, B flat
$200. Nickel plated flugal horn,
$200. King baratone horn in premi-
um condition $500. 604-852-1426
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
19 ACRES. LEVEL & TREED on
Sunshine Coast. Creek at back &
road down side. Rural, beautiful
Powell River. Call Neil Frost
604-483-6345. Coast Realty Group.
20 Acre Ranches ONLY $99
per/mo. $0 Down, $12,900 Near
Growing El Paso, Texas. Owner Fi-
nancing, No Credit Checks. Money
Back Guarantee. Free Map/Pic-
tures. 800-755-8953
www.sunsetranches.com
BEAUTIFUL ARIZONA LAND!
$0 down. $0 interest. Starting
$89/mo. Guaranteed Financing.
No credit check. 1-2.5 acre building
lots! Call (800) 631-8164 Code
4001 www.sunsiteslandrush.com
EUROPEAN bakery shop in
Cambie Plaza (Cambie and No. 5
Rd.), same location for 28 yrs. with
lots of regular clientele, reasonable
rent and owner will train. Call
Alex Chan, Macdonald Realty
at 604-230-5722 or email:
chanalex@telus.net for details.
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
* SELL YOUR HOME FAST *
Buying Any Price, Cond., Location.
NO COMMISSIONS ~ NO FEES ~
No Risk Home Buying Centre
(604)435-5555
WE BUY HOUSES
Older Home? Damaged Home?
Need Repairs? Behind on
Payments? Quick CASH!
Call Us First! 604.657.9422
BANK ON US! Mortgages for
purchases, renos, debt con-
solidation, foreclosure. Bank
rates. Many alternative lending
programs.Let Dave Fitzpatrick,
your Mortgage Warrior, simpli-
fy the process!1-888-711-8818
dave@mountaincitymort-
gage.ca
AUCTION
BANK--OWNED HOMES For Sale
including properties in this area.
Now is the time! The market, inter-
est rates, and oportunities could not
be better. NEW PROPERTIES
ADDED DAILY! Bid Now Online:
www.OnlineBidNow.com HUDSON
& MARSHALL, 1-866-539-4174
HOMES FOR SALE-SUPER BUYS
www.dannyevans.ca
Homelife Benchmark Realty Corp. Langley
7280 LINDSAY RD. 1 Bdrm apt.
$780/mo incls heat & H/W, 1 prkg,
604-321-9095 or 778-822-2660
RICHMOND, Ackroyd Rd. 1 bdrm
apt, top floor, vaulted ceiling, 1
bath, 5 appls, 1 cov. prk stall, balco-
ny, F/P, NS/NP. Cls to skytrain.
Sept. 1. $950. Call 1-250-574-8697.
RICHMOND, CENTRAL. 1 bdrm,
clean & spacious, insuite lndry,
NS/NP, $950/mth. Avail. Sept 1st.
C 21 Prudential. Call 604-232-3022.
RICHMOND
1 & 2 Bdrms
Available Immediately
Located in central
Richmond, close to all
amenities & Kwantlen
College. Rent includes heat
and hot water.Sorry no pets.
Call 604-830-4002 or
604-830-8246
Visit our website:
www.aptrentals.net
Richmond
Ocean Residences
11671 7th Avenue
Condo-like bldg with great
views a must see. Modern
living, beaut grounds incl’d
ponds & fountains. Close to
Steveston and markets;
Many stes with ocean views.
Indoor/outdoor pkg, lockers,
party rm, fitness rm, sauna,
outdoor pool, games rm,
social rm, BBQ Area. Bach,
1 & 2 bdrm stes from $800.
For more info & viewing call
Irina 778-788-1872
Email:
rentoceanresidences
@gmail.com
Professionally managed by
Gateway Property Management
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
356 RUBBISH REMOVAL
373A TELEPHONE SERVICES
477 PETS
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
373A TELEPHONE SERVICES
PETS
477 PETS
PETS
477 PETS
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
529 ESTATE SALES
548 FURNITURE
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
560 MISC. FOR SALE
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
560 MISC. FOR SALE
566 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
578 SPORTING GOODS
REAL ESTATE
603 ACREAGE
612 BUSINESSES FOR SALE
REAL ESTATE
627 HOMES WANTED
636 MORTGAGES
639 REAL ESTATE SERVICES
660 LANGLEY/ALDERGROVE
RENTALS
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
RENTALS
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
BUYING OR SELLING?
Use bcclassified.com - Merchandise for Sale 500’s
CLASSIFIED ADS
MEAN MORE BUSINESS
PHONE 604-575-5555
PLUMBING
5 MINUTE EXPRESS PAGING SYSTEM
PLUMBING SERVICES AT REASONABLE RATES
CALL 604-270-6338
RJ’S PLUMBING
& HOME SERVICE
** COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL **
KITCHEN & BATHROOM SPECIALIST PLUS TIDDLEY THINGS
604-272-2809 or cell: 604-841-2479
RENOVATIONS
BILL GILLESPIE
CONSTRUCTION • RENOVATIONS
604-263-7502
PAINTING
X Residential X Commercial
X Interior • Exterior
X Condo/Townhouse Specials
X Free Estimates X Insured
X Clean, Professional Service
Cedargreen Painting
HANDYMAN
New fence installation • Gates & repair
Roofing repairs • Powerwashing
• Odd jobs • Renos • Gutters etc.
Painting interior & exterior
STEVESTON HOME SERVICES
Free estimates (fully insured)
Call Darryn 604-339-5532
CONCRETE SERVICE
WEST CONCRETE
We specialize in driveway, sidewalk, patio,
foundation and retaining wall, all kinds of concrete jobs.
We also do fencing jobs.
Free estimate and free design.
CALL WEST: 778-895-0968 RMD
LANDSCAPE & GARDENING SERVICE
• Pressure Washing • Paving stones
• Irrigation• New lawn installations
• Lawn & garden maintenance
• Tree and hedge planting
• Painting, Res. & Com.
18 YEARS EXPERIENCE
604-771-6894 • 604-318-8805
FREE
ESTIMATES
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
BUILD NEW HOMES
2 - 5 - 10 Warranties
General Contractor
Total Renovations & Additions
•Licensed • Insured
604-985-8270
www.a-diamondhome.com
•Kitchens • Baths
•Drywall •Painting
•Garage •Roofs •Decks
•Driveways •Asphalt
•Concrete •Drain tiles
•Landscaping •Excavating
•Contracting
LAWN SERVICE
A+ LAWN & GARDEN
• Fertilization (packages available)
• Hedge trimming & Pruning
• Yard clean-up • Pressure washing • Gutters
Fully insured. Free Estimates.
Andy 604-908-3596
HOME SERVICE GUIDE
REVIEW
the richmond
PLUMBING & HEATING
604-868-7062
Licensed, Insured & Bonded
Local Plumbers
• Plumbing Repairs
• Boilers & Furnaces
• Gas
Water heater Special
Installed From $735
RENOVATIONS
AA CONTRACTOR
COMPLETE HOME RENOVATIONS
• Home Repair
• Bathroom, Kitchen Remodeling
• Fence, Deck Renewing
• Free Estimate and Low Cost
CALL ALLAN 778-229-7880
WINDOWS & DOORS
Trade in Your Old!
For New Energy
Efficient Windows!
Get $50 per Window Trade In
Towards New Replacement
Windows
FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION
604-270-1488
178-21300 GORDON WAY
RICHMOND, BC, V6W 1M2
www.gienow.com
ASK US ABOUT
ENERGY STAR
DOORS WINDOWS
SERVING WESTERN CANADA SINCE 1949
2600 FINLAYSON Court MultiFami-
ly Garage Sale, Saturday August
21st, 9am -3pm. Something for
everybody.
551 GARAGE SALES
GARAGE sale at Richmond Emma-
nuel Church on 7451 Elmbridge
Way,(604)214-0321 on Sat Aug 28,
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cheap
cheap sale on household items, fur-
niture, clothings, accessories, toys,
books, etc. Don’t miss the chance!
RICHM0ND
GARAGE SALE
10671 - SCEPTRE CRES.
Saturday, Aug. 21
- 9am to 3pm -
A GREAT VARIETY
OF ITEMS!
RICHMOND, 2 family sale. Sat Aug
21, 9am-3pm. 4720 & 4740 Pendle-
bury Road. Householditems, home
decor, office desks & chairs, tools
furniture, gym equipment, etc
Richmond:
BACK YARD SALE
7175 Moffat Road
Sat, Aug 21 ✿ 10am-5
No Early Birds, please.
Rain or Shine
All h/hold items must go! Some
brand new, some not. Small furn
& applis...too much to list!
551 GARAGE SALES
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
Get immediate
RESULTS!
www.bcclassified.com
P a g e 2 6 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
sports
Sebastian Hayes’ baseball season is be-
ing extended—for at least another week.
After a solid season for the Richmond
Chuckers in which he pitched eight wins
and had 62 RBIs, he was asked to join the
Vancouver Mounties in their quest for the
national Bantam AAA boys’ championship
Aug. 25-29 in Vaughan, Ont.
“Of course I’m excited,” said the quiet-
spoken Hayes, who expects to also play a
bit of infield for Vancouver.
Hayes, 15, helped the Chuckers, coached
by Alex Klenman, to a sixth-place finish at
the recent provincials. He feels he made
great strides in his defensive coverage, but
is hoping the chance to play at the nation-
als will be even more of a learning experi-
Hayes off to nationals
Sebastian Hayes has been added by Van-
couver for the upcoming Bantam AAA na-
tionals.
Richmond golfer Christine Wong is set to tee off at
the 2010 CN Canadian Women’s Open Aug. 23-29 at
St. Charles Country Club in Winnipeg.
As a member of Team Canada’s development squad,
Wong has received an exemption to compete in the
national championship.
Wong, 18, has had an impressive 2010 season, win-
ning the B.C. Women’s Amateur Championship and
finishing as the runner-up low amateur at the U.S.
Women’s Open Championship. She tied for 11th at
the 2009 Royale Cup Women’s Amateur Champion-
ship and has also won the 2009 Seattle Junior Open
and the 2009 Bellingham Junior Open as well as fin-
ishing fourth at the 2009 World Junior Girls Cham-
pionship.
Wong tees up for
Canadian Open
Christine Wong has earned an exemp-
tion into the Canadian Open.
Twins delight in Western championship
by Don Fennell
Sports Editor
A tune up against a young Richmond peewee team
proved to be just what the Lloydminster (Sask.) Twins
needed.
Buoyed by the experience they gained from an ex-
hibition doubleheader last week at Gibbons Park, the
Twins went on to win the Western Canadian peewee
AA boys’ baseball championship Sunday in Newton.
They defeated B.C. 15-5 in the final game.
Lloydmister coach David Keck told The Richmond
Review that the exhibition games were invaluable.
Keck also noted the similarities between the Lloy-
dminster and Richmond minor baseball progarms.
He said the program in Lloydmister had all but dis-
appeared in 1996, and the success enjoyed by this
year’s peewee Twins is a reward for hanging in and
rebuilding the program.
The Richmond City Baseball Association was
formed in 2008, a merger of the former Richmond
and West Richmond baseball associations. Under the
guidance of president Pat Weatherill, RCBA’s focus in
on developing youth baseball skills and sportsman-
ship in a fun, inclusive learning environment.
Weatherill said the exhibition games against Lloy-
dmister were equally important for Richmond’s pee-
wees.
“It gave us an opportunity to play a higher level
of ball, “ he said. “We would like to duplicate their
feat (winning Westerns), however because we have a
larger base of players we have to play AAA ball.”
Exhibition doubleheader in Richmond helped set table for title
Richmond City Baseball’s Chuckers see the resurgence of the Lloydminster
Twins’ program as an example of what it too can achieve.
3-10F A12
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tax receipt issued
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RICHMOND
QUEENSGATE GARDENS
11020 Williams Rd.
Spacious 2 & 3 bedroom town-
houses. 6 Appl’s., balcony, 2 car
garage, 2 full bath, gas f/p. 1
Year lease required. No Pets.
Professionally Managed by
Colliers International
Call 604-841-2665
SPACE AVAILABLE
FOR RENT
STEVESTON UNITED CHURCH
3720 Broadway St.
(at Second Avenue)
in Steveston Village
available to rent on
Sept. 1, 2010
3 rooms, 200 sq. feet each.
The classrooms have a folding
divider to make it into one
large room or 3 small rooms,
excellent lighting.
Also, the church hall is
available for rental, 1600 sq. ft.

For more information
please call 604-277-0508
or email: office@
stevestonunitedchurch.ca
SEAFAIR Rancher. 3Br house on
large lot in quiet, excellent neigh-
bourhood. Clean, well kept home.
Close to shopping, bus, schools.
Available Sept 1. $1700/mo. 604-
723-4114. mfu@shaw.ca
ON CANADA LINE
6700 #3 ROAD, RICHMOND
800 sq. ft. Ideal for Travel, Insu-
rance etc. Parking available. 604-
277-0966 or 604-273-1126
Richmond. 1000sf upstairs office.
Facing #6 Rd. nr entry to Hwy #91.
2pc bath, ac, alarm, $1080+hst, incl
everything. Avl Now. 778-882-0405
RICHMOND: Furnished bdrm. Sin-
gle room; share kitchen, bathroom,
ldry rm & eating nook. Cable, utils.
h/sp net & prkg. $550. N/S. Sept.
1st. 778-785-4236; 778-988-9746.
TSAWWASSEN. Room available in
comfortable home. Suit mature or
prof. person. $550 incl delicious
meals (604) 943-6130, 603-7210.
1 BR STEVESTON - g/l, sep entry,
fireplace, shared laundry. Walk to
bus, village, parks. n/s. Pets ok.
$875 + utilities. 604-992-0602
4th & Granville, 2 br. grnd lvl, N/P.
N/S. No ldry. Refs. $775/mo. incl
heat/hydro. Sept 1. Suit single,
couple neg. Priv Ent 604-244-7862
RICHMOND. #3 & Williams. 1 bdrm
Private entry, full kitchen, appl.
Np/ns. Near school & bus. Avail.
immed. $800/mo. incl. utils., cable,
net, shared w/d. 604-271-6949
RICHMOND: Beautiful Reno’d 1
bdrm g/lvl, kitch, nice lrg b/yard, nr
amens/bus; W/D, suit 1 person,
NS/NP. $850/mo inclds utils/cable.
Avail now. Call eves 604-272-3033.
RICHMOND. Spacious, clean, very
bright 1 bdrm. G/L. Close to every-
thing. $1100/mo. incl util. Sept. 1st.
604-275-3377 or 604-351-3679
SHELL & Williams rd. 1Br bsmt
suite, N/S, N/P. Util incl. close to
amen, avail immed.(604)323-6491
OPP. IRONWOOD Mall 3 bdrm
upper suite, $1550 incl. util, wire-
less, 5 appls, lge deck, fenced yard.
Ref req’d, pets ok, n/s. Avail Sept
1st 778-389-6524 / 778-389-6542
RICHMOND: New 3 bdrm, 2 full
baths. Nr bus & schools. Williams,
btwn Garden City & No 4 Rd. N/P.
$1600/mo. incl utils.778-237-7700.
RICHMOND West. #1 / Williams.
3 bdrm, 1.5 baths, ldry. Near bus,
shops & park. $1350. 604-375-3986
LANGLEY Willowbrook 31/2 Br
Large TH w/Appl and Laundry and
Balcony. 2 car Garage. ns/np.
1600$ avail. 604-788-0237
✰ RENTAL ✰
✰ INCENTIVES ✰
Richmond, East / New
Westminster: 3 storey
Townhouses with 5/appls,
2/bath, garage, f/p.
From $1440/mo.
Call 604-522-1050
RICHMOND CENTRAL. 2 bdrm., 2
bath, 1100 sf, 2 cov. parking, min.
1 year lease. Ns/np. $1300/mo
Avail. Sept 1. Phone 604-729-9672.
RICHMOND
Briargate & Paddock
Townhouses
2 Bedrm + Den
& 3 Bedrms Available
Private yard, carport or
double garage. Located on
No. 1 & Steveston, No. 3 &
Steveston. Landscape and
maintenance included.
Call 604-830-4002
or 604-830-8246
Website www.aptrentals.net
1975 TRANS AM, Original miles
60,000. Everything original.
$16,995. Exc cond. (604)220-1764
$0 DOWN & we make your 1st pay-
ment at auto credit fast. Need a
vehicle? Good or Bad credit
call Stephanie 1-877-792-0599.
www.autocreditfast.ca. DLN 30309.
TOWN TRACTORS
*1988 Kenworth,Triple4 Cummins
15/spd trans., 40rear, MVI ready.
*1986 Freightliner, good running
tractor, engine: Big Cam 400,
15/ spd, 46 rear.
*2 alum headache racks (cab
guards), truck snow chains, etc.
Call for more info: 604-936-1973
AAA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
Minimum $100 cash for full size
vehicles, any cond. 604-518-3673
......
#1 FREE SCRAP VEHICLE
REMOVAL
ASK ABOUT $500 CREDIT
$$$ PAID FOR SOME
604.683.2200
Scra
The Scrapper
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
WAREHOUSEMAN’S
LIEN ACT
Under the Warehouse Lien
Act, Marvel Auctions Ltd. @
4080 Vanguard Rd., Rich-
mond, BC, will sell by Auction
Thurs. Sept. 9th, 5:30 pm
the stored goods belonging to
1.) Ms. Lillian Roberts,
arrears owing $1181.60
2.) Rose Meyers,
arrears owing $1914.43
3.) Yrinda Berger,
arrears owing $3395.89
Plus costs of sale, all
outstanding money owing to
Laporte Moving & Storage
Systems Ltd.
WAREHOUSEMEN’S LIEN ACT
Mr. DAVID HILBORN,
Formerly of: 2016 Bowser Ave,
North Vancouver Owes us
$1103.04 PLUS THE COST OF
THIS AD For unpaid storage fees
for 2 lockers located at: 11820-
River Road, Richmond, B.C.
Ms. BITA RAMEZANKHAN
Formerly of: #1732- 938 Smithe
Street. Vancouver B.C. Owes
$1376.00 PLUS THE COST OF
THIS AD For unpaid storage fees
for 1 locker located at: 11820-
River Road, Richmond, B.C.
Or goods (Furniturer, misc items,
etc) will be sold on Sept 20, 2010
at #140-2251-No. 5 Road, Rich-
mond BC, V6X 2S8.
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
721 HALLS
736 HOMES FOR RENT
741 OFFICE/RETAIL
748 SHARED ACCOMMODATION
RENTALS
748 SHARED ACCOMMODATION
750 SUITES, LOWER
751 SUITES, UPPER
752 TOWNHOUSES
RENTALS
752 TOWNHOUSES
TRANSPORTATION
806 ANTIQUES/CLASSICS
810 AUTO FINANCING
TRANSPORTATION
810 AUTO FINANCING
828 COMMERCIAL VEHICLES
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
TRANSPORTATION
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
TRANSPORTATION
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
847 SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
BUSINESS AND FINANCE: Seeking a business
opportunity or partner? Posting legal notices?
Need investors, agents or distributors, this is
where you advertise. bcclassified.com
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
RENTALS
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 2 7
By the time they ask “Are we there yet?”
… you will be.
Copyright 2010 © | Higherground Project Marketing Inc.
Brokerage and Sales by Multiple Reality Ltd. Prices are sub-
ject to change without prior notice.
A mere 90-minute drive from downtown
Vancouver brings you to The Cottages. It feels like a
world apart. Steps from peaceful and pristine Cultus Lake,
surrounded by breathtaking mountains and lush green
forests, with the great outdoors right at your doorstep. But
this isn’t your grandfather’s rustic idea of a cottage – these
luxurious family cottages are styled your way, with all the
features and finishes you could hope for and large private
porches and decks providing plenty of space for family and
friends to gather and enjoy BC living at its best. And as if
that wasn’t enough, the 10,000 sq. ft. clubhouse with pools
offering all the amenities of a first-class resort.
1.877.888.4950
CultusLakeCottages.com
Discovery Centre & Display Cottages
Open daily from 12 noon to 5pm except Wednesday
1777 Columbia Valley Rd. Lindell Beach, BC
Single Family Cottages

$399,900
from
Phase 1 and 2 SOLD OUT!
Phase 3 now selling.
August 19, 2010
61 FRESH APARTMENT HOMES STARTING FROM $119,900!
Mon-Thurs 1pm-4pm; Sat & Sun Noon to 5pm
Metro Vancouver recorded 1,124 housing
starts in July, reports the Canada Mortgage
and Housing Corporation.
Year-to-date, builders have started con-
struction on 8,005 new homes in the Vancou-
ver Census Metropolitan Area, CMHC says.
“An adequate inventory of newly completed
and unsold homes, and a well-supplied resale
market have tempered housing starts to more
modest levels,” says CMHC senior market
analyst Robyn Adamache.
“So far this year, Surrey has led new hous-
ing construction in the Vancouver CMA with
half of the new homes started being single-
detached dwellings,” she says.
“Strong population growth and an ample
supply of land for development have encour-
aged new home construction in the area.”
While the total number of starts for the
region is down by 10 per cent from
June’s new-home starts, Greater Van-
couver Home Builders’ Association
president and CE) Peter Simpson
notes that “year-to-date, we’re more
than double.”
“I prefer to see double what we
were last year, rather than half,”
Simpson says of local housing starts.
He is impressed that, in just the
frst seven months of 2010, Surrey is respon-
sible for one-quarter of all housing starts in
Metro Vancouver, with so many being single-
family detached home starts.
Tis shows there is recognition among
builders that people want single-family
homes, Simpson says. Although Surrey came
close to having more single-detached starts
than all other Metro Vancouver communi-
ties combined, city staf work hard to ensure
there is still plenty of green space and a focus
on industrial and commercial development as
well, he notes.
“It enables you to live, work and play here,”
says Simpson, who lives in Surrey. “I don’t
have to leave town to go to work or for
recreation.”
Surrey was recently ranked fourth-
best place in Canada to invest in real
estate by the Real Estate Investment
Network; REIN also ranked it frst in
the province.
Even though starts are down this
month compared to last, Simpson says
that so far this year, housing starts have
generated about 12,000 direct and indirect
jobs in the region.
At the British Columbia Real Estate Asso-
ciation, the group notes that homebuyers are
‘in the driver’s seat.”
Multiple Listing Service residential sales
declined in July compared to the same time
last year, but the average MLS residential
price climbed by six per cent to $491,832 in
July compared to the same month last year,
the BCREA reports.
“A relatively large number of homes for sale
has created the most favourable supply condi-
tions for homebuyers in more than a year,”
says BCREA chief economist Cameron Muir.
Active MLS residential listings were 21 per
cent higher in July than at the start of the year
on a seasonally adjusted basis, but with newly
listed MLS residential units now declining,
“tighter market conditions may emerge this
fall,” the BCREA says.
Surrey leads
starts in Metro
Vancouver
A construction worker helps complete the
work on a new home in Surrey Friday.
Peter Simpson
P a g e 2 8 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 1 0
ACT
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604.638.0497 604-207-1888

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