NASA Daily News Summary For Release: Sept.

10, 1999 Media Advisory m99-185 Summary: HISTORIC SPACE SHUTTLE CREW COMES TO WASHINGTON NASA JOINS CONGRESS, U.S. DRUG CONTROL OFFICE IN DEPLOYING INTERNET SITE TO FIGHT DRUG USE Video File for Sept. 10, 1999 Summary: ITEM 1 - LA NINA RESURFACES, HAS EFFECT ON HURRICANES ITEM 2 - "PULSE OF THE PLANET" - NEW IMAGES OF A YEAR ON PLANET EARTH (replay) NOTE: NASA TELEVISION IS EXPERIENCING TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES. TODAY'S VIDEO FILE WILL RUN ONLY AT NOON, 3:00 PM, AND 6:00 PM (EDT). ONCE WE CORRECT THE PROBLEM, WE WILL LET YOU KNOW. ********** HISTORIC SPACE SHUTTLE CREW COMES TO WASHINGTON The crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-93, whose recent flight featured the first female commander, Eileen Collins, and the deployment of the world's most powerful x-ray telescope, will visit Washington Sept. 13-16, participating in three events open to media coverage: Sept. 13 - Anti-Drug Program with NASA Administrator, Rep. Matt Salmon (R-AZ), and former astronaut Buzz Aldrin, 2:30 p.m. EDT Sept. 14 - Crewmembers will share their mission experiences with NASA Headquarters employees from 2:00 p.m. EDT Sept. 16 - Discussion of the significance of space exploration and perspectives from their flight during luncheon presentation, National Press Club, 12:30 p.m. EDT

Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Kirsten Williams 202/358-0243. For full text, see: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/note2edt/1999/n99-048.txt __________ NASA JOINS CONGRESS, U.S. DRUG CONTROL OFFICE IN DEPLOYING INTERNET SITE TO FIGHT DRUG USE On Sept. 13 NASA will unveil a new World Wide Web site designed to steer children away from drugs. A joint project of NASA and the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the new Web site, will include messages from astronauts about the dangers of drug use. It will have a place for students to register their names for a CDROM that may eventually fly aboard the International Space Station. NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin will join former astronaut Buzz Aldrin, Congressman Matt Salmon (R-AZ), Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IO), and Barry R. McCaffrey, Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, at the event at Stuart-Hobson Middle School in Washington, DC. Also addressing the students will be the crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-93, including Astronaut Eileen Collins, the first woman to command a space mission. In July, NASA became the first federal agency to include anti-drug messages on its Web site. Since then, the Office of National Drug Control Policy has worked with 18 agencies and departments to add similar messages to their sites. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: Brian Dunbar 202/358-1600. Contact at Office of Congressman Matt Salmon, Washington, DC: Heather Mirjahangir .202/225-2635. Contact at Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC: Nicole Harry 202/395-6647. For full text, see: ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/note2edt/1999/n99-049.txt __________ If NASA issues any news releases later today, we will e-mail summaries and Internet URLs to this list.

Index of 1999 NASA News Releases: http://www.nasa.gov/releases/1999/index.html ********** Video File Sept. 10, 1999 ITEM 1 - LA NINA RESURFACES, HAS EFFECT ON HURRICANES 17:03 Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz 202/358-1730. Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Wade Sisler 301/286-6256. ITEM 1a - LA NINA RESURFACES This data sequence shows the evolution and demise of warm El Nino conditions in 1997 and early 1998. The cooler waters associated with La Nina began to emerge in the spring of 1998, peaked in the winter of 1998 and became much less organized in the spring of 1999. During the past two months the cool La Nina waters have resurfaced. Red indicates warmer than normal temperatures, and blue indicates cooler than normal temperatures. Sea height data is from NASA/CNES TOPEX/Poseidon radar altimeter. Subsurface temperature data is from NOAA TOGA TAO. Sea surface temperature data from NOAA NCEP SST analysis through 8/28/99. ITEM 1b - LA NINA RESURFACES - SATELLITE SEA TEMPERATURES This data sequence traces the evolution and demise of warm El Nino conditions in 1997 and early 1998. In June 1998, scientists were surprised by the rapid transition to cool La Nina conditions when water temperatures near the Galapagos Islands dropped over 10 degrees Fahrenheit in just a week. La Nina then became much less organized in the spring of 1999. During the past two months the cool La Nina waters have resurfaced. Sea surface temperature data is from NOAA NCEP SST analysis through 9/4/99. ITEM 1c - THE WINDS OF LA NINA TRT

Stronger than normal low-level equatorial winds have helped bring the cooler than normal waters to the ocean surface. ITEM 1d - THE HURRICANE CONNECTION Animation compares the effects of La Nina and El Nino on the formation of Atlantic Hurricanes. El Nino tends to suppress the formation of Atlantic hurricanes. During El Nino, the subtropical jet is displaced southward toward hurricane generation areas in the Atlantic. The quick moving air aloft tends to blow the top of the developing clouds in a hurricane which inhibits full growth of the system and decreases the number of hurricanes making North American landfall. During La Nina, the subtropical jet is displaced northward, away from hurricane generation areas, and hurricanes are not inhibited by the shearing effect of the quick moving air aloft. They are more free than normal to develop and make North American landfall. ITEM 1e - HURRICANES OF 1999 Images of Hurricanes of 1999. Hurricane Dennis as seen from SeaWiFS and GOES. Credit: NASA/NOAA ITEM 1f - HURRICANE MITCH - (TRMM) The 1998 hurricane season was unusually severe. This "CAT scan" image of Hurricane Mitch was captured by NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. The spaceborne rain radar allows scientists to create 3-D views of precipitation and the height of the rain column inside hurricanes. Red colors indicate rain rates in excess of 2 inches per hour. Data for this sequence were collected on 10/27/98. Credit: NASA/NASDA ITEM 1g - HURRICANE MITCH - (GOES) This time-lapse sequence of Hurricane Mitch was captured by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES).

Credit: NASA/NOAA ITEM 1h - WORLDWIDE CLIMATE CHANGES Animation illustrates how El Nino and La Nina drive global climate changes. As warm water in the tropical Pacific shifts its location one-third of the way around the globe, this major heat source to the atmosphere changes the position of atmospheric high and low pressure centers. This causes changes in the position of the jet streams hitting North America and associated temperature and rainfall patterns. The jet stream location is critical for steering storms into the continental U.S. During El Nino, the subtropical jet is displaced southward and storms are steered by the subtropical jet into southern California. During La Nina, the subtropical and polar jet streams combine to steer storms toward the northwest United States. ITEM 1i - SEASONAL EFFECTS OF LA NINA Graphic shows seasonal changes in temperature and precipitation in the United States as seen in previous La Nina events. ITEM 1j - SEASONAL EFFECTS OF EL NINO Graphic shows seasonal changes in temperature and precipitation in the United States as seen in previous El Nino events. ITEM 1k - B-ROLL: SCIENTISTS DECIPHER LA NINA PUZZLE ITEM 1l - REBOUND FROM EL NINO El Nino also has a dramatic impact on the global biosphere. Satellite instruments that measure color in the oceans monitor chlorophyll concentrations. These measurements help scientists monitor changes in phytoplankton, the lowest level of the marine food chain. During El Nino, an upwelling of nutrients in colder water is suppressed, with often disastrous implications for marine ecosystems. NASA's SeaWiFS instrument enabled scientists to

witness the ocean transition from El Nino (first image) to La Nina (second image) conditions in the equatorial Pacific. The cooler, upwelled nutrient-rich waters associated with the demise of El Nino and the transition to La Nina initiated a huge plankton bloom along the equator. ITEM 1m - EXPLOSION IN THE GALAPAGOS On regional scales, the SeaWiFS instrument documented the rapid demise of El Nino in the waters around the Galapagos Islands. The images show an explosion in plankton growth as the warm El Nino waters blamed for choking off essential ocean nutrients are replaced by deep, cold, upwelled waters. The false color images, which document plankton concentrations over a period from May 9 24, 1998, show that life in the region to the west of the archipelago has returned in remarkable abundance. High concentrations are shown in red. Areas occluded by clouds are shown in white. ITEM 1n - Interview Excerpts David Adamec, Research Oceanographer, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

ITEM 2 - "PULSE OF THE PLANET" -- NEW IMAGES OF A YEAR TRT 14:36 ON PLANET EARTH (replay) Contact at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Lynn Chandler 301/286-5562. Contact at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC: David E. Steitz 202/358-1730. Item 2a - New pictures from NASA capture dramatic changes in a year in the life of planet Earth TRT - 4:01

The latest portrait compresses an entire year of satellite data into just a few seconds. The Earth's colors bloom into an artists' palate of rich scientific information. The latest images help scientists better understand the complex rhythms of life in the

oceans, the pulse of the global biosphere, and human effects on the environment. Item 2b - Hurricanes From Seawifs Recent hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean. Item 2c - Fires in the Western United States TRT - :22 TRT - :32

Plumes of smoke from recent brush and forest fires in the West appear on SeaWiFS images. Item 2d - Pulse of the Planet - North Atlantic Bloom Rebound from El Nino TRT - :16

During the winter, storms and surface cooling mix the surface waters of the Atlantic, replenishing the nutrient supply from the deep, cold, nutrient-rich waters. Once sunlight is sufficient to support plant growth, phytoplankton populations explode and persist for nearly three months until nutrients are depleted. This bloom migrates northward in synchrony with the Sun throughout the summer. SeaWiFS enabled scientists to witness the ocean transition from El Niño (first image) to La Niña (second image) conditions in the Equatorial Pacific. The cooler nutrient-rich waters associated with the demise of El Nino also brought a huge plankton bloom along the equator. Item 2e - Pulse Of The Planet - Explosion in the Galapagos TRT - :22

SeaWiFS images documented the rapid demise of El Nino in the waters around the Galapagos Islands. The images show an explosion in plankton growth as the warm El Nino waters blamed for choking off essential ocean nutrients are replaced by deep, cold waters. The false color images, which document plankton concentrations a period from May 9 - 24 1998, show that life in the region to the west of the archipelago has returned in remarkable abundance. High concentrations are shown red. Areas occluded by clouds are shown in white.

Item 2f - An Eye For Disasters

TRT - :22

SeaWiFS provided a unique perspective to a variety of natural disasters, including fires in Florida, Mexico, and Indonesia; floods in China; and the progress of Hurricanes such as Bonnie and Danielle. Florida Fires - June 1998 Mexico Fires - May 1998 Indonesian Fires - October 1997 Flooding on the Yangtze River - August 1998 Hurricane Bonnie - September, 1998 Item 2g - SeaWiFs Instrument and Launch (Animation and footage) TRT - 1:35

The SeaWiFS instrument is one component of the SeaStar satellite. The SeaStar blasted into space on August 1, 1997, lifted by an extended Pegasus rocket. Item 2h - Interview/Soundbites TRT - 1:55

Dr. Chuck McClain, SeaWiFS Project Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center ---------Unless otherwise noted, ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN. ANY CHANGES TO THE LINE-UP WILL APPEAR ON THE NASA VIDEO FILE ADVISORY ON THE WEB AT ftp://ftp.hq.nasa.gov/pub/pao/tv-advisory/nasa-tv.txt WE UPDATE THE ADVISORY THROUGHOUT THE DAY. The NASA Video File normally airs at noon, 3 p.m., 6 p.m., 9 p.m. and midnight Eastern Time. NASA Television is available on GE-2, transponder 9C at 85 degrees West longitude, with vertical polarization. Frequency is on 3880.0 megahertz, with audio on 6.8 megahertz. Refer general questions about the video file to NASA

Headquarters, Washington, DC: Ray Castillo, 202/358-4555, or Elvia Thompson, 202/358-1696, elvia.thompson@hq.nasa.gov During Space Shuttle missions, the full NASA TV schedule will continue to be posted at: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/nasatv/schedule.html For general information about NASA TV see: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv/ ********** Contract Awards Contract awards are posted to the NASA Acquisition information Service Web site: http://procurement.nasa.gov/EPS/award.html ********** The NASA Daily News Summary is issued each business day at approximately 2 p.m. Eastern time. Members of the media who wish to subscribe or unsubscribe from this list, please send e-mail message to: Brian.Dunbar@hq.nasa.gov ********** end of daily news summary