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Nutrition Unit Outline

I.The Importance of Proper Nutrition


Before Reading Strategy: Brainstorming
During Reading Strategy: Making/Taking Notes
After Reading Strategy: Cloze Passage

II. Proper Eating Guidelines


Before Reading Strategy: KWLL Chart
During Reading Strategy: Group Retellings/Graphic Organizer
After Reading Strategy: Concept Circles
Lesson Extension/Homework: MyPlate Comparison Activity

Quiz: Lessons 1 and 2

III. Daily Values


Before Reading Strategy: Knowledge Ratings
During Reading Strategy: Read aloud guided reading/guided notes
After Reading Strategy: Magic Squares

IV. Nutrition Labels


Pre-lesson Activity: Think Pair Share
Lesson Activity 1: Reading a Nutrition Label
Lesson Activity 2: Researching Nutritional Claims
Lesson Activity 3/Homework: Nutritional Claims and Label Practice

V. Food Safety and Factors that Influence Food Choice


Lesson Activity 1: Lecture and Powerpoint on Food Safety/guided notes
Lesson Activity 2: Kahoot on Food Safety
Lesson Activity 3: Food influence reading with handout
Lesson Activity 4/homework: Analyzing Environmental Influences on
Food Choice

VI. Unit Review


VII. Unit Test
Sarah Swift

Date: 9/18/17

Lesson Plan: The Importance of Proper Nutrition

Subject: Health

Grade: 9

Virginia S.O.L.s:
9.1 The student will apply health knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain long-term
health and wellness.
g) Describe the importance of health habits that promote personal wellness.

9.2 The student will explain the impact of health risks and identify strategies and resources
to limit risk.
e) Describe the prevalence, causes, and long-term consequences of unhealthy eating,
sleep deprivation, and sedentary lifestyle.
f) Describe the need for proper nutrition, sleep and rest, physical activity, and healthy
body weight and other personal wellness behaviors, and develop a daily wellness plan.

Instructional Goals:

The student will be able to explain the importance of eating a healthy diet.
The student will be able to list 3 positive effects of a healthy diet.
The student will be able to list 3 negative effects of a poor diet.
The student will be able to identify one way that the type of diet they generally consume
effects their everyday life.

Essential Question: Why is proper nutrition important? What are some of the positive effects of
eating a healthy diet? What are some of the negative effects of eating a poor diet?

Key Concepts:

Understanding why eating a healthy diet is important.


Understanding the positive effects of eating a healthy diet.
Understanding the negative effects of eating a poor diet.
Understanding how a poor/healthy diet affects their lives in particular.
Vocabulary:
General: N/A
Special: N/A

Technical:
Calorie: the unit of measure for stored energy in food.

Empty Calories: calories derived from food with little nutritional value

Nutrient: a substance that provides nourishment essential for growth and the maintenance of
life.

Proteins: one of the three nutrients used as energy sources (calories) by the body. Proteins are
essential components of the muscle, skin, and bones.

Carbohydrate: Carbohydrates can also be defined chemically as neutral compounds of carbon,


hydrogen and oxygen. Carbohydrates come in simple forms such as sugars and in complex forms
such as starches and fiber.

Fat: a fuel source and the major storage form of energy in the body.

Saturated Fat: A fat that contains only saturated fatty acids, is solid at room temperature, and
comes chiefly from animal food products. Some examples of saturated fat are butter, lard,
meat fat, solid shortening, palm oil, and coconut oil. Saturated fat tends to raise the level of
cholesterol in the blood.

Unsaturated Fat: A fat that is liquid at room temperature and comes from a plant, such as olive,
peanut, corn, cottonseed, sunflower, safflower, or soybean oil.

Unsaturated Fat: A fat that is liquid at room temperature and comes from a plant, such as olive,
peanut, corn, cottonseed, sunflower, safflower, or soybean oil.

Instructional Materials/Resources:
Printed Materials: Reasons Why it is Important to Eat Healthy Foods to Stay Healthy reading
from http://www.livestrong.com/article/82340-reasons-important-eat-foods-stay/ (In printed
form)
Internet Resources: http://www.livestrong.com/article/82340-reasons-important-eat-foods-
stay/, chrome book or laptop

Other Resources: Student Chrome book/Laptop


Instructional Strategies and Activities

Instructional Strategies and Activities


Beginning of Class (5 minutes):

Introduce nutrition unit and topic for today's class

Pre-Reading Strategy: Brainstorming: (5 Minutes)


The teacher will ask the question, ''Why is eating a healthy diet important" to activate students'
prior knowledge and to get them introduced to the topic for the day. As the students brainstorm
ideas the teacher will write student responses on the board.

During Reading Strategy: Partner Reading/ Making, Taking Notes: (15 minutes):
The students will work in pairs to read the text selection and take notes. Each student will take
turns reading a paragraph of the text and they will both talk amongst themselves to determine
what the most important points of the text are. They will then take the most important
information and form them into notes they can use for the discussion that will take place after the
reading.

After Reading Strategy 1: Guided Discussion (10-15 minutes):


The teacher will lead a guided discussion to check that students understood the reading and were
able to identify the key concepts of the reading. The discussion questions would include:

What areas of your life are affected by eating a poor diet?


What type of foods are ideal for eating a balanced diet? What do foods need to have an
equal amount of? Explain how eating foods equal in nutrients and calories affect your
weight?
What are the 3 building blocks of energy?
What is the difference between complex and simple carbohydrates? What might some
examples of complex carbohydrates be? Simple carbohydrates?
How does eating food high in saturated fat, trans fat and sugar affect weight?
How does eating a poor diet effect your chances of obtaining diseases? What types of
foods increase your chances of getting liver and colon cancer? Can you give any
examples of processed meats? Fried meats?
Why is it good to consume foods high in antioxidants?
How does eating a poor diet affect your mood?
How did the information you provided during the brainstorming activity compare to what
you just read? Were any of your responses found in the reading? Which ones were not?
Are there any other areas of your life that the reading did not talk about that you think
could be affected by eating a poor diet?
*The discussion will also include the questions that the gifted students generate during the during
reading activity.

After Reading Strategy 2: Cloze Passage: (5 minutes):


After the discussion, the teacher will give each student a cloze passage. The students should be
able to take what they learned from reading and from the class discussion to correctly fill in the
blanks of the cloze passage.

Differentiated Instruction:
Struggling Readers:
During Reading:
The teacher will work closely with these students while they take turns reading the text selection.
At the end of every paragraph the teacher will have the students stop and think about the
information that they just read. The teacher will have them to talk about what the text said and to
state if there were any major ideas presented that they think would be worth taking note of.
When students identify important information, the teacher will ask them what type of note would
be the most beneficial for this information. Once these students decide, the teacher will help
them to determine how to format this note. If the students are unsure if certain information is
important, the teacher may have the students to circle this information so they can refer back to it
once they read the entire selection. When they have read the entire selection, they should have a
better idea of the main points of the text and if the information they were unsure of earlier, is
worth taking note of or if it is just filler information.

After Reading Activity: Cloze Passage:


The teacher will provide a word bank to help these students complete the modified cloze
passage. Providing a word bank will help to jog students' memory about the key ideas in the
reading. Having a word bank will also help these students make connections between words and
to also identify when certain words do not fit with certain information.

Gifted:
During Reading:
In addition to working in pairs to read and take notes on the reading, these students will also be
asked to use their notes to form 3-5 essential questions about the reading to contribute to the
class discussion. Throughout the class discussion the teacher will call on these students every so
often to ask one of their questions to the class. This will help these students to further interact
with the material because they will have to determine what information they found most
important in comprehending the main ideas of the reading.

Summary:
Today we learned why it is important to eat a healthy diet. We learned that what we eat can
affect our energy levels, our weight, our susceptibility to disease, and our mood and cognition.
We learned that proteins, carbohydrates and fats are the building blocks of energy, but we must
limit the simple carbohydrates we consume because they are usually high in calories and low in
nutrients. While we learned that energy provided by food calories is needed for every function of
the body, not all calories are good calories. To provide the body with the proper fuel while also
avoiding weight gain, we need to avoid empty calories that have little to no nutritional value, and
to eat foods that have an equal amount of calories and nutrients. Besides gaining weight, we also
found out that eating a poor diet increases your risks for obtaining diseases like diabetes and
heart disease and certain types of cancers. To avoid these health related issues, we can limit our
consumption of processed meats, fried meats and alcohol. Last, we learned that eating a proper
diet, specifically a diet high in antioxidants, increases your mood, cognition, and mental health,
reducing your risks for depression and anxiety disorders.

Additional Activities:
Daily Journal (5 minutes):
Reflect on what you learned in class today about how eating a poor diet can affect your life. How
does your normal diet affect your energy, weight management, mood and cognition? Does being
aware of the effects of a poor diet change how you plan to eat in the future? Be specific.
Name: Class Period: Date:

Cloze Passage
The Importance of Proper Nutrition
Directions: Fill in the missing blanks using what you learned from the class
reading.

A healthy diet is the basis for a well-functioning body. is the source of


energy for all of our bodily functions and directly affects how our bodies and
minds function in every stage of life. Calories are the unit of measure for stored
energy in food. The provided by food calories is needed for every
function of the body, including thought, physical activity, growth and healing.
, , and are the building blocks of
energy. like whole grains, vegetables and fruits
provide a balance of calories and nutrients, whereas
such as sugar and white flour are high in calories and low in nutrients, making
them a poor choice for energy production. A healthy diet helps maintain an ideal
body weight and prevents . When eaten frequently, foods high in
saturated fat, , and can lead to excess weight gain
and obesity. Eating foods with a balance of and can
help provide the body with the fuel it needs to function while avoiding weight
gain. A poor diet has been directly linked with such as diabetes, heart
disease and certain types of cancer. meats, meats and alcohol
are associated with an increased risk for certain types of cancer, such as cancer of
the colon or liver. A healthy diet can lead to better overall performance of the
mind and body. Foods high in can help promote generation of
neurons into old age while improving the ability of existing brain cells to
communicate with each other, resulting in improved cognitive functioning. A
healthy diet also plays a role in health by lowering the incidence of
depression and anxiety disorders that are associated with diets high in sugar,
processed foods and alcohol.
Name: Class Period: Date:

Cloze Passage
The Importance of Proper Nutrition
Directions: Fill in the missing blanks using what you learned from the class
reading.

A healthy diet is the basis for a well-functioning body. is the source of


energy for all of our bodily functions and directly affects how our bodies and
minds function in every stage of life. Calories are the unit of measure for stored
energy in food. The provided by food calories is needed for every
function of the body, including thought, physical activity, growth and healing.
, , and are the building blocks of
energy. like whole grains, vegetables and fruits
provide a balance of calories and nutrients, whereas
such as sugar and white flour are high in calories and low in nutrients, making
them a poor choice for energy production. A healthy diet helps maintain an ideal
body weight and prevents . When eaten frequently, foods high in
saturated fat, , and can lead to excess weight gain
and obesity. Eating foods with a balance of and can
help provide the body with the fuel it needs to function while avoiding weight
gain. A poor diet has been directly linked with such as diabetes, heart
disease and certain types of cancer. meats, meats and alcohol
are associated with an increased risk for certain types of cancer, such as cancer of
the colon or liver. A healthy diet can lead to better overall performance of the
mind and body. Foods high in can help promote generation of
neurons into old age while improving the ability of existing brain cells to
communicate with each other, resulting in improved cognitive functioning. A
healthy diet also plays a role in health by lowering the incidence of
depression and anxiety disorders that are associated with diets high in sugar,
processed foods and alcohol.

Word Bank

Calories Carbohydrates Diseases Trans fat

Sugar Obesity Food Nutrients

Energy Proteins Mental Processed

Fried Antioxidants Fat

Complex Carbohydrates Simple Carbohydrates


Sarah Swift

Lesson Plan: 2: Proper Eating Guidelines

Date: 9/20/17

Subject: Health

Grade: 9

Virginia S.O.L.s:
9.1 The student will apply health knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain long-term
health and wellness.
b) Identify guidelines for sleep, rest, nutrition, and physical activity.

Instructional Goals:

The student will be able to list the MyPlate food groups.


The student will be able to identify three foods found in each food group.
The student will be able to explain the importance of following the MyPlate guidelines.
The student will be able to compare their daily eating choices to the MyPlate
recommendations.

Essential Question: What are the nutritional guidelines for eating a well balanced meal? Why is
it important to eat a well balanced meal?

Key Concepts:

Understanding the food groups included in the MyPlate guidelines.


Being able to list at least three foods included in each food group.
Understanding the importance of following the MyPlate guidelines.
Understanding how to compare daily food consumption to the MyPlate guidelines.

Vocabulary:
General: N/A
Special: N/A

Technical:
Fiber: the indigestible part of plant foods that travels through our digestive system,
absorbing water along the way and easing bowel movements.

Dietary fiber: nutrients in the diet that are not digested


Whole grains: contain all the essential parts and naturally-occurring nutrients of the entire grain
seed in their original proportions.

Refined grains: grain products consisting of grains or grain flours that have been significantly
modified from their natural composition.

Folate: a water-soluble B vitamin that is naturally present in some foods, added to others, and
available as a dietary supplement.

Potassium: a mineral that, among other things, helps muscles contract, helps regulate fluids and
mineral balance in and out of body cells, and helps maintain normal blood pressure by blunting
the effect of sodium.

Calcium: the most important mineral for the human body. It helps form and maintain healthy
teeth and bones.

Monounsaturated fats: a type of fat found in a variety of foods and oils. Eating foods rich in
monounsaturated fatty acids improves blood cholesterol levels.

Polyunsaturated fats: a type of fat found mostly in plant-based foods and oils. Eating foods rich
in polyunsaturated fatty acids improves blood cholesterol levels.

Chronic disease: one lasting 3 months or more that cannot be prevented by vaccines or cured
by medication, nor do they just disappear.

Instructional Materials/Resources:
Internet Resources:
https://www.ahealthiermichigan.org/2015/04/28/why-all-5-food-groups-are-essential-to-
maximizing-your-health/
https://www.choosemyplate.gov
https://www.choosemyplate.gov/MyPlate-Daily-Checklist

Electronic Resources:
chrome book or laptop
Instructional Strategies and Activities
Beginning of Class: (5 minutes)

Introduce Topic for the day

Pre-Reading Strategy: KWL (5 minutes):


The teacher will start the lesson by giving each student a KWL organizer. The teacher will then
ask the students what they already know about the MyPlate nutritional guidelines. The teacher
will write student responses in the K column of the organizer on the board or projector so the
whole class can see the responses. After the students have stated what they already know about
the MyPlate guidelines, the teacher will ask them what they want to find out about them. The
teacher will then write those responses in the W column.

During Reading Strategy: Group Retellings: (20-25 minutes)


Once the students have completed the K & W sections of their chart, the teacher will split up the
students into groups of 6 to find out more about each of the MyPlate food groups. For this
activity the students will be provided two websites to go to where they will look up information
on each of the MyPlate food groups. These websites will have clickable links for additional
information on each food group that the students will need to access to complete the activity. The
teacher will introduce the initial website and demonstrate how to navigate between the two
websites before beginning the activity. After being assigned to a group, each student will choose
1 food group that they will be responsible for learning about. Each student will be given a
handout where they will record the information for their food group. Each student will be
responsible for filling out the following categories of information for their food group:

foods included in this group


daily recommendation for males (14-18)
daily recommendation for females (14-18)
serving equivalents
benefits of eating foods in this group

Once each student has filled in each of the categories for their food group, they will then present
the information they gathered to the rest of their group members. Each students should verbally
communicate this information. Simple copying down information from everyone's chart will not
be allowed. Once each group has filled in the information for each of the remaining food groups,
the teacher will conduct a class discussion to ensure that each group was able to gain the
necessary information about each food group. To do so, the teacher will go through each of the
categories for each food group, having students offer some of the information they recorded in
their chart. For example, for the fruits food group, the teacher may ask the student who was
responsible for fruits in group 1 to state some of the foods included in this group, then ask the
student who was responsible for fruits in group 2 to state what they found about daily
recommendations. Throughout this discussion, the students will have the opportunity to add
information to their charts about each food group.

Some additional questions that the teacher would ask in the discussion that were not included on
the food group chart would be:

Does it matter what types of grains we consume as long as we are meeting the
recommended amount? How much of the grains we consume should be whole grains?
Does all fruit juice count as a serving of fruit? What percentage does the fruit juice need
to be? Do these same rules apply to the vegetable group?
What should most of the dairy products we consume be?
Even though oils are not food groups why is it important for us to consume a certain
amount?
Are the recommended daily amounts for each food group the same for each person? What
do they depend on?

*Groups that do not have 6 members can work together on the remaining food groups to fill in
the categories of information for those food groups.

After Reading Strategies:


KWL: (10 minutes)
The teacher will first refer back to the KWL chart where she will ask the students what they have
learned after reading about the food groups. Once the students have filled in this column of their
chart, they will talk about any questions they had about the food groups that they still were not
able to answer. They will list these questions in the second L column. Lastly, the students will
list the information that they plan to use in the lower section of the chart.

Concept Circles: (10 Minutes):


Once the students have completed the four sections of their KWL the teacher will give each
student a series of concept circles to determine what they have gained from reading and talking
about the MyPlate food groups. Once each student completes their concept circle, the teacher
will go through each circle and ask the students what they put for each one. The teacher will
allow the students to add to or make changes to their circles so they can study them, along with
their food group chart for tomorrow's quiz.

Differentiated Instruction:
Struggling Readers:
During Reading:
For the group retelling activity, these students will be in a group that will be lead by the teacher.
The teacher will work closely with students in helping them locate the correct information to fill
out their section of the chart. The teacher will not find the answers for the students, but will be
there to provide support to them if they begin to have trouble understanding the content of the
reading. Having the teacher there to support the group will help these students to have success in
their particular roles in the group.

After Reading:
These students will be allowed to work in partners to complete the concept circles handout.
Having these students work in pairs will allow them to talk between one another about what they
remember from the reading activity. These students will most likely remember different aspects
of the reading, so they will be able to offer each other some support in remembering specific
facts about the food groups. Being able to talk back and forth about the reading content will help
them to develop a deeper understanding of what they read which will help them in completing
the concept circles.

Gifted:
During Reading:
In addition to completing their own section of the activity, these students will be the team leaders
of each group. They will be responsible for keeping each member on task, making sure their
group is completing their sections in a timely manner, and providing help to any of the group
members that encounter a problem while working on their section of the assignment.

After Reading:
These students will be given a special version of the concept circle handout and will be asked to
work on it on their own. The version that these students will complete requires them to think a
little harder about the answers to each concept circle because additional information is missing
for some of the circles.

After Reading Assignment/Homework: My Plate Comparison Activity: (10 minutes):


Now that the students have learned a little bit more about each food group and the recommended
amounts of each food group that they should be consuming each day they will see how their
average food choices match up to those recommendations. Each student will choose 3 complete
meals that they commonly consume, 1 for breakfast, 1 for lunch and 1 for dinner. They will
make educated guesses on how many cups, ounces, etc. they consume for each listed item and
write all this information down on a piece of paper or in a word document. Once the students
have chosen their meals they will use the MyPlate checklist calculator on the MyPlate website to
make their own food plan based on their age, gender, weight, height and level of physical
activity. The students will use the MyPlate food plan to see how their common meal choices
compare to their recommended totals for each food group. The students may need to refer back
to their food group charts or the equivalent pages on the MyPlate website to help them determine
equivalent amounts. Since this is most likely a new activity for all of the students in the
classroom, the teacher will tell the students what her 3 typical meals were and walk them through
how she calculated each food group and compared it to her daily totals. As the students are
working on their plans, the teacher will walk around the room to provide support and answers
questions.
*Since the students will not have time to complete this activity in class, the teacher will explain
the assignment and will have the students to complete it for homework. If some students do not
have internet access at home, the teacher can print out the required pages that they will need to
complete the activity.

Summary:
Today we learned that there are 5 food groups included in the MyPlate guidelines. These food
groups include: proteins, vegetables, fruits, grains and dairy. We also learned that oils are also a
not a food group but provide essential nutrients to our bodies, but consumption should be limited
to a very small amount. We learned that some of the foods in the protein group include meat,
poultry, seafood , beans and nuts, some of the foods in the grains group include any food made
from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or any other cereal grain, some of the foods in the dairy
group include all fluid milk products and many foods made from milk, and we learned that foods
in the fruit and vegetable groups include all fruits and vegetables or 100% fruit and vegetable
juices.
Name: Class Period: Date:

KWLL Chart
Topic: My Plate Food Groups

K- What I Know W-What I Want L- What I L-What I Still


to Know Learned Need to Learn

Categories of Information I Expect to Use


Name: Class Period: Date:

Directions: Each group member will pick 1 food group to complete the chart information for.
Information should be collected using only the websites provided in class. Once each member has filled
in their section of the chart, group members will take turns informing the rest of their group members
about their food group.

Fruits Vegetables Grains Proteins Dairy Oils

Foods Included

Daily
Recommendation
Males (14-18)

Daily
Recommendation
Females (14-18)

Serving
Equivalents

Benefits of Eating
Foods in this
group
Name: Class Period: Date:

Concept Circles
Directions: Shade in the section that does not relate to the words in the other sections,
then name the concept.

1.

Fruits Oils

Grains Proteins

2.

Wheat Pasta

Seeds Rice
3.

Any Fresh
Juice Berries

Banana
Grapes Puree

Directions: Add an additional example to the circle.

4. Oils

Vegetable

Olive Canola
5. Dairy

Soymilk Cheese

Milk

6. Protein

Eggs Seafood

Poultry
Directions: Add an additional example to the circle and name the concept.

7.

Sweet
Potato

Broccoli Spinach
Name: Class Period: Date:

Concept Circles
Directions: Shade in the section that does not relate to the words in the other sections,
add a word that does relate, then name the concept.

1.

Fruits Oils

Grains

2.

Pasta

Seeds Rice
3.

Any Fresh
Juice Berries

Grapes

Directions: Add an additional example to the circle, then name the concept.

4.

Vegetable

Olive Canola
5.

Soymilk Cheese

Milk

6.

Eggs Seafood

Poultry
7.

Sweet
Potato

Broccoli Spinach
Sarah Swift

Date: 9/26/17

Subject: Health-Nutrition Lesson 3- Nutrients

Grade: 9

Virginia S.O.L.s:
9.1 The student will apply health knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain long-term
health and wellness.
c) Explain the bodys need for amino acids and fat-soluble and water-soluble vitamins,
the role of vitamin and mineral supplements, and daily values.

Instructional Goals:

The student will be able to list the six categories of nutrients


The student will be able to state at least two common food products that each major
nutrient can be found in.
The student will be able to explain why the six major categories of nutrients are an
important part of their diet.

Essential Question: What are the six categories of nutrients and why are they important to our
overall diet? How much of each nutrient should we be consuming each day?

Key Concepts:

Understanding what the 6 categories of nutrients are


Understanding what food sources contain the 6 categories of nutrients
Understanding why nutrients are an essential part of a diet.

Vocabulary:
Carbohydrates: starches and sugars found in foods which provide your body's main source of
energy.

Fiber: a tough complex carbohydrate that the body cannot digest.

Proteins: nutrients the body uses to build and maintain its cells and tissues.

Cholesterol: a waxy, fatlike substance in your blood.

Vitamins: compounds found in food that help regulate many body processes.

Minerals: elements found in food that are used by the body.

Osteoporosis: a condition in which the bones become fragile and break easily.
Instructional Materials/Resources:
Glencoe Health Book
Student Chrome Book

Instructional Strategies and Activities


Before Lesson Activity (10 minutes):

The teacher will give a quiz that will cover the importance of nutrition and the MyPlate food
group information covered in lesson 1 and 2. The students will take this quiz via google forms
but a paper copy will be available for the students who do not have their chrome/book or laptop
with them.

Quiz link:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdbyzv4gYGN1QUegXRc8vZEgjZPdVTLxZu
UCIIaVtrsGwJouw/viewform?usp=sf_link

Pre-Reading Strategy: Knowledge Ratings: (5 minutes):


The students will complete a knowledge ratings handout with the main terms they will encounter
in today's reading. Once each student has completed their knowledge rating, the teacher will pull
up the responses on Google forms to see how the students responded. This will help the teacher
get a better understanding of how much the students know about these terms. This will also help
activate any prior knowledge that the students have about the terms they know or have seen, and
spark an interest in the terms they are unfamiliar with.

This survey will be accessed through Google forms, but a paper copy will be available as well.

Survey Link:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScL7v4oDlVI99IMiOS_wj7r6E8LAD_ryCggK
WirwglF67vymw/viewform?usp=sf_link

During Reading Activity: Read Aloud Guided Reading and Note Taking (20 minutes):
The teacher and the students will read this text together in class. The teacher will call on each
student to read a portion of the text. As the students are reading they will have a set of reading
questions to complete to help them organize the main points of the text. They will also be given a
graphic organizer where they will place the 6 nutrients and subcategories of each nutrient.

After Reading Activity: Magic Squares (10 minutes):


After the students read the text and complete their questions and fill in their graphic organizer,
they will work in pairs to complete a magic squares vocabulary activity.
Differentiated Instruction:
Struggling Readers:
Reading the text aloud as a class will help these students to better understand the information
being presented to them. The will have the opportunity to hear other readers of all abilities read
aloud which might help them understand the information better than if they were reading by
themselves. They will also have the advantage of hearing other students answer questions and
summarize information when filling in their graphic organizer and working on their reading
questions. These students will also be given extra support by their peers and by the teacher when
working in pairs to complete the magic squares vocabulary activity.

Gifted:
During the reading activity, the teacher may ask the students to summarize sections of the text
after reading, or pick out some of the most important points that were presented in the text to
help the other students fill in their guided reading questions. In addition to summarizing sections
of the text, the teacher will have these students work alone when completing the magic squares
activity to give them a bit of a challenge.
Name: Class Period: Date:

1.The basis for a well functioning body is a

A. Well functioning mind


B. A healthy diet
C. Moderate exercise
D. Healthy relationships

2. You should try to eat foods that have an equal amount of what?

A. Fats and nutrients


B. Calories and nutrients
C. Calories and carbohydrates
D. Proteins and sugars

3. Foods high in this substance can help promote the generation of neurons and improve
the ability of existing brain cells.

A. Proteins
B. Nutrients
C. Fats
D. Antioxidants

4. Proteins, carbohydrates, and fats are the building blocks of energy.

A. True
B. False

5. Simple carbohydrates contain a balance of calories and nutrients and are therefore
better for your body than complex carbohydrates.

A. True
B. False

6. Food is the source for all of our bodily functions.

A. True
B. False

7. The type of food you consume affects your chances of obtaining certain diseases.

A. True
B. False
8. Eating foods high in saturated fat can prevent excess weight gain and obesity.

A. True
B. False

9. Eating a poor diet is associated with lower levels of anxiety and depression.

A. True
B. False

10. Oils contain essential nutrients but should be consumed in small amounts.

A. True
B. False

11. Half of the grains you consume should be refined grains.

A. True
B. False

12. The majority of the dairy you consume should be fat-free or low-fat.

A. True
B. False

13. Any type of juice counts as an item for the fruit group.

A. True
B. False

14. What are 3 foods included in the grains group?

15. What are 3 foods included in the protein group?

16. What are 3 foods included in the dairy group?

17. What are 3 foods included in the fruit group?


18. What are 3 foods included in the vegetables group?

19. Choose one food group and list a benefit of eating foods from that group.

20. Explain why the daily recommended values are different for each person. What are
the categories of information that are looked at to determine how much food from each
food group a person should consume?
Name: Class Period: Date:

Knowledge Rating
Directions: Look at the following words and place an x in the category that best
describes your knowledge about each word.

Have
Can Define Seen/Heard ?
Nutrients

Carbohydrates

Fiber

Proteins

Unsaturated Fats

Saturated Fats

Trans Fats

Cholesterol

Minerals

Fat Soluble
Vitamins

Water Soluble
Vitamins
Nutrients

1. How does your body use nutrients?

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

2. Where does the energy in food come from? What does the body use these
nutrients to do?

3. Each gram or carbohydrate or protein provides calories of energy, while


each gram of fat provides calories.

4. How much of your daily calories should come from carbohydrates?

5. What are some examples of simple carbohydrates?

6. What are some examples of complex carbohydrates?

7. What is the role of fiber?


8. What are some good sources of fiber? What are some benefits of eating foods
high in fiber?

9. What is glucose? Where does glucose come from?

10. Proteins are made up of chemicals called .

11. What are essential amino acids? How many are there?

12. Why is protein good for your body?

13. Between and percent of your total daily calories should come
from protein.

14. are fatty acids that the body


needs but cannot produce on its own. These fatty acids are important in brain
development, blood clotting, controlling inflammation, and helping to maintain
healthy skin and hair.

15. What are some products that contain large amounts of unsaturated fats?

16. Where can saturated fat be found?


17. What are some products that have trans fat? What are health risks of
consuming products that contain trans fat?

18. What happens when your body consumes more calories than it needs?

19. What is the role of cholesterol in the body? What are the risks of consuming
too much?

20. You should consume less than to percent of your calories


from fat, and less than percent from trans fats.

21. The two types of vitamins are vitamins which


dissolve in water and pass easily through the bloodstream and
vitamins which are stored in the body for later use.

22. Vitamin C, folic acid and the B vitamins are


vitamins.

23. Vitamin A, D,E and K are vitamins.

24. What is the potential danger of fat soluble vitamins?

25. Why is it important to include foods that contain essential minerals?


26. Name the functions of the following minerals.

Calcium-

Phosphorus-

Magnesium-

Iron-

27. Why are the functions of water in a healthy diet?

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

28. About percent of your daily water intake comes from the foods you
eat, since all foods contain some water.

29. How does the amount of exercise you get effect the amount of water you
should consume?
Name: Class Period: Date:

Magic Squares
Directions: Select the best answer for each of the terms from the numbered
definitions. Put the number in the proper space in the magic square box. If the totals of
the numbers are the same both across and down, you have found the magic number!

A B C D

E F G H

I J K L

M N O P
1. Amino acids that the body must get from food.

2. Starches and sugars found in foods, which provide your


body's main source of energy.

A. Fat Soluble Vitamins 3. Nutrients the body uses to build and maintain its cells
and tissues.
B. Carbohydrates
4. These vitamins dissolve in water and pass easily into the
C. Proteins bloodstream during digestion. Vitamin C, folic acid, and the
B vitamins are classified in this group.
D. Unsaturated fatty acids
5. A waxy fat-like substance in your blood that is needed to
E. Cholesterol create cell walls, certain hormones, and vitamin D. If
excessive amounts of this substance put you at risks for
F. Vitamins
heart disease.
G. Minerals 6. Used as a major source of fuel for the body. They can be
classified as unsaturated, saturated or trans.
H. Non-essential Amino Acids
7. A condition in which the bones become fragile and break
I. Water
easily.
J. Osteoporosis 8. Amino acids that your body can produce.
K. Fats 9. All of the body cells contain this element. Some of its
functions include: moving food through the digestive
L. Saturated fatty acids
system, transporting nutrients and removing wastes, and
M. Water Soluble Vitamins cooling the body through perspiration.

N. Fiber 10. Elements found in food that are used by the body.

11. Compounds found in food that help regulate many body


O. Trans Fats
processes. They are either fat or water soluble.
P. Essential Amino Acids
12. A type of fat mostly found in animal based food
products. Consuming too many may increase your risk for
heart disease.

13. These types of fatty acids can be found in vegetables oils,


nuts and seeds and may lower your risks of heart disease if
consumed in moderation.

14. A tough complex carbohydrate that the body cannot


digest. Eating foods high in this can help you feel full, and
may reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease and type 2
diabetes.

15. These founds can be found in stick margarine, many


snack foods, and packaged baked goods. These fats can
raise your risk for heart disease.

16. Vitamins that are stored in the body for later use.
Vitamin A,D, E, and K are classified in this group.
Sarah Swift

Date: 9/28/17

Subject: Health- Nutrition Lesson 4- Nutrition Labels

Grade: 9

Virginia S.O.L.s:
9.2 The student will explain the impact of health risks and identify strategies and resources
to limit risk.
c) Analyze current research and scientific studies to interpret nutritional principles,
research the accuracy of health claims for a variety of processed foods and/or dietary
supplements, and analyze personal daily diet to determine if meeting daily values for amino
acids, vitamins, and minerals.

Instructional Goals:

The student will be able to read and understand a food label.


The student will be able to explain the actual meaning of common nutritional claims.

Essential Questions:

What type of information is listed on a nutrition label? Why is this information


important?

Key Concepts:

Food labels provide information about ingredients, nutritional value, serving sizes, and
calories.
Nutritional claims can be misleading about the actual nutritional value of food products.

Vocabulary:
Food additives: substances added to a food to produce a desired effect.

Instructional Materials/Resources:
Chrome book
Internet access
Instructional Strategies and Activities:

Pre-Lesson Activity: Think Pair Share (5 minutes):


The teacher will give the students to think about the categories of information that are listed on a
nutrition label. Once the students have had a minute to think, the teach will ask the students to
pair up with a person that is close to them to share their thinking. Once these pairs have had a
few minutes to discuss, the teacher will ask the students to share with the entire class what they
came up with. The teacher will write these responses on the board.

Lesson Activities:
Reading a Nutrition Label: (15 minutes):
Now that the students have thought about the contents of a nutrition label, the teacher will
present a set of nutrition labels to them to look at. The labels will be presented side by side, with
the first one being the current label and the second one being the updated version that will go
into effect in 2018. The teacher will ask the students to look at the two labels to first point out the
categories that are the same for both labels. As the students list these categories the teacher will
discuss each one and explain its importance. The teacher will then ask the students to point out
how the new label is different from the current one. As the students pick out the differences, the
teacher will explain the reasoning behind the changes. (Teaching Today's Health, pg. 318).

Researching Nutritional Claims: (15 minutes):


After reviewing the categories of information that are listed on nutrition labels, the teacher will
begin a discussion about nutritional claims. The teacher will give an example of a common
nutritional claim and will then ask the students to state some that they commonly see. After the
students have listed several nutritional claims the teacher will split the students into groups of
two and will have them pick a nutritional claim they want to research. The teacher will instruct
the students to find out what their nutritional claim actually means and how their nutritional
claim can be misleading. Once the students have had a few minutes to research their claim, they
will present what they found to the class.

Nutritional Claims Practice: (5 minutes):


The teacher will give each student a worksheet with a description of the 7 nutritional claims
regulated by the FDA. On this worksheet they will have to match each claim to its corresponding
definition.

Homework: Nutritional Label Practice:


The teacher will assign a set of questions for the students to answer using a nutrition label. The
students should be able to use what they learned in class about reading nutritional labels to
answer each question correctly.
Resources:
Teaching Today's Health 10th Edition pg. 318 & 325
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20599288,00.html#serving-size-0
Name: Date:

Nutritional Claims
Word Bank
Reduced High Free Light

Healthy Low Good Source of

The food contains none, or an insignificant amount, of a given


component: fat, sugar, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol,
sodium, or calories.

The food provides at least 20 percent of the daily value for a


vitamin, mineral, protein, or fiber. Synonyms for this claim
include: rich in and excellent source of.

Foods described with this term must be low in fat and saturated
fat and contain limited amounts of cholesterol and sodium. They
must also provide at least 10 percent of the daily value for
Vitamin A, Vitamin C, iron, calcium, protein or fiber.

You can eat this food regularly without exceeding your daily
limits for fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, or calories.

The food provides 10 to 19 percent of the daily value for a


vitamin, mineral, protein, or fiber. Synonyms for this term
include: contains and provides.

A food must contain 1/3 fewer calories, 1/2 the fat, or 1/2 the
sodium of the original version. This term may also refer to the
color of the food.

The food contains 25 percent fewer calories, or 25 percent less of


a given nutrient, than the original version. This term may also be
worded as less or fewer.
Name: Date:

Use this nutrition label to answer the following questions.


1.What is the serving size listed on the nutrition label?

2. How is this serving size misleading?

3. How many calories are in 12 pizza rolls?

4. How much total fat is in 2 servings?

5. What is the percent daily value of saturated fat for 12 pizza rolls?

6. How many calories from fat are in 1 serving?

7. How many grams of protein are in 1 serving?

8. How many milligrams of sodium are in 2 servings?

9. Name 1 mineral that is in this food item.

10. How much vitamin A is in 2 servings?


Sarah Swift

Date: 10/2/17

Subject: Health- Nutrition Lesson 4- Food safety and Factors that influence food choice

Grade: 9

Virginia S.O.L.s:
9.1 The student will apply health knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain long-term health
and wellness.
g) Describe the importance of health habits that promote personal wellness.
p) Evaluate how social environments affect health and well-being.

Instructional Goals:

The student will be able to explain how food borne illness occurs.
The student will be able to explain the four steps to prevent food borne illness.
The student will be able to explain why taking proper precautions before consuming food
is important.
The student will be able to explain the three types of influences on food choice.

Essential Question: How can I determine that my food is safe to eat? What are some common
food related risks and what are the steps that I can take to prevent those risks from occurring?

Key Concepts:

Foodborne illness occurs when bacteria comes into direct contact with animals or food
products or when an infected person spreads pathogens from their own skin to the food or
from one food to another.
The four steps to prevent food borne illness include: clean, separate, cook, and chill.
People with food allergies or food intolerances must take special care about the foods
they eat.
Food choice is influenced by hunger, appetite, emotions, and the surrounding
environment.

Vocabulary:

Foodborne illness: food poisoning.

Pasteurization: treating a substance with heat to kill or slow the growth of pathogens.

Cross-contamination: the spreading of pathogens from one food to another.


Food allergy: a condition in which the body's immune system reacts to substances in some
foods.

Food intolerance: a negative reaction to food that doesn't involve the immune system.

Hunger: the natural physical drive to eat, prompted by the body's need for food.

Appetite: the psychological desire food.

Psychological: directed toward the mind.

Instructional Materials/Resources:
Chrome Book, laptop, or smart phone
Internet Access

Instructional Strategies and Activities:

Before Lesson: Nutrition Label and Quiz Review (5 minutes):


The teacher will review each question on the previous quiz and clarify commonly missed
questions to help the students prepare for the upcoming test. The teacher will also go over the
nutrition label activity that was due for homework.

Lesson Activity 1: Lecture and PowerPoint on Food Safety (15 minutes):


The teacher will give a lecture about food safety. The teacher will provide each student with a set
of guided notes and will use a PowerPoint presentation to help the students follow along with the
material. The topics that will be covered in the lecture include:

Open Dating on food labels


Foodborne Illness
How Foodborne Illness Occurs
Preventing Foodborne Illness
Food Sensitives

Lesson Activity 2: Kahoot on Food Safety: (10 minutes):


The teacher will have the students do a Kahoot on the material they just covered in class to see
how well the students understood the material. After each question, the teacher will clarify any
misunderstood material.

Link: https://play.kahoot.it/#/?quizId=4a193f4a-8a75-47cb-9431-17e9364976dc

Lesson Activity 3: Food influence reading with handout: (15 minutes):


After the students finish the kahoot on food safety they will learn about the factors that influence
food choice. The students will read a short section out of the book silently to themselves. While
reading, the students will fill in a chart that will help them list each food influence and
corresponding examples and information. After the students finish filling in their chart, they will
pair up with a classmate to compare the information they listed in their chart.

Lesson Activity 4: Handout: Analyzing Environmental Influences on Food Choice: (10


minutes):
The students will use what they learned about the factors that influence food choice to respond to
real life examples of how food can influence a person's nutritional decisions.

Differentiated Instruction:
Struggling Readers:
Food Safety: The guided notes will help these students to not become overwhelmed with writing
a large amount of information down. Having these guided notes will help the students to keep up
with the speed of the lecture instead of becoming fixated on writing every single piece of
information down. These guided notes will also serve as a study guide for the upcoming test.

Factors that influence food choice: The reading chart will help these students pick out the
important information in the text.

Gifted: These students will be challenged to use their critical thinking skills to provide the best
answer to each of the stated situations.
Name: Date:

Food Safety
1. help you determine how long food will
remain fresh.

2. What are the four types of open dates?

1. show the last day on which a store


should sell a product.

2. show the last day on which a


product's quality can be guaranteed.

3. show the last date on which a


product is considered fresh.

4. show the day on which a food was processed or


packaged.

3. is an infection or irritation of
the gastrointestinal (GI) tract caused by food or beverages that contain
harmful bacteria, parasites, viruses, or chemicals.

4. and cause the most cases of foodborne


illness.

5. Foodborne illness can occur in two ways.

1. When comes into direct contact with animals or food


products.
2. When an infected person spreads pathogens from their own
to the or from one to another.

6. You should consult a doctor if you or someone else is having the


following symptoms of foodborne illness.

1. If you have a fever higher than degrees F.

2. vomiting or diarrhea.

3. in the stool.

4. A decrease in urination, mouth and throat, and feeling


when standing.

7. What are the 4 steps in preventing foodborne illness?

8. Clean

Wash and dry your hands frequently to keep pathogens on your skin
from entering your food.

Wash your hands for at least seconds with water


and soap before and after handling food, as well as using the
bathroom, changing a diaper, or handling pets.

Clean utensils and surfaces with water after you prepare each
food item to prevent cross-contamination.

Wash the food itself to remove bacteria.


9. is the spreading of pathogens from
one food to another.

10. Separate

The foods most likely to carry pathogens are meat,


poultry, , and eggs. Separate these food items from
other foods.

Use separate boards when preparing raw meat,


poultry and fish.

After cooking raw meat, poultry, or fish, transfer these foods to a


platter, rather than putting it back on the plate that
held the food.

11. Cook

Heating food to a high enough temperature will the pathogens


that cause foodborne illness.

is treating a substance with heat to kill or slow


the growth of pathogens.

The danger zone for food is between degrees F and


degrees F.

12. Chill

Refrigeration the growth of harmful bacteria.

To help slow the growth of bacteria you should:

Avoid the refrigerator, circulating air will help


keep the food cool.
Divide large amounts of food into , shallow containers to
help the food cool more quickly.

13. You should thaw frozen foods in the , in the


microwave, or under running water.

14. Discard any food that has been sitting out at room temperature for
hours or longer.

15. A is a condition in which the body's


immune system reacts to a substance in some foods.

16. The most common allergies are found in nuts, ,


, wheat, , fish and shellfish.

17. Common food allergy symptoms include:

skin irritations such as rashes, hives, and itching

Gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

which is a condition where the throat


swells up and the heart has difficulty pumping.

18. A is a negative reaction to a food that


doesn't involve the immune system.

19. Symptoms of food intolerance include: gas, , and


abdominal pain.
Name: Class: Date:

Directions: List 3 influences on food choice in the left columns of the table. Fill in the
right column of the table with details from the lesson that describe each influence.

Influences on Food Choice


Influences Details
Nutrition Unit Project
The students will participate in a project that will allow them to practice
and present what they learned about proper nutrition. The project will
require the students to do the following:

1. Choose a healthy meal to make following the MyPlate guidelines


2. Prepare the meal either by yourself or with the help of a family member
or guardian
3. Create a project that addresses the following questions:

How does your meal follow the MyPlate food group guidelines?
Does your meal meet the daily recommendations for certain
nutrients?
Were there any substitutions you made to make your meal healthier?
What influenced you to prepare this meal?
What were the food safety precautions you took before you prepared
the meal and while you prepared the meal?

Your project must also include:


A copy of the recipe you used
Pictures of you preparing the meal
Pictures of the finished meal
Your thoughts about the project.
o Did you enjoy participating in this project?
o What was hard/easy about doing this project?
o Do did you learn from participating in this project?

Your project may be a video, powerpoint presentation, poster presentation,


or written essay as long as it meets the project requirements. If you choose
to write an essay, include your recipe and your pictures at the end of your
essay.
Name: Class: Date:

Nutrition Unit Test


Directions: Match the term with the correct definition.

1. The process by which your body takes in and uses


food.
A. Food intolerance
2. The psychological desire for food.
B. Carbohydrates
3. Treating a substance with heat to kill or slow the
growth of pathogens. C. Proteins

4. Substances added to food to produce a desired D. Nutrition


effect.
E. Appetite
5. A condition in which the bones become fragile and
break easily. F. Cross Contamination

6. An infection or irritation of the gastrointestinal G. Cholesterol


tract caused by food or beverages that contain harmful H. Osteoporosis
bacteria, parasites, viruses, or chemicals.
I. Food Additives
7. These vitamins pass easily in the bloodstream
during digestion. J. Fat Soluble Vitamins

8. The natural physical drive to eat, prompted by the K. Foodborne Illness


body's need for food.
L. Water Soluble Vitamins
9. The spreading of pathogens from one food to
M. Pasteurization
another.
N. Hunger
10. A unit of heat used to measure the energy your
body uses and the energy it receives from food. O. Food Allergy
11. These vitamins are stored in body fat for later use. P. Calorie
12. Nutrients the body uses to build and maintain its Q. Fiber
cells and tissues.

13. A condition in which the body's immune system


reacts to substances in some foods.

14. Starches and sugars found in foods, which provide


your body's main source of energy.

15. A negative reaction to food that doesn't involve the


immune system.
16. A waxy, fat-like substance in your blood.

17. A tough substance that the body cannot digest. Eating foods high in this can
help you feel full, and may reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Directions: Choose the best answer.

18. The basis for a well functioning body is a

A. Well functioning mind

B. A healthy diet

C. Moderate exercise

D. Healthy Relationships

19. You should try to eat foods that have an equal amount of

A. Fats and Nutrients

B. Calories and Nutrients

C. Calories and Carbohydrates

D. Proteins and Sugars

20. Foods high in can help promote the generation of neurons and
improve the ability of existing brain cells.

A. Protein

B. Nutrients

C. Fat

D. Antioxidants
21. Carbohydrates, proteins, and are the building blocks of energy.

A. Fat

B. Nutrients

C. Water

D. Minerals

22. Which essential nutrient contains amino acids?

A. Proteins

B. Carbohydrates

C. Fats

D. Minerals

23. Which of the following is the basic building material of all your body cells?

A. Protein

B. Fat

C. Vitamins

D. Sugar

24. Vegetable oils, nuts and seeds contain larger amounts of which type of fat?

A. Unsaturated Fat

B. Saturated Fat

C. Trans Fat

D. Total Fat
25. Which type of fat can be found in Margarine, cookies, and crackers, and many other
snack foods.

A. Unsaturated Fat

B. Saturated Fat

C. Trans Fat

D. Total Fat

26. Which type of fat is most commonly found in animals based foods such as meat and
dairy products?

A. Unsaturated Fat

B. Saturated Fat

C. Trans Fat

D. Total Fat

27. The danger zone for food is between?

A. 40 and 145 degrees F

B. 32 and 140 degrees F

C. 32 and 140 degrees F

D. 40 and 140 degrees F

Directions: Write either true or false on the line provided for each statement. If the
statement is false, make it true.

28. Food is the source of energy for all of our bodily functions.

29. The type of food you consume affects your chances of obtaining certain
diseases.

30. Eating a poor diet is associated with lower levels of anxiety and
depression.
31. Oils contain essential nutrients but should be consumed in small amounts.

32. Half of the grains you consume should be refined grains.

33. The majority of the dairy you consume should be fat-free or low fat.

34. Juice with any percentage of fruit counts as an item for the fruit group.

35. The daily recommended values are the same for each individual.

36. Calcium, phosphorus, potassium, sulfur, sodium, chloride, and


magnesium are major vitamins.

37. Most of the water we consume comes directly from the water we drink.

38. Percent daily value provides recommended dietary information for


important nutrients.

39. Many of the meals you eat can be made healthier by substituting
ingredients.
40. Simple carbohydrates contain a balance of nutrients and are therefore
better for your body than complex carbohydrates. Common sources include: bread,
pasta and root vegetables.
41. The more you exercise, the more water you need to drink.
42. Non-essential amino acids are amino acids that the body does not produce
and therefore must get from food.

Directions: Answer each question by providing written responses.

43. What are 2 foods included in the grains group?

44. What are 2 foods included in the proteins group?

45. What are 2 foods included in the dairy group?


46. What are 2 foods included in the fruits group?

47. What are 2 foods included in the vegetable group?

48. Explain why the daily recommended values are different for each person? What are
the categories of information that are looked at to determine how much from each food
group a person should consume?

49. Give an example of how hunger and appetite can influence your food choice.

50. Give an example of how your emotions can influence your food choice.

51. Give an example of how your environment can influence your food choice.

52. List two functions of vitamins in the body.

1.

2.
53. List two functions of minerals in the body.

1.

2.

54. List two ways that eating a healthy diet affects your health.

1.

2.

55. State two tips that you can use to make healthier food choices when eating out.

1.

2.

56. What are the 4 steps in preventing foodborne illness?

57. You should discard any food that has been sitting out for hours or
longer.

Extra Credit: List up to 3 facts about nutrition that were not asked on this test.

1.

2.

3.