NASA Daily News Summary For Release: August 10, 1999 Media Advisory m99-163 Summary: SHARPEST-EVER

MARS IMAGES REVEAL ACTIVE RED PLANET Video File for August 10, 1999 ********** SHARPEST-EVER MARS IMAGES REVEAL ACTIVE RED PLANET Newly released images from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor show that the red planet is a different place today than it was two years ago when the spacecraft arrived--a world constantly reshaped by forces of nature including shifting sand dunes, monster dust devils, wind storms, frosts and polar ice caps that grow and retreat with the seasons. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Doug Isbell 202/358-1753. Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Frank O'Donnell 818/354-5011. For full text, see: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/pressrel/1999/99-091.txt ********** If NASA issues additional news releases later today, we will e-mail summaries and Internet URLs to this list. Index of 1999 NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1999/index.html ********** Video File for August 10, 1999 Summary:

Item 1 - Mars Global Surveyor Images are Sharpest-Ever and Reveal an Active Red Planet Item 2 - QuikScat Images - Animated images from radar instrument aboard QuikScat spacecraft showing fury of Typhoon Olga as it grew in intensity last week over the China Sea (replay) Item 3 - Underwater Sea Probe -- Volcanic Vent Mission (replay) Footage and Interview (transferred to Beta-SP from High Definition format) Item 4 - Solar Eclipse Preview (replay) ---------Item 1 - Mars Global Surveyor Images are Sharpest-Ever and Reveal an Active Red Planet Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Doug Isbell 202/358-1753. Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Frank O'Donnell 818/354-5011. Item 1a - Rotating Globe TRT: :28

A mosaic of 24 images taken on a single northern summer day in April 1999 can be stitched together to create a snapshot of weather patterns across Mars. As the planet turns, bluish-white water clouds hanging above the Tharsis volcanos are clearly visible. Item 1b - Movie - Storm over Martian North Pole TRT: :29

This movie of the Martian North Pole was created from a series of Mars Orbiter Camera images taken every two hours on successive orbits for a period of two days during the month of June. The evolution of dust and water clouds are visible as the move in response to the invisible, turbulent flow of the wind. Item 1c - Movie - Dust Devils TRT: :21 Dust Devils appear and disappear in this animation produced from two images, taken several days apart, of the same area on Mars. The bright tops and long, dark shadows allow identification and measurement of height of dust devils on Mars.

Item 1d - Dus Devils Size Chart

TRT :15

This image compares the sizes of dust devils on Earth and Mars with the size of terrestrial tornados and the size of the largest mountains on the two planets. At 8km in height, the largest Martian dust devils are as tall as Mount Everest, twice as high as tornados on Earth. Item 1e - Changing Frost on Martian Dunes TRT :26

As dunes in the polar region thaw at the end of the long winter night, dark spots in the frost enlarge over time. The Mars Orbiter Camera shows changes in these spots over a period of 26 days. Item 1f - Movie of the dunes in Proctor Crater TRT :57

Using a Mariner 9 image of the dune field in Proctor Crater, we zoom into a Mars Orbiter Camera close-up of the dunes. As we travel across the dunes, we see evidence of the last remnants of the frost and movement of the sand. Item 1g - Dunes in Proctor Crater TRT :31

The following two images show (a) the dunes in the Proctor Crater as photographed by Mariner 9 and (b) a close-up of the dune field in Proctor Crater. The dark color indicates the light dust that covers much of the planet does not accumulate on the sandy surfaces of the dunes. The white areas are the remains of the late winter seasonal frost. Item 2 - QuikScat Images - Animated images from radar instrument aboard QuikScat spacecraft showing fury of Typhoon Olga as it grew in intensity last week over the China Sea Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz 202/358-1730. Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Diane Ainsworth 818/354-0850. Item 2a - Animation of data from SeaWinds on Quikscat TRT - :52

Animation of the spinning globe shows SeaWinds data taken August

1, 1999, highlighting Typhoon Olga in the China Sea. Item 2b - Animation of data from SeaWinds on Quikscat TRT - :28

Animation of the spinning globe shows SeaWinds data taken August 1, 1999, highlighting Typhoon Olga in the China Sea. This blowup of the China Sea shows Typhoon Olga as it moved toward the coast of south Asia. Item 2c - First view of surface winds over the Pacific and Atlantic by SeaWinds TRT - :21

These images of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans were derived from observations made by the radar scatterometer, SeaWinds, onboard the NASA mission Quikscat, August 1, 1999. Item 2d - Quickscat Animation TRT - :55

The Quick Scatterometer (Quikscat), NASA's next El Nino watcher, will be used to better understand global weather anomalies. The SeaWinds instrument aboard Quikscat will provide daily, detailed measurements of winds as they swirl above the world's oceans. Quikscat launched June 18, 1999. Item 2e - Quikscat - clean room b-roll TRT - :34

Footage shows the Quikscat satellite in the clean room at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation, Boulder, CO. Item 2f - Interview excerpts: Dr. Jim Graf TRT - 2:03

Quikscat Project Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, CA Item 2g - Interview excerpts: Dr. Timothy Liu TRT - :50

Quikscat project scientist, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, CA Item 3 - Underwater Sea Probe -- Volcanic Vent Mission Footage and Interview (transferred to Beta-SP from High Definition format) Contact at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Diane Ainsworth 818/354-0850.

Contact at Monterey Bay Aquarium, Monterey, CA: Mimi Drummond 831/648-4918. Item 3a - Testing of new instrument package for Underwater Volcanic Vent Mission Researchers at JPL recently tested a new deep sea instrument package of cameras, temperature sensors, optics, and a spectrometer at depths of 30 ft. at the Monterey Bay Aquarium's giant kelp tank. Footage was shot in HDTV and transferred to tape. Item 3b - Interview excerpts TRT - 2:30

Lloyd French, Research Scientist, Underwater Volcanic Vent Mission Project, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, CA Item 3c - Interview excerpts TRT - 2:41

Dr. Lonne Lane, Research Scientist, Underwater Volcanic Vent Mission Project, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, CA Item 4 - Solar Eclipse Preview (replay) Sneak preview of upcoming solar eclipse on August 11. The package contains animation showing the path of the eclipse through Europe, some eclipse viewing tips, and examples of how NASA uses artificial eclipses to enhance its understanding of the Sun's corona. NASA scientists will be providing spectacular pictures of the August 11 total solar eclipse - the last in the millennium - from both Earth and a million miles out in space. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Donald Savage 202/358-1547. Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Wade Sisler 301/286-6256. Item 4a - The Great Eclipse of 1999 - animation Shows the path of the Moon's shadow on the Earth during the August 11th solar eclipse.

Item 4b - The Aruba Eclipse of 1998 Footage of the last total solar eclipse as seen from the Caribbean island of Aruba on February 26, 1998. This footage was produced and distributed as part of a live webcast by the San Francisco Exploratorium and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection. Courtesy Exploratorium/NASA Item 4c - Eclipse on Parade Eclipse highlights. Courtesy of Dr. Jay Pasachoff, Williams College Item 4d - Moon Shadow The time-lapse sequence shows the shadow of the moon as it first touches the Earth in the Pacific Ocean, about 2,000 miles south of the Hawaiian Islands, and follows its race across the Pacific, over northern South America and across the Caribbean Sea before exiting in the Atlantic about 600 miles west of Morocco. The time-lapse image sequence was taken from the NOAA/National Weather Services' Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-10. The sequence was enhanced and rendered at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Laboratory for Atmospheres. Super: NASA/NOAA Item 4e - The Longest Eclipse - Images from SOHO NASA uses artificial eclipses to continuously monitor the Sun's corona. Time-lapse sequences from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft (SOHO). Courtesy NASA/ESA (European Space Agency) Item 4f - The Active Sun Two sequences from SOHO's Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) illustrate the increase in solar activity from January 1996 (first sequence) to July, 1999 (second sequence). The sun is nearing the peak of its period 11-year solar cycle. Courtesy NASA/ESA (European Space Agency) Item 4g - The Speedy Solar 'Wind' - animation

The solar 'wind' can travel at speeds up to two million miles per hour. As it flows past Earth, the solar wind changes the shape and structure of the Earth's magnetic field, which can damage satellites and disrupt communications and power systems. Courtesy NASA/ESA (European Space Agency) Item 4h - Source of the Solar 'Wind' These combined images display UV light emitted by the solar corona over one full solar rotation (27 days) in August 1996. The inner images of the solar disk were taken by the EIT instrument aboard SOHO. The outer diffuse emission was observed by the UVCS instrument aboard SOHO, which creates an 'artificial eclipse' in ultraviolet light to observe the dim extended solar corona. The dark regions at the north and south poles are called "coronal holes," and they are thought to be the primary source regions of the high-speed solar 'wind.' Courtesy Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) Item 4i - Earth Gets Blasted This computer visualization shows the impacts of a coronal mass ejection on the Earth's magnetosphere. This discovery of a way to provide early warning of approaching solar storms could prove useful to power companies, the communications industry and organizations that operate spacecraft. The data were collected by the NASA's Wind satellite. Item 4j - SOHO Animation Animation of the SOHO Spacecraft Courtesy NASA/ESA (European Space Agency) Item 4k - An Interactive Event B-Roll from the San Francisco Exploratorium's interactive webcast of the February, 1998 eclipse. The Exploratorium will bring this year's total eclipse to viewers around the world via a live interactive webcast made possible with support from NASA's SunEarth Connection Education Forum. Courtesy Exploratorium / NASA Item 4l - Solar Researcher B-Roll Images of scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's SOHO

Operations Facility. Item 4m - Eclipse Viewing Tips Eclipse viewing tips with NASA Astronomer Dr. Fred Espanek. Never attempt to observe the partial phases of any eclipse with the naked eye. Includes B-roll from viewing tips. Item 4n - Interview Excerpt - Craig Deforest Craig DeForest explains why scientists are interested in studying eclipses. Craig DeForest is a solar physicist working for Stanford University at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

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