NASA Daily News Summary For Release: July 9, 1999 Media Advisory m99-138 Summary: News Release

: NASA Managers Set July 20 as Launch Date for Chandra Telescope Video File for July 9 ********** NASA Managers Set July 20 as Launch Date for Chandra Telescope NASA managers set Tuesday, July 20, 1999, as the official launch date for NASA's second Space Shuttle Mission of the year that will mark the launch of the first female Shuttle Commander and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Columbia is scheduled to liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center on July 20 at the opening of a 46-minute launch window at 12:36 a.m. EDT. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Dwayne C. Brown 202/358-1726. Contact at NASA Kennedy Space Center, FL: Lisa Malone 407/8672468. For full copy of press release see: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/pressrel/1999/99-078.txt ---------If NASA issues additional news releases later today, we will email summaries and Internet URLs to this list. Index of 1999 NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1999/index.html ********** Video File for July 9, 1999 Item 1 - Historical Footage of Charles "Pete" Conrad Item 2 - Apollo 11 Retrospective TRT 14:45

interviews and B-Roll TRT 31:00 Item 3 - Surfing the Solar Winds (replay) TRT 11:00 Item 4 - Apollo 11 30th Anniversary (replay) TRT 18:42 Item 5 - Highlights of X-38 Free Flight Test #4 ----Item 1 - Historical Footage of Charles "Pete" Conrad Footage from Pete Conrad's missions: Apollo 12, Gemini V, Gemini XI, Spacelab I Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Ray Castillo 202/358-4555. Contact at NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX: Ed Campion 281/483-5111. Item 2 - Apollo 11 - 30th Anniversary Retrospective Video Includes interviews conducted at the National Air and Space Museum on May 26, 1989, with all three astronauts--Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong, and Ed "Buzz" Aldrin--as well as historical footage of Apollo 11. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Ray Castillo 202/358-4555. Item 3 - Speedy Solar Wind Surfs Magnetic Waves (replay) Synopsis: The high-speed portion of the solar wind achieves its unexpectedly high velocity by 'surfing' magnetic waves in the Sun's outer atmosphere to reach speeds up to 500 miles per second, according to coordinated observations by two spacecraft made during John Glenn's return to space. a - Surfing the Solar Wind The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is normally visible only during a solar eclipse. Instruments aboard Spartan 201 and SOHO create artificial eclipses to view the accelerating solar wind of electrically charged particles. New observations of particles 'surfing' on waves in the corona have shed light on an ongoing mystery of why the solar wind flows as fast as it does.

b - Wind Spiraling and Wave Damping Charged particles in the solar wind spiral around lines of magnetic force, and these lines oscillate back and forth to create outward-propagating waves. When the particles' spiraling frequencies match the wave frequencies, the particles can absorb the waves' energy; this spins up the particles into larger orbits, gives them an added outward boost, and damps out the waves. c - The Speedy Solar 'Wind' The solar wind comes in two varieties: high speed and low speed. The low speed solar wind moves at roughly a million miles per hour, while the high speed wind is even faster, moving at speeds as high as two million miles per hour. d - Effects of the Solar Wind on Earth As it flows past Earth, the solar wind changes the shape and structure of the Earth's magnetic field, which can damage satellites and disrupt communications and power systems. e - Source of the Solar Wind These combined images display UV light emitted by the solar corona over one full solar rotation (27 days) in August 1996. The inner images of the solar disk were taken by the EIT instrument aboard SOHO. The outer diffuse emission was observed by the UVCS instrument aboard SOHO, which creates an 'artificial eclipse' in ultraviolet light to observe the dim extended solar corona. The dark regions at the north and south poles are called 'coronal holes,' and they are thought to be the primary source regions of the high-speed solar wind. f - Solar Wind--Observations from LASCO Image of the solar corona--source of the solar wind--as recorded by SOHO's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) instrument. g - Sun Obserations by EIT Image of the full sun as seen by SOHO's Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT).

h - SOHO Animation Animation of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). i - SPARTAN 201/STS-95 Mission Images of NASA's Spartan 201 spacecraft deployed from the space shuttle during the historic STS-95 mission during John Glenn's return to space. j - Spartan Animation k - Solar Scientists at Work NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 l - Interview Excerpts with Dr. Craig DeForest, Stanford University Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Donald Savage 202/358-1547. Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Bill Steigerwald 301/286-5017. Item 4 - Apollo 11 30th Anniversary (replay) a - The Apollo 11 Mission: Prior to Flight TRT - 5:47 Clips show various aspects of the Apollo 11 mission that sent Astronauts Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong, and Ed "Buzz" Aldrin to the Moon. The first set of clips includes the following: Crew photo Mission simulator LEM flight tests Suit-up Walkout b - The Apollo 11 Mission: Liftoff TRT - 5:44 Footage includes: Saturn V liftoff First and second stage separation Crew enroute to Moon Views of Earth from the Command module

c - The Apollo 11 Mission: On the Moon Footage includes: Lunar views LEM separates from command module LEM descends to the Moon Earth views

TRT - 1:27

d - The Apollo 11 Mission: From the Moon back to Earth TRT - 4:22 Footage includes: Armstrong steps on the Moon Walking on Moon Planting flag on Moon Crew retrieval from ocean and quarantine Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Ray Castillo 202/358-4555. Item 5 - Highlights of X-38 Free Flight Test #4 Footage features highlights of today's fourth free flight test of the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle prototype at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The goal of this test flight is to release the vehicle from a higher altitude, fly it longer, conduct aerodynamic verification maneuvers and check improvements made to the drogue parachute. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Jim Cast 202/3581779. Contact at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA: Fred A. Brown 805/258-2663. ----The NASA Video File generally airs at noon, 3 p.m., 6 p.m., 9 p.m. and midnight Eastern Time, but may be pre-empted by mission coverage or breaking news. NASA Television is available on GE-2, transponder 9C at 85 degrees West longitude, with vertical polarization. Frequency is on 3880.0 megahertz, with audio on 6.8 megahertz. Refer general questions about the video file to NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Ray Castillo, 202/358-4555, or Pam Poe, 202/358-0373.

During Space Shuttle missions, you can access the full NASA TV schedule from: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/nasatv/schedule.html For general information about NASA TV see: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv/ ********** Contract Awards Contract awards are posted to the NASA Acquisition information Service Web site: http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/award.html ********** The NASA Daily News Summary is issued each business day at approximately 2 p.m. Eastern time. Members of the media who wish to subscribe or unsubscribe from this list, please send e-mail message to: Brian.Dunbar@hq.nasa.gov ********** end of daily news summary