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Classroom Management
Profile

Sarah Klunder

Table of Contents
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Part 1:
Component 1: Research About Classroom Management.pg. 3
Component 2: Personal Beliefs and Style of Classroom Managementpg. 5

Part 2:
Component 3: Routines and Procedures..pg. 7
Component 4: Plan to Maintain Appropriate Behavior (Norms & Rules)..pg. 12

Part 3:
Component 5: Creating Classroom Environment/Climate.pg. 14
Component 6: First Day of School Plan.pg. 18
Component 7: Transition and Sponge Timepg. 20

Part 4:
Component 8: Communication Planpg. 23

Part 5:
Component 9 & 10: Application of Research and Professional Writing.pg. 36

Materials:
Class Syllabus..pg. 27
Accountability Partnerspg. 30
Sample Permission Letterpg. 31

First Day of School Letter..pg. 32

Twitter Pagepg. 33

Parent-Teacher-Student Progress Checkup.pg. 34

Classroom Layoutpg. 35

Component 1: Research about Classroom Management

Effective teachers MANAGE their classrooms, ineffective teachers DISCIPLINE their


classrooms (Wong, 2010, p. 82).
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Classroom Management

TAKES PLACE IN AN ENVIRONMENT IN WHICH TEACHING AND LEARNING CAN


FLOURISH (Marzano 2003)

IS CREATED BY CLEAR, CONCISE ROUTINES AND PROCEDURES

ENSURES A SAFE, POSITIVE, AND ENGAGING LEARNING EXPERIENCE (Wong, 2009,


p. 83)

HAS THE LARGEST EFFECT ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT (Marzano, 2003, p. 128).

Choices, choices

Each day in the classroom for a student is another day presented with choices. From start to finish,
budding teens face decisions from what to wear in the morning, to how to react best when their
crush walks by in the hallway. Some of these choices may be complicated; those made in the
classroom should not be. In a time of life already so confusing for students, a well-managed
classroom is made all the more essential. Proper classroom management involves routines and
procedures which leave little room for wasted class time, and are clear and concise; that is,
explained thoroughly in a way for students to easily understand (Wong, 2010). These routines are
what occur daily or consistently in the students week, and create a strong foundation of structure
and safety in the classroom (Wong, 2009). When students already know what they should be doing
when they enter the classroom, the choice is made simple. Their only decision becomes whether
to adhere by the given rules and procedures or not.

Research says

Rules and procedures are not put in place as a means of discipline to the students; instead, it is a
way for me, their teacher, to establish a trusting relationship with them. Robert and Jana
Marzano (2003) emphasize the importance of there being a balance between the teacher actions
that provide clear consequences for unacceptable behavior and teacher actions that recognize and
reward acceptable behavior (Marzano, 2003, p. 128). By implementing rules and procedures,
my actions become predictable: students will not be surprised to receive the punishment they do,
nor be surprised to be encouraged in the pursuit of learning. Clarity provides safety, which then
leads to trust.

Master teacher, master learners

It is of utmost importance that my students achieve all that I know they are capable ofand yes,
they are capable of great things! This is why classroom management is so crucial to a successful
learning experience. Marzano (2003) states, Of all the variables, classroom management has the
largest effect on student achievement (Marzano, 2003, p. 128). As a teacher, I will work to create
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the environment needed to set my students up for success, and one which encourages them through
love and and safety amidst their failures.

Component 2: Personal Beliefs and Style of Classroom Management

Tell me what you pay attention to and I will tell you who you are.
Jos Ortega y Gasset

I believe in

1. THE COLLABORATION BETWEEN STUDENT AND TEACHER


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2. SHOWING EMPATHY AND ESTABLISHING TRUST THROUGH HONESTY AND


SINCERITY

3. SPEAKING UP, SPEAKING OUT, SPEAKING KINDLY

The collaboration between student and teacher begins with the acknowledgment that I am not
the only one in the classroom; therefore, I must acknowledge that my personality, however big it
may be, is not the only one effecting the environment of the classroom. This, I believe, is a
strength which will produce both trust amongst my students, and a steady rhythm in the heart of
the classroom. Here, we are a team; therefore, we will collaborate as a class to create Classroom
Hashtags (also known as norms, or the Classroom Code of Conduct) which will specify how
everyone, including me, is to behave and interact (Albert, 2005, p. 208). Together, we will reach
a level of mutual consent (Marzano, 2003) which will set the tone for our entire school year. Our
procedures will be a chameleon of personal standards, both mine and the students; thus, the
choice to go against such procedures is the choice to defy the students own beliefs and the trust
built between us.

Showing empathy and establishing trust happens through honesty and sincerity. If we are
to have an engaging and productive year, there must be a level of mutual respect between the
students and myself. I am not teaching children, but budding young-adults with minds of their
own; therefore, discipline will always be given with compassion and understanding (Fay, 1996),
then followed by a choice to either maturely resolve their misconduct or be given a separate task
or consequence of my own choosing. Kindness does not mean the exemplification of truth;
rather, the sincere desire for my students to succeed; thus, words between the students and I will
remain straightforward. If I trust my students to make the better choice, they will trust me to help
them reach their goals.

Students will be encouraged to speak up and speak out, but speak kindly. As an English
teacher, I firmly believe in the power of words. My students will be given great freedom in the
classroom to engage in small-group and class discussions, to share their personal beliefs, and to
ask the big questions. However, as Spiderman would say, with great power comes great
responsibility. The safety and comfort of the classroom relies on the trust of one another to
respect different perspectives, and use kindness as a response to new ideas. This applies not only
to my students, but to me as their teacher.

Influences (in order of listed beliefs): Linda Alberts Cooperative Discipline, Marzano strategies,
Jim Fays Love and Logic, Harry Wong.
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Component 3: Routines and Procedures

Typical School Day Schedule


7:00-7:45 am (Before School)
Arrive at school
Make copies, gather materials needed for class
Write class schedule/objectives on the board
Write daily Notebook prompt on the board

7:45-8:40 am (1st Period - Freshmen English)


Greet students at the door with a high five/handshake
Notebook prompt (5-7 minutes)
Daily Cool Quote (2 minutes)
Daily Grammar Blast - adjectives and adverbs (10 minutes)
Reading Discussion
Small groups (10 minutes)
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Class discussion (15 minutes)


Read ahead for next class (Rest of class)

8:45-9:40 am (2nd Period - Prep Hour)


Grade papers
Make changes to lesson if need be
Gather any extra materials needed
Answer emails/phone calls
Update class twitter feed

9:45-10:40 am (3rd Period - Freshmen English)


Notebook prompt (5-7 minutes)
Daily Cool Quote (2 minutes)
Daily Grammar Blast - adjectives and adverbs (10 minutes)
Reading Discussion
Small groups (10 minutes)
Class discussion (15 minutes)
Read ahead for next class (Rest of class)

10:45-11:40 am (4th Period - Freshmen English)


Notebook prompt (5-7 minutes)
Daily Cool Quote (2 minutes)
Daily Grammar Blast - adjectives and adverbs (10 minutes)
Reading Discussion
Small groups (10 minutes)
Class discussion (15 minutes)
Read ahead for next class (Rest of class)

11:45-12:15 pm (Lunch)
Eat lunch
Serve any detentions given

12:20-1:15 pm (5th Period - Study Hall)


Grade papers
Plan ahead for next lesson
Take care of any administrative business

1:15-2:15 pm (6th Period - Freshmen English)


Greet students at the door with a high five/handshake
Notebook prompt (5-7 minutes)
Daily Cool Quote (2 minutes)
Daily Grammar Blast - adjectives and adverbs (10 minutes)
Reading Discussion
Small groups (10 minutes)
Class discussion (15 minutes)
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Read ahead for next class (Rest of class)

12:15-2:45 pm (7th Period - Home Period)

2:45-4:00 pm (After School)


Plan for next lesson
Grade quizzes/papers
Meet with any students who need additional help
Meet with fellow teachers for ideas/feedback
Make any copies needed for next day

Typical Weekly Schedule


Monday:
Post schedule/objectives for the week
Notebook prompts
Grammar: Adjectives and adverbs
Introduction/lesson on new text
Homework: reading

Tuesday:
Notebook prompts
Grammar: Verbs
Reading discussion
Homework: reading

Wednesday:
Notebook prompts
Grammar: Nouns
In-class research
Students will be divided equally into two groups and will have a chance to explore an issue
that has come up in their reading. I will assign two sides to the issue.
The class will have to gather enough evidence from their text/research to make a valid
argument
Homework: reading
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Thursday:
Notebook prompts
Grammar: Parts of speech
Class debate
Homework: reading

Friday:
Notebook prompts
Famous Last Words
On every friday, a different student will be chosen to present to the class famous last words
spoken by anyone they find interesting or ridiculous from the past.
Review games
Reading quiz
For the rest of class: free read

Procedures:
1. Getting students attention
1. Students will know to quiet down and give me their eyes when I raise my hand in the
air. This is an effective way to ensure that students are listening to their peers
especially in group work when everyone may not see meand a way to avoid raising
my own voice. Students will be expected to watch for this signal and respond
appropriately.
2. Turning work in
1. At the beginning of every class, students will place their homework in a binder in
front of my desk assigned to their class (e.g. 9A, 9B).
3. Entering the classroom
1. At the beginning of each class period, a new Notebook prompt will be written on the
white board. While I understand the desire to talk to fellow classmates upon entering
the classroom, students will be expected to find their seats, pull out their Notebooks
and respond to the given prompt. This will ensure that students are in the right
mindset to begin class.
4. Dismissing the classroom
1. Students are not allowed to pack up until the bell. After the bell has rung, they may
create as much noise as they want.
5. Using the bathroom
1. 9th graders are young adults and do not have to ask for permission to use the
bathroom; however, students will be expected to wait until their is a transition period
during class to leave in exception to an absolute emergency.
6. Missing homework
1. Students who fail to complete their assignments on time will be given 0s in the grade
book. Second chances will always be given to those willing to ask for more time and
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willing to create a viable case; however, no excuses will be allowed for those who
simply made a decision not to do their work.
7. Tardiness/absence
1. Students who are tardy receive an automatic break-time detention, and must sign
their name on a tardy sheet. If students do not care to arrive to class on time, they
will be expected to make up the same amount of minutes they were late during their
personal time.
2. Students who are absent must check in with their Accountability Partners.
Accountability partners are established on the first day of class, and are expected to
gather any materials handed out in class while the other partner is absent.
8. What to do when work is done
1. This is English class; therefore, there will always be something new to read. Students
who complete their work early will be expected to read quietly in their seats unless
told otherwise.

WHY:

I believe that the chosen procedures are necessary in maintaining a well-balanced, smoothly
running classroom. These are core procedures that every student will be able to remember and
adjust to. As ninth graders, my students are expected to behave like young adults; therefore,
procedures such as pencil sharpening and missing materials will not be directly addressed.
Students should be able to appropriately address these issues without disturbing the rest of the
class.

Wong and Wong encourage practice, practice, practice (Wong 1). I understand that learning
these procedures will take time, and for the first classes students will be given grace for not
following procedures correctly. However, if after an appropriate amount of time these procedures
are not setting in, we will come together as a class to discuss what problems we are having. If
after this discussion procedures continue to be broken, then guideline infraction notices be be
given.
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Component 4: Plan to Maintain Appropriate Behavior (Norms and Rules)

*To adhere to modern-day growth, we will refer to our classroom norms as Class Hashtags

Ninth graders are young-adults; therefore, they will be given the responsibility of setting their
own classroom norms as well as playing a part in the creation of our rules and procedures. These
norms and procedures will be through collaboration and mutual consent on the part of both the
students and myself, the teacher (Marzano, 2003, p. 129).

On the first day of school, after greeting my students at the door with a smile and a
handshake/high-five, we will immediately discuss and create these norms and procedures
through an activity called #gabANDcollab.

#gabANDcollab

1. The class will be split evenly into four separate groups.


2. Within these groups, students will discuss different procedures among themselves (as
explained by me.) They will come up with reasonable ideas and solutions for each procedure
(aka, easily remembered, possible for all classmates, appropriate).
3. Students will also decide on four different hashtags within their assigned groups.
4. After an allotted time period, students will delegate one representative from their groups.
5. Representatives will read their hashtags aloud to the class first, as I write them down on the
white board. Similar themes/ideas will be combined.
6. Once each of the four representatives read their hashtags aloud, we will discuss as a class
which hashtags we deem best.
7. This will be repeated with procedures as well.

Examples of appropriate classroom hashtags may be similar to the following:

#PreparationNation
#RespectYoNeighbors
#DesiretoDiscuss
#StayOnTask
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Enforcement of Rules:

Guideline Infraction Notice: A pink slip of paper signaling that a student is off-task, passed to
them in a non-confrontational manner. When a student receives this, they know to see me after
class to do one of three things:

1st offense: A warning and documentation of the infraction


2nd offense: Student must write an action plan: This is what I did, this is how I will fix it
3rd offense: A friday detention.

If the norms/rules are not setting in after multiple infractions, we will come together as a class to
discuss revisions. We are a team; whatever problems we may have with the rules we created as a
class can also be solved as a class.
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Component 5: Creating Classroom Environment/Climate

Tangible:
(Classroom Diagram on pg. 35)

Seating

My Desk:
My desk will be at the back of the classroom in the corner adjacent to the door. I believe it is
easier to keep an eye on students who are talking or disturbing other classmates from the back of
the classroom, where I can see everyone. This way, no one can hide behind their book.

Students Desks:
Students will be arranged in groups of four around the classroom. Due to our frequent group
discussions, this makes for a more conducive learning environment and saves time otherwise
spent forming groups every day.

Couch:
There will be one couch at the back of the classroom for students who finish work early and get
to work ahead in their reading. This is a comfier alternative to desks, and a reward to those who
finish early.

Whiteboards/Materials

The Whiteboard:
The whiteboard is at the front of the class. This is so that when students take their seats, they will
immediately look up and see the daily Notebook prompt and class agenda written on the board.
This way, there is no excuse not to get to work right away.

Book Shelves:
Our textbooks are written works, both classical and modern. They will be kept in the back
corner of the classroom in bookshelves when they are not to be taken homea reading nook
of sorts. When students are done with a text, they will replace it on the shelf where it originally
came from.

Turn in Box:
Whenever a new assignment is due, students will come to the front of my desk, find the turn-in
box assigned to their class number, and turn in their work. By having the turn-in box where I can
always see it, I know who turns in their work on time and who does not even before the look
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through the assignments. This is meant to encourage responsibility, but also confidence. Students
who have worked hard and turn in their work on time may approach my desk with pride.

Aesthetics

Plants:
Words are given life in this classroom. It is only fitting that we have other forms of life growing
and changing as we do. Plants will be placed among desks and by the shelves, bringing an
organic feel to the classroom. Plus, a little greenery never hurt anyone.

Candles:
Coffee, sweet, and holiday scents will create an aroma of comfort around the classroom. Perfect
for getting to work on a big paper or starting a new book.

Lamps:
Lamps will provide a relieving alternative to the harsh overhead light of most classrooms, and
will be used as an additional glow.

Rugs:
By decorating with a rug near the book shelves, the classroom is given a more comfortable vibe.
By having a classroom that feels more like home, students willingness to share grows, and they
become more at ease in the classroom and among other classmates.

*The idea is to create an environment similar to that of a local coffee shop. Coffee
shops are places where people get together to meet, share, read, and write. An
English classroom should encourage the same mindset. While we are not friends
gathering together to gossip, we are indeed colleagues; collaborators and sharers,
creators and thinkers. We are budding writers in the pursuit of truth and
knowledge. Thus, my classroom will be conducive to such thinking.*
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Intangible:

Classroom Climate

Beginning of the year: TRUST, FAMILY

Welcome to Freshman English letter


-I want to establish a culture of family in my classroom; therefore, a week before classes
start, I will mail out a letter to both the student and the students guardian. This is to set a tone of
welcoming and acceptance even before they set foot in the classroom. (See Welcome letter on
pg. 32)
Name Games: Establishing and encouraging familiarity and trust among the students and I
will be one of our top priorities. In order to create a safe, comfortable environment, we must
get to know one another as fellow learners, and they as friends. In order to do so, we will play
icebreaker and name games for the first few days of class.
-The human knot: The entire class will come together and join hands. The idea is for each
arm to be attached to a different classmate; thus, forming a giant human knot. Students must try
to untangle themselves from said knot.
-Name games: At one group of desk, a students will begin: My name is _____, and my
favorite flavor of ice-cream is________. The student next to them will also state their name and
a fact, but will also be expected to repeat the name of the previous person, as well as the previous
fact. This activity grows more difficult with each student.
-Mafia: A card game. All students begin with eyes closed as I pass out cards to each
individual. Students may only look at their own card. The QUEEN is the nurse, the KING is the
sheriff, and the JOKER is the mafia. All other cards are townsfolk. At the beginning of each
round, students will close their eyes as the mafia decides who to kill, the nurse decides who to
save, and the sheriff decides to condemn. A game that encourages group collaboration and tests
the trust of every student. Muahahahaha!
#gabANDcollab
-Freshman English will be a place where my students voices are heard. Collaboration
will always be encouraged, and situations will be handled in a democratic nature. In order to
establish this tone of respect, my students will play a part in the creation of their own norms and
procedures.
1. The class will be split evenly into four separate groups.
2.Within these groups, students will discuss the different norms among themselves. They
will come up with reasonable ideas and solutions for each procedure (aka, easily remembered,
possible for all classmates, appropriate).
3.Students will also decide on four different hashtags within their assigned groups.
4. After an allotted time period, students will delegate one representative from their
groups.
5. Representatives will read their hashtags aloud to the class first, as I write them down
on the white board. Similar themes/ideas will be combined.
6. Once each of the four representatives read their hashtags aloud, we will discuss as a
class which hashtags we deem best.
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Group work: COLLABORATION, RESPONSIBILITY

Desk Groupings: Collaborating, sharing ideas, and debating topics of interest found in our
texts is highly encouraged in this classroom. Students will be expected to share often and speak
out. Group work will take place almost every day in order for students to build trusting
relationships with their classmates. Additionally, the more comfortable students grow voicing
their thoughts and opinions aloud, the more proficient writers they will ultimately become.
-Students will be placed in desk-groups of four to encourage trust and familiarity (see
class layout on pg. 35).
Accountability Partners: In my classroom, I want to encourage responsibility. Ninth graders
are young adults, and should be treated as such. Students who are absent must check in with
their Accountability Partners when they return. Accountability partners are established on
the first day of class, and are expected to gather any materials handed out in class while the
other partner is absent. When students are not only held responsible for their own success, but
the success of a fellow student, accountability is established.

Weekly traditions: CREATIVITY, FUN

Quotables: English is fun. I wish to encourage my students to look at this class through a
lens of interest in learning new things, and finding joy through the power of words. At the
beginning of every week, I will add another quote to the Quotables Boarda board made up
of funny, interesting, and encouraging quotes by random people.
Famous last words: In my classroom, I wish to encourage creativity. Therefore, a new
student will be chosen every week to find new famous last wordsthe last words of anyone
the students finds funny, interesting, or weird. The last words will be presented every friday by
the student in front of the classroom, and then displayed on the whiteboard with a magnet.

Component 6: First Day of School Plan

The First Day of School:


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According to Wong and Wong (2010), the greatest impression is made on the first day of school.
Having a detailed script and agenda prepared is essential in establishing a good first impression,
as well as instilling confidence in my students. What I say and do as the teacher on the first day
of classes will set the tone for the rest of the school year.

Below is a scripted agenda for the first hour of classes taught on the first day of school. Due to
the fact that I will be teaching the same class throughout the entirety of the day, my agenda will
be exactly the same for the rest of the hours as well. Therefore, only one hour of classes is given
below.

7:45-8:40 am (1st Period - Freshmen English)

7:45- 7:50: Greet students at the door with a high five/handshake

- Good morning, class!


- Hello, nice to see you this morning.
- Welcome!

7:50-8:00: Welcome

- Welcome, students, to 9th grade English! Freshman year is the beginning of something
truly unique and terrifying (just kidding). It is the first stepping stone of your high school
career; the beginning of the rest of your lives; and, as someone wise and wonderful once
sang, the start of something new. This truly is a momentous time of life; you as freshman
have the power to make the first year of your high school experience into something you
recall fondly years down the road. You will be presented new responsibilities, choices, and
opportunities. Our theme for the year will be The Butterfly Effect a celebration and
exploration of different thoughts, perspectives, and shared creativity. The Butterfly Effect
is about one choice influencing many areas of life; thus, our focus will be on the power of
actions paired with words, and each work we explore in class will build off of this theme.
These works matter, our studies matter, and you matter, dear students. Here, in this
classroom, we will establish trust. We will build confidence. We will hear and be heard.
Whatever passions and dreams you have, take them, and stretch those wings. The time is
now.

8:00-8:05: Accountability Partners

- This morning, we will be doing two things: The first of these is introducing the concept of
Accountability Partners. The second thing we will be doing is creating our classroom
hashtags.
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- Your Accountability Partner is the person seated directly across from you in your group of
four. Look this person in the eye. Say I will not fail you, Accountability Partner. These
people are responsible for collecting whatever handouts you do not receive while you are
missing. They should take notes for you as well. Simple enough? Alright, lets move on to
something a little more fun.

8:05-8:40: gabANDcollab

- Okay, you guys. If you take away nothing else from this class, hear this: You have a voice,
and it matters. In order to begin our year with that in mind, YOU as class will be creating our
classroom norms. Im super hip with it, as you will soon discover if you havent already, so
were going to call them hashtags in this class. Now, listen carefully to the following
directions:
- I am going to split the class into four separate groups. Within these groups, you will discuss
the different norms among yourselves. Dont worry, Ill provide a handout with ideas;
however, it is your job to make them your own. Revise. Redo. Completely get rid of them, if
you wish. They are simply there for guidance. The goal is to come up with reasonable class
normsthis means easily remembered, possible for all classmates to achieve, and
appropriate. You will decide on four different hashtags within your assigned groups. After the
allotted time period, each group will delegate one representative among you to read your
hashtags aloud to the class. I will write them down on the white board. Similar themes/ideas
will be combined. Once each of the four representatives read their hashtags aloud, we will
discuss as a class which hashtags we deem best.

I will split the class into four groups.

After the hashtags have been read and decided upon, I will read the final four to the
class.

After the bell rings, I will stand by the door and high-five/shake the hand of each of my
students.

- Thank you for a great first class.


- You guys rocked today.
- See you tomorrow!

Component 7: Transition and Sponge Time

Sponge Activities

Sponge Activities: Their Importance


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As a teacher, it is my job to give lessons, facilitate discussions and group work, and encourage an
overall conducive environment to learning. These goals are made possible by Sponge
Activities, activities which keep classroom learning flowing smoothly. Sponge Activities
ensure that no precious time is wasted in transitions or debating what to do next. These prepared
activities are essential in making sure every minute of class time is valued. They soak up time,
just like a sponge.

*The following examples were chosen due to their relevance in an English classroom, as well as
their relevance in a secondary level classroom. The chosen Sponge Activities encourage
communication among classmates, the processing of one piece of information in order to get to a
different conclusion, and reading skills.*

Examples of Sponge Activities:

1. Think, Pair, Share


-After a question is posed to the class, give students a moment to think on their own.
-Then have them pair with a partner and discuss their thoughts.
-Finally, come back together as a class and have a few students share what they talked
about in their groups.

*This activity could be used as both an introduction to a lesson, to wrap up a lesson at the end of
the class, or as a transition from one part of the lesson into another. This versatile Sponge
Activity encourages students to think on three different levels, ultimately leading to a higher level
of processing.

2. The Notebook Daily Prompt


-Every morning, students who enter the classroom will be greeted with a writing prompt
written on the whiteboard. They will take out The Notebook and write for a few minutes about
what they think the prompt is getting at, or just some related thoughts and ideas.

*This is a great Academic Sponge Transition from being rowdy in the hallways to entering the
English classroom. Students will have an opportunity to learn the minute they walk in the door.

3. Short Movie Clip


-At the beginning (or end) of class, show a short video clip with relevance to the lesson
being taught.

*This activity could be used as an introduction to a new unit, or as a means of wrapping up a


lesson. Either way, this activity must be planned and set up ahead of time so as not to take away
from any valuable class time.

4. Song Sound-Bite
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-A quick snippet of a song played overhead can indicate a change in station or group
work. When the song is played, students will know to switch stations/partners, or wrap up
whatever theyre working on.
-Make sure to play this song at the very beginning of the activity so that students know
what it means!

*In this example, Song Sound-Bite is used as an Academic Sponge Transition. Instead of
wasting time getting students attention, a song is played to indicate change. However, this
activity could also be used as an Academic Sponge Activity. A song played at the beginning of
class with relevance to the lesson being taught could be an excellent introduction to new
thoughts or a problem being addressed.

5. Three Minute Free-Write


-After being given a prompt, watching a movie, reading a portion of a book, etc. students
will, on any writing surface available, quickly jot down their thoughts.

*This Sponge Activity is an informal writing prompta way to quickly synthesize student
learning without much preparation or time being taken up in the class period. This can also be
used as a Academic Sponge Transition from one part of the lesson to the next. e.g. We just
learning this about our characterwhat do you think shell do next? On any paper in front of
you quickly write down your thoughts.

6. Who Am I
-Students will each be given a notecard and told to write down three characteristics of
any character or place from our current text.
-The notecards will be placed around the room.
-Students, on a different sheet of paper, will walk around the room and write down at
every station which character or place they think the notecard is describing.
-At the end, we will come together to determine the correct answers.

*This activity is a great Sponge Activity to use on quiz or test days. For my class, every friday is
quiz day, and we will spend the day reviewing. It is important that students understand why
people and places in a novel are important to the story; thus, this activity provides a fun way of
gathering those thoughts.

7. 3-2-1
-At the end of a lesson, have students write down
-Three things they learned
-Two things they found especially interesting
-One question they have

*An Academic Sponge Activity to gauge the knowledge students after a lesson or reading.

8. Ticket Out the Door - Sponge Activity


-Before leaving the classroom, students must write down one thing they learned during
the class.
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-This ticket will be handed to me on the way out of the door.

* This Academic Sponge Activity can be used at the end of class as a form of assessment,
reinforcement of concepts learned, or a way for students to pose new questions

9. Extra, ExtraRead All About It!


-Students will be given a single paragraph or more snippet of a magazine or news article
to read
-Students will be asked to find make connections and find relevance between the article
and the current text or lesson we are working on

*This Academic Sponge Activity is a way for students to understand WHY we are talking about
something. Instead of having me tell them the importance of a topic, students must make
connections themselves, drawing from context clues in the article. This is an activity that is
effective and quick. Could also be used as a transition from one area of a lesson into another.

10. Picture This


-I will display a picture on the overhead or SmartBoard, or simply hold it up in my hand
at the front of the class.
-Students will turn to their Accountability Partners and determine its relevance or
meaning.

*Similar to Extra, ExtraRead All About It! This activity is drawing information from context
clues, but with an image instead of an article.

Component 8: Communication Plan

ADMINISTRATION:

WHY
Principals, office workers, and the custodial staff are all different parts
of one body of administration who seek to create the safest, most
conducive learning environment for our students. It is vital that I
communicate any concerns, requests, or ideas I have with these people.
We are a team.
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WHEN
Before, during, and after school hours.

HOW
The administration and I will communicate via email, phone, and in
person.

TEACHERS:

WHY
My fellow teachers and I are a team; a united front. We beg, borrow, and
steal each others ideas. In order to pursue our own growth and
development as teachers, we need our colleagues support and
accountability. Therefore, the communication between us is vital.

WHEN
Before, during, and after school hours.

HOW
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My fellow teachers and I will communicate via email, phone, and in


person; additionally, social networks are a valuable source of interaction.

PARENTS:

WHY
Communicating with my students parents allows for educational
opportunities for both parties. Together, we aim to help the student reach
his/her highest potential. While high school students are young adults
and will be given many responsibilities of their own, I believe it is
important to consistently provide encouragement and supportboth at
school and at home. Parents will occasionally receive an approval form
for movies and books we will watch and read in class; additionally, a
welcome letter to students will be sent out a month before the first day
of school. This is welcome to parents as well. (pg. 32). Students are,
however, largely in charge of communicating with their parents.
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WHEN
Before, during, and after school hours.

HOW
I will communicate with parents via email, phone, in person, through my
website, school open-houses, and parent-teacher conferences.

Examples include the following:

A parent-student-teacher log kept year round to keep track of conversations held


between parents and I (see pg. 34).
A letter home to students sent before the first day of school (see pg. 32).
Classroom syllabus (students may provide parents with this piece of information
as they choose.) (See pg. 27).
Permission form (see pg. 31).

STUDENTS:

WHY
Open and consistent communication is key in developing a trusting
relationship with my students. They will be encouraged to seek
additional help outside of class if need be, as well as use their classmates
as accountability partners. Freshmen in high school are young adults,
and will be treated as such; therefore, while I will provide students with
means of communication, it is ultimately their job to convey any
information necessary to their parents and ask me for whatever extra
assistance they need. My doors will always be open to a student willing
to ask questions and seek help.
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WHEN
Before, during, and after school hours.

HOW
I will communicate with students via email, in person, through
typed/written notes, and the class twitter (handle:
@MissKlundersClassSince1996)

Syllabus

9th Grade English


Ms. Klunder
Room 111

Sometimes Ill start a sentence and I dont even know where its going. I just hope I find it
along the way -Michael Scott, The Office

Email: sarah.klunder@education.mi.us
Phone: 616-111-222 Ext. 333

Welcome, students, to 9th grade English! Freshman year is the beginning of something truly
unique and terrifying (just kidding). It is the first stepping stone of your high school career; the
beginning of the rest of your lives; and, as someone wise and wonderful once sang, the start of
something new. This truly is a momentous time of life; you as freshman have the power to
make the first year of your high school experience into something you recall fondly years down
the road. You will be presented new responsibilities, choices, and opportunities. Our theme for
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the year will be The Butterfly Effect a celebration and exploration of different thoughts,
perspectives, and shared creativity. The Butterfly Effect is about one choice influencing many
areas of life; thus, our focus will be on the power of actions paired with words, and each work
we explore in class will build off of this theme. These works matter, our studies matter, and you
matter, dear students. Whatever passions and dreams you have, take them, and stretch those
wings. The time is now.

Objectives:
-Students will demonstrate listening, writing, and reading skills through a variety of classic and
modern works (such as To Kill a Mockingbird, Romeo and Juliet, and 13 Reasons Why.)
-Students will experiment with persuasive writing skills dealing with a current issue that interests
or confuses them.
-Students will enhance their research skills while reading The Book Thief.
-Students will ultimately create their own short stories featuring a character faced with a choice.

Teachers Role:
As your teacher, my role in this class will be to
-Lead daily lessons and facilitate group discussions
-Manage classroom activity as enforced by our class-created hashtags
-Help answer any questions I can; and further, help direct students toward their goals if need be
-Provide feedback in both group settings and individually to students

I dont bite. Only occasionally burst into random song. Please dont hesitate to come to me with
any questions you may have. My doors will be open from 7:15-7:45 am, and after school from
2:45-4:00 pm.

Students Role:
As a student in this classroom, your role will be to
-Follow the class hashtags as created by YOU
-Put in your best effort and come to class prepared to learn every day
-Take responsibility for your actions and in your learning: it starts with you

Required Learning Materials:


-Each student will receive The Notebook, a journal provided by me for free writes, taking notes,
and jotting down ideas for projects and group work. Besides formal papers and tests, most
homework assignments will be done in this journal. It is required that students bring The
Notebook to class every day. If students fail to do this, there is no reason for them to be in class.
-Here in English class, our textbooks will be books by classic and modern day authors. These
will be provided by me.
-Pencils or pens. Duh, you guys. Youre freshmen. You know this.

Grades:
Participation: 10%
Readings: 30%
Tests/Quizzes: 20%
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Projects: 40%

Total: 100%

There will be opportunities given to improve grades periodically throughout the semester.

Participation:
Students will receive participation points based on in-class attendance, willingness to share
during class discussions, and contribution to group projects. The majority of our class will be
focused around group or whole-class discussion and debates. It is essential as we broach topics
that are both fascinating and at times difficult to digest, that we create a comfortable, safe
environment to share thoughts and ideas.

Readings:
This is English class. Our textbooks are books, and a large portion of these books will be
explored outside of class as homework. While my ultimate wish is for students to view these
readings as useful and fun, this is not a perfect world; therefore, students will be required to take
notes in The Notebook for each assigned chapter. This is a pass/fail grade. If it is evident that
students have read, they will receive full points. If not, they will receive a zero for that
assignment.

Quizzes:
Students can expect a quiz every friday based on the given weeks readings. These will be short,
and fairly easy as long as the student has been keep up with the readings.

Papers:
Instead of a test at the end of each unit, there will be a paper to tie together everything we have
been learning. All semester, students will be reading, researching, discussing, and analyzing
texts. These papers will generally be from three to five pages long and will require students to
draw from previous texts in order to answer a question of their choosing. These papers are a
synthesis of learning so that I may judge student understanding.
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Accountability Partners

This paper is to signify that I, ____________________ , am partly

responsible for the learning and success of my classmate,

___________________. When my partner is absent, I will collect extra

of any handouts, assignments, or notes given in class. I am responsible

for sharing what I learned in class to my accountability partner upon

his/her return.
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Signed, ___________________________

Accountability Partner __________________________

Guardian Permission Form

Dear guardian,

In Freshmen English we will explore a wide variety of texts, both classic and
modern. While most all of these works fall under the genre of Young Adult
Literature, all of them deal with issues that at times will be difficult to read. In
some cases, mention of rape, genocide, and homosexuality are mentioned. Our
goal is not to shy away from these topics; instead, address them in a safe,
protective environment. Students will be encouraged to ask questions. They will be
encouraged to explore the topic further if they are confused. They will be
encouraged to consider different perspectives and opinions. These issues should be
addressed, and what better place to bring them into the conversation than the
classroom?

This is a growing opportunity for your student, and I ask that you please
consider allowing them to pursue an education that does not shy away from tough
conversations.

Thank you,

Miss Sarah Klunder


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Guardian Signature _____________________________.

Welcome to Freshmen English!

Dear students,

The time is almost upon us to dive into the wonderful world of English! Your
freshman year starts in less than a month, and I could not be more excited for you
to being this amazing journey through high school. This time in your lives is a
chameleon of emotionsits okay to feel nervous! However, I encourage you to
embrace what lies ahead.

A few things to consider as you enjoy this last month of summer:

While I will be providing your textbooks and writing journals, I strongly suggest
coming to the first day of class prepared with writing utensils and perhaps a
folder for loose notes and handouts.
We will be exploring many different topics, sometimes difficult to read about.
You may not agree with everything being saidbegin opening your mind now to
different ideas and perspectives. This will be a safe learning environment where
all thoughts and opinions are respected.
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I so look forward to meeting all of you in person.

Now, soak up the sun! In less than a month, you will be soaking up the power of
words!

Blessings,

Miss Klunder

Twitter Page:

Because Shakespeare never goes out of style.

Check out our class twitter page for funny/interesting quotes, homework
updates, and reminders.

Twitter Handle: @MissKlundersClassSince1996

Sample Tweets:
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Parent-Teacher Student Progress Checkup

I would challenge you to a battle of wits, but I see you are unarmed -
William Shakespeare

DO NOT FORGET: Quiz this friday on major characters in The Book


Thief

Reminder that it is Emma Jones turn to bring in famous last words


this friday

Date & Time Student Name Parent Name Reason for


communication
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Works Cited

Albert, Linda. Building Classroom Discipline. California State University San Marcos, 2005,

p. 199-202.

Fay, Jim. Love and Logic Classroom Management. Center 2 Support Documents, 1998, p. 1
34

Marzano, R.J., Marzano, J.S. The Critical Role of Classroom Management. Classroom

Management That Works, 2003, p. 105-133.

Wong, Harry., & Wong, Rosemary. Wong Classroom Management. The First Day of School,

25 September 2007, p. 1.