NASA Daily News Summary For Release: Jan.

7, 1999 Media Advisory m99-004 TODAY'S SUMMARY: NASA TECHNOLOGY ASSISTS IN DETECTING NATURAL MARINE OIL SEEPS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO STS-95 CREW TO VISIT WASHINGTON, DC, AREA NASA VIDEO FILE FOR JAN. 7, 1999 ********** NASA TECHNOLOGY ASSISTS IN DETECTING NATURAL MARINE OIL SEEPS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO NASA is teaming with industry to identify natural marine oil seeps in the Gulf of Mexico, offering clues on oil deposits. Through the Commercial Remote Sensing Program at NASA's Stennis Space Center, Stennis, MS, NASA is demonstrating practical applications of space technologies in America's marketplace. One such partnership is with the Earth Satellite Corporation (EarthSat), of Rockville, MD, a company that is using remote sensing technology to help identify the oil seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. Remote sensing uses sensors mounted on aircraft or satellites to look at the Earth's surface and gather information for many uses, including roadway planning, disaster assessment, or in this case, to help identify marine oil seeps. Marine oil seeps occur naturally as oil migrates naturally through cracks from deposits deep below the ocean floor and then rises to the surface, visible as oil slicks. The seeps offer a clues to the location of oil deposits. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz 202/358-1730. Contact at NASA Stennis Space Center, Stennis, MS: Lanee Cooksey 228/688-3341. For full text, see:

ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/pressrel/1999/99-001.txt ^^^^^ STS-95 CREW TO VISIT WASHINGTON, DC, AREA The STS-95 Space Shuttle astronauts will visit the Washington, DC, area on Friday, Jan. 8, to discuss their mission. They will meet with NASA employees at Headquarters and the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, and will visit the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, hosted by Secretary of Health & Human Services, Dr. Donna Shalala. Mission commander Curtis L. Brown; pilot Steven W. Lindsey; mission specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Stephen K. Robinson and Pedro Duque; payload specialists Chiaki Mukai and Senator John Glenn will participate in the mission discussions. Media representatives are welcome to attend these employee events on a first-come, first-served basis, but seating will be limited. Due to schedule constraints, only employees will be able to ask questions at these events. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Beth Schmid 202/358-1760. Contact at National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD: Claudia Feldman 301/496-1752. For full text, see: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/note2edt/1999/n99-001.txt ^^^^^ If NASA issues additional news releases later today, we will e-mail summaries and Internet URLs to this list. Index of 1998 NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1998/index.html Index of 1999 NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1999/index.html ********** NASA VIDEO FILE FOR JAN. 7, 1999

ITEM 1: HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE DEEP FIELD SOUTH IMAGE This Hubble Space Telescope Deep Field South Image is a deep view of some of the farthest and faintest objects ever seen in the universe. It shows a small patch of sky in the constellation Tucana and reveals a plethora of galaxies, as seen in the visible and infrared spectrum. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Don Savage 202/358-1727. Contact at Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD: Cheryl Gundy 410/338-4707. ITEM 2: HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE HERITAGE IMAGE OF THE RING NEBULA (replay) The NASA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the sharpest view yet of the most famous of all planetary nebulae: the Ring Nebula (M57). In this October 1998 image, the telescope has looked down a barrel of gas cast off by a dying star thousands of years ago. This photo reveals elongated dark clumps of material embedded in the gas at the edge of the nebula; the dying central star floating in a blue haze of hot gas. The nebula is about a light-year in diameter and is located some 2,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Lyra. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Don Savage 202/358-1727. Contact at Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD: Cheryl Gundy 410/338-4707. ITEM 3: PLANETARY NEBULA FORMATION ANIMATION (replay) Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Don Savage 202/358-1727. Contact at Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD: Cheryl Gundy 410/338-4707. ^^^^^ NASA normally airs the Video File at noon, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00

p.m. and midnight Eastern time. NASA Television is available on GE-2, transponder 9C at 85 degrees West longitude, with vertical polarization. Frequency is on 3880.0 megahertz, with audio on 6.8 megahertz. Ray Castillo NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: 202/358-4555. For the most recent NASA Video File Advisory, see: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/tv-advisory/nasa-tv.txt ********** CONTRACT AWARDS NASA posts contract awards to: http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/award.html ********** NASA issues the Daily News Summary at approximately 2:00 p.m. Eastern time on business days when we issue news releases, new Video File material or schedule live events. Members of the news media who wish to subscribe to or unsubscribe from this list should send an e-mail message to: brian.dunbar@hq.nasa.gov ********** END OF DAILY NEWS SUMMARY