Sample Safety Program

Provided to you by

Continental Western Insurance Company Tri-State Insurance Company of Minnesota Union Insurance Company 11201 Douglas Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa 50322

WELCOME POLICY HOLDERS:
A successful Safety Program will help you to avoid losses in the future. Continental Western Group wants to work with you to prevent losses. We believe that when you make job safety a real part of your everyday operations you will benefit in the long run. This sample safety program and information is provided as a guide and is not construed as legal advice by Continental Western Group, nor does it relieve you of your responsibility to comply with applicable laws or regulations. For additional information or assistance with your safety program contact OSHA, your State Workers’ Compensation Office, your agent or your underwriter at Continental Western Group. A copy of this sample program is available on computer diskettes with the necessary software to review and modify the information for your individual business and operation. You may contact your insurance agent or the Loss Control Department at Continental Western Group for computerized information and instructions on how to install the software for most personal computer systems.

Sincerely,

CONTINENTAL WESTERN GROUP
Copyright Notice © 2001 by Continental Western Group. All rights reserved. Information in this document is subject to change without notice. No part of this manual may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or information storage and retrieval systems, for any purpose other than personal use, without the express written permission of Continental Western Group. Continental Western Group Attn Loss Control Department 11201 Douglas Avenue Des Moines, Iowa 50306

Contents
SAFETY PROGRAM WHAT IS A SAFETY PROGRAM? .................................................................. A-1 WHY A SAFETY PROGRAM? ......................................................................... A-1 WHO NEEDS A SAFETY PROGRAM?............................................................. A-1 HOW DO YOU GET STARTED? .................................................................... A-1 STEPS TO A SUCCESSFUL SAFETY PROGRAM .............................................. A-2 OBJECTIVE OF A SAFETY PROGRAM ............................................................ A-3 MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT MANAGEMENT COMMITMENT ..................................................................... B-1 FORMATION OF THE SAFETY COMMITTEE .................................................... B-3 WHAT A SAFETY COMMITTEE DOES ............................................................ B-4 WHAT A SAFETY COMMITTEE DOES NOT DO ........................................... B-5 SAFETY COMMITTEE MEMBERS .................................................................... B-5 SAFETY COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS ................................................... B-6 SAFETY COMMITTEE MINUTES ..................................................................... B-7 PLANNING FOR EMPLOYEE SAFETY SAFETY TRAINING .......................................................................................... C-1 EMERGENCY ACTION PLANS ......................................................................... C-2 HAZARD RECOGNITION AND CONTROL HOUSEKEEPING ..............................................................................................D-1 COMMON HAZARDS ......................................................................................D-1 SPECIAL HAZARDS .........................................................................................D-1 EXTERIORS ......................................................................................................D-2 MACHINERY ....................................................................................................D-2 EMPLOYEE PROTECTION .................................................................................D-2 SAFETY ACTIVITIES .........................................................................................D-3 BUILDING SECURITY EXTERIOR .....................................................................D-3 GENERAL .........................................................................................................D-4

ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAMS FIRE SAFETY PROGRAM .................................................................................. E-1 FIRE HAZARDS ................................................................................................ E-1 HOUSEKEEPING RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................................. E-6 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL COMMUNICATION ................................................. E-7 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT ...........................................................E-11 1. EYE AND FACE PROTECTION ............................................................E-11 2. EAR PROTECTION .............................................................................E-11 3. RESPIRATORY PROTECTION .............................................................E-11 4. TORSO PROTECTION ....................................................................... E-12 5. ARM AND HAND PROTECTION ..................................................... E-12 6. FOOT AND LEG PROTECTION ..........................................................E-13 7. WORKING WITH COMPUTERS .........................................................E-13 RESPIRATOR PROGRAM ............................................................................... E-15 HEARING PROTECTION PROGRAM .............................................................. E-20 PROPER LIFTING TECHNIQUES .................................................................... E-24 BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS ......................................................................... E-26 FORKLIFT OPERATION ................................................................................. E-31 LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROGRAM ................................................................... E-34 MACHINE SAFEGUARDING .......................................................................... E-38 INCENTIVE PROGRAMS ................................................................................. E-40 MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY PROGRAM ............................................................. F-1 ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION & REPORT ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION ............................................................................. G-1 ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORT .............................................................. G-3

SAFETY PROGRAM
WHAT IS A SAFETY PROGRAM?
A planned approach to reducing hazards, eliminating accidents, and controlling losses.

WHY A SAFETY PROGRAM?
Safety pays. Preventing accidents is less costly than having them. Injured employees cost business owners millions of dollars in training costs and production losses, not to mention insurance costs. Many states are beginning to require business owners to develop safety programs. You may as well get a head start.

WHO NEEDS A SAFETY PROGRAM?
You do. Even if injury-related accidents have not yet occurred in your workplace, there may be hazards with the potential for causing injury. Recognizing and controlling the hazards before an accident occurs is just good business.

HOW DO YOU GET STARTED?
1. Ask for help. Many organizations, including Continental Western Group, OSHA, the National Safety Council, and your State Workers’ Compensation Office, have excellent information available to assist you in setting up a safety program that will meet your specific needs. Determine the goals of your program and issue a written policy statement affirming management’s complete commitment to the program. Select a safety coordinator and appoint a safety committee. Encourage volunteers. Include both management and employees. Delegate to the committee the responsibility and authority to develop safe work rules, and to conduct safety training, job safety analyses, worksite inspections, accident investigations, and claims case management. Designate a Preferred Medical Provider to service all workplace injuries.

2.

3.

4.

5.

NOW IS THE TIME

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STEPS TO A SUCCESSFUL SAFETY PROGRAM 1. DECIDE WHAT YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS
Your safety program will not be exactly like any other. It should be designed to fit your unique needs. You, as the owner/manager of the company, should determine the broad goals and the general structure of the program.

2. SELECT A SAFETY COORDINATOR
The Safety Coordinator should be a person committed to safety and willing to assume the responsibilities of developing and managing the program. The selected individual should have good problem solving skills, work well with others and have the time to devote to the job. You and/or the Safety Coordinator should develop a basic safety plan.

3. ISSUE A WRITTEN POLICY STATEMENT
The success of the program will depend entirely upon YOUR commitment to it. Upper management leads the way by setting policy, assigning responsibility and setting an example. The attitudes of upper management will be reflected in the attitudes of the employees. Their cooperation depends on their understanding of what the safety program is, why it is important to them, and how it will affect their work. Your policy statement will be written to suit your particular business climate, but should include, at a minimum, a declaration that the safety and health of the employees is paramount, that prevention of accidents will take precedence over expediency, and that every attempt will be made to reduce the possibility of accidents. You should sign and date the statement and post it in a conspicuous location.

4. SELECT A SAFETY COMMITTEE
The size of the committee will depend on the size and specific needs of your business. Encourage volunteers. Select an equal number of members from management and line employees. Foster open communication with employees. Their participation in the formulation and implementation of the program is crucial to its success.

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OBJECTIVE OF A SAFETY PROGRAM
To create a healthier, safer environment for your employees and the general public by: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Implementing a full written safety program complying with OSHA and other applicable standards. Establishing a safety committee, involving management and employees, to develop safety rules and safe working procedures. Implementing a hazard communication program. Promptly reporting and investigating all accidents & injuries, or incidents that could lead to injuries or damage. Educating all personnel and posting all necessary data to comply with state, federal, and local laws. Conducting an ongoing safety training program for all employees. Establishing procedures & training for: Medical emergencies Fire emergencies Natural disasters Conducting drills on a regular basis with local authorities. Implementing a fleet safety program.

8.

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MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT
MANAGEMENT COMMITMENT POLICY STATEMENT
________________________ recognizes that the safety of its employees, guests and the general public is of the utmost importance. The Safety Program is designed to aid employees and management in adhering to safe standards in our workplace. The ultimate company objective is to prevent accidents and injuries to all concerned. While it is the responsibility of management to establish safety standards and to maintain an effective level of compliance to the standards, it is the responsibility of all ___________________ employees to perform their jobs and conduct themselves in accordance with such standards. Working together, we can assure a safe and healthy environment. Management is committed to the health and safety of all employees, guests and the general public. To this end, we will respond immediately to unsafe conditions or practices. Sincerely, ______________________

INJURY PREVENTION PROGRAM
for ________________________________________________________________________ The Company’s goal is to establish and maintain the best practical Injury Prevention/ Safety Program. While safety is the direct responsibility of each and every employee, the company will establish a safety committee to manage the formal safety program. Safety Committee: The safety committee is intended to assist the Company by making recommendations concerning safety and health hazards at each work site. The committee shall be balanced with representatives of management and employees. The Company shall randomly select, from volunteers, safety committee members to represent the employees. All employees shall have an opportunity to be committee members. Any employee may report to the committee information of concern related to safety and health conditions.

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Communication: As safety committee policies are formulated and approved, they will be distributed to every employee, supervisor and manager in the organization. Regulations: In designing safety measures, it is the Company’s goal to meet, or surpass, all federal and state regulations that directly concern the Company’s employees, facilities and operations. OSHA Compliance: The Company intends to comply with all OSHA requirements. Because such rules and regulations are complicated, difficult and extensive, each employee, supervisor and manager is strongly advised to seek expert assistance when needed. Workers’ Compensation: The Company shall strive to reduce workers’ compensation claims by seeking to eliminate safety and health hazards. The status of an employee shall not be affected by the filing of a workers’ compensation claim. Protective Measures: The Company shall advise employees when occupational health risks are identified and shall develop, implement and enforce the best possible protective measures without delay. The Company shall advise all concerned parties of new occupational health information as it becomes available. Safety Education: The Company strongly believes that the key to success in a safety and health program is the individual employee. The Company will endeavor to keep all employees informed of required safety and health procedures. Where safety training is necessary for employees, the Company will support such training. Employees’ Responsibilities: In cases of serious hazards where employees are endangered, employees are not required to unreasonably jeopardize their personal safety, but should immediately warn their fellow employees, supervisors, managers and anyone else affected by the situation. Supervisors and managers should immediately take the steps necessary to control such conditions. Such situations should be communicated to the Company’s safety committee. The Company’s Property: Each employee is responsible for the safe operation of all equipment, machinery, vehicles, or other property in his or her charge. The Company shall provide for proper care and maintenance of property, but each employee should report any problem with, or malfunction of such property to his or her immediate supervisor. The supervisor should investigate and take the necessary steps to address the issue as soon as possible. Protective Equipment: Employees are expected to wear all appropriate protective equipment at the proper times and in the proper environments. The company expects each employee to comply with this policy. Supervisors and managers should strictly enforce this policy.

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MANAGERS WILL:
1. 2. 3. 4. Communicate top management’s Safety/Injury Prevention Program to employees. Encourage employees to bring safety and health problems to their supervisors’ attention. Demonstrate their own commitment to safety by taking an active and visible role in safety issues. Ensure that supervisors understand their responsibilities regarding safety and health.

SUPERVISORS WILL:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Share appropriate educational material with employees. Analyze the work performed under their supervision to identify potential hazards. Inspect and safely maintain the physical environment in their work areas. Set a positive example by using appropriate personal protective equipment. Investigate workplace accidents and provide feedback to the safety committee. The committee shall review this information and make written recommendations regarding future prevention.

EMPLOYEES WILL:
1. Stay alert to hazards and correct them if they are able to do so without endangering themselves or others. Hazards that are considered a threat to life and limb shall be reported immediately to the facility’s safety and health representative. Analyze their jobs to discover potential hazards and help develop safer work procedures. Periodically review their own progress toward meeting the safety objectives set by the department.

2. 3.

FORMATION OF THE SAFETY COMMITTEE
All employers with one or more employees shall establish at least one safety committee to be responsible for all work sites of the employer. Each committee must be made up of an equal number of representatives of management and line employees. The employer’s representatives may be non-management employees. This means management may appoint employees to represent management on the committee. The employer should seek volunteers for employee representatives through a written notice directed to all employees. If there are not enough volunteers, the employer may select at random from the remaining employees. Characteristics of an ideal committee member include: Willingness to serve Sufficient knowledge to competently represent hazardous areas Respect by peers SAFETY MANUAL PAGE B-3 REV 3-01

Names of the committee members shall be posted and made available to all employees. A current roster of all committee members shall be attached to the written Safety/Injury Prevention Program. Membership shall be made available to all employees at least once every two years. Terms may be staggered. A safety committee member cannot be subjected to any penalties, discipline, discharge, employer interference or reprisal of any kind as a result of participating on the committee. Employees must be compensated at their regular rate and must continue to receive benefits while participating on the committee.

WHAT A SAFETY COMMITTEE DOES
It is the duty of the Safety Committee to adopt and maintain an effective written Safety/ Injury Prevention Program. The Safety Committee shall meet a minimum of once every 3 months. Minutes of all meetings shall be recorded and kept for at least 3 years. The committee shall make recommendations to the employer. These recommendations are advisory only. The employer shall retain full authority to manage the work site and to adopt, reject or postpone the recommendations.

SAFETY COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES MAY INCLUDE:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Receiving and promptly responding to suggestions and recommendations. Responses should be in writing. Inspecting a selected area each month for the purpose of detecting hazards and recommending corrective action. Conducting inspections and interviews in response to complaints regarding safety and health hazards. Investigating accidents or near accidents, and recommending means to prevent recurrence. Recommending changes or additions to the safety program. Developing or revising rules to comply with current safety and health standards. Promoting safety and first-aid training for employees. Promoting safety and health program participation by all employees.

WHAT A SAFETY COMMITTEE DOES NOT DO
1. 2. Does not mandate or dictate any policy or standard. The committee may only recommend. Does not engage in any bargaining or contract negotiation.

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SAFETY COMMITTEE MEMBERS
The Company’s safety committee management representatives shall be the following: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ The Company’s equal number of voluntary safety committee employee representatives shall be the following: ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Committee members may change every two years. Management safety committee members may change or remain the same. One half of the employee representatives’ terms may be staggered so that new members will always serve with at least half of the carry-over members. All company employees shall have access to management’s Safety Policy Statement, the Safety/Injury Prevention Program, and the names of the Safety Committee members.

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SAFETY COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS
We the Safety Committee of ______________________________________________ hereby recommend the following changes to the Safety/Injury Prevention Program: Work Site Affected (identify each site/location) Employee Position Affected 1. Methods used to identify, evaluate and document safety and health hazards: Recommended Change ________________________________________________________ 2. Methods for timely correction of safety and health hazards identified: Recommended Change ________________________________________________________ 3. Methods of emergency response and first aid: Recommended Change ________________________________________________________ 4. Initial safety orientation covering rules, policies, and job-specific procedures for employees new to the work: Recommended Change ________________________________________________________ 5. Job-specific training for employees before they perform potentially hazardous work: Recommended Change ________________________________________________________ 6. Periodic refresher training/dissemination of information for employees regarding the employer’s Safety/Injury Prevention Program, safety rules, policies, and procedures: Recommended Change ________________________________________________________ Date _____________________________________________________ Management Representative __________________________________ Date _____________________________________________________ Employee Representative _____________________________________

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SAFETY COMMITTEE MINUTES
Company _________________________________________________ Location _________________________________________________ Date of Meeting____________________________________________ Time Opened _____________________________________________ Time Closed ______________________________________________ Member Present for Meeting ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ Minutes of the Meeting ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ A copy of this report should be kept on file for a period of 3 years and should be available for all employees to review. Signed ______________________________ Safety Coordinator

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PLANNING FOR EMPLOYEE SAFETY
SAFETY TRAINING
An effective Safety/Injury Prevention Program is based on safe working conditions and safe job performance. To assure both, supervisors should provide safety training for their people. Safety training must be carefully planned and properly conducted in order to achieve the desired results. It is imperative that a formal lesson plan be developed and adjusted as training needs dictate.

EVERY PERSON WHO CONDUCTS SAFETY TRAINING SHOULD POSSESS A NUMBER OF QUALITIES:
Knowledge of the subject Desire to instruct Friendly and cooperative attitude Professional approach Exemplary behavior

TRAINING SHOULD BE OFFERED:
When new employees are hired When new equipment or processes are introduced When procedures are revised When information must be made available When employee performance needs improvement When losses occur Training programs should be based on clearly defined objectives which state the purpose of the training and should include a method to determine the effectiveness of the training. Although training will not solve all problems, it will prove useful in the prevention of accidents.

FIRST AID SUPPLIES FOR YOUR SAFETY KIT
Antiseptic Wipes Burn Cream Elastic Bandages Roll of First Aid Tape First Aid Guide Rolled Bandages Medium Dressing Pads Rescue Blanket Small Dressing Pads Tourniquet Tweezers Band-Aid Bandages Disposable Gloves Eye Irrigation Solution First Aid Cream Instant Cold Packs Large Dressing Pads Oval Eye Pads Scissors Sterile Sponges Triangular Bandage Aspirin

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EMERGENCY ACTION PLANS STATEMENT OF POLICY
The company believes that its employees are its most important asset and their safety and health are one of its greatest responsibilities.

FIRE EVACUATION PROCEDURE
The purpose of an evacuation procedure is to insure the orderly removal of employees from the work place to a safe location away from danger until the hazardous condition is controlled or eliminated. The following instructions apply to the person who discovers a fire: 1. 2. 3. Sound the alarm and call 911 to give them the location of the fire. Make sure that no person is in immediate danger. Use the fire extinguisher located in the area if you can without endangering your own life.

ACTION WHEN THE FIRE ALARM SOUNDS
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Turn off all machines and lock up money and important papers. Close all doors. Aid the handicapped. Employees should guide and assist members of the public in the work area out of the building. Evacuate the building by the nearest safety stairway or exit. Walk, do not run, and use the handrails provided on the stairs. Stay to the right side of the stairway to allow room for fire fighters to pass. Return to regular work when directed by a person in authority.

TORNADO EVACUATION PROCEDURES
In the event of a tornado warning by the Civil Defense Sirens or telephone, the following actions will be taken: 1. All persons will move to the core area of the building or their designated shelter. If time is available, take shelter on the lowest level of the structure. Keep away from windows. Move away from the base of the stairway to avoid blocking the exit. Under no circumstances will employees or members of the public remain in the work areas or office area.

2.

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3. 4. 5.

Follow security procedures of locking money and papers as in the case of fire emergency. In buildings without basements, take cover in the smallest interior room with stout walls or under heavy furniture. Stay away from large span roofs.

BOMB THREAT PROCEDURES
When a bomb threat is received by telephone, employees should: 1. 2. 3. Keep the caller on the line as long as possible. Inform the caller that the area is occupied and that detonation may cause injury or death to innocent people. Ask for the location of the bomb and time of detonation. Listen closely to the caller to identify gender, voice quality, accents, speech impediments and background noises. Immediately after the caller hangs up, report all information to police or fire department at 911.

PROCEDURE FOR EVACUATION:
The decision to evacuate will be made by police, fire department, or authorized person. 1. 2. Be alert to suspicious packages in your work area and report them to the fire department. DO NOT TOUCH ! Stay calm. Assist the public and handicapped to the nearest exit and continue outside. Walk at least one block from the building to a designated meeting place.

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HAZARD RECOGNITION AND CONTROL
HOUSEKEEPING: ACCIDENTS.
A. B. C. D. E. F.

POOR HOUSEKEEPING PRACTICES OFTEN RESULT IN
Yes Is all unwanted material removed daily? Is combustible trash in approved containers? Are aisles kept clear? Are aisles three feet wide? Is there any combustible storage within 36” of furnaces or boilers? Are all exits free from accumulation of combustibles?

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No

COMMON HAZARDS: ELECTRICAL SERVICE, HEATING SYSTEMS AND SMOKING CAN CREATE HAZARDS IN ANY WORK PLACE.
Yes A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. Is sufficient access provided to all electrical equipment? Are all electrical panels, boxes, and switches covered? Are all switches marked and properly grounded? Are all power tools and extension cords properly grounded? Are furnaces and boilers properly maintained and vented? Are adequate clearances maintained around all heating devices? Is there a designated safe area provided for smoking? Are “No Smoking” rules posted and enforced? Is the work area properly illuminated?

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No

SPECIAL HAZARDS: THOSE HAZARDS ASSOCIATED WITH A SPECIFIC
OCCUPANCY GENERALLY REQUIRE SPECIAL ATTENTION BECAUSE OF THEIR POTENTIAL TO PRODUCE A LOSS.

Yes A. B. C. D. E. Are all flammable liquids properly stored? Is parts cleaning performed with approved solvents? Are approved safety cans used? Is spray painting done in an approved booth? Are all wiring, outlets and junction boxes installed to code in hazardous areas? F. Is bonding and grounding used when necessary? G. Are hydraulic lines and fittings inspected periodically? H. Is welding done in a safe manner? I. Are compressed gas cylinders properly secured and are safety caps installed? J. Are materials, products, and supplies safely stacked to a workable height? K. Are ladders provided where needed and in good condition?

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No

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EXTERIORS: WALKING SURFACES AND PARKING LOTS EXPOSE BOTH EMPLOYEES AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC TO HAZARDS.
Yes A. B. Are all parking areas properly marked? Are sidewalks and parking lots level and free of cracks, holes and tripping hazards? C. Are stairs in good condition? D. Are handrails provided? E. Is adequate illumination provided? F. Are entrances kept dry or provided with nonskid mats? G. Are emergency exits marked and accessible? H. Are exit doors unlocked and do they open outward?

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

No

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MACHINERY: MOVING PARTS AND MACHINE DRIVES ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR NUMEROUS EMPLOYEE ACCIDENTS. THESE MUST BE PROPERLY PROTECTED IN ACCORDANCE WITH ACCEPTABLE STANDARDS.
Yes A. B. Are all belts and chain drives properly protected? Are all floor fans protected with openings no greater than 1/2 inch? C. Are all machines that create hazards at the point of operation guarded? D. Is a lockout system in effect for maintenance of machinery?

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

No

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

EMPLOYEE PROTECTION: EMPLOYEES SHOULD BE PROVIDED PROTECTION FROM THE HAZARDS OF THE WORK ENVIRONMENT.
Yes A. Have all hazards of the work environment been identified? (noise, dust, fumes, and vapors) B. Is all personal protective equipment sanitary and in good condition? C. Are first aid supplies provided? D. Is ventilation adequate? E. Is the work environment properly illuminated? F. Are all employees trained in proper material handling techniques? (lifting, pushing, and pulling) G. Is the work area clean and orderly? No

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SAFETY ACTIVITIES: A SAFETY AWARENESS PROGRAM ENDORSED BY
MANAGEMENT PLAYS A KEY ROLE IN REDUCING ACCIDENTS AND CONTROLLING THEIR IMPACT ON YOUR BUSINESS.

YES A. B. C. D. E. Is there a formal statement of safety policy? Is there a safety coordinator? Are regular safety committee meetings scheduled? Are all accidents investigated? Are regular inspections conducted to detect hazards and unsafe work practices?

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

NO

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BUILDING SECURITY EXTERIOR
YES A. Are all accessible openings well illuminated by signs, street lights or security lighting? B. Are dark areas illuminated? C. Is merchandise arranged to allow good visibility on the lot? D. Is good housekeeping maintained around the building and lot to allow for good visibility? E. Are physical barriers such as posts, walls, and hedges kept lower than three feet? F. Are barrier posts at least four to six feet in the ground and two to three feet above the ground? G. Are barrier posts close enough together to prevent a thief from moving equipment between the posts? H. Is the perimeter security fence at least six to eight feet in height with barbedwire tilted out? I. Are all gates, posts, hinges, and other hardware in good condition? J. Are gates secured with a case-hardened chain and padlock? K. Is small equipment such as lawn and garden tractors, skid loaders, and ATVs displayed in a secured area? L. Is equipment arranged on the lot so missing equipment would be easily noticed? NO

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DOORS:
A. B. Are all unused doors secured? Are doors designed so that the lock cannot be reached by breaking a window or lightweight panel? C. Are door hinges located to prevent the pins from being pulled out? D. Are the locks and components firmly mounted to prevent them from being circumvented? E. Is there a key control program in place and used? F. Are padlocks locked in place when the door is unlocked? G. Are overhead doors locked with padlocks in their track above one roller on each side of the door? H. Is power off to the automatic openers when the business is closed? SAFETY MANUAL PAGE D-3

WINDOWS:
A. B. C. Are easy access windows protected against forced entry? Are unused windows permanently and securely closed? Is valuable, target type of merchandise removed from the display windows after closing? D. Are window locks designed or located so that the window cannot be opened just by breaking the glass? E. Are exposed roof hatches secured?

YES

NO

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏
YES

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏
NO

SAFES AND CASH:
A. B. C. Is your safe burglary and fire resistive? Is your safe U.L. listed? If your safe is less than 750 pounds, is it secured to the floor or walls? D. If a vault is used, are the walls and doors secured? E. Is cash kept to a minimum in your safe and on-site after business hours? F. Do you spin the dial when you lock the safe? G. Are the cash registers left open at night?

ALARMS:
A. B. C. D. E. F. Has the feasibility of an alarm system been studied? Is the alarm system U.L. listed? If installing an alarm system, are the installers U.L. listed? Do you test your alarm system regularly? Does the alarm adequately cover the hazardous points in your facility? If the building has been remodeled has the alarm system been updated?

MISCELLANEOUS:
A. Is there a walk-through each night to make sure the building and lots are properly secured? B. Have you recorded all product identification numbers and descriptions of the equipment in your inventory? C. Are your shop tools and business equipment inventoried by serial numbers and have you engraved these items with identification numbers? D. Have employees been instructed to remove all keys from doors, locks and vehicles when arriving and departing? E. Have employees been instructed to report suspicious activity to management?

GENERAL:
A. B. C. D. E. F. SAFETY MANUAL Is an emergency plan in effect? Is all safety equipment inspected on a regular basis? Are all exterior storage tanks protected from vehicle damage? Are fire extinguishers easily accessible and properly serviced? Are all exits marked, clear, and easily accessible? Are safety instructions and warning signs posted where needed? PAGE D-4

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ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAMS
FIRE SAFETY PROGRAM
It is the intention of _______________________________ to comply with the OSHA Fire Prevention Standard, Title 29 CFR 1910.38 (b) (4) (ii). This program applies to all operations in our company. A safety and health coordinator shall be selected and shall be responsible for the following: A. Selection, placement, use, maintenance and testing of all fire equipment. B. Documented monthly visual inspections. C. Training and education of employees. Each year fires in the workplace cause deaths and injuries, as well as extensive damage to property. On-the-job fires are often the result of not following instructions, using poor judgment or not following fire safety rules. The first step in preventing fires is knowing what causes them.

FIRE HAZARDS A. FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS
Flammable substances are those liquids, solids or gases which have a flash point below 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Some flammable substances are gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, certain paints and thinners, etc. Combustible substances are those liquids, solids or gases which have a flash point above 100 degrees, and below 140 degrees Fahrenheit. The safety coordinator will supervise and control the accumulation of flammable and combustible waste materials and residues that could contribute to a fire emergency. Safety requirements for controlling the supply of flammable and combustible substances include: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. SAFETY MANUAL Keep only as much flammable material on hand as you need for one days’ work. Return unused material to storage at the end of each day. Store flammable liquids in approved and labeled safety cans or storage cabinets. Keep flammable liquids in areas that are well ventilated. Store flammable liquids away from heat or sparks. Pipes or containers that hold hazardous substances should be leak-free. Clean up spills promptly. Never smoke or light a match when you are near flammable liquids. Spontaneous Ignition occurs when heat builds up in piles of trash, damp waste or PAGE E-1 REV 3-01

oily rags. Store oily rags in a metal container with a self-closing lid. 8. Control static electricity. Static electricity has caused many serious fires and is a constant danger when transferring flammable liquids between containers. The formation of static electricity is due to the action of contact and separation of dissimilar substances. Liquids produce static electricity when they flow through pipes or hoses, when they fall through the air in drops or as spray, when they are splashed around in tanks and when air or other gas is bubbled through them.

If there is no way for static electricity to drain or flow away as it is formed, the charge builds up gradually. It may eventually develop a sufficiently high voltage to cause a spark to jump the gap to some nearby grounded or less highly charged object. Sparks can ignite surface vapors when flammable liquids flow from one container to another. Use brass or plastic containers when transferring flammable liquids, or ground and bond containers to prevent static electricity from causing a spark. Use only an approved dispensing hose and/or spigot, designed in such a way that it is self closing and includes a bonding wire for attachment to the container into which the liquid is dispensed. The illustration shows an effective method of preventing static accumulation by grounding drums to a water pipe or other low resistance ground, and bonding the drums to small containers during filling operations. Ground each container and electrically bond all containers within a dispensing area to each other. Suitable grounding connections may be made to wet sprinkler or other water pipes. Metal plates buried in moist earth may be used as ground electrodes if water pipes are not available. Hose may be either conducting or nonconducting Nozzle in contact with container,--no other bonding necessary. Bond wire necessary except where containers are inherently bonded together,-or arrangement is such that fill stem is always in metallic contact with receiving container during transfer..

Insulating support 10° OHM or more

Conducting support less than 10° OHMS

Metal strips fastened to floor

B. ELECTRICAL HAZARDS
Faulty electrical wiring is a common fire hazard. Here’s how you can prevent electrical fires: 1. 2. Check tools, equipment, extension cords and plugs for worn spots and exposed wires. Keep switch boxes clean and closed.

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3. 4.

Do not try to use broken power tools or equipment. Report them to your supervisor. Do not attempt to repair broken power tools or equipment unless you’re a trained and experienced repair technician.

C. HOT WORK/SURFACES
Get a hot-work permit before you use heating tools or appliances, such as welding torches. To prevent falling sparks and hot metal from causing a fire, sweep off wood floors and cover them with metal or other noncombustible material. Clear the area of anything that could ignite. Surround the area with fire-retardant curtains if they are available. When welding, make sure a fire spotter is standing by with a fire extinguisher. In some cases, the fire watch may need to continue for up to 30 minutes after the job is finished. Turn off and unplug appliances such as soldering irons and coffee pots when your workday is over.

D. SPARKS
Friction produces sparks which can cause fires. To avoid them: 1. 2. Watch for sparks from metal-to-metal or metal to-concrete contact. Use brass or plastic containers and tools when you work with flammable materials. Check belt drives and conveyors for rubbing, high stress or tautness that can produce sparks. Oil motor bearings frequently to cut down on friction and overheating.

E. SMOKING
Careless smoking can cause fires. Smoke only in areas where smoking is allowed. Use butt cans and ashtrays for cigarettes and matches.

F. ARSON
Some fires are started deliberately. If you see someone or something suspicious, report it to your supervisor.

IN CASE OF FIRE
Ask your supervisor to show you your company’s emergency plan, and familiarize yourself with the fire emergency procedures for your facility before a fire. Sometimes, no matter how careful you are, fires happen. When a fire breaks out: 1. Report the fire immediately, no matter what size it is. The longer you wait, the more dangerous the fire can be to you and your coworkers. Follow your employer’s fire emergency notification policy. Warn your coworkers. Close any fire doors. PAGE E-3 REV 3-01

2.

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Fight It. If a fire is small, you may try to fight it after you report it. To fight a small fire: A. Use the right fire extinguisher. Do not try to use a fire extinguisher unless you’ve been trained in which one to use and how to use it. B. Break the seal and remove the pin from the fire extinguisher. C. Stay 8 to 10 feet from the fire. D. Press the lever and aim the fire extinguisher nozzle or horn at the base of the flames. Sweep the base of the fire. E. Continue with a steady stream, not short bursts.

4.

Escape It. If the fire is large and out of control, escape is your best choice. Stay calm and evacuate the area or building. Move quickly but don’t panic. Fire exits and passageways should be clearly marked and free of obstructions. Don’t use elevators. You could get trapped inside if the power fails. Take the stairs instead. Use the evacuation plan for your work area. Head for the designated fire exit. Use a secondary exit if the first is blocked. Close doors behind you as you go. Go to your designated evacuation location. Wait for orders from your supervisor or the fire fighters.

5.

When fire fighters arrive, direct them to the fire area. Warn them of any special hazards you know about.

FIRE EQUIPMENT
There is no time to search for equipment in an emergency. Fire fighting and safety equipment should be labeled for fast identification. You should be able to get to this equipment quickly if you need it. The equipment should be inspected or tested each month.

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
Fire extinguishers are your first line of defense in case of a fire. Know the location of the closest fire extinguisher. Don’t try to use a fire extinguisher unless you’ve been trained. Learn which fire extinguisher to use on what kind of fire. Most fire extinguishers are rated for more than one kind of fire. Keep fire extinguishers and sprinkler heads free of obstructions.

OTHER FIRE EQUIPMENT
Find out where other emergency equipment is located, such as: First Aid Kit Stretcher Fire Blanket Respiratory protection

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ELIMINATE FIRE HAZARDS
You are responsible for reporting unsafe conditions. Report these hazards: Spills of flammable liquids Leaking tanks, pipes and gas lines Overloaded circuits Faulty connections Frayed, exposed wires Poor ventilation Dirty tools, equipment and machinery Messy trash areas Oily rags that are not properly stored Clogged flues and pipes Broken fire fighting equipment No ashtrays Broken fire doors or exits that are blocked or locked You can remedy some unsafe conditions: Keep your work area neat, uncluttered and free of trash Clean equipment, tools and machinery Repair any equipment you’re qualified to fix Prevent machinery from overheating Keep items that are flammable or combustible away from flames and hot surfaces Put oily rags in metal container with a self closing metal lid Wipe up spills promptly Remove doorstops or wedges used under fire doors Do not let materials pile in corridors, stairwells and exit lanes Do not use portable space heaters Keep flammable materials away from incompatibles, such as acids Do not store flammable gases near oxygen tanks Smoke only in designated areas and use ashtrays

HOUSEKEEPING RESPONSIBILITIES
No matter what kind of work you do, good housekeeping is important. Good housekeeping helps make your work safer, easier, more productive, and more pleasant. Good housekeeping helps prevent accidents. Treating your work area with respect will help you avoid slips, falls, and bumps. By maintaining a clean, orderly work area, you will help to eliminate accidents and prevent fires from starting and spreading. There should be a place for everything, so you can put tools, equipment, supplies, and waste in their proper places. Follow these basics of good housekeeping:

TOOLS:
1. 2. 3. Clean off dirt and oil after you use them. Return equipment and tools to their proper place after you use them. Repair broken tools or report them to your supervisor.

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MACHINES:
1. 2. 3. Follow cleaning and maintenance routines, including lockout/tagout procedures. Be sure guards and interlocks are secured and in good working order. Report any problem promptly to the proper person.

MATERIALS:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Keep paper products, supplies, flammable liquids, and hazardous substances in labeled containers. Store materials neatly in designated storage areas. Be careful not to overfill racks, bins, and storage areas. Close cabinet doors and drawers and keep them closed. Dispose of oily, greasy or paint covered rags in a designated container with a tight lid.

FLOORS:
1. 2. Sweep up dust, dirt, wood, and metal filings and wipe up spills immediately. Dispose of waste and scrap in the proper receptacle as it collects.

LIGHTS:
Keep lights bright, clean and free from obstructions.

HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL COMMUNICATION
The Hazardous Chemical Communication Program is based on the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations 1910.1200. The basic goal of the standard is to ensure that employers and employees know about chemical hazards and how to protect themselves. This knowledge, in turn, should help reduce the incidence of chemical source illnesses and injuries.

WHAT THE STANDARD REQUIRES
The Hazard Communication Standard establishes uniform requirements to assure that the hazards associated with all chemicals imported into, produced or used in U.S. workplaces are evaluated, and that the resulting hazard information and recommended protective measures are transmitted to affected employers and potentially exposed employees. Chemical manufacturers and importers must convey the hazard information they learn from their evaluations to downstream employees by means of labels on containers and material safety data sheets (MSDS’s). In addition, all covered employers must have a hazard communication program to transmit this information to their employees through container labels, MSDS’s, and training.

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The program ensures that all employers receive the information they need to inform and train their employees properly and to design and put in place employee protection programs. It also provides necessary hazard information to employees, so they participate in, and support, the protective measures in place at their workplaces.

HOW TO COMPLY WITH THE STANDARD
The following steps should aid you in complying with the standard and in developing your hazard communication program. 1. 2. Read the standard. Make sure you understand the provisions of the standard. Know your responsibility as an employer. List the hazardous chemicals in the workplace. Walk around the workplace, read all container labels, and list the identity of all materials that may be hazardous, the manufacturer’s product name, location, telephone number, and the area where the product is used. Be sure to include hazardous chemicals that are generated by the work but are not in a container (i.e. welding fumes). Check with your purchasing department to ensure that all hazardous chemicals purchased are included on your list. Review your list and determine whether any substances are exempt. Establish a file on hazardous chemicals used in your workplace, and include a copy of the latest MSDS’s, and any other pertinent information. Develop procedures to keep your list current. When new substances are used, add them to your list. 3. Obtain material safety data sheets for all chemical substances. If you do not have an MSDS for a hazardous substance in your workplace, request a copy from the chemical manufacturer, distributor or importer as soon as possible. An MSDS must accompany or precede the shipment and must be used to obtain identifying information such as the chemical name and the hazards of a particular substance. Review each MSDS to be sure that it is complete and clearly written. The MSDS must contain the physical and chemical properties of a substance, as well as the physical and health hazards, routes of exposure, precautions for safe handling and use, emergency and first-aid procedures, and control measures. 4. Make sure that all containers are labeled. The manufacturer, importer or distributor is responsible for labeling containers, but the employer must: Check all incoming shipments of hazardous chemicals to be sure that they are labeled.

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Ensure that all containers of hazardous substances in the workplace are labeled, tagged or marked, and include the identity of the hazardous chemical and the appropriate hazard warnings. Container labels for purchased chemicals must also include the name and address of the chemical manufacturer, importer, or other responsible party. If a container is not labeled, obtain a label or the information from the responsible party and prepare a label. Employers are responsible for ensuring that containers in the workplace are labeled, tagged, or marked. Ensure that existing labels on containers are not removed or defaced unless the container is immediately marked with the required information. Instruct employees on the importance of labeling portable receptacles into which they have poured hazardous substances. If the portable container is for their immediate use, the container does not have to be labeled. 5. Develop and implement a written hazard communication program. This program must include: Container labeling and other forms of warnings. Material Data Safety Sheets (MSDS) Employee training based on the list of chemicals, MSDS’s, and labeling information. Methods for communicating hazards and protective measures to employees and others. YES NO

HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL CHECKLIST
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Listed all of the hazardous chemicals in our workplace. ❏ Established a file for information on hazardous chemicals. Obtained an MSDS for each hazardous chemical in use. Developed a system to ensure that all incoming hazardous chemicals are labeled. Reviewed each MSDS to be sure it is complete. Make sure that MSDS’s are available where necessary. Developed a written hazard communication program. Developed a method to communicate hazards to employees and others. Informed employees of protective measures for hazardous chemicals in the work place.

❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏
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❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

10. Alerted employees to other forms of warnings that may be used. ❏ SAFETY MANUAL PAGE E-8

TRAINING RECORD - HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS AND MSDS’S
Name of Employee Instructor Training Date Type of Training Initial Annual

____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 1. EYE AND FACE PROTECTION
Suitable eye protection must be provided where there is a potential for injury to the eyes or face from flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids or caustic liquids, chemical gas vapors, potentially injurious light radiation or a combination of these hazards. Protectors must meet the following requirements: Provide adequate protection against the particular hazard for which they are designed. Be reasonably comfortable when worn under the designated conditions. Fit snugly without interfering with the movements or vision of the wearer. Be durable. Be capable of being disinfected. Be easily cleanable. Be kept clean and in good repair.

2. EAR PROTECTION
Exposure to high noise levels can cause hearing loss or impairment and can create physical and psychological stress. Protection is required for the exposure and may include specifically designed preformed or molded earplugs or earmuffs. Earmuffs must make a perfect seal around the ear to be effective.

3. RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
Respirators shall be provided by the employer when such equipment is necessary to protect the health of the employee. Respirators shall be used in the following circumstances: Where exposure levels exceed the permissible exposure limit (PEL), during the time period necessary to install or implement feasible engineering and work practice controls. In those maintenance and repair activities and during those brief or intermittent operations where exposures exceed the PEL and engineering and work practice controls are not feasible or are not required. Where the employer has implemented all feasible engineering and work practices controls and such controls are not sufficient to reduce exposures to or below the PEL. In regulated areas. In emergencies.

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4. TORSO PROTECTION
Many hazards can threaten the torso: heat, splashes from hot metals and liquids, impacts, cuts, acids, and radiation. A variety of protective clothing is available including vests, jackets, aprons, coveralls, and full body suits. Wool and specially treated cotton are two natural fibers that are fire resistant and comfortable since they adapt well to changing workplace temperatures. Heat-resistant material, such as leather, is often used in protective clothing to guard against dry heat and flames. Duck, a closely woven cotton fabric, is good for light-duty protective clothing. It can protect against cuts and bruises on jobs where employees handle heavy, sharp, or rough material. Rubber and rubberized fabrics, neoprene, and plastics give protection against some acids and chemicals.

5. ARM AND HAND PROTECTION
Examples of injuries to arms and hands are burns, cuts, electrical shock, amputation, and absorption of chemicals. There is a wide assortment of gloves, hand pads, sleeves, and wristlets for protection against various hazardous situations. Employers need to determine what hand protection their employees need. A number of factors need to be taken into account when choosing a glove for a particular application. In the initial selection process, the following are of primary importance: A. The toxic properties of the chemical or chemicals. In particular, the ability for the chemical to cause local effects on the skin and/or to pass through the skin and cause systemic effects should be known. The work activities being undertaken. These must be studied to determine the degree of dexterity required, the duration, frequency and degree of chemical exposure and the physical stresses which will be applied. The performance characteristics of the gloves. These should be assessed using standard test procedures. Characteristics to be considered include chemical, puncture, tear, and abrasion resistance.

B.

C.

6. FOOT AND LEG PROTECTION
Most workers who suffer foot injuries are not wearing protective footwear when the accident occurs. The typical foot injury is caused by objects weighing about 65 pounds, falling fewer than 4 feet. Most workers are injured while performing their normal job activities at their work sites.

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To protect feet and legs from falling or rolling objects, sharp objects, molten metal, hot surfaces, and slippery surfaces workers should used appropriate foot guards, safety shoes, or boots and leggings. Leggings protect the lower leg and feet from molten metal or welding sparks. Safety snaps permit their rapid removal. Safety shoes should be sturdy and have impact-resistant toes. In some shoes, metal insoles protect against puncture wounds. Additional protection, such as metatarsus guards, may be found in some types of footwear.

7. WORKING WITH COMPUTERS
If you are working four hours or more daily at your computer, the work can be more pleasant and less stressful if you follow a few simple rules to provide for your own fitness and comfort. A. Your Work Area Having a desk that is the correct size and height is of primary importance. The desk should be large enough to hold a computer monitor and keyboard, telephone, desk set, and all other needed accessories. It should also provide space for writing comfortably. The keyboard should be movable, nonglossy and tilted slightly forward. A chair with padded wrist rests, or wrist supports should be used by anyone who types a good deal. Wrists should be straight and forearms parallel to the floor when fingers are on the keys. The light should be adjustable so it can shine on a book or note pad without casting an annoying reflection on the screen. Document holder should be moveable, upright, tilted, and at the same height as the video screen for easy reading. Video monitors should be a least four feet apart. The screen should be positioned so it will not reflect light from windows or overhead lights. B. Your Chair Your chair should be padded and fully adjustable. You should be able to raise or lower it so your arms and wrists are straight when your fingers are on the keys. If your feet are not resting comfortably on the floor, use a footrest.

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C.

Common Computer Complaints Backaches and sore muscles from sitting on a chair which is not comfortably padded and does not provide full back support. Stiffness and aches and pains from typing too long with wrists and arms in an unnatural position. Headaches and eye strain from staring at a computer screen. Body aches from working too long at one task without a break.

D. Recommendations Get up and walk around occasionally. Limber up. Take work breaks mid-morning and mid-afternoon. If performing especially demanding, repetitious work, take a short break every hour. Exercise your eyes while you are at the computer. Make a conscious effort to blink so your eyes will not dry out. Rest your eyes occasionally. Keep your eyes closed and covered for one minute.

RESPIRATOR PROGRAM
The basic goal of the Respirator Program is to ensure that employers and employees know about atmospheric contaminates and how to protect themselves with the proper engineering controls or required respirators. The program is based on the OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard 1910.134 In order to control occupational diseases caused by breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors, the primary strategy shall be to prevent atmospheric contamination. This shall be accomplished, as far as is feasible, by accepted engineering control measures including enclosure or confinement of the operation, general and local ventilation, and substitution of less toxic materials. When effective engineering controls are not feasible, or while they are being instituted, appropriate respirators shall be used. The employer shall be responsible for the establishment and maintenance of a Respiratory Protective Program which shall include the following requirements: 1. Respirators shall be provided by the employer when such equipment is necessary to protect the health of the employee. The employer shall provide the respirators which are suitable for the purpose intended. The employee shall use the provided respiratory protection in accordance with instructions and training received.

2.

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3. 4. 5.

Respirators shall be cleaned and disinfected. Those used by more than one worker shall be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected after each use. Respirators shall be stored in a convenient, clean, and sanitary location. Respirators used routinely shall be inspected during cleaning. Worn or deteriorated parts shall be replaced. Respirators for emergency use, such as self-contained devices, shall be thoroughly inspected at least once a month and after each use. Appropriate surveillance of work area conditions and degree of employee exposure to stress shall be maintained. There shall be regular inspections and evaluation to determine the effectiveness of the program. Persons should not be assigned to tasks requiring the use of respirators unless they are physically able to perform the work and use the equipment. The local physician shall determine what health and physical conditions are pertinent. The respirator user’s medical status should be reviewed periodically. Respirators shall be selected from among those jointly approved by the Mine Safety and Health Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health provisions of 30 CFR part Respirator Selection.

6. 7. 8.

9.

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RESPIRATOR SELECTION
Company Name ___________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________

RESPIRATORS
We have the following operations where respirators are used on a routine basis: ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ In those areas, the following chemicals or hazards exits: Area Chemical or Hazard ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ The respirator selected for the employees in those areas are: Area Respirator ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ Additionally, we have areas where an emergency condition could exist. Those areas are: ________________________________________________________ The hazards in those areas are: ________________________________________________________ We have selected the following respirator(s) for use in those areas: ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

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COLOR ASSIGNED RESPIRATOR CANISTERS
Atmospheric Contaminates to be Protected Against Acid gases Hydrocyanic acid gas Colors Assigned White. White with 1/2 inch green stripe completely around the canister near the bottom. White with 1/2 inch yellow stripe completely around the canister near the bottom. Black. Green. Green with 1/2 inch white stripe completely around the canister near the bottom. Blue. Yellow. Yellow with 1/2 inch blue stripe completely around the canister near the bottom. Brown. Purple (Magenta). Canister color for contaminant, as designated above, with 1/2 inch gray stripe completely around the canister near the top. Red with 1/2 inch gray stripe completely around the canister near the top.

Chlorine gas

Organic vapors Ammonia gas Acid gases and ammonia gases

Carbon Monoxide Acid gases and organic vapors Hydrocyanic acid gas and chloropicrin vapor Acid gases, organic vapors, and ammonia gases Radioactive materials, except tritium and noble gases Particulates (dust, fumes, mists, fogs, or smokes) in combination with any of the above gases or vapors All of the above atmospheric contaminants

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STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE DISASSEMBLY, CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE OF RESPIRATORS
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Remove cartridge, canisters of filters and all gaskets that are not affixed to seats. Visually inspect face pieces and parts; discard faulty items. Remove all elastic headbands. Remove exhalation valve cover. Remove speaking diaphragm or speaking diaphragms exhalation valve assembly, or pressure demand exhalation valve assembly. Remove inhalation valves. Wash, sanitize and rinse face pieces (see specific procedure for operation of washing equipment). Maximum water temperature 140 degrees, optimum range 120 to 140 degrees. Parts removed from respirators may be washed separately as necessary. Dry mask (see specific procedures for drying). Hand wipe face pieces, valves and valve seats with damp, lint-free cloth to remove any soap or water residues, mold release powders or foreign materials not removed by washing.

8. 9.

10. Disassemble and hand clean the pressure demand and exhalation valve assembly, exercising care to avoid damage to the rubber diaphragm. 11. Visually inspect face pieces and all parts for deterioration, distortion, or other faults that might affect the performance of the respirators. 12. Replace any questionable or obviously faulty parts or assemblies including rubber components that show weather checking when flexed or stretched, and distorted face pieces. Replace only with parts specifically designed for the particular respirator. 13. Reassemble mask and visually inspect completed assembly. 14. Install new or retested filters, cartridges or canisters. 15. Clean and apply fogproof to lens per fogproof manufacturer’s instructions (full face pieces only). 16. Install lens cover. 17. Fogproof outside of lens cover. 18. Quality assurance test each completed unit (see specific procedure for QA test). 19. Individually seal each mask in plastic bag.

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HEARING PROTECTION PROGRAM
The purpose of this information is to provide you with an overview of OSHA Occupational Noise Exposure Standard, Title 29 CFR 1910.95. The information should be used to inform employees and employers of the risks associated with occupational noise. Noise, or unwanted sound, is one of the most pervasive occupational health problems. It is a by-product of many industrial processes. Sound consists of pressure changes in a medium (usually air), caused by vibration or turbulence. Exposure to high levels of noise causes hearing loss and may cause other harmful health effects as well. The extent of damage depends primarily on the intensity of the noise and the duration of the exposure. Noise-induced hearing loss can be temporary or permanent. Temporary hearing loss results from short term exposures to noise, with normal hearing returning after a period of rest. Generally, prolonged exposure to high noise levels over a period of time gradually causes permanent damage. OSHA’s hearing conservation program is designed to protect workers with significant occupational noise exposures from suffering material hearing impairment, even if they are subject to such noise exposures over their entire working lifetime. The following summarizes the requirements of OSHA’s hearing conservation program.

MONITORING
The hearing conservation program requires employers to monitor noise exposure levels in a manner that will accurately identify employees who are exposed to noise at or above 85 decibels (dB) averaged over 8 working hours, or an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). The exposure measurement must include all continuous, intermittent, and impulsive noise within an 80 dB to 130 dB range, and must be taken during a typical work situation. Employers are allowed to choose the monitoring method that best suits each individual situation. Monitoring needs to be repeated when changes at the worksite increase the noise exposure. The program entitles employees to observe monitoring procedures and they must be notified of the results of exposure monitoring. The method used to notify employees may be determined by the employer. Instruments used for monitoring employee exposures must be carefully checked or calibrated to ensure that the measurements are accurate. Calibration procedures are unique to specific instruments. Employers have the duty to ensure that the measuring instruments are properly calibrated.

AUDIOMETRIC TESTING
Audiometric testing must be made available at no cost to all employees who are exposed to an action level of 85 dB or above, measured as an 8-hour TWA. The employer shall establish and maintain the audiometric testing program. The important elements of an audiometric testing program include baseline audiograms, annual audiograms, training, and follow-up procedures. The audiometric testing program follow-up should indicate whether the employer’s hearing conservation program is preventing hearing loss. A licensed or certified audiologist, an otolaryngologist, or physician must be responsible for the program. Both professionals and trained technicians may conduct audiometric testing. The professional in charge does not need to be present when a qualified technician conducts the test. The SAFETY MANUAL PAGE E-18 REV 3-01

professional’s responsibilities include overseeing the program and the work of the technicians, reviewing problem audiograms, and determining whether a referral is needed. The employee needs a referral for further testing when test results are questionable or when problems of a medical nature are suspected. If additional testing is needed or an employer suspects a medical pathology of the ear is caused or aggravated by the wearing of hearing protectors, the employee shall be referred for a clinical audiological evaluation or otological exam, as appropriate. There are two types of audiograms required in the hearing conservation program: baseline and annual audiograms.

BASELINE AUDIOGRAMS
The baseline audiogram is the reference audiogram against which future audiograms are compared. Baseline audiograms must be provided within 6 months of an employee’s first exposure at or above an 8-hour TWA of 85 dB. If mobile test vans are used to obtain audiograms, these tests must be completed within 1 year of the employee’s first exposure. Employees however, must be fitted with, issued, and required to wear hearing protectors for any period exceeding 6 months after their first exposure until the baseline audiogram is obtained. Employees should not be exposed to workplace noise for 14 hours prior to the baseline testing, however, appropriate hearing protectors can serve as a substitute for this requirement, and can be worn during this time period.

ANNUAL AUDIOGRAMS
It is important to test hearing on an annual basis to identify deterioration in hearing ability so that protective follow-up measures can be initiated before hearing loss progresses. Annual audiograms must be compared to the baseline test to determine whether the audiogram is valid and to determine whether the employee has lost hearing ability. The results should indicate if a standard threshold shift (STS) has occurred.

AUDIOGRAM EVALUATION
If an STS is identified, employees must be fitted or refitted with adequate hearing protectors, shown how to use them, and required to wear them. Employees must be notified within 21 days from the time the determination is made that their audiometric test results showed an STS. Some employees with an STS may need to be referred for further testing if the professional determines that their test results are questionable or if they have an ear problem of a medical nature that is thought to be caused or aggravated by wearing hearing protectors. If the suspected medical problem is not thought to be related to wearing hearing protection, employees must be informed that they should see a physician. If subsequent audiometric tests show that the STS identified on a previous audiogram is not persistent, employees who are exposed to noise less than a TWA of 90 dB may discontinue wearing hearing protectors. An annual audiogram may be substituted for the original baseline audiogram if the professional supervising the program determines that the employee’s STS is persistent. In this case the original baseline test must be kept for the length of the employee’s employment. This substitution will ensure that the same shift is not repeatedly identified. The professional also may decide to revise the baseline audiogram if an improvement in hearing occurs.

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HEARING PROTECTORS
Hearing protectors must be made available to all workers exposed to 8-hour TWA noise levels of 85 dB or above. This requirement will ensure that employees have access to protectors before they experience a loss in hearing. Hearing protectors must be worn by: 1. Employees for any period exceeding 6 months from the time they are first exposed to 8-hour TWA noise levels of 85 dB or above until they receive their baseline audiogram. Employees who have incurred standard threshold shifts since these workers have demonstrated that they are susceptible to noise. Employees exposed over the permissible exposure limit of 90 dB over an 8-hour TWA.

2. 3.

Employees should decide, with the help of a person who is trained in fitting hearing protectors, which size and type protector is most suitable for their working environment. The protectors selected should be comfortable to wear and offer sufficient attenuation to prevent hearing loss. Hearing protectors must adequately reduce the severity of the noise level for employee’s work environment. The employer must reevaluate the suitability of the employee’s hearing protectors whenever there is a change in working conditions that increases the noise levels. If workplace noise levels increase, employees must be given more effective protectors. The protectors must reduce employee exposures to at least 90 dB and to 85 dB when an STS already has occurred in the worker’s hearing.

TRAINING
Employee training is very important. When workers understand the reasons for the hearing conservation program’s requirements and the need to protect their hearing, they will be better motivated to participate actively in the program, and to cooperate by wearing their protectors and taking audiometric tests. Employees exposed to TWAs of 85 dB and above must be trained at least annually in the effects of noise; the purpose, advantages, and disadvantages of various types of hearing protectors; the selection, fit, and care of protectors; and the purpose and procedures of audiometric testing. The training program may be structured in any format, with different portions conducted by different individuals and at different times, as long as the required topics are covered.

RECORDKEEPING
Noise exposure measurement records must be kept for 2 years. Records of audiometric test results must be maintained for the duration of employment of the affected employee. Audiometric test records must include the name and job classification of the employee, the date, the examiner’s name, the date of the last acoustic or exhaustive calibration, measurements of background sound pressure levels in audiometric test rooms, and the employee’s most recent noise exposure measurement.

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PROPER LIFTING TECHNIQUES
Safe lifting is a challenge that faces almost everyone. Learning correct lifting techniques is vital to your health. This section describes the basics of safe lifting. 1. The Right Lifting Position The position of your upper body in relation to the lift can make the lift easier or harder. The more you bend and reach, the more you stress and tire your back. Lifting objects that are far away from your body, are the most difficult to lift. The closer the object, the easier it is to lift. Keep the object you are lifting as close to your body as possible. 2. Determining Your Ability To Lift An Object Your ability to lift an object depends on several factors: A. Your age B. Your height C. Your weight D. Your physical condition E. The shape of the object you want to lift Try the tilt test. Tilt the object up slowly. If it is difficult to move, it is too heavy to lift.. Have someone help you or use a lifting aid, such as a hoist or a lift truck. 3. Frequency of Lifting The most difficult and exhausting work involves performing the same task over and over. Continued repetition of even the easiest task can strain your muscles, tendons, ligaments, and joints. Use lifting aids for tasks that must be repeated. Avoid Twisting Twisting is a frequent cause of lifting injuries. Twisting your back as you lift can strain the muscles that support your back. The strain is even greater if you bend and twist at the same time. Here is what to do when you need to lift and turn: A. Point one foot in the direction you want to go before you lift. B. Lift the object. C. Turn your body (not just your back) in the direction you want to go. The Right Grasp Grasping the object is important for safe lifting. The stronger your grasp, the more stable your lift will be. A powerful grip is a combination of the: A. Angle of the wrist B. Position of the hand C. Strength of the grip The stress on your back increases when the load to be lifted is awkward, bulky, heavy, or hard to grasp. Lifting handles can make the lift easier. If materials being lifted are hazardous, follow your employer’s special instructions.

4.

5.

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6.

A Firm Footing Always try to lift on a solid footing. Extra caution is needed on surfaces that are slippery, unstable or uneven. Working on dangerous surfaces can tire your muscles and contribute to a lifting accident. Shoes with nonskid soles and reinforced toes can help overcome surface hazards. Always plan your route. Check to make sure it is free from tripping hazards.

7.

Stay Strong To lift without injury, your body needs strength and flexibility. Here are some pointers for general well being: A. Eat nutritious food and drink plenty of water. B. Walk straight and tall. C. Exercise regularly and keep your weight under control. D. Learn to handle stress before it gets out of control. A healthy, trouble-free back is worth the effort of developing safe lifting habits. You can stay in control of your own safety as you lift. If you observe these lifting techniques, you will reduce the risk of injury.

BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS
The purpose of this information is to provide an overview of OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, Title 29 CFR 1910.1030. The information educates employees and employers concerning the risks of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens and how to reduce these risks.

WHO IS COVERED?
OSHA’s rule applies to all persons occupationally exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials. Blood means human blood, blood products or blood components. Other potentially infectious materials include the following: (1) human body fluids: semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid visibly contaminated with blood, and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids; (2) any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human (living or dead); and (3) HIV-containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV or HBV-containing culture medium or other solutions as well as blood, organs, or other tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV.

EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN
The standard requires the employer to develop a written exposure control plan. At a minimum, the exposure control plan must include (1) the exposure determination, (2) the procedures for evaluating the circumstances surrounding an exposure incident, and (3) the schedule and method for implementing sections of the standard covering the methods of compliance. The schedule of how and when the provisions of the standard will be implemented may be as simple as a calendar with brief notations describing the methods of implementations, and an annotated copy of the standard.

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The plan must be reviewed and updated at least annually or whenever new tasks and procedures affect occupational exposure, made accessible to employees, and made available to the Assistant Secretary for OSHA and to the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for examination and copying.

WHO HAS OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE?
The exposure determination must be based on the definition of occupational exposure without regard to personal protective clothing and equipment. The exposure determination is made by reviewing job classifications within the work environment and listing exposures into two groups. The first group includes job classifications in which all of the employees have occupational exposure. The second group includes those classifications in which some of the employees have occupational exposure. Where only some of the employees have occupational exposure, specific tasks and procedures causing occupational exposure must be listed.

COMMUNICATING HAZARDS TO EMPLOYEES
Each occupationally exposed employee must be given information and training. Information and training must be provided at no cost to the employee, at the time of initial assignment, during working hours, and at least once a year thereafter. Additional training is needed when existing tasks are modified or new tasks that involve occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens affect the employee’s exposure. Persons conducting training must be knowledgeable about the subject matter, and the information provided must be appropriate in content and vocabulary to the educational level, literacy, and language of the audience.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Hepatitis B Vaccination The employer must make the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series available to all employees who have occupational exposure as well as provide a post-exposure evaluation and follow-up to all employees who experience an exposure incident. The vaccine and vaccinations, as well as all medical evaluations and follow-up, must be made available at no cost to the employee, provided at a reasonable time and place, and performed by or under the supervision of a licensed physician or another licensed health care professional whose scope of practice allows him or her to independently perform activities required. Employees who decline the vaccination must sign a declination. The employees may request and obtain the vaccination at a later date, and at no cost, if they continue to be exposed. The hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series must be offered within 10 working days of initial assignment to employees who have occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials unless (1) the employee has previously received the completed hepatitis B vaccination series, (2) antibody testing reveals that the employee is immune, or (3) medical reasons prevent taking the vaccinations. Prescreening is not required before receiving the hepatitis B vaccination series.

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The employer must obtain and provide the employee with a copy of the health care professional’s written opinion stating whether a hepatitis B vaccination is indicated for the employee and whether the employee has received such vaccination.

METHODS OF CONTROL
1. Engineering and Work Practice Controls Engineering and work practice controls are the primary methods used to prevent occupational transmission of HBV and HIV. Personal protective clothing and equipment are necessary when occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens remain even after instituting these controls. Engineering controls reduce employees’ exposure in the workplace either by removing or isolating the hazard or isolating the workers from exposure. Self-sheathing needles, puncture-resistant disposal containers for contaminated sharp instruments, resuscitation bags, and ventilation devices are examples of engineering controls. Engineering controls must be examined and maintained or replaced on a scheduled basis. Proper work practice controls alter the manner in which a task is performed. In work areas where a reasonable likelihood of occupational exposure exists, work practice controls include restricting eating, drinking, smoking, applying cosmetics or lip balm, and handling contact lenses; prohibiting mouth pipetting; preventing the storage of food and/or drink in refrigerators or other locations where blood or other potentially infectious materials are kept; providing the use of hand washing facilities; routinely checking equipment and decontaminating it prior to servicing and shipping. 2. Personal Protective Equipment Personal protective equipment must be used if occupational exposure remains after instituting engineering and work practice controls, or if those controls are not feasible. The use of personal protective equipment helps prevent occupational exposure to infectious materials. Such equipment includes, but is not limited to, gloves, gowns, laboratory coats, face shields or masks, and eye protection. Personal protective equipment is considered appropriate only if it does not permit blood or other potentially infectious materials to pass through or reach employees’ work clothes, undergarments, skin, eyes, mouth or other mucous membranes under normal conditions of use and for the duration of time the protective equipment will be used. Under the standard, employers must provide, make accessible, and require the use of personal protective equipment at no cost to the employees. Personal protective clothing also must be provided in appropriate sizes. Hypoallergenic gloves or other similar alternatives must be made available to employees who have allergic sensitivity to gloves. Employers also must ensure that protective equipment is properly used, cleaned, laundered, repaired or replaced, as needed, or discarded.

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3.

Housekeeping Under the standard, each place of employment must be kept clean and sanitary. To ensure adequate housekeeping, the employer must develop and implement a cleaning schedule that includes appropriate methods of decontamination, and specific cleaning tasks or procedures to be performed. This written schedule must take into consideration the location within the facility, the type of surfaces to be cleaned, the type of contamination present and the tasks or procedures to be performed. Labeling The standard requires that fluorescent orange or orange-red warning labels be attached to containers of regulated waste, to refrigerators, and freezers containing blood and other potentially infectious materials, and other containers used to store, transport, or ship blood or other potentially infectious materials. These labels are not required when (1) red bags or red containers are used, (2) containers of blood, blood components, or blood products are labeled as to their contents and have been released for transfusion or other clinical use, and (3) individual containers of blood or other potentially infectious materials are placed in a labeled container during storage, transport, shipment or disposal. The red warning label must be fluorescent orange or orange-red, contain the biohazard symbol and the word BIOHAZARD, in a contrasting color, and be attached to each object by string, wire, adhesive, or other method to prevent loss or unintentional removal of the label. Recordkeeping Employers must preserve and maintain for each employee an accurate record of occupational exposure according to OSHA’s rule governing access to employee exposure and medical records, Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1910.20. Under the bloodborne pathogens standard, medical records also must include the following information: A. Employee’s name and social security number. B. Employee’s hepatitis B vaccination status including vaccination dates and any medical records related to the employee’s ability to receive vaccinations. C. Results of examinations, medical testing, and post-exposure evaluation and follow-up procedures. D. Health care professional’s written opinion. E. A copy of the information provided to the health care professional.

4.

5.

Medical records must be kept confidential and maintained for at least the duration of employment plus 30 years. The bloodborne pathogens standard also requires employers to maintain and to keep accurate training records for 3 years and to include the following: 1. Training dates. 2. Content or a summary of the training. 3. Name and qualifications of the trainer or trainers. 4. Name and job titles of trainees. Upon request, both medical and training records must be made available to the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and to the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health. Training records must be made available to employees or the employee representatives upon request. An employee’s medical records can be obtained by that employee or anyone having that employee’s written consent. Also, if the employer ceases to do business, medical and training records SAFETY MANUAL PAGE E-25 REV 3-01

must be transferred to the successor employer. If there is no successor employer, the employer must notify the Director, NIOSH, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, for specific directions regarding disposition of the records at least 3 months prior to intended disposal.

FORKLIFT OPERATION
Forklifts can simplify many material handling tasks. One person and a lift truck can move large amounts of materials with ease and efficiency. Lift trucks can also prevent many injuries involving lifting and material handling.

GETTING READY
Employers are responsible for training operators in the safe operation of powered industrial forklifts. No one other than authorized personnel should operate a forklift. The wheels of a lift truck act as the balance point. They stabilize the truck between the load in the front and the counter weight in the rear. A truck loaded beyond its capacity can tip forward or on its side and cause serious injury. Steering a forklift or truck differs from other vehicles in several ways. Most lifts are steered by the rear wheels. Lift trucks steer more easily loaded than empty. A lift truck is often driven in reverse, when the operator’s forward view is obstructed. It must be steered with both hands, except when one hand is used to operate the controls. Use a pre-start safety inspection checklist prior to operating the forklift or truck. Inspect the brakes, tires, controls, lights, horn, and other component parts. Safeguards such as the overhead guard must be in place. If the lift truck is not working properly, remove it from service and advise the supervisor. All lift trucks must carry an identification plate that shows the rated load capacity of the truck. Never go beyond the capacity limit.

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Before loading or unloading truck trailers, set the brakes and lock the rear wheels so the trailer cannot move. Trailers that are not coupled to tractor or truck should have a jack in place to support the front end of the trailer. Make sure the load is stable before you load or unload the material or objects. Move the lift truck into position. Adjust the forks to the width of the load to increase the stability. Drive forward until the forks are positioned all the way into the load. Brace the load against the fork carriage, the section of the fork that is attached to the mast. Lift the load slightly and back out. Do not maneuver or turn the truck while the forks are in the raised position. Lower the load to within 4 inches of the floor. Tilt the mast back before you travel with the load. Handle only loads that are stable and arranged safety. Stay in the center of the aisles as you travel. SAFETY MANUAL PAGE E-26 REV 3-01

Stop, sound your horn and proceed with caution at doorways, blind corners, and intersections. Sound your horn to warn employees of your presence. Yield the right of way to pedestrians. Then proceed with caution, looking in your direction of travel. Keep your hands, arms, and legs inside the lift truck. Use safety restraints including seat belts when they are provided. Obey posted speed limits and other signs, including aisle markings. Wear personal protective equipment, including head, eye, hand, foot, and respiratory protection as needed. Start, stop, travel, and brake smoothly, with no sudden or jerky movements. Keep at least three vehicle lengths between your truck and the vehicle ahead. Speed and carelessness can be dangerous when operating a forklift. Do not try to overtake and pass other forklifts at intersections or blind corners. Be alert for other trucks and low overhead clearances. Concentrate on operating your lift truck safely, and keep a clear view of where you are going. If the load blocks your view, drive in reverse. Do not let anyone stand or walk under the elevated forks. Do not let anyone ride on the lift truck, and do not use the lift to lift people. The only exception is when an approved safety platform is used. Parking: Before you leave the lift truck unattended, place the forks flat on the floor and set the controls in neutral. Turn off the engine and set the brake. Do not leave your truck in an aisle or doorway. Make sure it will not obstruct emergency equipment. Your truck is considered unattended if you are more than 25 feet from it or if you cannot see the forklift or truck.

SPECIAL SITUATIONS
Certain lift truck circumstances require extra caution. 1. 2. 3. 4. Backing: Always look behind you before you back up. Inclines and Ramps: Travel with the load uphill, whether you are going up or coming down. Keep a safe distance from the edges of ramps, elevated platforms, docks, etc. Drive slowly down ramps and allow extra room to stop.

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5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

High Lifts: Watch for storage racks, projecting stock and other obstructions as you raise or lower a load. Docks: Make sure the dock-plates are securely fastened before you travel over them. Do not drive your lift truck up to anyone standing in front of a fixed object like a wall. Be careful of employees when servicing work areas and assembly lines. Refuel only in designated areas.

10. Follow the posted safety instructions for refueling, charging, handling, and storage.

PEDESTRIAN SAFETY
When working near a lift truck, you as a pedestrian must follow these guidelines: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Do not try to operate a lift truck unless you have been trained and authorized by your supervisor. Do not use short-cuts. Walk only in designated aisles and walk ways. Stop and look both ways before you cross aisles and intersections. Then proceed with caution. Do not walk or stand under the raised forks of a lift truck. Stand clear of lift trucks so the wheels will not run over your feet. Do not smoke near a lift truck that is being refueled or recharged. Watch for the rear end swinging on a turning truck. Be on the lookout for lift trucks that are backing up or out. The operator may not be able to see you. Lift trucks are designed to handle material, not people. Do not ride on a lift truck, on the forks, or on the load.

Remember: Forklifts and lift trucks are not cars. The are complex material handling vehicles and can be dangerous if they are not operated safely. The safe operation of a lift truck is your responsibility. It is your job to follow lift truck safety rules for your safety and the safety of your fellow workers.

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LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROGRAM
This program establishes procedures for compliance with OSHA’s Mechanical and Electrical lockout and tagout (LOTO) program requirements, 29 CFR 1910.147 and 29 CFR 1910.333. These procedures are designed to protect employees from the hazards and subsequent injuries that result from the unexpected release of a hazardous energy source during the performance of maintenance operations.

SCOPE
A specific procedure has been developed for each separate piece of machinery and equipment. Following is a listing of all machines and equipment included in the LOTO program: ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ (Note - List every machine and piece of equipment for which a specific procedure exists)

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TRAINING
TRAINING FOR AUTHORIZED EMPLOYEES: The training for authorized employees (those employees authorized to lockout and tagout equipment) will include all aspects of the LOTO program and specific LOTO procedures for each machine and piece of equipment identified in the program. TRAINING FOR AFFECTED EMPLOYEES: The training for affected employees (those employees who work with the equipment) will include the purpose of the program, how to recognize a LOTO operation and how it will affect them. TRAINING FOR OTHER EMPLOYEES: The training for other employees will include notification that a LOTO program exists and to stay clear of a LOTO operation in progress. TRAINING FOR QUALIFIED EMPLOYEES: Training for qualified employees (those employees authorized and qualified to service equipment) will include the same training as for the authorized employees plus the following: 1. The skills and techniques necessary to distinguish exposed parts from other parts of electrical equipment. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. The skills and techniques necessary to determine the nominal voltage of exposed live parts. How to work safely on energized circuits. The proper use of precautionary techniques, and personal protective equipment. How to use insulating and shielding materials, and insulated tools. The proper use of test equipment. How to test circuit elements and electrical parts of equipment to which employees may be exposed. How to verify that circuit elements and equipment are deenergized. How to check if the test equipment is properly working before and after each operation.

10. How to determine if an energized condition exists and if it exists as a result of inadvertently induced voltage or unrelated voltage backfeed even though specific parts of the circuit have been deenergized.

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METHODS TO ENFORCE COMPLIANCE
Supervisory personnel will enforce compliance with the LOTO program by disciplining employees who do not follow the policies and procedures set forth in this program. The chain of command will be followed when disciplinary action is required. Each supervisor will be held responsible for the violations of his or her employees. In addition to the employee being disciplined, his/her supervisor will also be disciplined when appropriate. The first disciplinary action for non-compliance with the program will be to verbally warn the employee. Immediately thereafter, verbal instruction will be provided as to how to perform the work properly. For every subsequent violation the following actions will be taken: 1st offense - written warning 2nd offense - indefinite suspension 3rd offense - termination of employment Note - The program incorporates many significant and critical elements for its success, therefore, a heavy responsibility is placed on each employee to follow these procedures.

PERIODIC INSPECTIONS
To ensure that the LOTO program is being properly implemented, random audits (follow-up inspections) and planned visual observations will be conducted to determine the following: if the energy control procedures are followed; if employees know their responsibilities; if the procedure is adequate and what changes are needed. The audits will be conducted by authorized and qualified employees other than the one implementing the energy control procedure. If deviations are identified or if employees do not clearly understand the procedure, retraining will be conducted. Accordingly, the procedure will be re-evaluated and a more appropriate procedure will be implemented. These inspections will be conducted at least annually, on a one-to-one basis, and when appropriate, through meetings with entire crews.

GENERAL LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROCESS
Preparation for shutdown - Before authorized, qualified, or affected employees turn off a machine or equipment that is to be serviced, they will have knowledge of the type and magnitude of the energy, the hazards of the energy to be controlled, and the means to control that energy. An assessment will be made to determine all energy sources associated with the specific piece of equipment or machinery. A specific procedure will then be developed which will document the methods to be used for isolating the energy (see specific procedures), which will be followed by the authorized or qualified employee performing the servicing or maintenance operation. SAFETY MANUAL PAGE E-31 REV 3-01

Machine or equipment shutdown - The machine or equipment will be turned off or shut down using the specific procedures. An orderly shutdown will be followed to avoid any additional or increased hazards to employees as the result of equipment deenergization. Machine or equipment isolation - All energy control devices that are needed to control the energy to the machine or equipment will be physically located and operated in such a manner as to isolate the machine or equipment from the energy source. Lockout or tagout application - Lockout or tagout devices will be affixed to energy isolation devices by authorized or qualified employees. The lockout devices will be affixed in a manner that will hold the energy isolation device in a “safe” or “off” position . Where tagout devices are used they will be affixed in a manner that will clearly state that the operation or the movement of energy isolation devices from the “safe” or “off” position is prohibited. The tagout devices will be attached to the same point a lock would be attached. If the tag cannot be affixed at that point, the tag will be located as close as possible to the device in a position that will be immediately obvious to anyone attempting to operate the device. Stored energy - Following the application of the lockout or tagout devices to the energy isolating devices, all residual energy will be relieved, disconnected, restrained, and otherwise rendered safe. Where the reaccumulation of stored energy to a hazardous energy level is possible, verification of isolation will be continued until the maintenance or servicing is complete.

OUTSIDE PERSONNEL (MULTI-EMPLOYER WORKSITES)
With regards to our mechanical LOTO program, all outside contractors will be informed by the manager of our LOTO procedures, and will be expected to follow them. No work will be performed by outside personnel until the manager has certified their awareness of our procedures. Electrical contractors will be required to follow our LOTO program. The only exception will be that they (electrical contractors) will be required to develop their own specific procedures for the work they are contracted to perform. The manager will certify the procedures and grant permission for the work to proceed. Failure to follow this process is a serious breach of our LOTO procedures and will result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of the contract.

MACHINE SAFEGUARDING
Hazardous Machine Parts Require Safeguarding: 1. 2. Point of operation, where operations such as cutting, punching, boring, grinding, forming and assembling take place. Power transmission components, including flywheels, pulleys, belts, connecting rods, cams, spindles, chains, feed rolls, cranks, and gears.

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3.

All other moving parts of the machines. Movements can be rotations, forwards and backwards. Feed mechanisms and auxiliary parts of the machine also need safeguards.

OTHER MACHINE HAZARDS:
1. 2. Flying objects, flying metal chips, chemical and hot metal splashes. Malfunction of machines due to mechanical failure or energy failure.

HOW TO BE SAFE AROUND MACHINES:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Do not operate the machine unless trained and authorized. Follow instructions when operating machines. Do not operate the machine unless all safety guards are in place. Shut off the machine when clearing a jam. Wear clothes which are close fitting or with short sleeves. Do not wear rings, bracelets, chains or watches when working around machinery. Wear work gloves only if approved for the machine. Work gloves can get caught and pull the operator into the machine. Wear proper protective equipment when operating machines.

USE SAFETY EQUIPMENT WHEN OPERATING MACHINES:
1. Eye Protection Wear industry-rated eye protection. Wear safety goggles or safety glasses. Regular glasses or contacts will not protect your eyes. If around chemicals, do not wear contact lenses. Head Protection Wear hard hats, face shields, goggles, or hood when needed. Hat should fit securely. Make sure all equipment is free of cracks and that straps and headbands are not frayed. Foot Protection Foot protection should fit comfortably and be effective for the type of work you are doing. Hearing Protection Hearing protection should fit comfortably and should work with your other equipment. Ear plugs or ear muffs should be appropriate for the type of work being done.

2.

3.

4.

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INCENTIVE PROGRAMS
The purpose of an incentive program is to improve the attitude and behavior of each employee, in order to reduce accidents and injuries. Safety incentives, such as prizes, may be viewed negatively by some. Critics of incentive programs question why you would reward employees for performing their jobs safely, since staying alive and being healthy should be its own reward. Those who support incentive programs argue that individuals respond to recognition, no matter how small the reward, and that unsafe behaviors can be changed, through an incentive program, helping to reduce injuries. Incentive programs cost money, but so do accidents and injuries. In order for the incentive program to be a worthwhile investment, the dollars saved should outweigh the dollars spent. Some costs of accidents and injuries include: increased workers’ compensation premiums, legal suits, equipment downtime, training new employees or temporary employees, loss of employee productivity, absenteeism due to injury or illness, and administrative paperwork. If the incentive program is to be cost-effective, some guidelines should be followed.

SET MEANINGFUL GOALS
Set goals that all employees can achieve. Include goals for all areas of the operation. Provide employees with additional training or education if needed to reach the goals. Once a goal is reached, increase the goal, keeping in mind the reason behind the program is to continue to improve safety.

CHOOSE APPROPRIATE REWARDS
Rewards should be meaningful to each employee. Some might be motivated by a monetary bonus, others by public recognition. Awarding items employees can wear at work or use on the job may be effective. Such items provide constant reminders of the importance of safe behavior.

PROMOTE THE INCENTIVE PROGRAM
Clearly communicate the objective of the incentive program to employees and promote the plan often. Announce the program at a special meeting attended by all employees. Carefully explain the program, including objectives, rules, and prizes. Print the details of the program on handouts for everyone to read and review, so there is no confusion. Hang posters and post lists of employees who reach goals to keep reminding everyone of the program. Consider offering additional incentives for employees who offer suggestions to improve the program or safety at the facility.

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MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY PROGRAM
Vehicles include semi-trucks, straight trucks, pick-ups, and automobiles. 35% to 40% of Workers’ Compensation claims are motor vehicle related, therefore an effective Motor Vehicle Safety Program is an essential part of a company’s Safety/Injury Prevention Program. A competent manager should be selected to manage the program.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE FLEET MANAGER
1. Hire Qualified Drivers Consider driving ability when hiring employees who will drive occasionally as well as full time fleet drivers. Prior to hiring, obtain the motor vehicle record (MVR) for every state in which the driver has been licensed. 2. Develop a Written Driver’s Manual Be direct, clearly explaining what is expected of drivers. Specify the consequences of non-performance. Be consistent in the treatment of all drivers. Do not make exceptions for individual drivers. 3. Develop a Standard Road Test for Prospective Drivers All prospective employees should be tested in all vehicles they will drive. The test should last at least 20 minutes or cover at least 15 miles. Define acceptable performance before administering the test. Evaluate the performance based on written standards. Inform the driver of the test results. 4. Monitor Drivers’ Performance 1. Continue reviewing MVR’s on a regular basis, informing drivers if a problem such as speeding tickets, accidents, or loss of license is discovered. 2. Occasionally ride with or follow behind drivers to observe their driving habits. 5. Vehicle Inspection & Maintenance Perform a weekly physical inspection of all vehicles to reduce down time and accidents that could result from improper maintenance or service. Establish a standard for employee owned vehicles. Vehicles kept in top operating condition may improve the drivers’ morale and their driving habits. SAFETY MANUAL PAGE F-1 REV 3-01

Keeping vehicles clean and well maintained improves customer relations and the public image. Trucks can be a good advertising tool when well maintained. 6. Investigate and Respond to Accidents Discuss the accident and what might have prevented it with employees. Respond constructively to all accidents and moving violations: 1. Defensive Driving Course 2. Additional Training 3. Probation 4. Termination 7. Implement Incentive Programs Safer job performance is the goal. Recognize employees who reach specific safety goals.Offer rewards that are meaningful to the employees, such as small tokens or money. Review Performance Use 1-800 numbers on the back of the trucks to have the public call to tell how the driver is doing. Some companies offer this service for a set fee per vehicle. Discuss with drivers both their good and bad results. Job evaluations and salary adjustments should reflect driving performance as well as performance of other duties. If you reward good and poor drivers the same: A. Bad drivers are rewarded for poor performance B. Good drivers are not rewarded for good performance.

8.

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ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION & REPORT
ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION
When an accident and/or injury occurs, the safety coordinator is responsible for: 1. Taking emergency action to have first aid administered. 2. 3. Obtaining professional medical attention as soon as possible. Protecting other employees and equipment.

The safety coordinator must then begin to investigate the circumstances of the accident. The following procedures will be followed when investigating an accident: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Go to the scene of the accident at once, if feasible. Talk with the injured employee as soon as possible. Talk to witnesses. Stress getting the facts, not placing blame or responsibility. Ask open ended questions. Listen for clues in the conversation around you. Unsolicited comments often have merit. Encourage people to give their ideas for preventing similar accidents. Study possible causes, unsafe conditions, and unsafe practices. Consult with interested persons for possible solutions. Write the accident report giving a complete, accurate account of the accident (who, what, where, when, why, and how). Follow up to make sure conditions and/or practices responsible for the accident or injury have been corrected. If the condition and/or practices cannot be corrected immediately, report them to the supervisors responsible for the area.

In order for the accident report to be effective, it should contain, at a minimum, the following information: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Date, time, and place of the accident and/or injury. Law enforcement agency investigating the accident and/or injury. Names of the persons involved in the accident. Description of the accident. Causes of the accident.

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6. 7.

Recommendations to reduce the chance for a recurring accident and/or injury. Names, addresses, and telephone numbers of witnesses to the accident.

Note: The information gathered during the accident investigation will also be used in documenting the claim for the insurance company.

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ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORT
Date of Report _____________________________________________________ Date & Time of Accident or Injury _____________________________________ Location of Office __________________________________________________ Name of Injured Party _______________________________________________ Employee _________ Customer _________ Other ______________________ If Employee, Job Title _______________________________________________ How Long Employed________________________________________________ What was the Individual Doing at the Time of the Accident? _________________ ________________________________________________________________ Was Property Involved? _______ If so, Describe ___________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Assistance: Fire Department __________ Police ______________________ Ambulances-EMS __________________________________________________ Transport to Hospital _______________________________________________ Location _________________________________________________________ What Caused the Accident? ___________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ What Can be Done to Prevent a Similar Accident? _________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ What Have You Done to Control the Conditions Responsible for the Accident? ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ If Corrective Action is Taken or Recommendations Made, How Will this Improve the Operation? _____________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Witnesses to this Accident _________________________________

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PUBLICATIONS OF SAFETY RESOURCES OSHA PUBLICATIONS
OSHA Publications Office U.S. Department of Labor PO Box 37535 Washington DC 20013-7535 Telephone (202) 219-4667 Fax (202) 219-9266 Internet World Wide Web http://www.osha.gov/ and http://www.osha.slc.gov/

NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL
National Safety council 444 N. Michigan Ave Chicago IL 60611-3991 Telephone (312) 527-4800

CONTINENTAL WESTERN GROUP
Continental Western Group Attn Loss Control Department 11201 Douglas Avenue Des Moines, Iowa 50306 Telephone 1-800-235-2942

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