NASA Daily News Summary For Release: Nov.

24, 1998 Media Advisory 98-82 TODAY'S SUMMARY: * TRMM Completes One Year Of Dramatic Weather Observations * NASA Video File for Nov. 24, 1998 ********** TRMM COMPLETES ONE YEAR OF DRAMATIC WEATHER OBSERVATIONS The world's first space mission dedicated to observing and understanding tropical rainfall has successfully completed its first year of continuous data-gathering. Launched last fall, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft continues to provide exciting new insight into cloud and precipitation systems over the tropics. Changes in wind patterns generated by these tropical systems spread across the globe to impact weather patterns everywhere. TRMM is a joint U.S.-Japanese mission that was launched on Nov. 27, 1997, from the National Space Development Agency at Japan's Tanegashima Space Center. The TRMM satellite has produced continuous data since Dec. 8, 1997. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz 202/358-1730. Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Allen Kenitzer 301/286-2806. Full text available at: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/pressrel/1998/98-212.txt ^^^^^ If additional news releases are issued later today, summaries and Internet URLs will be e-mailed to this list. Index of NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1998/index.html

********** VIDEO FILE FOR NOV. 24, 1998 ITEM 1: TRMM COMPLETES ONE YEAR OF DRAMATIC WEATHER OBSERVATIONS Video accompanying press release, TRMM Completes One Year Of Dramatic Weather Observations, summarized above. Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Allen Kenitzer 301/286-2806. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Dave Steitz 202/358-1730. ITEM 2: THE MYTH OF THE EXPANDING SAHARA DESERT Nearly two decades of satellite data show that rainfall, not humans, controls the size of the Sahara. The Sahelian/Sahara border has received a lot of attention because in very dry years, the border moves south. In the 1970s and early 1980s, this gave the impression that the desert was steadily moving south into the temperate zones. But satellite data show that Saharan/Sahelian boundary moves north with rainfall in wet years such as 1994. Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Wade Sisler 301/286-6256. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Dave Steitz 202/358-1730. ITEM 3: HUBBLE PHOTOGRAPHS NEVER-BEFORE-SEEN GALAXIES (replay) Contact at Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD: Ray Villard 410/338-4514. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Don Savage 202/358-1727. ^^^^^ The NASA Video File normally airs at noon, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 p.m. and midnight Eastern time. NASA Television is available on GE-2, transponder 9C at 85 degrees West longitude, with

vertical polarization. Frequency is on 3880.0 megahertz, with audio on 6.8 megahertz. Ray Castillo NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: 202/358-4555. The most recent NASA Video File Advisory can be found at: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/tv-advisory/nasa-tv.txt ********** CONTRACT AWARDS NASA contract awards are posted to: http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/award.html ********** The NASA Daily News Summary is issued at approximately 2:00 p.m. Eastern time on business days when news releases, new Video File material or live events are scheduled. Members of the news media who wish to subscribe to or unsubscribe from this list should send an e-mail message to: brian.dunbar@hq.nasa.gov ********** END OF DAILY NEWS SUMMARY