You are on page 1of 3

Kelly​ ​1

Maya​ ​Kelly

Miss​ ​Akers

Honors​ ​English​ ​9

19​ ​October​ ​2017

Moses​ ​is​ ​the​ ​leader​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Hebrew​ ​people.​ ​He​ ​became​ ​their​ ​leader​ ​when​ ​God​ ​spoke​ ​to

him​ ​on​ ​Mount.​ ​Horeb,​ ​saying​ ​that​ ​Moses​ ​must​ ​leave​ ​Midian​ ​and​ ​free​ ​the​ ​Hebrews​ ​from​ ​Egypt.

Moses​ ​is​ ​a​ ​prominent​ ​figure​ ​in​ ​the​ ​book​ ​of​ ​Exodus​ ​because​ ​he​ ​parted​ ​the​ ​Red​ ​Sea​ ​and​ ​lead​ ​the

Hebrews​ ​to​ ​the​ ​promise​ ​land​ ​of​ ​Canaan.​ ​Moses​ ​was​ ​God’s​ ​personal​ ​servant​ ​on​ ​Earth,​ ​assuring

his​ ​people​ ​that​ ​they​ ​are​ ​worthy​ ​and​ ​should​ ​keep​ ​faith​ ​in​ ​Him.​ ​Moses​ ​has​ ​suffered​ ​since​ ​birth.​ ​He

was​ ​born​ ​in​ ​a​ ​time​ ​where​ ​every​ ​Hebrew​ ​boy​ ​was​ ​supposed​ ​to​ ​be​ ​killed.​ ​Moses​ ​was​ ​separated

from​ ​his​ ​family​ ​at​ ​the​ ​young​ ​age​ ​of​ ​three​ ​months​ ​old,​ ​and​ ​was​ ​later​ ​on​ ​forced​ ​to​ ​leave​ ​Egypt

after​ ​he​ ​killed​ ​an​ ​Egyptian​ ​guard​ ​who​ ​had​ ​beaten​ ​a​ ​Hebrew.​ ​Moses​ ​would​ ​not​ ​have​ ​become​ ​the

leader​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Hebrews​ ​if​ ​he​ ​had​ ​not​ ​endured​ ​the​ ​separation​ ​and​ ​fear​ ​that​ ​he​ ​did.

Most​ ​of​ ​Moses’​ ​life​ ​was​ ​spent​ ​on​ ​the​ ​run,​ ​fearful,​ ​always​ ​hiding​ ​from​ ​someone.​ ​This

pattern​ ​was​ ​started​ ​when​ ​he​ ​was​ ​just​ ​3​ ​months​ ​old,​ ​when​ ​his​ ​mother​ ​could​ ​no​ ​longer,​ ​and​ ​was

forced​ ​out​ ​of​ ​fear​ ​to​ ​send​ ​Moses​ ​away​ ​for​ ​good.​ ​ ​Moses​ ​mother​ ​puts​ ​him​ ​in​ ​a​ ​basket​ ​and​ ​sends

him​ ​down​ ​the​ ​Nile​ ​river:​ ​“...​ ​and​ ​she​ ​put​ ​the​ ​child​ ​in​ ​it​ ​and​ ​placed​ ​it​ ​among​ ​the​ ​reeds​ ​at​ ​the​ ​river”

(110).​ ​This​ ​event​ ​is​ ​a​ ​crucial​ ​part​ ​of​ ​the​ ​story​ ​of​ ​Moses,​ ​because​ ​without​ ​it,​ ​he​ ​would​ ​never​ ​have

been​ ​raised​ ​in​ ​Egypt​ ​with​ ​the​ ​Pharaoh.​ ​The​ ​Pharaoh’s​ ​daughter​ ​sees​ ​baby​ ​Moses​ ​floating​ ​in​ ​the

Nile:​ ​“...​ ​she​ ​saw​ ​the​ ​basket​ ​among​ ​the​ ​reeds​ ​and​ ​sent​ ​her​ ​maid​ ​to​ ​fetch​ ​it”​ ​(110).​ ​When​ ​the
Pharaoh’s​ ​daughter​ ​finds​ ​Moses,​ ​she​ ​brings​ ​him​ ​back​ ​to​ ​the​ ​palace​ ​and​ ​raises​ ​him​ ​there.​ ​Though

Moses​ ​lived

Kelly​ ​2

a​ ​life​ ​of​ ​security​ ​and​ ​riches​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Egyptian​ ​kingdom,​ ​it​ ​was​ ​mostly​ ​likely​ ​hard​ ​to​ ​forget​ ​the

trauma​ ​of​ ​maternal​ ​separation,​ ​and​ ​then​ ​forced​ ​to​ ​be​ ​raised​ ​by​ ​a​ ​total​ ​stranger.

One​ ​day,​ ​when​ ​Moses​ ​was​ ​out,​ ​he​ ​saw​ ​an​ ​Egyptian​ ​beating​ ​a​ ​Hebrew,​ ​one​ ​of​ ​his​ ​people.

He​ ​killed​ ​the​ ​Egyptian,​ ​hoping​ ​no​ ​one​ ​had​ ​seen​ ​his​ ​act​ ​of​ ​anger.​ ​Soon​ ​Moses​ ​finds​ ​out​ ​that​ ​the

his​ ​people​ ​know​ ​about​ ​his​ ​act​ ​of​ ​vengeance​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Pharaoh​ ​has​ ​promised​ ​to​ ​kill​ ​him.​ ​Moses

gets​ ​a​ ​death​ ​threat​ ​and​ ​flees:​ ​“Then​ ​Moses​ ​was​ ​afraid,​ ​and​ ​thought​ ​“surely​ ​the​ ​thing​ ​is​ ​known”.

When​ ​Pharaoh​ ​heard​ ​of​ ​it,​ ​he​ ​sought​ ​to​ ​kill​ ​Moses”​ ​(111).​ ​Moses​ ​leaves​ ​the​ ​only​ ​life​ ​he​ ​has​ ​ever

known,​ ​and​ ​has​ ​to​ ​start​ ​anew.​ ​In​ ​Midian,​ ​he​ ​becomes​ ​a​ ​shepherd​ ​for​ ​a​ ​man​ ​by​ ​the​ ​name​ ​Jethro.

Moses​ ​then​ ​marries​ ​Jethro’s​ ​daughter​ ​Zipporah.​ ​He​ ​would​ ​have​ ​never​ ​met​ ​is​ ​future​ ​wife​ ​if​ ​he

had​ ​not​ ​been​ ​exiled​ ​from​ ​Egypt.​ ​Without​ ​fleeing​ ​to​ ​Midian,​ ​Moses​ ​would​ ​have​ ​never​ ​seen​ ​the

burning​ ​bush​ ​and​ ​talked​ ​to​ ​God.​ ​God​ ​tells​ ​him​ ​“I​ ​have​ ​seen​ ​the​ ​affliction​ ​of​ ​my​ ​people​ ​who​ ​are

in​ ​Egypt,​ ​and​ ​have​ ​heard​ ​their​ ​cry​ ​because​ ​of​ ​their​ ​taskmasters…”​ ​(112).​ ​Moses’​ ​struggling​ ​has

paid​ ​off,​ ​because​ ​he​ ​is​ ​now​ ​the​ ​hero.​ ​Though​ ​he​ ​is​ ​first​ ​afraid​ ​because​ ​of​ ​his​ ​previous​ ​actions​ ​in

Egypt,​ ​God​ ​assures​ ​him​ ​that​ ​anyone​ ​who​ ​would​ ​still​ ​be​ ​holding​ ​a​ ​grudge​ ​is​ ​dead.​ ​The​ ​story​ ​of

Moses​ ​is​ ​in​ ​some​ ​ways​ ​unfortunate,​ ​but​ ​everything​ ​happens​ ​for​ ​a​ ​reason,​ ​and​ ​Moses​ ​ends​ ​up

being​ ​the​ ​Leader​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Hebrews.

One​ ​of​ ​Moses’​ ​biggest​ ​challenges​ ​is​ ​freeing​ ​the​ ​Hebrews​ ​from​ ​Egypt.​ ​When​ ​God​ ​sends

down​ ​the​ ​ten​ ​plagues,​ ​from​ ​the​ ​bloody​ ​Nile​ ​to​ ​the​ ​Passover,​ ​the​ ​Pharaoh​ ​finally​ ​agrees​ ​to​ ​let​ ​the

Hebrews​ ​leave​ ​his​ ​land.​ ​The​ ​Pharaoh​ ​tells​ ​Moses​ ​to​ ​gather​ ​his​ ​people​ ​and​ ​leave​ ​Egypt:​ ​“Take
your​ ​flocks​ ​and​ ​your​ ​herds,​ ​as​ ​you​ ​have​ ​said,​ ​and​ ​be​ ​gone,​ ​and​ ​bless​ ​me​ ​also”​ ​(120).​ ​Soon​ ​after

the​ ​Pharaoh​ ​sets​ ​them​ ​free,​ ​he​ ​changes​ ​his​ ​mind.​ ​He​ ​chases​ ​after​ ​Moses​ ​and​ ​his​ ​people​ ​with​ ​the

Kelly​ ​3

Egyptian​ ​army.​ ​The​ ​Hebrews​ ​start​ ​to​ ​lose​ ​faith​ ​in​ ​Moses​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Lord.​ ​Moses​ ​must​ ​convince

them​ ​that​ ​the​ ​Lord​ ​is​ ​holy​ ​and​ ​they​ ​must​ ​keep​ ​their​ ​faith​ ​in​ ​him.​ ​The​ ​Hebrews​ ​are​ ​hesitant​ ​and

believe​ ​they​ ​will​ ​die​ ​before​ ​they​ ​have​ ​gotten​ ​to​ ​the​ ​promise​ ​land​ ​of​ ​Canaan.​ ​Moses​ ​finally​ ​proves

that​ ​the​ ​Lord​ ​will​ ​fight​ ​for​ ​them​ ​when​ ​he​ ​parts​ ​the​ ​Red​ ​Sea​ ​with​ ​the​ ​help​ ​of​ ​God.​ ​The​ ​sea​ ​falls

back​ ​on​ ​the​ ​Egyptians​ ​and​ ​they​ ​all​ ​die.​ ​Moses​ ​is​ ​once​ ​again​ ​the​ ​hero,​ ​thanks​ ​to​ ​his​ ​unwavering

faith​ ​in​ ​God​ ​and​ ​his​ ​patience​ ​in​ ​the​ ​face​ ​of​ ​struggle.

Through​ ​his​ ​rough​ ​times,​ ​he​ ​stayed​ ​faithful,​ ​which​ ​proved​ ​that​ ​he​ ​was​ ​worthy​ ​to​ ​be​ ​the

Hebrew’s​ ​leader.​ ​One​ ​of​ ​the​ ​important​ ​morals​ ​of​ ​Moses’​ ​story​ ​is​ ​that​ ​everything​ ​happens​ ​for​ ​a

reason.​ ​Though​ ​things​ ​may​ ​have​ ​been​ ​hard​ ​in​ ​the​ ​moment,​ ​Moses​ ​always​ ​ended​ ​up​ ​victorious

because​ ​of​ ​his​ ​strong​ ​sense​ ​of​ ​faith.​ ​Moses’​ ​suffering​ ​was​ ​significant,​ ​because​ ​without​ ​it​ ​he

would​ ​not​ ​have​ ​become​ ​Leader​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Hebrews.