NASA Daily News Summary For Release: Nov.

10, 1998 Media Advisory 98-73 TODAY'S SUMMARY: * NASA Technology Helps Smithsonian Preserve the Star-Spangled Banner * News Briefings on STS-88, Mars Mission set for Nov. 13. * NASA Video for Nov. 10, 1998 ********** * NASA Technology Helps Smithsonian Preserve the Star-Spangled Banner A NASA infrared camera developed to explore Mars will assist the Smithsonian Institution in its three-year project to preserve the Star-Spangled Banner. The camera is taking images this week of the historic flag in infrared light to help preservationists identify deteriorated and soiled areas not obvious to the human eye. Full text of the release can be found at: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/pressrel/1998/98-201.txt * News Briefings on STS-88, Mars Mission set for Nov. 13. A series of background briefings on the upcoming STS-88 mission--the first Space Shuttle flight for assembly of the International Space Station--and on NASA's next missions to Mars on Nov. 13. Full text of the Note to Editors will be at: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/note2edt/1998/n98-068.txt ********** If any news releases are issued later today, summaries and Internet URLs will be e-mailed to this list. Index of NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1998/index.html ********** VIDEO FILE FOR NOVEMBER 10, 1998

ITEM 1: PRESERVING THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER A NASA infrared camera developed for space research will assist the Smithsonian Institution in its three year project to preserve a national treasure, the Star Spangled Banner. Despite receiving the best possible care at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, the flag is deteriorating from decades of exposure to light, pollution and temperature fluctuations. The camera, a prototype candidate for the Mars 2003 Missions, was built at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. It will make images of the flag using infrared light to identify deteriorated and soiled areas not obvious to the human eye. On November 6, 1998, the camera, developed by Dr. David Glenar at Goddard and called the Acousto-Optic Imaging Spectrometer (AImS), began making images of the flag. This process will end November 15. Contact at Goddard Space Center: Bill Steigerwald 301-2865017; contact at Headquarters: Doug Isbell 202/358-1753. ITEM 2: DEEP SPACE 1 (replay) Contact at Jet Propulsion Laboratory: John Watson 818-354-5011; contact at Headquarters: Doug Isbell 202/358-1753. ITEM 3: Lockheed Releases Updated C130 Plane For almost 50 years, NASA has partnered with industry to develop advanced technologies for the nation's primary tactical airlift aircraft, the C130. B-roll shows the updated C-130J, which includes advancements in structures and materials, aerodynamics, high lift concepts, propulsion, and integrated avionics. Contact at Langley Research Center: Keith Henry 757/864-6120; contact at Headquarters: Mike Braukus: 202/358-1979. The NASA Video File normally airs at noon, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 p.m. and midnight Eastern time. For further information, please contact Ray Castillo, 202/358-4555. NASA Television is available on GE-2, transponder 9C at 85 degrees West longitude, with vertical polarization. Frequency is on 3880.0 megahertz, with audio on 6.8 megahertz. The most recent NASA Video File Advisory can be found at: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/tv-advisory/nasa-tv.txt Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Ray Castillo 202/358-4555. **********

CONTRACT AWARDS NASA contract awards are posted to: http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/award.html ********** The NASA Daily News Summary is issued at approximately 2 p.m. Eastern time on business days when news releases, new Video File material or live events are scheduled. Members of the news media who wish to subscribe to or unsubscribe from this list should send an e-mail message to: brian.dunbar@hq.nasa.gov ********** END OF DAILY NEWS SUMMARY