You are on page 1of 467

Chapter File Folders

Teacher Tools

Assessment Guide

English Language Learner Handbook

Math Center Cards

Problem of the Day


Quit Success on Standardized Tests
Print This Page
Name

Print This
11 Page
Explore How Big Is a Million? P PRACTICE

Solve.
1. How many 10-by-10 grids would 2. How many thousand cubes would
you need to make a thousand cube? you need to make a million?

3. How many hundreds are in 1,000?

4. How many hundreds are in 10,000?

5. How many thousands are in 1,000?

6. How many thousands are in 10,000?

7. How many thousands are in 100,000?

8. How many thousands are in 1,000,000?


McGraw-Hill School Division

9. How many ten thousands are in 10,000?

10. How many ten thousands are in 100,000?

11. How many ten thousands are in 1,000,000?

12. How many hundred thousands are in 100,000?

13. How many hundred thousands are in 1,000,000?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 1, pages 23. (1) NS 1.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
11 Page
Explore How Big Is a Million? R RETEACH

You can show numbers in different ways.


You can think of 1,000
in the following ways:
1 thousand
10 hundreds
100 tens
1,000 ones
1 thousand 10 hundreds

1. What number is shown below?

Complete. Name each number in different ways.


2. 10,000 3. 100,000 4. 1,000,000

ten thousand hundred thousand million

thousands ten thousands hundred thousands

hundreds thousands ten thousands


McGraw-Hill School Division

tens hundreds thousands

ones tens hundreds

ones tens

ones

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 1, pages 23. (2) NS 1.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
11 Page
Explore How Big Is a Million? E ENRICH

A Million Pizzas
Skye just opened Skyes Pizzas. Her dream is to sell one million
pizzas. She wants to see how long it will take. Answer these
questions to help her find out.

1. Skye says, If I sell 100 pizzas every day, I can sell 1,000,000 pizzas
in days! She frowns. Thats a long time.

2. Suddenly Skye snaps her fingers. I know! Ill open more stores!
If I have 10 stores and each store sells 100 pizzas every day, it will
only take days to sell 1,000,000 pizzas!

3. Wait a minute! she exclaims. What if I have 100 stores and


each store sells 1,000 pizzas every day? How long will it take to
sell 1,000,000 pizzas?

Why dont you try to sell 1,000,000 pizzas in just 1 day? Skyes friend
Emma asks. Hmmm, Skye murmurs. How many stores would I
need? How many pizzas would each store need to sell?

4. Decide how many stores Skye would need and how many pizzas
each store would need to sell in 1 day.
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. What if you were Skye? What would be your plan? Tell about your plan.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 1, pages 23. (3) NS 1.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
12 Page
Place Value Through Millions P PRACTICE

Write the word name and the expanded form for each number.

1. 1,420,316

2. 2,672,400

3. 12,060,072

4. 785,004,012

Write the value of each underlined digit.


5. 842,753 6. 6,782,141

7. 153,428,090 8. 715,124,068

Write each number in standard form.


9. one million, two hundred thousand, five

10. thirty-eight million, four hundred thousand, eight

11. five hundred eighty million, sixty-two thousand, seventeen


McGraw-Hill School Division

12. two hundred fifty-four million, seven thousand, five

Algebra & Functions Write the missing number.


13. 42,865  40,000   800  60  5

14. 168,943  100,000  60,000  8,000   40  3

15. 888,888  800,000   8,000  800  80  8

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 2, pages 47. (4) NS 1.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
12 Page
Place Value Through Millions R RETEACH

Numbers in the millions have three periods.


Each period is separated by a comma.
Millions Thousands Ones

Hundreds Tens Ones Hundreds Tens Ones Hundreds Tens Ones

7 0 1 2 2 1 3 5 4

Expanded form: 700,000,000  1,000,000  200,000 


20,000  1,000  300  50  4
Standard form: 701,221,354
Word name: seven hundred one million, two hundred twenty-one thousand,
three hundred fifty-four

Complete.
1. 824,124 = + 20,000 + 4,000 + + +
2. 7,624,139 = 7,000,000 + + 20,000 + + + +
3. 42,521,012 = + 2,000,000 + 500,000 + + + 10 +

Standard Form Expanded Form Word Name

3,000,000  200,000
4.  500  20

2,000,000  400,000
5.  50,000  7,000  800
McGraw-Hill School Division

 20  1

30,000,000  7,000,000
6.  800,000  50,000
 2,000  4

40,000,000  9,000,000
7.  300,000  50,000
 2,000  6

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 2, pages 47. (5) NS 1.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
12 Page
Place Value Through Millions E ENRICH

And the Number Is . . .


Use the digits below only once in each exercise.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1. What is the greatest number with 4 in the hundred millions place?

, ,
2. What is the greatest number with 5 in the hundred thousands place?

, ,
3. What is the least number with 6 in the millions place?

, ,
4. What is the least number with 3 in the ten thousands place?

, ,
5. What is the greatest number with 8 in the thousands place?

, ,
6. What is the greatest number with 1 in the ten millions place?

, ,
7. What is the least number with 9 in the millions place and 2 in
the ten thousands place?
, ,
8. What is the greatest number with 7 in the hundred thousands
place and 1 in the thousands place?
McGraw-Hill School Division

, ,
9. How did you use place value to help you make the greatest
possible number? the least possible number?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 2, pages 47. (6) NS 1.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
13 Page
Compare and Order Numbers P PRACTICE

and Money
Compare. Write >, <, or =.
1. 3,874 3,862 2. 5,741 5,862 3. $78.24 $77.24

4. 14,624 1,462 5. 42,542 41,617 6. 32,145 32,264

7. $101.42 $126.41 8. 25,632 25,632 9. 89,000 87,999

10. 150,420 100,042 11. 434,121 432,154 12. 187,654 197,541

13. 782,421 782,342 14. 642,134 642,134 15. 874,158 972,421

Order from greatest to least.


16. 3,421; 3,641; 3,481; 3,562

17. $216.49; $218.42; $206.49

18. 72,642; 71,848; 70,621

19. 748,629; 747,832; 748,532

Order from least to greatest.


20. $64.21; $68.78; $87.68; $65.43

21. 25,421; 24,462; 24,416

22. 324,621; 324,742; 325,697


McGraw-Hill School Division

23. 524,607; 525,712; 524,872

Problem Solving
24. Sean has 1,575 bird stamps and Li has 25. Seans stamp album cost $12.75 and
2,075 bird stamps. Cindy has a Lis album cost $18.50. Cindys album
number of stamps between Seans and cost the most. Is it $18.75 or $11.75?
Lis numbers. Is it 1,075 or 1,755? Explain.
Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 3, pages 811. (7) NS 1.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
13 Page
Compare and Order Numbers R RETEACH

and Money
You can use a place-value chart to compare numbers. Start at the left.
Look for the first place where the digits are different.
Compare 4,872 and 4,892.
Thousands Hundreds Tens Ones
4 8 7 2
4 8 9 2

same number same number 4,892 has more So, 4,892 4,872.
of thousands of hundreds tens than 4,872.

Compare $306.97 and $319.23.


Hundred Ten One
Dollars Dollars Dollars Cents
3 0 6 97
3 1 9 23

same number of $319.23 has more So, $319.23 $306.97.


hundred dollars ten dollars than $306.97.

Use the place-value chart to compare the numbers. Write , , or .


1. Compare 3,234 and 3,216. 3,234 3,216

Thousands Hundreds Tens Ones


McGraw-Hill School Division

Compare. Write , , or .
2. 8,504 8,515 3. $25.16 $21.12

4. 5,558 5,585 5. 6,117 6,117

6. $324.89 $314.89 7. 50,281 51,002

8. 56,619 56,916 9. $285.45 $293.45

10. 502,300 510,239 11. 832,077 822,077


Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 3, pages 811. (8) NS 1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
13 Page
Compare and Order Numbers E ENRICH

and Money
Greater Numbers
Look at the value that each letter represents. Then order the letters
from least to greatest values in the boxes below.

A. There are 9,123 public libraries in the United States.

B. There were 54,773 poodles registered by the American Kennel Club, Inc.

C. There were 54,470 beagles registered by the American Kennel Club, Inc.

D. The area of Mexico is 761,604 square miles.

E. In the year ending December 31, 1997, there were 4,819 Maine coon cats

registered in the United States.

F. The area of the United States is 3,618,770 square miles.

G. In the 1864 United States Presidential election, Abraham Lincoln received

2,216,067 votes.

H. In the 1868 United States Presidential election, Ulysses S. Grant received


McGraw-Hill School Division

3,015,071 votes.

I. The area of Japan is 145,856 square miles.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 3, pages 811. (9) NS 1.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
14 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Using the Four-Step Process Reading


Skill
Read the problem. Then read each step in the problem-solving
process. Write a number next to each step to show the order in
which the steps are done. Write a 1 for the first step, and so on.
1. A male elk weighs 600 pounds. A male moose weighs
1,000 pounds. A male caribou weighs 300 pounds. What is
the order of the three animals from greatest to least weight?
Check your answer.
Identify what you need to find. You need to find the order of the male
elk, the male moose, and the male caribou from greatest to least weight.
Read the problem.
Identify what you know: A male elk weighs 600 pounds. A male
moose weighs 1,000 pounds. A male caribou weighs 300 pounds.
Make a plan for solving the problem. Order the animals by comparing
their weights two at a time. List the animals from greatest to least weight.
Follow your plan to solve the problem.
What is the order of the three animals from greatest to least weight?

2. A mink can be 20 inches long. A wolverine can be 36 inches long.


A black-footed ferret can be 18 inches long. Which animal can
grow to the greatest length?
Identify what you know. A mink can be 20 inches long. A wolverine
can be 36 inches long. A black-footed ferret can be 18 inches long.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Check your answer.


Make a plan for solving the problem. Order the animals by comparing
their lengths two at a time. List the animals from least to greatest length.
Identify what you need to find: Which animal can
grow to the greatest length?
Follow your plan to solve the problem.
Read the problem.
Which animal can grow to the greatest length?
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 4, pages 1213. (10) MR 1.1, 1.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
14 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Using the Four-Step Process Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
A bottle-nosed dolphin can weigh up to 440 pounds. A common dolphin
can weigh up to 165 pounds. Which kind of dolphin can be heavier?
1. Which of these statements is true? 2. Which plan will help you solve the
A A bottle-nosed dolphin cannot be problem?
as heavy as a common dolphin. F Add 440 and 165.
B A common dolphin can weigh G Compare 440 and 165.
615 pounds. H Subtract 165 from 440.
C A bottle-nosed dolphin can weigh
440 pounds.

On Friday, 660 people went to Ocean World Animal Park. On Saturday,


1,096 people went to Ocean World. On Sunday, 998 people went to
Ocean World. On which day did the most people go to Ocean World?

3. Which plan can you use to solve this 4. On which day did the most people
problem? go to Ocean World?
A Compare 660; 1,096; and 998. F Friday
B Add 660 and 1,096. G Saturday
C Add 1,096 and 998. H Sunday

Lassies Dog Walking Service walks 68 dogs per week. Doggie Express
walks 57 dogs per week. Top Dog Company walks 101 dogs per week.
List the dog walking services in order from least dogs walked per week
to most dogs walked per week.
5. Which statement is true? 6. Which plan can you use to solve the
McGraw-Hill School Division

A Lassies Dog Walking Service walks problem?


the most dogs per week. F Compare the numbers of dogs
B Doggie Express walks 57 dogs per walked two at a time.
week. G Find the difference between the
C Top Dog Company walks 68 dogs number of dogs walked by Top
per week Dog Company and the number
walked by Lassies.
H Find the total number of dogs
walked by the three services.
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 4, pages 1213. (11) MR 1.1, 1.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
14 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Using the Four-Step Process Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
Ocean World Animal Park needs 750 customers each day to make
money. On Monday, Ocean World had 803 customers. On Tuesday,
Ocean World had 691 customers. On Wednesday, Ocean World had
911 customers. On which day or days did Ocean World make money?
7. Which plan will help you solve the 8. On which day or days did Ocean
problem? World make money?
A Compare the daily customer totals F Tuesday only
two at a time. G Wednesday only
B Compare each daily customer H Monday and Wednesday only
total to 750.
C Order the daily customer totals
from greatest to least.

Solve.
9. A marlin can move at a speed of 50 10. Brandon, Timothy, and Norah have
miles per hour. A striped dolphin can pet care services. Last year, Brandon
move 19 miles per hour. A killer earned $712, Timothy earned $1,110,
whale can move 55 miles per hour. and Norah earned $650. List the
List the animals in order from slowest people in order from greatest amount
to fastest. earned to least amount earned.

11. A poll shows that 311 students have 12. The pet shelter has 324 dogs in
dogs, 424 students have cats, 96 April, 411 dogs in May, and 399
McGraw-Hill School Division

students have birds, and 38 students dogs in June. List the months in
have a different pet. Which kind of order from least number of dogs to
pet is owned by the most students? greatest number of dogs.

13. Dylan spots 48 birds. Nicole spots 51 14. In 1997, about 36,000,000 people went
birds. Who spots fewer birds? to aquariums and about 86,000,000
people went to zoos. Did more
people go to aquariums or to zoos?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 4, pages 1213. (12) MR 1.1, 1.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
15 Page
Round Numbers and Money P PRACTICE

Round to the given place.


1. 923 to the nearest 2. $0.93 to the nearest 3. $6.49 to the nearest
ten ten cents dollar

4. $57.52 to the nearest 5. 862 to the nearest 6. $46.47 to the nearest


dollar hundred dollar

7. 4,357 to the nearest 8. $73.96 to the nearest 9. 8,553 to the nearest


thousand ten cents hundred

10. 380,256 to the nearest 11. 61,479 to the nearest 12. 1,555 to the nearest
hundred thousand ten thousand hundred

13. $34.06 to the nearest 14. 7,502,475 to the 15. 2,653,789 to the
ten cents nearest million nearest hundred thousand

Algebra & Functions Find the rule. Complete the table.


16.

Rule:
Input 57,124 64,142 91,722 234,162 478,234

Output 60,000
McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
17.The radio announcer said that there 18.Joes class bought a bird feeder for
were 1,532 bluebird sightings on the $38.75. To the nearest dollar, what
island. To the nearest hundred, how was the cost?
many sightings were there?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 5, pages 1417. (13) NS 1.3


Print This Page
Name

Print This
15 Page
Round Numbers and Money R RETEACH

You can use a number line to help you round.

40,000 41,000 42,000 43,000 44,000 45,000 46,000 47,000 48,000 49,000 50,000

Round 46,208 to the nearest ten thousand.


Think: 46,000 is closer to 50,000 than 40,000.
So, 46,208 rounds up to 50,000.

$6.00 $6.10 $6.20 $6.30 $6.40 $6.50 $6.60 $6.70 $6.80 $6.90 $7.00

Round $6.38 to the nearest dollar.

Think: $6.30 is closer to $6.00 than $7.00.

So, $6.38 rounds down to $6.00.

Round to the nearest ten thousand.

1. 42,496 2. 49,009 3. 43,875

4. 45,800 5. 42,900 6. 47,250

7. 44,987 8. 41,875 9. 45,203

Round to the nearest million.

10. 7,450,000 11. 7,550,000

12. 7,832,010 13. 7,289,999


McGraw-Hill School Division

14. 7,362,800 15. 7,512,300

Round to the nearest dollar.

16. $12.60 17. $12.45 18. $12.13

19. $12.93 20. $12.53 21. $12.39

22. $12.25 23. $12.62 24. $12.59

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 5, pages 1417. (14) NS 1.3


Print This Page
Name

Print This
15 Page
Round Numbers and Money E ENRICH

Mystery Numbers
1. If you round me to the nearest hundred, you get 400.
If you round me to the nearest ten, you get 430.
The sum of my digits is 8.
What number am I?

2. If you round me to the nearest thousand, you get 3,000.


If you round me to the nearest hundred, you get 2,600.
Three of my digits are the same.
The sum of my digits is 17.
What number am I?

3. If you round me to the nearest thousand, you get 4,000.


The sum of my digits is 10.
If you read me forward or backward, I am the same.
What number am I?

4. If you round me to the nearest ten thousand, you get 50,000.


My first two digits add up to 10.
The digit in my hundreds place is one more than 2.
My last three digits add up to 8, and round (to the nearest hundred) to 400.
What number am I?

5. The sum of my seven digits is 60. Six of the digits are the same.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Rounding me to the nearest ten, hundred, thousand, ten thousand,


or million will give you the same number.
What number am I?

6. If you round me to the nearest 100,000, you get 600,000.


Each of my six digits is the same.
What number am I?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 5, pages 1417. (15) NS 1.3


Print This Page
Name

Print This
16 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy P PRACTICE

Make a Table
Make a table. Use data from the table to solve problems 1 and 2.
What is your favorite kind of pet?
Elliotdog Howarddog Janebird Rebeccabird
Marioncat Norikobird Tericat Melaniecat
Tinahamster Yolandadog Sarahcat Tracidog
Paulafish Barrycat Brucedog Noreenfish
Samcat Juandog Mikecat Sylviacat

1. Which pet had the most votes? 2. Which pet had the least votes?

3. Mark cuts out letters to make a sign. 4. Which letter does Mark need to
The sign says, "Get Pet Kittens for make the most of? How many of
Free." How many different kinds of these letters does Mark have to
letters does Mark need to make? make?

Mixed Strategy Review


Solve. Use any strategy.
5. A pet store sold 137 bags of dog 6. In 1999, The Pet Palace made about
food called The Vets Choice. It sold $100,000. In 2000, The Pet Palace
249 bags of a dog food called Fidos increased this amount by $10,000.
Friend. How many more bags of How much did The Pet Palace make
Fidos Friend than The Vets Choice in 2000?
were sold?
Strategy:
Strategy:
McGraw-Hill School Division

7. Science Adult sun bears usually 8. Create a problem you would make
weigh from 60 to 100 pounds. Adult a table to solve. Share it with others.
grizzly bears weigh from 350 to 500
pounds. Adult Asiatic black bears
weigh about 250 pounds. Which
bear weighs the least?

Strategy:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 6, pages 2021. (16) NS 1.2; SDP 1.3; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
16 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Make a Table
Page 21, Problem 2
Which type of fish has the greatest number of varieties?
Different Varieties of Tetras, Goldfish, and Angelfish
tetrasblack neon tetra goldfishfan tail goldfish goldfishlionhead
goldfishblack moor tetraswhite skirt tetrasblack neon tetras
angelfishgold angel tetrassilver dollar angelfishsilver angel
tetraslemon tetra angelfishmarble angel

Step 1
Be sure you understand the problem.
Read Read carefully.
What do you know?
There are different varieties of ,
, and .
What do you need to find?
You need to know how many different varieties of
, , and
there are.

Step 2
Make a plan.
Plan Choose a strategy.
Make a Table or List A table can help you organize what you know.
Write a Number Sentence
Make a table to solve the problem.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Work Backward
Act it Out
Find a Pattern
Make a Graph
Guess and Check
Logical Reasoning
Solve a Simpler Problem
Draw a Picture

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 6, pages 2021. (17) NS 1.2; SDP 1.3; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
16 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Make a Table

Step 3
Carry out your plan.
Solve Make a table to solve.

Tally the number of for each fish. Write a


number for each set of tallies. Compare the numbers.

Complete the table.


Type of Fish Tally of Different Number
Varieties
Tetras
Goldfish 3
Angelfish

There are different kinds of tetras.


There are different kinds of goldfish.
There are different kinds of angelfish.
There are more varieties of than either of the other
two kinds of fish.

Step 4
Is the solution reasonable?
Look Back Reread the problem.
Does your answer match the data given in the problem?
McGraw-Hill School Division

Practice
1. Jack lists the fish in his aquarium. He has 2. Alex, Brian, and Yumi each like one kind
a fan tail goldfish, a lionhead goldfish, a of dog. The dog is either a terrier, a
gold angel angelfish, a lemon tetra, and retriever, or a poodle. Alex does not like
a black neon tetra. Of which type of fish retrievers. Brian does not like poodles or
does Jack have the least? retrievers. Who likes poodles?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 6, pages 2021. (18) NS 1.2; SDP 1.3; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
17 Page
Count Money and Make Change P PRACTICE

Write the amount of money shown.


1. 2. 3.

SCHOOL MONEY SCHOOL MONEY


8 8 8 8

8 8 8 8

Tell which coins and bills make the amount.

4. $0.89 5. $3.62 6. $7.67

Find the amount of change.


7. Price: $0.59 8. Price: $2.45 9. Price: $7.81
Amount given: $1.00 Amount given: $5.00 Amount given: $10.00

10. Price: $0.86 11. Price: $3.09 12. Price: $9.25


Amount given: $5.00 Amount given: $10.00 Amount given: $10.00
McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
13. Andy gives the cashier $5.00 to pay 14. Lowanda receives 1 quarter, 2 dimes,
for a $3.75 calendar. How much and 1 nickel in change. How much
change does he receive? money is that?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 7, pages 2223. (19) NS 1.0; MR 2.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
17 Page
Count Money and Make Change R RETEACH

To make change, start with the cost. Then count up to the amount
given to you. Use the fewest number of bills and coins possible.

You sell a pen for $2.49.


Someone gives you $5.00 for the pen.

$2.49 $2.50 $2.75 $3.00 $4.00 $5.00


Cost
Count the bills and coins to find the change: $2.51.

Count up. Find the amount of change.


1. Amount given: $6.00

$5.34
Cost

Amount of change:

2. Amount given: $10.00


McGraw-Hill School Division

SCHOOL MONEY
8 8

8 8

$3.79
Cost

Amount of change:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 7, pages 2223. (20) NS 1.0; MR 2.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
17 Page
Count Money and Make Change E ENRICH

Money Detective
Use the clues to find which coins and bills are inside each bank.
1. 2.

$0.47 $0.58

Clue: 6 coins Clue: 13 coins

3. 4.

$0.73 $0.81

Clue: 10 coins Clue: 8 coins

5. 6.

$1.00 $7.45

Clue: 19 coins, but only two kinds Clue: 3 bills, 3 coins


McGraw-Hill School Division

7. 8.

$15.55 $23.00

Clue: 2 bills, 3 coins Clue: 5 bills, 3 coins

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 7, pages 2223. (21) NS 1.0; MR 2.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
18 Page
Negative Numbers P PRACTICE

Write a positive or negative number to represent each situation.

1. Lose $4 2. Deposit $50

3. 300 feet above sea level 4. 12F below zero

5. Gain 3 pounds 6. Go 3 floors down

7. Take 8 steps back 8. Earn $25

9. 52F 10. Lose 10 pounds

Compare. Write  or . You may use a number line to help.


  
11. 0 9 12. 2 3 13. 4 2 14. 5 6

    
15. 4 7 16. 0 8 17. 3 0 18. 3 3

   
19. 1 12 20. 6 10 21. 12 12 22. 7 15

   
23. 5 2 24. 12 24 25. 10 0 26. 9 9

    
27. 4 8 28. 17 13 29. 15 9 30. 0 11

  
31. 11 11 32. 0 8 33. 6 11 34. 13 3

     
McGraw-Hill School Division

35. 6 1 36. 2 10 37. 4 4 38. 12 7

Problem Solving
39. Manuel deposited a check for $25 in 40. An airplane descended 1,000 feet. Ten
his savings account. Then he withdrew minutes later, it climbed 9,500 feet.
$30. Write a number to represent Write a number to represent each
each situation. situation.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 8, pages 2425. (22) NS 1.8


Print This Page
Name

Print This
18 Page
Negative Numbers R RETEACH

You can use a number line to understand and compare positive and
negative numbers.

negative numbers positive numbers

less than zero greater than zero

           
6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6

Numbers to the right are greater than numbers to the left.



2 is to the right of 2, so 2  2.
 
0 is to the right of 4, so 0  4.

3 is to the right of 6, so 3  6.

Complete.

5 is to the right of 3, so 5  
1. 3.

of 1, so 1 
2. 1 is to the 1.

of 6, so 5 
3. 5 is to the 6.

of 1, so 4 
4. 4 is to the 1.

5. 6 is to the of 6, so 6 
6.

of 4, so 2 
6. 2 is to the 4.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Compare. Write  or . You may use a number line to help.


       
7. 14 14 8. 13 31 9. 9 15 10. 20 18

       
11. 12 21 12. 25 5 13. 8 2 14. 20 20

       
15. 6 15 16. 10 12 17. 2 12 18. 4 4

      
19. 7 7 20. 8 2 21. 9 8 22. 0 10
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 8, pages 2425. (23) NS 1.8
Print This Page
Name

Print This
18 Page
Negative Numbers E ENRICH

Are You Positive or Negative?


Play with a partner.

You will need 10 blank cards for each player.

Each player writes five different negative and five


different positive integers, one on each card.
They should use the integers from 10 to 10.
Each player mixes up their cards and spreads them
out face down.

To play, each player touches one of these cards.


One player announces Mine is greater than
(or less than or equal to) yours. Both players
turn over their card. If the statement was correct,
that player gets both cards. If not, they go to the 
original player. 9
Repeat touching cards and taking turns making
the statements. When all cards are collected, the
player with the most cards wins. 7 8



2 6

1 3
McGraw-Hill School Division

0 5

4

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 8, pages 2425. (24) NS 1.8


Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


19
Problem Solving: Application Part
A WORKSHEET

Decision
Applying Place Value Making

Record your data. Answers may vary.

Cost of 20 Pounds Cost of Gas for


Store
of Dog Food Trip to Store

Pet Supply

Animal World

Pets Place

Discount Pet Food

Your Decision
McGraw-Hill School Division

What is your recommendation for Stacia? Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 9, pages 2627. (25) NS 1.2; MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


19
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

How do you compare with your partner? Math &


Science

Record your data.

Data for Data for Are the two


Student 1 Student 2 sets of data
the same or
close to
being the
same?

1. Your favorite number

2. Number of hours you sleep


each night

3. Number of push-ups you can do


in 30 seconds

4. Number of objects in your desk


right now

5. Number of cups of water you


drank yesterday

6. Number of cats and dogs you know

7. Length of your arm from shoulder


to wrist
McGraw-Hill School Division

8. How long you can stand on one foot

9. Number of times you breathe in


one minute

10. Your age

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 9, pages 2829. (26) NS 1.2; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


19
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

How do you compare with your partner? Math &


Science

1. How many times were you and your partner the same? different?

2. Explain how you decided whether you and your partner were the
same. Did the numbers have to be exactly alike? Why or why not?

3. In which areas did you vary the most from your partner?

4. In which areas did you vary the least from your partner?
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Why is it good to have variation in nature?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 1, Lesson 9, pages 2829. (27) NS 1.2; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
21 Page
Use Properties of Addition P PRACTICE

Complete the set of related number sentences.


1. 5 , 3, 8 2. 6, 8, 14 3. 6, 9, 15
5n8 68n n  6  15
n38 8  n  14 6  n  15
85n 14  6  n 15  n  6
8n5 14  n  8 15  6  n

4. 3, 7, 10 5. 22, 5, 27 6. 34, 4, 38
3  n  10 22  n  27 34  n  38
37n 5  22  n 4  n  38
n37 n  22  5 38  n  34
10  n  3 27  5  n n  4  34

Find the sum or difference. Write the related number sentences.


7. 2  9  8. 35  4  9. 54  0 

Write the related number sentences for the set of numbers.


10. 4, 5, 9 11. 11, 24, 35 12. 0, 46, 46
McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving 14. Meg has 13 coins in her collection.


Then she gives 7 coins to her cousin.
13. Ken has 6 coins in his collection.
How many coins does Meg have now?
Barb has 5 more coins than Ken.
How many coins does Barb have?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 1, pages 4445. (28) NS 3.1; AF 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
21 Page
Use Properties of Addition R RETEACH

Every number sentence in a set of related number sentences uses


the same numbers.
The model below shows a set of related number sentences.
538 Commutative Property:
358 } 5  3  8 is the same as 3  5  8.
835
853

You can also use the properties and the idea of related sentences
with greater numbers.

Look at each model. Write the related number sentences.


1. 2.

Find the sum. Write the related number sentences.


3. 8  3  n 4. 2  7  n 5. 18  0  n
McGraw-Hill School Division

Write the related number sentences for the set of numbers.


6. 26, 17, 43 7. 0, 56, 56 8. 9, 45, 54

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 1, pages 4445. (29) NS 3.1; AF 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
21 Page
Use Properties of Addition E ENRICH

Properties and Rules

Complete each number sentence. Then write the property


or rule you used.

1. MNM N

2. A  BB

3. CDC D

4. HH

5. JJ

6. Z0

7. QQP

8. 0W
McGraw-Hill School Division

Write the related number sentences.

9. ANB 10. DEF

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 1, pages 4445. (30) NS 3.1; AF 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
22 Page
Addition Patterns P PRACTICE

Complete the pattern.


1. 8  8  n 2. 7  6  n
80  80  n 70  60  n
800  800  n 700  600  n
8,000  8,000  n 7,000  6,000  n
80,000  80,000  n 70,000  60,000  n
800,000  800,000  n 700,000  600,000  n

3. 5  9  n 4. 8  9  n
50  90  n 80  90  n
500  900  n 800  900  n
5,000  9,000  n 8,000  9,000  n
50,000  90,000  n 80,000  90,000  n
500,000  900,000  n 800,000  900,000  n

Add mentally.
5. 500  400  6. 3,000  9,000 

7. 30,000  80,000  8. 700  800 

9. 600  500  10. 70,000  30,000 

11. 100,000  900,000  12. 800,000  500,000 


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
13. A music store made $50,000 selling 14. The Green Hornets sold 800,000
CDs and tapes in December. In copies of their first CD. They sold
January, the store made $30,000. 500,000 copies of their second CD.
How much did the store make How many CDs did the Green
in all? Hornets sell in all?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 2, pages 4647. (31) NS 3.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
22 Page
Addition Patterns R RETEACH

You can use addition facts and patterns to add multiples of ten mentally.
Add the front digits. Then write a zero to match each place value.

5  7  12 5 5,000  7,000  12,000 5,000


7  7,000
12 12,000
50  70  120 50 50,000  70,000  120,000 50,000
 70  70,000
120 120,000
500  700  1,200 500 500,000  700,000  1,200,000 500,000
 700  700,000
1,200 1,200,000

Complete the pattern.

1. 3  8  n 2. 5  9  n
30  80  n 50  90  n

300  800  n 500  900  n

3,000  8,000  n 5,000  9,000  n

30,000  80,000  n 50,000  90,000  n

300,000  800,000  n 500,000  900,000  n


McGraw-Hill School Division

Add mentally.

3. 800  600  4. 9,000  7,000 

5. 80,000  80,000  6. 5,000  4,000 

7. 900  500  8. 700,000  600,000 

9. 800,000  700,000  10. 60,000  50,000 

11. 300  700  12. 80,000  90,000 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 2, pages 4647. (32) NS 3.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
22 Page
Addition Patterns E ENRICH

Pascals Triangle
The triangle below is called Pascals Triangle. Each row begins and
ends with the number 1. Every other number is the sum of the two
numbers above it.

Complete this Pascals Triangle.

Row 1 1

Row 2 1 1

Row 3 1 2 1

Row 4 1 3 3 1

Row 5 1 6 1

Row 6 1 1

Row 7 1 1

Now complete this Pascals Triangle. Each row begins and ends with 200.

Row 1 200

Row 2 200 200

Row 3 200 400 200


McGraw-Hill School Division

Row 4 200 600 600 200

Row 5 200 1,200 200

Row 6 200 200

Row 7 200 200

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 2, pages 4647. (33) NS 3.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
23 Page
Add Whole Numbers and Money P PRACTICE

Find each sum.


1. 688 2. 574 3. 757 4. $8.72
 207  434  529  1.38

5. $2.98 6. 989 7. 8,489 8. $3,824


 0.59  624  2,467  962

9. 5,174 10. $12.57 11. 6,672 12. $78.29


 327  7.43  878  45.32

13. 12,345 14. 43,802 15. 24,316 16. 183,462


 67,890  7,526  893  570,184

17. $3,421.78 18. 204,177 19. 741,243 20. $427,535


 1,657.18  678,687  85,278  6,280

21. $7.77  $6.66  22. 5,872  754 

23. 3,489  87  741  24. $256.82  $357.47  $83.95 

25. 42,608  7,709  3,047  26. 782,070  879,162  115,603 


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
27. At the Lakeside School, 522 students 28. Last week, $325 worth of play tickets
ride the bus and 714 students walk and $729 worth of carnival tickets
or are driven to school. How many were sold. How much money was
students attend Lakeside School? collected altogether?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 3, pages 4851. (34) NS 3.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
23 Page
Add Whole Numbers and Money R RETEACH

Add 587  269.


Step 1 Step 2 Step 3
Add the ones. Add the tens. Add the hundreds.
Regroup if necessary. Regroup if necessary. Regroup if necessary.

H T O H T O H T O

1 1 1 1 1

5 8 7 5 8 7 5 8 7
2 6 9 2 6 9 2 6 9
6 5 6 8 5 6

7 ones  9 ones  16 ones 1 ten  8 tens  6 tens 1 hundred  5 hundreds 


16 ones  1 ten 6 ones  15 tens 2 hundreds  8 hundreds
15 tens  1 hundred 5 tens

Find each sum.


1. 413 2. 336 3. $4.80 4. 327
 228  574  2.57  425

5. $828 6. 187 7. 534 8. $9.34


 16  219  394  3.68

9. 692 10. $7.99 11. 1,245 12. $31.15


 810  7.99  3,717  85.29
McGraw-Hill School Division

13. 6,289 14. 8,147 15. 5,326 16. 71,128


 764  3,988  383  3,511

17. 87,421 18. 25,784 19. 399,625 20. $62.41


2,032 4,408 99,990 7.38
 5,857  64,726  437,487  1.21

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 3, pages 4851. (35) NS 3.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
23 Page
Add Whole Numbers and Money E ENRICH

Hindu Addition
The Hindu people of ancient India added numbers from the left and
moved to the right.
Here is an example of Hindu addition.

Add the hundreds. Next add the tens. Last, add the ones.
8  8  16. Regroup Regroup to the tens place.
to the hundreds place. The sum is 1,371.
589 589 589
 782  782  782
12 126 1261
3 37

Use the Hindu method of addition to find the sum. Show your work.
1. 56 2. 96 3. 538 4. 322
 35  87  247  489

5. 289 6. $9.63 7. 238 8. 766


 556  8.75  849  984

9. $1.87 10. 874 11. 385 12. $6.11


McGraw-Hill School Division

 7.58  496  496  9.97

Compare the Hindu method of addition to the method of addition you use. Which
method do you like best? Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 3, pages 4851. (36) NS 3.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
24 Page
Use Mental Math to Add P PRACTICE

Add mentally.
1. 32  45  2. 21  64 

3. 35  13  4. $39  $24 

5. 48  31  6. 298  311 

7. 595  409  8. 255  344 

9. 238  495  10. 730  214 

11. 891  108  12. $256  $222 

13. 4,524  3,173  14. 8,999  1,333 

15. 2,295  2,124  16. 1,487  1,511 

Algebra & Functions Find each missing number.

17. 36  a  86 18. b  61  81

19. $498  c  $698 20. d  298  598

21. e  657  957 22. $63  h  $243

23. $725  k  $1,125 24. m  837  1,137

25. 1,650  n  3,300 26. r  $750  $1,500


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
27. There are 38 dogs and 24 cats at the 28. The pet show committee spends
pet show. How many cats and dogs $316 on dog treats and $299 on cat
are there in all? treats. How much does the
committee spend on treats?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 4, pages 5253. (37) NS 3.1; AF 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
24 Page
Use Mental Math to Add R RETEACH

You can use these two strategies to add mentally.


Compensation
Use compensation when a number is close to a ten or a hundred.

197 200 Add 3 to make 200: 197  3  200.


 254  251 Subtract 3 from the other number: 254  3  251.
451

Zig-zag
Use the zig-zag method to add 356  627.
Take apart 627.
627  600  20  7
Then add each place separately.
356 356 956 976
 627  600  20  7
956 976 983

Add mentally.
1. 62  39  2. 54  17 

3. 202  248  4. $316  $455 

5. $625  $330  6. 437  128 

7. 499  252  8. 697  140 

9. $29  $56  10. $62  $78 

11. $268  $441  12. 298  465 


McGraw-Hill School Division

13. 752  247 14. 365  113 

15. 599  109  16. 232  657 

17. 253  35  18. 849  52 

19. 425  222  20. 723  245 

21. 3,398  1,343  22. 2,377  196 

23. $6,512  $950  24. 1,783  5,097 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 4, pages 5253. (38) NS 3.1; AF 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
24 Page
Use Mental Math to Add E ENRICH

Countdown!
Move from left to right. Add each pair of numbers mentally.
Shade any box that is the sum of the previous two boxes.
Example:
In row 1, add 19 and 53. The sum is 72. Shade the box with 72 in it.
Add 53 and 72. If the sum is 125, then shade the box with 125 in it.

19 53 72 125 197 232 429 661 1,090 1,000 3,090 4,090


195 302 402 67 469 12 480 115 595 110 805 915

17 21 37 58 95 22 127 149 270 199 39 238

34 51 99 154 253 307 560 857 1,317 174 399 573

79 15 94 109 203 311 514 825 1,339 2,064 2,213 4,277

1. Look at the shaded boxes. What number do the boxes form?

2. Which method did you use to add pairs of numbers mentally when:

the sum of the digits was less than 9?


one number was close to 10, 100, or 1,000?
the sum of the digits was greater than 9?

How is mental math different from estimation?


McGraw-Hill School Division

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 4, pages 5253. (39) NS 3.1; AF 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
25 Page
Estimate Sums P PRACTICE

Estimate each sum. Show your work

1. 478  597

2. $8.65  $7.15

3. $0.32  $0.65

4. 4,990  405

5. 2,188  5,621

6. 47,522  3,721

7. 863,122  254,087

Add. Estimate to check that each answer is reasonable.


8. 621  308  9. 2,188  5,621 

10. $4.20  $8.12  11. 601,128  328,125 

Compare. Write  or  to make a true sentence.


12. 176  335 400 13. 243  50 300

14. 500 251  127 15. 900 895  68

16. 1,348  2,489 5,000 17. 4,725  321 3,923  289

18. 9,000 4,487  5,672 19. 8,000 6,081  950

20. 22,152  28,174 60,000 21. 49,912  2,839 5,000


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
22. Julio wants to buy drawing paper 23. The fourth-grade students make
for $8.50 and brushes for $19.95. 268 posters about bicycle safety.
About how much will he spend? The fifth-grade students make 229.
About how many posters do the
students make altogether?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 5, pages 5455. (40) NS 2.1; 3.1; MR 2.1, 2.5
Print This Page
Name

Print This
25 Page
Estimate Sums R RETEACH

To estimate a sum, you can round each number. Then add the
rounded numbers.
Estimate 252  49. Estimate $5.95  $7.25.
Round each number 252  49 Round each $5.95  $7.25
to the nearest ten. number to the
250  50 nearest dollar. $6.00  $7.00

Add. 250  50  300 Add. $6.00  $7.00  $13.00

So, 252  49 is about 300. So, $5.95  $7.25 is about $13.00.

To which place will you round each number? Circle the digits in
that place. Then estimate each sum. Show how you rounded.

1. $7.89  $5.29 2. $0.32  $0.48

3. 6,714  8,217 4. 27,822  2,321

5. 5,214  642 6. 38,629  5,927

Estimate each sum.

7. 469  563 8. $9.08  $12.75


McGraw-Hill School Division

9. 143  431 10. 5,723  3,501

11. 1,827  764 12. 2,357  8,605

13. $38,956  $7,653 14. $46.90  $327.54

15. 896,455  11,321 16. 477,995  865,311

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 5, pages 5455. (41) NS 2.1, 3.1; MR 2.1, 2.5
Print This Page
Name

Print This
25 Page
Estimate Sums E ENRICH

Star Estimates
There are five paths. Each path has six numbers. Round each
number to the nearest hundred. Then estimate the sum of the
rounded numbers on each path of the star. Write your estimate in
the box at the end of each path.

3. 30,800
23,724

5,627 3,846

1. 47,600
Start 225 45,672 152 172 429 874
5. 44,100
810 126,582

381 714

825
McGraw-Hill School Division

524 418,670

174 41,321

432 645
2. 129,600 4. 447,700

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 5, pages 5455. (42) NS 2.1, 3.1; MR 2.1, 2.5
Print This Page
Name

Print This
26 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Estimate or Exact Answer Reading


Skill
Solve. Explain why you gave an estimate or an exact answer.
1. James, Max, and Melba collect baseball cards. James has 870 cards,
Max has 569 cards, and Melba has 812 cards. Do the three friends
have more than 2,000 baseball cards?

2. Nicki has a collection of 79 shells and 64 rocks. How many items are
in her collection?

3. Kelly has a coin collection. Her quarters are worth $104.50. Her
dimes are worth $75.10. Her nickels are worth $27.75. What is the
total value of Kellys coin collection?

4. The Comic Book Show sells 474 tickets on Friday and 396 tickets on
Saturday. About how many tickets does the Comic Book Show sell?

5. Eldon has 98 rock CDs, 121 classical CDs, and 25 folk music CDs.
How many CDs does Eldon have?
McGraw-Hill School Division

6. Molly has 221 stamps from the United States and 395 stamps from
other countries. About how many stamps does Molly have?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 6, pages 5657. (43) MR 1.1, 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
26 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Estimate or Exact Answer Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.

Jenny has a collection of 249 football cards. Ken has a collection of


329 football cards. Are there more than 500 cards in these two
collections altogether?
1. Which of the following statements is 2. Which number sentence will help
true? you solve the problem?
A Jenny has more cards than Ken. F 249  329  500
B Ken has more than 500 cards. G 329  249  500
C Jenny has 249 cards. H 500  249  500

Paco has 129 toy cars. His brother has 167 toy cars. How many toy
cars do they have in all?
3. Which plan can you use to solve the 4. How many toy cars do they have
problem? in all?
A Estimate the sum of 129 and 167. F 300
B Add 129 and 167. G 296
C Compare 129 and 167. H 200

Hiroshi has 429 football cards, 278 baseball cards, and 97 hockey
cards. Does Hiroshi have more than 1,000 cards in all?
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Which of the following statements is 6. What do you have to do to solve this


true? problem?
A Hiroshi has 278 baseball cards. F Find the exact sum for
429  278  97.
B Hiroshi has 429 cards in all.
G Estimate to tell if 429  278 is
C Hiroshi has 97 football cards.
greater than 1,000.
H Estimate to tell if 429  278  97
is greater than 1,000.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 6, pages 5657. (44) MR 1.1, 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
26 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Estimate or Exact Answer Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.

On Friday, 529 people see the museums collection of antique dolls.


On Saturday, 994 people see the collection. On Sunday, 812 people
see the collection. How many people came to see the antique doll
show during the three days?

7. Which plan can you use to solve the 8. How many people came to see
problem? the antique doll show during the
three days?
A Estimate the sum of 529, 994,
and 812. F 2,335
B Add 529, 994, and 812. G 2,300
C Order 529, 994 and 812 from H 1,523
least to greatest.

Solve.
9. Chelsea has 635 postcards from the 10. Gus has 65 autographs from sports
United States, 291 postcards from players, 97 autographs from actors
Canada, and 456 postcards from and actresses, and 27 autographs
Europe and Asia. Does she have from singers. About how many
more than 2,000 postcards? autographs does he have?

11. Miles has 75 old movie posters, 12. Evan has 4,212 cards. His sister has
63 concert posters, and 54 posters 5,349 cards. If they put their cards
from plays. How many posters does together, will they have more than
McGraw-Hill School Division

Miles have? 9,000 cards?

13. Nina has 379 stamps from the 14. Morris has a collection of
United States and 458 stamps from 44 quarters, 92 dimes, and
other countries. How many stamps 89 pennies. About how many
does she have? coins does he have?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 6, pages 5657. (45) MR 1.1, 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
27 Page
Subtraction Patterns P PRACTICE

Complete the pattern.


1. 12  8  n 2. 16  7  n
120  80  n 160  70  n
1,200  800  n 1,600  700  n
12,000  8,000  n 16,000  7,000  n
120,000  80,000  n 160,000  70,000  n
1,200,000  800,000  n 1,600,000  700,000  n

3. 11  5  n 4. 15  8  n
110  50  n 150  80  n
1,100  500  n 1,500  800  n
11,000  5,000  n 15,000  8,000  n
110,000  50,000  n 150,000  80,000  n
1,100,000  500,000  n 1,500,000  800,000  n

Subtract mentally.
5. 1,200  600  6. $8,000  $3,000 

7. 600,000  500,000  8. 70,000  50,000 

9. $13,000  $9,000  10. 160,000  80,000 

11. 140,000  50,000  12. 1,200,000  600,000 


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
13. A video store rented 900,000 videos 14. The price for a house is $120,000.
last year. This year the store rented Ms. Smith decides to make an offer
1,500,000 videos. How many more that is $30,000 less than the price.
videos did it rent this year? How much does Ms. Smith offer
for the house?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 7, pages 6061. (46) NS 3.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
27 Page
Subtraction Patterns R RETEACH

You can use subtraction facts and patterns to subtract multiples of


ten mentally.
Subtract the front digits. Then write a zero to match each place value.
12  7  5 12 12,000  7,000  5,000 12,000
 7  7,000
5 5,000
120  70  50 120 120,000  70,000  50,000 120,000
 70  70,000
50 50,000
1,200  700  500 1,200 1,200,000  700,000  500,000 1,200,000
 700  700,000
500 500,000

Complete the pattern.

1. 11  8  n 2. 14  5  n
110  80  n 140  50  n

1,100  800  n 1,400  500  n

11,000 80,000 = n 14,000  5,000  n

110,000  800,000  n 140,000  50,000  n

1,100,000  8,000,000  n 1,400,000  500,000  n

Subtract mentally.
McGraw-Hill School Division

3. 1,400  600  4. $16,000  $7,000 

5. 160,000  80,000  6. 1,200  500 

7. $1,500  $700  8. 110,000  50,000 

9. 14,000  8,000  10. $1,700,000  $900,000 

11. 1,800,000  900,000  12. 120,000  40,000 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 7, pages 6061. (47) NS 3.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
27 Page
Subtraction Patterns E ENRICH

Subtraction Squares (Diffy)


Each subtraction square is made up of eight numbers. To find the
missing numbers, subtract the two corner numbers in each square
and write the difference in between the numbers. Find the missing
numbers. Subtract until you reach the center of the square.

150 70 80

10 30 40

20 20 0
0 0 0
60 10 20 0 0 20 30 30
0 0 0
0 20 20

20 10 10
McGraw-Hill School Division

90 40 50
2. What happens in the center of the squares?

3. What do you think will happen if you choose four other corner
numbers for the largest square? Try it and check your prediction!

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 7, pages 6061. (48) NS 3.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
28 Page
Explore Subtracting Whole Numbers P PRACTICE

Subtract.
1. Use models to subtract 525  272.

Subtract the ones.  5 2 5


 2 7 2

Subtract the tens. 5 2 5


Regroup 1 hundred 2 7 2
as 10 tens.

Subtract the hundreds. 5 2 5


2 7 2

Subtract.
2. 187 3. 612 4. 356 5. 923 6. 319
 95  74  127  707  79
McGraw-Hill School Division

7. 711 8. 425 9. 857 10. 562 11. 227


 380  258  79  348  138

12. 684  327  13. 573  495 

14. 813  75  15. 263  88 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 8, pages 6263. (49) NS 3.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
28 Page
Explore Subtracting Whole Numbers R RETEACH

Use models to subtract 322  145.


Step 1 You need to 322
Model the subtract 145, 145
or 1 hundred
greater number. 4 tens 5 ones.

Step 2 1 12

Subtract the 3 2/ 2/
ones. Regroup a Subtract 145
5 ones.
ten for 10 ones, 7
if necessary.
Step 3 2 11 12

Subtract the 3/ 2/ 2/
tens. Regroup a 145
hundred for 10 77
tens, if necessary. Subtract 4 tens.
Step 4 2 11 12

Subtract the 3/ 2/ 2/
hundreds. 145
177
Subtract 1 hundred.

Subtract. Use or draw models to help you subtract.


1. 724 2. 916 3. 568 4. 428 5. 353
 318  108  59  247  182
McGraw-Hill School Division

6. 964 7. 735 8. 327 9. 863 10. 651


 281  586  299  575  93

11. 274  126  12. 745  67 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 8, pages 6263. (50) NS 3.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
28 Page
Explore Subtracting Whole Numbers E ENRICH

Crack the Code


Find each difference. Match the code number beside each problem
with the correct code letter.
Problems Code Numbers Code Letters
1. $3.63  $1.77 6 761  S
2. $4.25  $2.86 4 88  A
3. 181  92 9 $1.39  U
4. 573  397 13 176  T
5. 426  326 14 304  C
6. 880  119 5 $1.59  N
7. 625  317 2 89  V
8. 682 594 12 $1.86  E
9. 170  98 7 308  M
10. 590  399 15 100  I
11. 731  427 11 77  N
12. $9.05 $7.89 3 191  O
13. $6.52  $4.93 16 47  A
14. 464  387 8 138  A
15. 222  175 1 72  O
McGraw-Hill School Division

16. 832  694 10 $1.16  O

Use this code to solve the riddle. Write the correct letter above each number.
Riddle: What animal is gray and has a trunk?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 8, pages 6263. (51) NS 3.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
29 Page
Subtract Whole Numbers and Money P PRACTICE

Subtract. Check by adding.


1. 757 2. $582 3. 693 4. 851
 28  492  516  569

5. $2.48 6. 2,345 7. $67.89 8. $11,321


 1.95  1,658  18.95  979

9. 4,672 10. 3,523 11. $33,572 12. 74,125


 873  2,846  13,689  65,239

13. 49,785 14. 98,142 15. $224.39 16. $4,561.71


 8,998  617  15.87  291.68

17. 389,243 18. $672,145 19. 914,617 20. $7,211.53


 136,354  98,276  117,814  5,926.84

21. 827  468  22. $9.12  $7.58 

23. 42,625  9,846  24. 65,932  46,464 

25. $311.42  $4.65  26. $578,423  $89,743 

27. 982,561  678,984  28. $2,176.53  $1,993.76 


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
29. A toy factory made 32,154 board 30. A store earned $12,415 selling
games on Monday. On Tuesday it puzzles this week. Last week it
made 31,687 board games. How earned $9,326 selling puzzles.
many more board games did the How much more did the store
factory make on Monday? earn this week?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 9, pages 6465. (52) NS 3.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
29 Page
Subtract Whole Numbers and Money R RETEACH

Subtract 7,617  5,789.

Step 1 Step 2
Subtract the ones. Regroup if necessary. Subtract the tens. Regroup if necessary.
TH H T O TH H T O

5 10 17
0 17 0/
7 6 1/ /
7 7 6/ 1/ /
7
5 7 8 9 5 7 8 9
8 2 8

Step 3 Step 4
Subtract the hundreds. Subtract the thousands.
Regroup if necessary.
TH H T O TH H T O

15 10 17 15 10 17
6 5/ 0/ 6 5/ 0/
7/ 6/ 1/ /
7 7/ 6/ 1/ /
7
5 7 8 9 5 7 8 9
8 2 8 1 8 2 8

Use the same steps to subtract money.

Subtract. Check by adding.


1. 577 2. 872 3. $6.21 4. 3,457 5. $2.49
 385  465  4.43  965  0.98
McGraw-Hill School Division

6. 4,872 7. 7,501 8. 8,142 9. 12,435 10. $6,423


 3,785  6,874  6,527  8,679  2,496

11. 24,652 12. $56,716 13. 347,072 14. $6,192.48 15. 743,219
 9,788  39,897  59,687  1,671.39  19,733

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 9, pages 6465. (53) NS 3.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
29 Page
Subtract Whole Numbers and Money E ENRICH

Sumerian Numbers
The Sumerians were an ancient civilization. Sumerians were one of the first
people to develop a written number system and compute with it. They had
five number symbols.
The chart shows the value of each symbol.

1 10 60 600 3,600

The symbols were combined to represent numbers.


Example:

3,600  600  60  10  10  4,280

Solve the Sumerian subtraction problems. Translate the


Sumerian symbols to the numbers in our system and subtract.
Then write the difference using Sumerian symbols.
1. 2. 3.
133 1,263 7,280
 
125  626   4,861

8 637 2,419
McGraw-Hill School Division

4. 5. 6.
1,821 3,750 1,242
 
 1,205   3,650  922

616 100 320

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 9, pages 6465. (54) NS 3.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
210 Page
Regroup Across Zeros P PRACTICE

Subtract. Check by adding.


1. 804 2. 701 3. $500 4. 600
 565  387  244  58

5. 300 6. 3,000 7. 9,000 8. 4,050


 108  2,987  5,431  2,542

9. 2,000 10. 8,000 11. $15,000 12. 70,700


 784  2,450  7,641  8,633

13. 50,000 14. 80,000 15. 30,000 16. 600,003


 25,625  35,189  7,984  25,178

17. $900,000 18. 400,707 19. 210,303 20. 575,000


 321,229  39,698  101,506  89,342

21. 602  423  22. 800  68 

23. 3,400  1,762  24. 6,000  672 

25. $20,800  $13,972  26. 70,000  52,087 

27. 160,000  149,999  28. 307,000  198,621 


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
29. Crystal Lake School held a dance 30. At the festival, 39,251 people
festival. There were 3,000 dancers at watched the dancers. Another
the festival. Of those dancers, 2,682 700,000 people watched the festival
did not win prizes. How many on television. How many more people
dancers did win prizes? watched the festival on television?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 10, pages 6667. (55) NS 3.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
210 Page
Regroup Across Zeros R RETEACH

Subtract 500  185.


Step 1 Step 2 Step 3
No ones. Regroup the tens. Subtract the ones, the tens,
No tens. and then the hundreds.
Regroup the hundreds.
H T O H T O H T O

4 10 9 9
5/ /
0 4 /
10 10 4 /
10 10
/
5 0/ 0 /
5 0/ 0/ /
5 0/ 0/
1 8 5 1 8 5 1 8 5
3 1 5

5 hundreds  4 hundreds 10 tens  9 tens 10 ones 10 ones  5 ones  5 ones


10 tens 9 tens  8 tens  1 ten
There are not enough ones 4 hundreds  1 hundred 
to subtract 9 ones. 3 hundreds

Subtract. Check by adding.


1. 602 2. 700 3. $900 4. 800 5. 304
 314  203  306  523  150

6. $4,000 7. 2,005 8. 3,000 9. 5,000 10. 6,000


 1,527  1,083  2,225  259  1,326
McGraw-Hill School Division

11. 68,000 12. 80,000 13. 74,800 14. $40,050 15. 45,000
 11,770  5,287  27,862  32,037  2,374

16. 300,077  124,364  17. $200,008  $187,053 

18. 107,006  84,119  19. 906,004  205,457 

20. 60,000  29,730  21. $500,600  $50,250 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 10, pages 6667. (56) NS 3.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
210 Page
Regroup Across Zeros E ENRICH

Missing Digits
Find the missing digits.
1. 8 0 5 2. 5, 0 8 2 3. 9 8
 7  2, 3 7  2 6
7 1 , 7 3 7 3

4. 3 0 8 5. 2, 0 3 6. 5, 1 0
 9  1, 9 8 1  5 8
1 7 9 2 4, 6 4 5

7. 6, 0 4 8. 6 6 9. 5, 0
 3, 8 4 7  3  3, 5 8

, 2 0 7 3 7 1 2, 2 8 3

10. 7 0 11. 0 12. 7, 3 0


 2 6 2  3 8 6  3, 0 8 5
4 2 1 6 , 2 1 5

13. 9 8 14. 6, 5 7 15. , 0 7


 3 9  3 2 9  4, 8 8 1
McGraw-Hill School Division

6 7 , 5 2 , 1 4

16. 5 7 17. 0 0 18. 7 , 1


 2 0  2  , 2 3 4
5 7 3 3 3 5, 7 6

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 10, pages 6667. (57) NS 3.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
211 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy P PRACTICE

Write a Number Sentence


Write a number sentence to solve.
1. Meg buys candle-making supplies for 2. Sally has finished 86 squares in her
$37. She has $25 left. How much quilt. The quilt will have 100 squares.
money did Meg have before she How many squares does Sally still
bought the supplies? have to make?

3. Eric sells a painting for $125. He sells 4. Noah has saved $42. How much
a sculpture for $390. How much more money does he need to buy a
money does Eric earn in all? rare coin for $90?

Mixed Strategy Review


Solve. Use any strategy.
5. Howard has 75 shells. On a trip, he 6. Tom makes letters for a sign that
collects another 16 shells. How many says Arts and Crafts Fair. Which
shells does he have now? letter does Mark need to make the
most of?

Strategy:
Strategy:

7. Social Studies During the 1800s, 8. Create a problem which you could
sailors made carvings called scrimshaw write a number sentence to solve.
McGraw-Hill School Division

on whale teeth, whalebone, and Share it with others.


tortoise shells. Suppose a sailor made
a carving in 1805. A collector buys the
carving in 2000. How many years old
is the carving?

Strategy:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 11, pages 6869. (58) NS 3.1; AF 1.1, 2.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
211 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Write a Number Sentence


Page 69, Problem 2

Ms. Green had 29 buttons to sew on dolls. She has 14 buttons left.
How many buttons has she already sewn on?

Step 1
Be sure you understand the problem.
Read Read carefully.
What do you know?
Ms. Green had buttons to sew on dolls.

She has buttons left.


What do you need to find?
You need to find how many
.

Step 2
Make a plan.
Plan Choose a strategy.
Make a Table You can write a number sentence to solve the problem.
or List
Write a Number Since you know the original total and the number left,
Sentence
you can write a subtraction sentence.
Work Backward
Act It Out
Find a Pattern
Make a Graph
McGraw-Hill School Division

Guess and Check


Logical Reasoning
Solve a Simpler
Problem
Draw a Picture

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 11, pages 6869. (59) NS 3.1; AF 1.1, 2.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
211 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Write a Number Sentence


Step 3
Carry out your plan.
Solve
You know Ms. Green had buttons to sew on dolls.

You know she has buttons left.

Write a subtration sentence to represent the situation.


29  n  14
number of buttons buttons left
buttons she had already sewn on
Then use a related sentence to solve.
 
number of buttons left buttons already
buttons she had sewn on
She has already sewn on buttons.

Step 4
Is the solution reasonable?
Look Back Reread the problem.
Does your answer make sense? Yes No
Did you answer the question? Yes No
How can you check your answer?
What other stategies could you use to solve the problem?
McGraw-Hill School Division

Practice
1. Keshawn spends $45 on glass and 2. Melanie sells a model sailing ship and
copper molding. He pays with a a model airplane for a total of
hundred-dollar bill. How much $40.95. She receives $23.49 for the
change does Keshawn get back? ship. How much money does Melanie
receive for the airplane?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 11, pages 6869. (60) NS 3.1; AF 1.1, 2.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
212 Page
Subtract Using Mental Math P PRACTICE

Subtract mentally.
1. 46  7  2. 81  36  3. 53  19 

4. 99  19  5. $78  $49  6. 92  28 

7. 74  38  8. 95  37 9. 64  37 

10. 687  48  11. $273  $58 

12. 394  86  13. $704  $589 

14. 745  597  15. 782  203 

16. 613  309  17. 555  299 

18. 998  145  19. 578  465 

Algebra & Functions Find each missing number.

20. 648  a  548 21. b  60  340

22. c  412  388 23. d  235  665

24. 950  e  400 25. 823  h  123

26. k  599  301 27. 450  m  100

28. 775  n  200 29. r  300  1,456


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
30. Josh buys a wooden horse for $4.89. 31. A bicycle shop has 309 water-bottle
He gives the cashier $5.00. How holders in stock. Ashley buys 259
much change should Josh receive? water-bottle holders from the shop.
How many water-bottle holders does
the store have left?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 12, pages 7071. (61) NS 3.1; AF 2.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
212 Page
Subtract Using Mental Math R RETEACH

You can use these two strategies to subtract mentally.


Compensation
Use compensation when one number is close to a ten or a hundred.
Add or subtract the same number from both numbers.
95 97 Add 2 to 28 to make 30: 28  2  30.
 28  30 Add 2 to the other number: 95  2  97.
67
103 100 Subtract 3 from 103 to make 100: 103  3  100.
 45  42 Subtract 3 from 45: 45  3  42.
58
Zig-zag
Use the zig-zag method to subtract 95  28.
Take apart 28.
28  20  8
Then subtract each place separately.
95 95 75
 28  20  8
75 67
Subtract mentally.
1. 26  7  2. 84  32  3. 79  31 

4. $58  $17  5. 94  38  6. 86  24 

7. 196  49  8. $253  $42


McGraw-Hill School Division

9. 395  91  10. 888  277 

11. 245  197  12. $428  $117 

13. 482  204  14. 613  307 

15. 354  99  16. $755  $402 

17. 519  404  18. 505  301 

19. $535  $122  20. 350  198 

21. 657  312 22. 648  305


Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 12, pages 7071. (62) NS 3.1; AF 2.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
212 Page
Subtract Using Mental Math E ENRICH

Crossnumber Puzzle
Subtract mentally to complete the crossnumber puzzle.

A B C D
4 8 5 8 1 4
E F
2 2 5 3 3
G H I J
9 7 1 2 8 4
K L M
6 5 4 3 2
N
2 4 5 5 7
O
9 8 6 3 7

Across Down
A. 596  111 A. 626  197

C. 879  65 B. 360  308

E. 281  28 D. 237 105

G. 192  95 F. 591  76

H. 383  99 I. 950  113


McGraw-Hill School Division

K. 1,253599 J. 765  723

M. 194  162 K. 686  28

N. 448  203 L. 635  179

O. 662  25 N. 228  199

Look at N. Down. What method did you use to subtract mentally?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 12, pages 7071. (63) NS 3.1; AF 2.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
213 Page
Estimate Differences P PRACTICE

Estimate each difference. Show your work.


1. 467  215

2. 2,835  1,487

3. $13.95  $7.25

4. 65,074  15,472

5. 174,921  18,421

Subtract. Estimate to check that each answer is reasonable.


6. 835 7. $81.79 8. 6,984 9. 242,003 10. 654,026
 487  31.55  322  49,887  529,620

11. $0.88  $0.35  12. 787,008  117,584 

Compare. Write  or  to make a true sentence.


13. 4,173  2,589 2,000 14. 8,329  957 7,000

15. $300.00 $367.20  $59.45 16. 600 938  452

17. 15,425  3,535 10,000 18. 8,053  7,645 1,000

19. 42,345  16,174 20,000 20. 48,592  961 4,000


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
21. There were 787,897 copies of the 22. The Hoop Store spends $129.99 for
Science Monthly sold last year. This an ad in the Science Monthly. The
year, 914,632 copies were sold. store spends $19.29 for an ad in the
About how many more were sold Allentown News. About how much
this year? more does the store spend on
advertising in the Science Monthly
than in the Allentown News?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 13, pages 7273. (64) NS 2.1, 3.1; MR 2.1, 2.5
Print This Page
Name

Print This
213 Page
Estimate Differences R RETEACH

To estimate a difference, you can round each number.


Then subtract the rounded numbers.
Estimate 486  27. Estimate $6.98  $4.59.
Round each number 486  27 Round each number $6.98  $4.59
to the nearest ten. to the nearest dollar
490  30 $7.00  $5.00
Subtract. 490  30  460 Subtract. $7.00  $5.00 
$2.00
So, 486  27 is about 460.
So, $6.98  $4.59 is about $2.00.

To which place will you round each number? Circle the digits in that place.
Then estimate each difference. Show how you rounded.

1. $14.95  $8.35 2. $0.78  $0.29

3. 7,842  799 4. $589.10  $85.25

5. 53,425  20,741 6. 425,697  289,721

Estimate each difference.


McGraw-Hill School Division

7. 529  158 8. $683  $475

9. 947  349 10. 5,522  1,378

11. $12.48  $3.98 12. 3,241  678

13. 52,745  47,523 14. 72,393  8,088

15. 232,500  83,900 16. 809,765  528,750

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 13, pages 7273. (65) NS 2.1, 3.1; MR 2.1, 2.5
Print This Page
Name

Print This
213 Page
Estimate Differences E ENRICH

A-Mazing Differences
Estimate each difference. Circle the correct answer.
Use your answers to find the path through the maze.
1. 961  472 2. 874  215 3. 4,971  2,364 4. 729 346
A. 400 A. 500 A. 3,000 A. 300
B. 500 B. 600 B. 2,000 B. 400
C. 600 C. 700 C. 1,000 C. 500

5. 526  481 6. $8.16  $1.92 7. $72.59  $24.71 8. 9,742  6,381


A. 0 A. $5.00 A. $30.00 A. 2,000
B. 100 B. $6.00 B. $40.00 B. 3,000
C. 200 C. $7.00 C. $50.00 C. 4,000

9. 5,692  3,766 10. 42,874  16,422 11. 69,124  31,346 12. 892,617 85,600
A. 1,000 A. 20,000 A. 40,000 A. 700,000
B. 2,000 B. 30,000 B. 30,000 B. 800,000
C. 3,000 C. 40,000 C. 20,000 C. 900,000

7A
9C

6B

7C
6C
t
ar

6A
5A
St

7A

5B

7B
8A

9B
5C
1A

4B

8C
C
10
4A
1C

4C
1B
McGraw-Hill School Division

B
10
2B

10
C
11
2C

A
11
3C

8B

C
11

12
3A

sh
12
3B
2A

ni
Fi
B
12

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 13, pages 7273. (66) NS 2.1, 3.1; MR 2.1, 2.5
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


214
Problem Solving: Application Part
A WORKSHEET

Decision
Applying Addition and Subtraction Making

Record your data.

Burgers-to-Go Rubys Healthy Diner Carnival Lunch Menu


McGraw-Hill School Division

Your Decision
Where do you think The Outdoor Club should eat? Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 14, pages 7475. (67) MR 1.1; NS 3.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


214
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

Which materials block a magnet? Math &


Science

Record your data.

Material used as blocker Number of paper clips Find the difference.


that the magnet can hold (Number of paper clips a
when this material is magnet can hold with
used as a blocker no blocker)
minus
(Number of paper clips a
magnet can hold when
this material is used
as a blocker)

Magnet only

Magnet with paper

Magnet with foil


McGraw-Hill School Division

Magnet with tape

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 14, pages 7677. (68) NS 1.2, 3.1; MR 1.1, 3.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


214
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

Which materials block a magnet? Math &


Science

1. What is the difference between the number of paper clips a magnet


can hold with no blocker and the number of paper clips a magnet
can hold with each of the different blockers you used?

2. Put the three materials in order from best blocker to worst.

3. Explain the results of your activity in terms of shielding.

4. What are some other materials that you think would be good
blockers? Explain.
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. What are some other materials that you think would be bad
blockers? Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 2, Lesson 14, pages 7677. (69) NS 1.2, 3.1; MR 1.1, 3.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
31 Page
Tell Time P PRACTICE

Write the time in two ways.


1. 2. 3.

9 48

Choose the most reasonable units of time. Write seconds, minutes,


or hours.
4. Debbie spends 20 at the dentist.

5. You are in school for about 6 .

6. Jerry walks to the store in 15 .

7. Ben swims underwater for 30 .

Tell how much time.


8. 120 minutes = hours 9. seconds = 3 minutes
1
10. 2 hour = minutes 11. 15 minutes = hour

12. minutes = 2 12 hours 13. minutes = 1 41 hours


McGraw-Hill School Division

Algebra & Functions Describe and complete the conversion patterns.


14.
Minutes 60 120 180 240 300

Hours 1 2

15.
Minutes 1 2 3 4 5

Seconds 60 120

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 1, pages 9295. (70) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
31 Page
Tell Time R RETEACH

You can read time in different ways.

5 40

Read: five-forty Read: forty minutes Read: twenty minutes before


after five six or twenty minutes to six
Write: 5:40

Write the time in as many different ways as you can.


1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6.

4 15 3 20 2 50
McGraw-Hill School Division

7. 8. 9.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 1, pages 9295. (71) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
31 Page
Tell Time E ENRICH

Patterns in Time
The times shown on the clocks are in a pattern.
What time would the next clock show? What is the pattern?
1.
11 12 1 11 12 1 11 12 1
10 2 10 2 10 2
9 3 9 3 9 3
8 4 8 4 8 4
7 6 5 7 6 5 7 6 5

Time: Pattern: Increase by hour.

2.
5 :45 5 :30 5 :15
Time: Pattern: Decrease by hour.

3.
11 12 1 11 12 1 11 12 1
10 2 10 2 10 2
9 3 9 3 9 3
8 4 8 4 8 4
7 6 5 7 6 5 7 6 5

Time: Pattern: Increase by hour.

4.
3 :10 3 :00 2 :50
McGraw-Hill School Division

Time: Pattern: Decrease by hour.

5.
11 12 1 11 12 1 11 12 1
10 2 10 2 10 2
9 3 9 3 9 3
8 4 8 4 8 4
7 6 5 7 6 5 7 6 5

Time: Pattern: Increase by hour.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 1, pages 9295. (72) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
32 Page
Elapsed Time P PRACTICE

How much time has passed?


1. Begin: 12:00 P.M. 2. Begin: 1:15 A.M. 3. Begin: 11:05 P.M.
End: 2:20 P.M. End: 1:50 A.M. End: 1:00 A.M.

4. Begin: 2:25 A.M. 5. Begin: 3:40 P.M. 6. Begin: 5:45 A.M.


End: 5:40 A.M. End: 12:00 A.M. End: 12:15 P.M.

7. Begin: 8:10 P.M. 8. Begin: 9:30 A.M. 9. Begin: 10:35 P.M.


End: 1:55 A.M. End: 2:10 P.M. End: 8:00 A.M.

What time will it be in 1 hour 20 minutes?


10. 11. 12.

8 50

Algebra & Functions Write the missing numbers.


13. 5:16 A.M. is minutes after 5:00 A.M.

14. 2:45 P.M. is minutes before 3:00 P.M.

15. 7:22 P.M. is hours minutes after 7:00 P.M.


McGraw-Hill School Division

16. 9:58 A.M. is minutes before A.M.

Problem Solving
17. Lisa leaves her house at 8:45 A.M. 18. The Big Beach bus leaves the city at
She gets to karate class 35 minutes 6:40 P.M. The bus arrives at the
later. At what time does Lisa get beach at 8:25 P.M. How long is the
to karate class? trip to the beach?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 2, pages 9697. (73) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
32 Page
Elapsed Time R RETEACH

Elapsed time is the amount of time that passes from the start to the
end of an action. Follow these steps to find how much time has
elapsed from 8:20 A.M. to 11:35 A.M.
First count the number of hours. Then count the number of minutes.

From 8:20 to 11:20 is 3 hours. From 11:20 to 11:35 is 15 minutes.


So, 3 hours 15 minutes have passed.
How much time has passed?
1. Begin End 2. Begin End

3. Begin End 4. Begin End

12 15 3 15
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Begin End 6. Begin End

6 00 10 30 2 15 2 35

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 2, pages 9697. (74) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
32 Page
Elapsed Time E ENRICH

Flying Time
Use the time zone map to answer each question. Show your answer in local
time. Remember to include the time zone; for example, 7:00 A.M. Central Time.
Pacific Time Mountain Time Central Time Eastern Time
11 12 1 11 12 1 11 12 1 11 12 1
10 2 10 2 10 2 10 2
9 3 9 3 9 3 9 3
8 4 8 4 8 4 8 4
7 6 5 7 6 5 7 6 5 7 6 5

Seattle

New York City

Los Angeles Atlanta


Phoenix Dallas

Miami

1. It takes about 5 hours to fly from Los Angeles to New York City.
If a plane leaves Los Angeles at 8:00 A.M., at what time will it arrive
in New York City?
2. It takes 4 hours 30 minutes for a plane to fly from Atlanta to
Phoenix. If a plane departs from Atlanta at 10:00 A.M., at what
time will it arrive in Phoenix?
3. A plane flew from Seattle to Atlanta. It arrived in Atlanta at
1:05 A.M. The flight lasted for 5 hours 40 minutes. At what
time did it depart from Seattle?
4. The flight between Dallas and Miami takes 2 hours 41 minutes.
Complete the flight schedule below.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Depart Dallas Arrive Miami Depart Miami Arrive Dallas

7:00 A.M. CT 2:30 P.M. ET

9:10 A.M. CT 4:45 P.M. ET

11:20 A.M. CT 6:57 P.M. ET

5. How did you adjust for the time zones in your answers?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 2, pages 9697. (75) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
33 Page
Calendar P PRACTICE

Use the calendars for July and August for exercises 18.

July 2000 August 2000


S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 1 2 3 4 5
Nick
arrives!
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Independence
Day!
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
Football
practice
begins!
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 31

30 31

1. What is the date of the fourth 2. On which day of the week is


Thursday in July? Independence Day?

3. Cindy will return from vacation on 4. If soccer camp runs from July 7
the Monday after Nick arrives. On through the following Saturday, how
which date will Cindy return? long is soccer camp?
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Justin is moving to a new town on 6. Jason has a violin lesson every


August 1. The movers are coming Wednesday. How many lessons will
4 days before that. On which date he have in July and August?
will the movers arrive?

8. Pat saw the dentist on July 25. He has


7. Nick will leave on August 30. another appointment 10 days later. On
For how many weeks will he visit? which date is Pats appointment?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 3, pages 9899. (76) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
33 Page
Calendar R RETEACH

You can use a calendar to find elapsed time.


Suppose today is May 8. How many days is it until Mothers Day?
Count on from May 8 to May 14. It is 6 days from May 8 to May 14.

May 2000 June 2000


S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
Mothers Flag
Day Day
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
Fathers
Day
28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Use the calendars above for exercises 18.


1. How long is it from Flag Day to 2. How long is it from Mothers Day
Fathers Day? to the following Sunday?

3. Sports camp runs from June 19 through 4. How many weeks are there from May
June 30. How long is camp? 1 to June 5?
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. On which day of the week is Flag Day? 6. Memorial Day is celebrated on the last
Monday in May. Which date is that?

7. Dave will return from vacation on the 8. The last day of school is June 7. Toms
Monday after Flag Day. On which birthday is 5 days before that. When
date will he return? is Toms birthday?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 3, pages 9899. (77) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
33 Page
Calendar E ENRICH

Calendar Calculations
Use the calendar to solve the problems.

January February March April May June


S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30
30 31 30

July August September October November December


S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 1 2
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30 31 31

1. Jamie will start basketball practice 2. John plans to go on a skiing trip the
on the first Monday in September. third Friday in December. He must
She plans to buy sneakers at least buy his ticket 14 days in advance of
two weeks before practice begins. the flight. He wants to make the
On which date will basketball plane reservations 4 weeks before
practice begin? Which is the latest buying the ticket. Which is the latest
date on which she can buy her date on which he should make his
sneakers? plane reservations?

3. George's team has its first game on 4. Holly wants to run her best race the
May 15. They plan to spend four second Saturday in June. To train, she
McGraw-Hill School Division

Saturdays practicing. Then they will wants to do speed workouts for 5


spend a week practicing every day weeks. Before she begins speed
after school. Which is the latest training, she must do endurance runs
date on which they should start for 4 weeks. Which is the latest date
practicing? on which she should begin training?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 3, pages 9899. (78) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
34 Page
Line Plots P PRACTICE

1. Complete the tally table and line plot for the following data.

Number of Miles Run Each Day by the Members of the Fleet-Footed Club
3 2 5 4 6 3 1 5 4 3 2 6
4 3 5 3 2 2 1 5 4 3 6 3
2 5 3 1 4 2 5 6 2 3 2
Number of Miles Run Each Day
Number of Miles Run Each Day by the
by Members of The Fleet-Footed Club
Members of the Fleet-Footed Club

Number of
Tally Total
Miles

6
1 2 3 4 5 6
Use the line plot to answer the questions.
2. How many miles did the greatest number of students run?

3. How many members ran 6 miles a day?

4. How many members ran 4 miles or more a day?

5. How many more members ran 4 miles a day than ran 1 mile a day?

6. How many members are in the club?


McGraw-Hill School Division

Use the data below to make a tally table and line plot on a separate sheet of paper.
Ages of Fleet-Footed Club Members
8 11 12 9 13 14 12 11 8 12 10 12
11 9 13 12 11 9 12 14 11 12 13 10
9 12 10 13 9 12 11 14 10 9 13
7. What statement can you make about the data in your line plot?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 4, pages 100101. (79) SDP 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
34 Page
Line Plots R RETEACH

Marcia counted the number of letters in each word in a story. The


data is shown below.
Number of Letters in Words in a Story
3 3 5 6 4 2 1 5 6 3 4 7
3 2 3 5 2 8 4 5 3 3 5 2
5 6 3 5 1 4

You can organize the data in a tally table.


To compare the data, you can make a line plot.
Example: For the first number, 3, make a tally mark in the table. Cross out
the 3 in the data above. Then record and cross out the remaining
3s. In the line plot, use an X to stand for each word in the story.

Complete the tally table and the line plot.

Number of Letters in Words in a Story Number of Letters in Words in a Story


Number of Total 2 words had 7 words had
Letters in Tally Number 1 letter. 5 letters.
Words of Words
1 2 X
X
2 3 words had
X 6 letters.
3 8
X
4
X X
5
X X X
6 X X X
McGraw-Hill School Division

7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
8

Use the line plot. How many words had:


1. 3 letters? 2. 2 letters? 3. 8 letters?

4. more than 3 letters? 5. less than 3 letters?

6. How many letters did the greatest number of words have?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 4, pages 100101. (80) SDP 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
34 Page
Line Plots E ENRICH

Mystery Plot
Use the clues below to complete the line plot.
Number of Books Read in September by Students in Fourth Grade

5 6 7 8 9 10
Clues
There are 4 students who read 5 books The number of students who read 8
a month and 3 times as many who read books a month is 2 less than the
7 books a month. number of students who read 6 and 9
books a month combined.
The number of students who read 6
books a month is 7 less than the number The number of students who read 9
of students who read 7 books a month. books a month is twice as many as the
number of the students who read 6
The number of students who read 10
McGraw-Hill School Division

books a month.
books a month is half the number who
read 7 books a month.

Use the line plot to answer the questions.


1. How many students were surveyed?

2. How many books were read by the greatest number of students each month?
About how many was that a week?
3. How many books were read by the least number of students?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 4, pages 100101. (81) SDP 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
35 Page
Range, Median and Mode P PRACTICE

The third-grade class at Blue Hill School collects and recycles


aluminum cans. The line plot shows how many cans the students
collected in March. Use data from the line plot for exercises 13.

1. Find the range, median, and mode Number of Aluminum Cans Collected
from the line plot. in March

Range: X
X
Median:
X X
Mode: X X
X X
2. What does the mode tell you about
X X X
this data?
X X X X X
X X X X X X X
X X X X X X X X
X X X X X X X X X
3. What does the median tell you about 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32
this data?

Complete the table.

Data Order Data from Range Median Mode


Least to Greatest
4. 6, 8, 8, 9, 5, 4, 8, 7, 5
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. 30, 35, 29, 42, 35, 35, 40

6. 30, 19, 21, 17, 25, 23, 25

7. 20, 80, 40, 50, 90, 60, 50

8. 78, 85, 100, 100, 95, 92, 88

9. $9, $13, $23, $15, $13

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 5, pages 102103. (82) SDP 1.1, 1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
35 Page
Range, Median and Mode R RETEACH

You can analyze data using the range, median, and mode.
Use the line plot to help you find the range, median, and mode.
Range: the difference between the Time It Takes to Get to School
greatest and least numbers X
Range: 25  5  20 X
Median: the middle number when the X X
data is arranged in order from least to X X X
greatest X X X
The data in the line plot is arranged in X X X
order. There are 29 Xs, so the middle X is X X X
the 15th X. The 15th X in the line plot is X X X X
above 10, so the median is 10. X X X X
Mode: the number that occurs most often X X X X X
The greatest number of Xs is above 10, so 0 5 10 15 20 25
10 is the mode. Minutes

Order the data from least to greatest. Then find the range, median, and mode.
1. Data: 6, 4, 3, 3, 0, 5, 8
List in order from least to greatest: , , , , , ,
Range: 0 =
Median:
Mode:
2. Data: 83, 96, 72, 91, 83
List in order from least to greatest: , , , ,
McGraw-Hill School Division

Range: 96 =
Median:
Mode:
3. Data: 56, 88, 100, 34, 96, 56, 92
List in order from least to greatest: , , , , , ,
Range:
Median:
Mode:
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 5, pages 102103. (83) SDP 1.1, 1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
35 Page
Range, Median, and Mode E ENRICH

The Case of the Missing Math Tests


Ms. Lee's math class is divided into three groups. Each group
found the range, median, and mode of the group's scores.
Use the data for each group to find the missing scores.
1.
Group 1s Test Scores Students Scores for Group 1

Range 18 Megan 80 Joe 90

Median 88 Stephanie 92 Chris 76

Mode 94 Gregory 84 Alison 94

Brian 86 Nancy

2.
Group 2s Test Scores Students Scores for Group 2

Range 18 Jason Ann 88

Median 91 Steven 82 Karen 94

Mode 94 Melissa 94 Leroy 90

Serena 98 Carl 80

3.
Group 3s Test Scores Students Scores for Group 3

Range 16 Sam Jamal 92

Median 92 Beth 92 Sally 96


McGraw-Hill School Division

Mode 92 Susan 88 Bill 82

Mario 86 Rita 92

4. Explain how you found each missing test score.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 5, pages 102103. (84) SDP 1.1,1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
36 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Identify Extra and Missing Information Reading


Skill
Circle the question that you need to answer. Cross out any extra
information. Then solve or tell what information you need to solve
the problem.
1. Fiona is taking a train from Boston to 2. On Tuesday, September 7, Noah
Providence on May 6th. The train bought a ticket for a flight that
arrives in Providence at 3:54 P.M. leaves on September 20th. The ticket
How long is the train trip? cost $329. On what day of the week
is Noahs flight?

3. Marion and her daughter fly from 4. A train leaves Washington, D.C., at
Atlanta to Dallas. The round-trip fare 5:45 A.M. and arrives in Philadelphia
for Marion is $349. The fare for at 8:00 A.M. A train from New York
Marions daughter is the same. This City arrives in Washington, D.C., at
fare costs $50 more than the fare 8:10 A.M. Which train ride takes
the last time Marion flew. What was more time?
the round-trip fare the last time
Marion flew?

5. Kendra wants to fly from Atlanta to 6. A round-trip coach ticket on Flight


Philadelphia. Flight 17 leaves Atlanta 54 from New York City to San
at 11:39 A.M. and arrives in Francisco costs $399. A round-trip
Philadelphia at 1:43 P.M. Flight 20 first-class ticket on Flight 54 costs
McGraw-Hill School Division

leaves Atlanta at 8:40 P.M. and $1,609. A round-trip coach ticket on


arrives in Philadelphia at 10:54 P.M. Flight 98 from New York City to San
A coach ticket on Flight 17 is $109. Francisco costs $438. How much
This is $20 more than a ticket on more expensive is a round-trip coach
Flight 20. Which flight is shorter? ticket on Flight 98 than on Flight 54?
How much shorter is it?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 6, pages 104105. (85) MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
36 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Identify Extra and Missing Information Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
Flight 81 leaves Salt Lake City at 2:55 P.M. and arrives in Phoenix at
4:30 P.M. Flight 62 from Salt Lake City, which is sold out, arrives in
Phoenix at 3:45 P.M. Which flight is faster?
1. Which of the following statements 2. What important information is
is false? missing?
A Flight 81 takes less than 2 hours. F the time that Flight 81 leaves Salt
B Flight 62 arrives in Phoenix after Lake City
Flight 81 does. G the time that Flight 81 arrives in
C Flight 62 is sold out. Phoenix
D Flight 81 arrives in Phoenix before H the time that Flight 62 leaves Salt
5:00 P.M. Lake City
J the time that Flight 62 arrives in
Salt Lake City
An express train leaves Grand Terminal at 5:05 P.M. The train arrives
at the first stop at 5:21 P.M., the second stop at 5:46 P.M., and the
last stop at 6:04 P.M. How long is the train ride?
3. Which extra information is not 4. How long is the train ride?
needed to solve the problem? F 16 minutes
A the time the train leaves Grand G 41 minutes
Terminal H 59 minutes
B the time the train arrives at the J 61 minutes
second stop
C the time the train arrives at the
last stop
D none of the above
McGraw-Hill School Division

A train leaves Chicago at 4:20 P.M. on Wednesday, November 24. It arrives in


Houston at 11:50 A.M. the next day. How long does the train ride take?
5. Which extra information is not 6. How long does the train ride take?
needed to solve the problem? F 4 hours 30 minutes
A the time the train leaves Chicago G 7 hours 30 minutes
B the time the train arrives in H 8 hours 30 minutes
Sacramento J 19 hours 30 minutes
C the date the train leaves
D none of the above

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 6, pages 104105. (86) MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
36 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Identify Extra and Missing Information Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
Ty wants to take a nonstop flight that leaves Miami at 7:25 A.M. and arrives
in Cincinnati at 9:55 A.M., but the flight is sold out. Instead, he takes a
9:00 A.M. flight from Miami to Atlanta. Then Ty takes a flight from Atlanta to
Cincinnati. That flight leaves Atlanta at 12:00 noon. How much later does Ty
arrive in Cincinnati than he would have if he had taken a nonstop flight?
7. Which of the following statements 8. What information do you still need
is false? to solve the problem?
A Ty catches a 12:00 noon flight. F the time the 12:00 noon flight
B Ty catches a 9:00 A.M. flight. from Atlanta arrives in Cincinnati
C The nonstop flight takes less than G the time the 9:00 A.M. flight from
3 hours. Miami arrives in Atlanta
D Tys trip to Cincinnati takes H the time the 7:25 A.M. flight from
3 hours. Miami arrives in Cincinnati
J the time the 7:25 A.M. flight from
Miami arrives in Atlanta
Solve. Identify extra or missing information in each problem.
9. A round-trip first-class ticket from St. 10. A train leaves Rocky Mount, NC, at
Louis to San Diego costs $1,600. A 1:16 P.M. The train arrives in Petersburg,
round-trip coach ticket costs $359. VA, at 2:45 P.M. and in Richmond,
The Howards buy 3 tickets. How VA, at 3:22 P.M. How long is the trip
much do they spend? from Rocky Mount to Richmond?
McGraw-Hill School Division

11. A bus leaves the terminal at 6:10 P.M. 12. Samantha takes a train to New York
It makes its first stop at 6:30 P.M. and City. She catches the train at 7:25 A.M.
its second stop at 6:55 P.M. When The train stops in Newark at 7:41 A.M.
will the bus arrive at its third stop? The train arrives in New York at
7:59 A.M. How much time does
Samanthas ride take?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 6, pages 104105. (87) MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
37 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy P PRACTICE

Work Backward
Work backward to solve.

1. Bill wants to arrive 15 minutes early 2. It takes Sandy 35 minutes to walk


for a movie that starts at 7:45 P.M. It from school to the mall. She spends
will take him about 20 minutes to 45 minutes at the mall. Sandy leaves
walk to the theater. When should Bill the mall at 4:20 P.M. When did she
leave home? leave school?

3. Nick spent $21.50 on a theater ticket 4. Sally spends $16.50 on gas, $2.25
and $12.50 on a meal. He has on tolls, and $2.75 on a snack. She
$14.25 left. How much money did has $32.10. How much money did
Nick start with? she start with?

Mixed Strategy Review


Solve. Use any strategy.

5. Barry makes letters for a sign that 6. Mr. Carlson has $424. He spends
reads Free Field Trip Sign-Up Sheet. $29 on gasoline. How much money
Which letter does Mark need to does Mr. Carlson have left?
make the most of?

Strategy:
Strategy:
McGraw-Hill School Division

7. Health Walking a mile burns about 8. Create a problem which can be


110 calories. About how many solved by working backward. Share
calories would you burn if you it with others.
walked 2 miles?

Strategy:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 7, pages 108109. (88) MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
37 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Work Backward
Page 109, Problem 1

Mindy wants to eat before the 7:40 P.M. show. She needs about 45 minutes
to order and eat her dinner. What is the latest time she can order?

Step 1
Be sure you understand the problem.
Read Read carefully.
What do you know?
Mindy needs about minutes to order and
eat her dinner.

She wants to eat before .


What do you need to find?
You need to find the latest time that Mindy
.

Step 2
Make a plan.
Plan Choose a strategy.
Make a Table You can work backward to solve the problem.
or List

Write a Number Start at the time of the show.
Sentence
Work Backward Then work backward to find the time that Mindy needs

Act it Out to order.
Find a Pattern
McGraw-Hill School Division

Make a Graph
Guess and Check
Logical Reasoning
Solve Simpler
Problem
Draw a Picture

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 7, pages 108109. (89) MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
37 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Work Backward

Step 3
Carry out your plan.
Solve
Mindy needs about minutes to order and
eat her dinner.

She wants to finish eating by .


Start at 7:40 P.M.
Think: Mindy wants to finish eating
by 7:40 P.M. She needs to order
45 minutes before that time.
Move backward 45 minutes.

The latest time that Mindy can order


is .

Step 4
Is the solution reasonable?
Look Back Reread the problem.
Work forward to check your answer.
Start with your answer. Move forward 45 minutes.
Did you end at 7:40 P.M.?
What other strategies could you use to solve the problem?
McGraw-Hill School Division

Practice
1. Laurel wants to watch a show that 2. Paul plays basketball for 30 minutes
begins at 8:30 A.M. Before she can and Frisbee for 15 minutes. Then he
watch TV, she has to practice piano walks home.The walk takes 20 minutes.
for 1 hour 15 minutes. At what time If Paul gets home at 2:30 P.M., at what
does Laurel have to start practicing? time did he start playing basketball?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 7, pages 108109. (90) MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
38 Page
Explore Pictographs P PRACTICE

1. Complete the table. Then use the table to complete the pictograph.

Which Modern Invention Do You Which Modern Invention Do You


Like the Most? Like the Most?
Invention Tally Total Computer
Computer
CD Player
CD Player
Car
Car
Television Television

Key: Each stands for people

Use the pictograph for exercises 25.


2. Which item do people like the most?

3. How many more people like their computers than their televisions?

4. How many people were surveyed?

5. What key would you use if 80 people were surveyed? Explain.

Use the table to make a pictograph on a separate piece of paper.


Then answer each question.
McGraw-Hill School Division

6. 7. How many more students like pizza


Favorite Lunches
more than spaghetti?
Lunch Tally
Pizza
8. How many students took part in
Hamburgers
the survey?
Spaghetti
Chicken

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 8, pages 110111. (91) SDP 1.1, 1.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
38 Page
Explore Pictographs R RETEACH

Evan and Jenny surveyed students to find Favorite Colors


out whether their favorite color is red, blue,
or yellow. This is the data they collected. Red 10
Blue 11
Yellow 6
Here is how to make a pictograph of the data. Favorite Colors
Step 1: Write a title. List the categories. Red
Step 2: Choose a picture to show the data.
Blue
You can use 1 picture to represent 2
students. So, half of a picture will Yellow
represent 1 student. Use the picture
to make a key. Key: Each stands for 2 students.
Step 3: Use the key to draw pictures to show
Key: Each stands for 1 student.
the data for each category.

Use the data in the table to complete the pictograph.


Answer the questions to help you.
1. How many people chose oranges? 2. How many people chose apples?

How many faces will you draw? How many faces will you draw?

Favorite Fruit Favorite Fruit


Fruit Tally Total Apples
McGraw-Hill School Division

Apples 9
Pears
Pears 5
Oranges
Oranges 10
Plums 4 Plums

Key: Each stands for 2 people.

Key: Each stands for 1 person.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 1, pages 110111. (92) SDP 1.1, 1.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
38 Page
Explore Pictographs E ENRICH

Stamp Collecting
Use the clues below to complete the pictograph.

Sarahs Stamp Collection

Stamps of famous people

Stamps of famous landmarks

Stamps of famous events

Stamps of birds

Stamps from other countries

Stamps of flowers

Key: Each stands for 2 stamps.

Clues
Sarah has 5 fewer stamps from other countries than stamps of
famous people.
Sarah has twice as many stamps of famous events as stamps from
other countries.
Sarah has 3 more stamps of famous landmarks than stamps from
McGraw-Hill School Division

other countries.
Sarah has 1 more than twice as many bird stamps as stamps of
famous events.
If Sarah had 6 more flower stamps, she would have an amount
equal to the number of bird stamps.
Would you use 1 stamp to stand for 8 stamps in the key? Why or why not?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 8, pages 110111. (93) SDP 1.1, 1.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
39 Page
Bar Graphs P PRACTICE

Complete the table below. Then use it to complete the bar graph
and answer exercises 14.
Favorite Types of Music

Adults Teenagers

Type of Music Tally Marks Total Tally Marks Total

Country

Classical

Jazz

Rap

Rock and roll

Favorite Types of Music


16
14
Number of People

12
10
8
6
4
2
0
Country Classical Jazz Rap Rock and Roll
Adults Teenagers
McGraw-Hill School Division

1. How many teenagers chose rock and roll?

2. Which type of music was chosen about the same number of


times by adults and teenagers?

3. Which type of music do adults like the most?

4. Did more adults or teenagers choose jazz as their favorite


music?
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 9, pages 112115. (94) SDP 1.1, 1.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
39 Page
Bar Graphs R RETEACH

You can use single-bar graphs or double-bar graphs to show data.


A single-bar graph presents one set of data. A double-bar graph
presents two sets of data.

When you create a double-bar graph, you need to make a key to


represent each set of data. Write a title, headings for the vertical
and horizontal sides, and select a scale just as you would for a
single-bar graph. Remember to include different headings for both
sets of data.

Use the graphs to answer the questions.

1. What is the favorite


Favorite Vacation Spots
vacation spot? How many 20
people chose it? 18
16
Number of People

14
12
10
8
6
2. Did more people choose 4
2
France, Hawaii, or Greece as
0
their favorite vacation spot? Hawaii Greece Florida France Australia

Favorite Vacation Spots


3. How many more boys than 10
girls chose Hawaii as their 9
McGraw-Hill School Division

8
Number of People

favorite vacation spot?


7
6
5
4
4. Which vacation spot shows 3
the greatest difference 2
between boys and girls? 1
0
Hawaii Greece Florida France Australia
Boys Girls

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 9, pages 112115. (95) SDP 1.1, 1.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
39 Page
Bar Graphs E ENRICH

Misleading Graphs
The bar graph shows the earnings of Bayside Auto Plaza and Auto World.
1. The bar for Auto World is twice as
high as the bar for Bayside Auto Earnings of Car Sales
Plaza. Does this mean that Auto $150,000
World earns twice as much as
Bayside Auto Plaza?
$140,000

2. What is the actual difference in the $130,000


earnings of the two stores?

$120,000
3. Is the graph misleading? Explain.
0 130,000 150,000
Bayside Auto
Auto Plaza World

A car salesperson made Graphs A and B to show the number of


cars she sold in one year.
Car SalesGraph A Car SalesGraph B
Number of Cars Sold

Number of Cars Sold

50 100
40 80
30 60
20 40
10 20
McGraw-Hill School Division

0 0
March

April
Jan.
Feb.
March
April
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.

Oct.
Jan.

Sept.
July
June

Dec.

Month Months
4. Do both bar graphs show the same data?

5. Which graph do you think the salesperson showed her boss? Tell why.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 9, pages 112115. (96) SDP 1.1, 1.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
310 Page
Coordinate Graphing P PRACTICE

Give the ordered pair for each place on the grid.

1. mall 12
11
school
10
2. library 9 post office
library
8
bank
3. park 7
park
6
4. school 5 mall
fire station
4
3
5. video arcade video arcade
2
pool
1
0
Name the place at each location. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112

6. (9, 1) 7. (1, 9)

8. (4, 5) 9. (3, 8)

Give the ordered pair for each place on the grid.


12
city hall
10. jail 11
police station
10 jail
9
11. movie theater court house
8 pet store
7
12. police station 6
movie theater
5 grocery store
4
13. grocery store 3
2 soccer field
1
Name the place at each location. 0
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112
McGraw-Hill School Division

14. (7, 2) 15. (8, 11)

16. (8, 9) 17. (4, 8)

18. A drive-in diner is being built 19. A parking garage is being built
3 blocks down from the pet between the city hall and the
store. What ordered pair names court house. What ordered pair
this location? names the garages location?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 10, pages 116117. (97) MG 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
310 Page
Coordinate Graphing R RETEACH

The grid shows the location of 10


rides at an amusement park.
9
Where is the Space Ride located?
Sky Ride Ferris Wheel Carousel
Start at 0. Go right 1, and then 8
go up 2. You can write the
location of the Space Ride as the 7
Swings Paddle Boats
ordered pair (1, 2). 6
Tidal Force
In an ordered pair, the first
5
number tells you how far to go to
the right. The second number Log Ride Roller Coaster
4
tells you how far to go up.
3
Shells Scrambler
Try this. Go right 5, Go up 1.
2
(5, 1) ordered pair Space Ride
Tea Cups
1
Which ride do you find?
0
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Complete. Use the grid above.

1. Start at 0. Go right 8, then up 3. 2. Start at 0. Go right 4, then up 4.

The ordered pair is (8, ). The ordered pair is ( , 4).


What is here? What is here?

3. Start at 0. Go right 2, then up 8. 4. Start at 0. Go right 6, then up 7.

The ordered pair is . The ordered pair is .


McGraw-Hill School Division

What is here? What is here?

Use the grid above to tell which is at each location.

5. (5, 8) 6. (2, 3)

7. (4, 6) 8. (1, 6)

9. (6, 4) 10. (8, 8)

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 10, pages 116117. (98) MG 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
310 Page
Coordinate Graphing E ENRICH

Find the Hidden Picture


Locate each ordered pair on the grid below. Label it with the
exercise number. Then connect the dots in order.
1. (17, 3) 2. (11, 7) 3. (10, 0) 4. (9, 7)

5. (3, 3) 6. (7, 9) 7. (0, 10) 8. (7, 11)

9. (3, 17) 10. (9, 13) 11. (10, 20) 12. (11, 13)

13. (17, 17) 14. (13, 11) 15. (20, 10) 16. (13, 9)

20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
McGraw-Hill School Division

6
5
4
3
2
1

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 10, pages 116117. (99) MG 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
311 Page
Explore Line Graphs P PRACTICE

Use the table to complete the line graph.

Toy Sales at Toy City Toys Sold at Toy City


Month Amount $3,200
$3,000
July $1,700 $2,800
$2,600

Amount
August $1,000 $2,400
$2,200
September $1,700 $2,000
$1,800
October $2,500 $1,600
$1,400
November $2,700 $1,200
$1,000
December $3,200 0
July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
Month

Use the line graph to answer the questions.

1. In which month was the greatest 2. In which two months were sales
dollar amount of toys sold at Toy City? the same?

3. During which month did sales 4. During which month did sales
McGraw-Hill School Division

decrease? increase the most?

5. What is the difference in sales 6. In how many months did Toy City sell

between the highest and lowest more than $1,600 worth of toys?
points on the graph

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 11, pages 118119. (100) SDP 1.1,1.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
311 Page
Explore Line Graphs R RETEACH

A line graph shows change over a period of time.


The table below shows the number of ice-cream cones sold over a
year at the Ice-Cream Cottage. You can also show this information
in a line graph.
Ice-Cream Cones Sold
Ice-Cream Cone Sales 900

Number of Cones Sold


Month Number 800
July 800 700
600
August 900
500
September 700
400
October 650 300
November 350 200
December 100 100
0
July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.
Show the data from the table in Month
the line graph.

In October, 650 cones were sold.


Draw a dot across from 650 on the
graphs scale (650 is half way
between 600 and 700).
Draw a dot for each of the other months number of sales.

Use the line graph to answer the questions.


McGraw-Hill School Division

1. In which month was the greatest 2. How many ice-cream cones were
number of ice-cream cones sold? sold in July?

3. How many more ice-cream cones 4. Between which two months did the
were sold in July than in December? greatest decrease in sales take place?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 11, pages 118119. (101) SDP 1.1, 1.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
311 Page
Explore Line Graphs E ENRICH

Population Trends
Use the clues to complete the line graph.
Clues
Foxwood had 200 more people in 1930 than it did in 1920.
The population was the same in 1940 as it was in 1930.
In 1950, the number of people increased by 200.
There were 1,600 people living in Foxwood in 1960.
The number of people decreased by 200 in 1970 and 100 in 1980.
The population in 1990 was 200 more than in 1980.
Population Changes in Foxwood
2,200
2,100
2,000
Number of People

1,900
1,800
1,700
1,600
1,500
1,400
1,300
1,200
1,100
0
1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000
Year

Write the years during which each event most likely happened.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Event Years

For the first time in 30 years, the between and


population began growing again.

A computer factory opened. People between and


moved to Foxwood for jobs.

The town's toy factory closed. Many between and


people lost their jobs.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 11, pages 118119. (102) SDP 1.1, 1.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


312
Problem Solving: Application Part
A WORKSHEET

Decision
Applying Time and Data Making

Show how the Sequoia Nature Club can spend its time. Make a
schedule.
Activity Starting Time of Activity Ending Time of Activity

Your Decision
McGraw-Hill School Division

Which activities did you choose for the Sequoia Nature Club?
Explain your choices.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 12, pages 120121. (103) MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.6, 3.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


312
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

Does practice make perfect? Math &


Science

Record your data.

Attempt Time Needed to Complete the Puzzle

10
McGraw-Hill School Division

1. Describe what happened to the time you needed as you


repeated the puzzle over and over.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 12, pages 122123. (104) NS 1.2; SDP 1.1, 1.3; MR 2.3, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


312
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

Does practice make perfect? Math &


Science
2. How many times did you have to work the puzzle until you
mastered it?

3. What happened to your time after you mastered the puzzle?

4. Make a line graph, comparing puzzle number and time.

What happened to the line on the graph after you mastered


the puzzle?
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Explain how you used your short- and long-term memory to learn
the puzzle.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 3, Lesson 12, pages 122123. (105) NS 1.2; SDP 1.1, 1.3; MR 2.3, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
41 Page
The Meaning of Multiplication P PRACTICE

Write a multiplication sentence for each model.


1. 2.

3. 4.

Find each product.


5. 6 6. 7 7. 3 8. 7 9. 6 10. 7
6 7 5 3 0 5

11. 5 12. 8 13. 4 14. 9 15. 6 16. 4


8 7 6 5 8 8

17. 8  8  18. 2  6  19. 9  6  20. 9  8 

21. 3  3  22. 6  7  23. 2  3  24. 6  9 

25. 8  6  26. 3  6  27. 1  9  28. 9  3 

Algebra & Functions Find the missing number.


McGraw-Hill School Division

29. 2  (n  5)  30 30. (j  7)  4  56

31. (2  v)  6  48 32. (3  r)  8  72

Problem Solving
33. Jason practices his violin 2 hours 34. Sheila arranges her pennies in 9
every day. How many hours does rows with 6 pennies in each row.
he practice in 7 days? How many pennies does Sheila have?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 1, pages 138139. (106) AF 1.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
41 Page
The Meaning of Multiplication R RETEACH

The numbers you multiply are the factors.


The answer is the product.
First factor:
number of rows 5
Second factor:
number in each row 6

6 factor
6  6  6  6  6  30 You can write 5  6  30 or  5 factor

factor factor product 30 product

Complete the table.

Number Number in Number Multiplication


of Rows Each Row in All Sentence

1.

2.

3.

Find each product.


McGraw-Hill School Division

4. 4 5. 7 6. 6 7. 5 8. 3 9. 6
3 3 4 0 5 5

10. 2  5  11. 5  3  12. 9  3  13. 5  5 

14. 4  7  15. 8  3  16. 5  9  17. 6  2 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 1, pages 138139. (107) AF 1.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
41 Page
The Meaning of Multiplication E ENRICH

Factors, Products, and Rectangles


To show all the facts with a product of 6, draw as many rectangles
as you can that contain 6 squares. Count the number of squares in
each column and row.

List the numbers you count.


Those are the factors.
The factors of 6 are 1, 2, 3, and 6.
616 166 326 236

Draw as many rectangles as you can to show different facts for


each product. Then list the factors.
1. 12 2. 18

3. 20 4. 24
McGraw-Hill School Division

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 1, pages 138139. (108) AF 1.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
42 Page
Properties of Multiplication P PRACTICE

Find the product. Then use the Commutative Property to write a


different multiplication sentence.
1. 9  8  2. 8  7  3. 5  2 

4. 9  4  5. 3  4  6. 9  2 

7. 6  9  8. 2  3  9. 7  4 

10. 3  9  11. 9  7  12. 5  8 

13. 5  0  14. 1  8  15. 4  5 

Write  or  to make a true sentence.

16. 6 6  36 17. 8 19 18. 3 9  27

19. 7 7  14 20. 9 09 21. 9 9  81

22. 4 39 3 23. 8 75 3 24. 6 4  12 2

25. 9 26 3 26. 6 79 4 27. 4 48 8


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving

28. Joe plants pine seedlings in 7 rows. 29. Tanya has 9 pencils in each package.
He puts 6 seedlings in each row. How She has 6 packages. How many
many seedlings does Joe plant? pencils does Tanya have in all?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 2, pages 140141. (109) AF 1.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
42 Page
Properties of Multiplication R RETEACH

Commutative Property
The order of the factors does not change
the answer.

428 248
Identity Property Zero Property
The product of 1 and any number is The product of any number and
that number. zero is zero.

313 Think: 4 rows of 0 counters.


400

166 Think: 0 rows of 7 counters.


070

Find each product. Then use the Commutative Property to write


another sentence.
1. 3  9  2. 5  7  3. 4  6 

9  27 5 6 

4. 2  8  5. 1  4  6. 0  5 
McGraw-Hill School Division

Multiply. Tell which property you used.


7. 1  8  8. 0  7  9. 5  1 

10. 6  0  11. 0  4  12. 1  9 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 2, pages 140141. (110) AF 1.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
42 Page
Properties of Multiplication E ENRICH

Crack the Code!


What number does each symbol in the table below stand for? Use the
Commutative, Identity, and Zero properties of multiplication to help
you find out. Write the number next to the symbol in the code key.

    

    

1. 6  6 2. 6  26

7 8 5  10

3. 90 4. 6  

5 0 6 

5. 9   6.  8

 9  
McGraw-Hill School Division

7.  05 8.  4

  10  6

9. If you know that   ,


what other multiplication fact do you know?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 2, pages 140141. (111) AF 1.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
43 Page
Multiply by 2, 3, 4, and 6 P PRACTICE

Write the multiplication sentence.


1. 2.

Multiply.
3. 7  4  4. 1  6  5. 8  2  6. 3  3 

7. 9  6  8. 5  4  9. 0  6  10. 5  3 

11. 5  2  12. 6  4  13. 9  4  14. 6  3 

15. 2  4  16. 8  3  17. 4  2  18. 6  7 

19. 4 20. 5 21. 2 22. 3 23. 4 24. 9


3 6 2 6 8 6

25. 4 26. 2 27. 2 28. 7 29. 6 30. 1


4 3 0 6 2 6

31. 4 32. 6 33. 2 34. 6 35. 3 36. 4


6 8 5 6 9 7

Algebra & Functions Find the answer.


37. If   3, then how much is    ?
McGraw-Hill School Division

38. If   6, then how much is     ?

39. If   4, then how much is     ?

Problem Solving

40. Cars are parked in 2 rows. There are 41. Four parents are needed on each of
8 cars in each row. How many cars 9 committees. How many parents are
are parked? needed?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 3, pages 142145. (112) NS 4.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
43 Page
Multiply by 2, 3, 4, and 6 R RETEACH

You can skip count to multiply by 2 and 3.


Find 2  8. Think: Skip count by 2s eight times.
2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 These are multiples of 2.
       
2  8  16

Find 7  3. Think: Skip count by 3s seven times.


3 6 9 12 15 18 21 These are multiples of 3.
      
7  3  21

You can double a fact you know to multiply by 4 and 6.


Double a fact to multiply by 4. Double a fact to multiply by 6.
4  5  (2  5)  (2  5) 6  5  (3  5)  (3  5)

10  10  20 15  15  30


 



Skip count to find the answer. Use the models above to help you.
1. 2  7  2. 6  2  3. 2  8  4. 9  2 

5. 6  3  6. 3  8  7. 9  3  8. 3  7 
McGraw-Hill School Division

Double a fact to find the answer. You can use counters to help you.
9. 6  8  (3  8)  (3  ) 10. 4  7  (2  )  (2  )
   

11. 7  6  (7  )  (7  ) 12. 8  4  (8  )  (8  )
   

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 3, pages 142145. (113) NS 4.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
43 Page
Multiply by 2, 3, 4, and 6 E ENRICH

Triangle Math
In each triangle, the number on the bottom left is the product of
the middle left and the top number. The number on the bottom
right is the product of the middle right and the top number.
Complete the triangles. The top number must be a 2, 3, 4, or 6.
1. 2. 3. 4.
2 3 6 4
1 6 6 3 3 1 8 3

2 12 18 9 18 6 32 12

5. 6. 7. 8.
6 2 4 3
7 5 7 8 2 6 7 8

42 30 14 16 8 24 21 24

9. 10. 11. 12.


2 6 3 4
9 5 6 8 9 5 5 9
18 10 36 48 27 15 20 36

13. 14. 15. 16.


3 4 6 2
McGraw-Hill School Division

1 4 4 7 4 9 2 3
3 12 16 28 24 54 4 6

17. Explain how you found the answer to the triangle in exercise 3.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 3, pages 142145. (114) NS 4.1


Print This Page
Name

Print This
44 Page
Multiply by 5 and 10 P PRACTICE

Multiply.
1. 5  4  2. 5  8  3. 6  10  4. 1  5 

5. 0  5  6. 3  10  7. 7  5  8. 4  10 

9. 3  5  10. 6  5  11. 5  10  12. 1  10 

13. 2  5  14. 4  5  15. 9  5  16. 8  10 

17. 9  10  18. 2  10  19. 8  5  20. 5  5 

21. 10  6  22. 0  10  23. 5  2  24. 7  10 

25. 5 26. 10 27. 5 28. 10 29. 5 30. 10


6  3 3  8 2  5

31. 10 32. 5 33. 5 34. 10 35. 10 36. 5


 9 1 5  6  4 4

37. 10 38. 5 39. 5 40. 10 41. 10 42. 5


 7 8 0  0  2 7

43. 10 44. 5 45. 6 46. 9 47. 8 48. 3


 1 9 5 5 5 5

Tell whether the number is a multiple of 2, 5, or 10.


McGraw-Hill School Division

49. 18 50. 30 51. 35 52. 40

Problem Solving

53. Gene has 5 boxes of crayons with 54. Jan places 5 rows of 8 stars in a
10 crayons in each box. How many rectangle to make a design. How
crayons does Gene have? many stars does she use?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 4, pages 146147. (115) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
44 Page
Multiply by 5 and 10 R RETEACH

You can skip count using nickels to multiply by 5.


Find 7  5 Think: Skip count by 5s four times.

five ten fifteen twenty twenty-five thirty thirty-five


5 10 15 20 25 30 35
7  5  35

You can skip count using dimes to multiply by ten.


Find 8  10. Think: Skip count by 10s three times.

ten twenty thirty forty fifty sixty seventy eighty


10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80
8  10  80

Skip count to find the answer.


1. 2.

65 5  10 

Multiply. You can use nickels and dimes to help you.


McGraw-Hill School Division

3. 4  5  4. 3  10  5. 5  10  6. 6  5 

7. 9  5  8. 6  10  9. 7  5  10. 7  10 

11. 2  5  12. 2  10  13. 1  10  14. 5  5 

15. 10 16. 5 17. 10 18. 10 19. 5 20. 10


 8 8  5  9 9  4

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 4, pages 146147. (116) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
44 Page
Multiply by 5 and 10 E ENRICH

True Sums
Write multiplication sentences to make each sum true. Each
multiplication sentence must have a 5 or a 10 as one of its factors.

Product Product Product


1. 2  10 20 2. 10  1 10 3. 7  10 70
5 4 20 5 2 10 8 5 40
40 Sum 20 Sum 110 Sum

Product Product Product


4. 5 3 15 5. 5  6 30 6. 4 5 20
10  10 100 8 10 80 10  9 90
115 Sum 110 Sum 110 Sum

Product Product Product


7. 5  7 35 8. 9 5 45 9. 5  1 5
5 10 50 10  8 80 5 10 50
85 Sum 125 Sum 55 Sum

Product Product Product


10. 3  10 30 11. 4  10 40 12. 5 5 25
5 9 45 5 10 50 10  6 60
75 Sum 90 Sum 85 Sum
McGraw-Hill School Division

Can you follow the rules and find other numbers that will give
a true sum for exercises 1 and 4?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 4, pages 146147. (117) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
45 Page
Multiply by 7, 8, and 9 P PRACTICE

Multiply.
1. 5  7  2. 9  7  3. 1  8  4. 9  9 

5. 3  8  6. 8  7  7. 4  9  8. 2  8 

9. 3  7  10. 6  9  11. 7  8  12. 7  7 

13. 5  8  14. 2  9  15. 0  7  16. 1  9 

17. 6  8  18. 4  7  19. 8  9  20. 4  8 

21. 5 22. 7 23. 9 24. 9 25. 8 26. 7


9 2 8 3 0 9

27. 8 28. 2 29. 7 30. 6 31. 9 32. 9


8 8 1 7 1 6

33. 8 34. 9 35. 7 36. 8 37. 7 38. 8


4 2 3 3 5 6

Algebra & Functions Find the rule. Then complete the table.
39.
Rule:
0 1 2 3 4 5 6
0 9 18 27
40.
Rule:
McGraw-Hill School Division

0 1 2 3 4 5 6
0 8 16 24

Problem Solving

41. Nathan puts 6 cards on each of 8 42. A marching band has 5 rows with
pages in an album. How many cards 9 students in each row. How many
does he put in the album? students are in the marching band?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 5, pages 148149. (118) NS 3.2, 4.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
45 Page
Multiply by 7, 8, and 9 R RETEACH

You can use known facts to multiply by 7, 8, and 9.


Add to a known fact to Subtract from a known Double a fact to multiply
multiply by 7. fact to multiply by 9. by 8.

Find 7  6. Find 6  9. Find 8  7.

You know 7  5  35. Double 4  7.


You know 6  10  60.
Think: Think: (4  7)  (4  7)
35  7 is the same as 7  6. 60  6 is the same as 6  9.
28  28  56
35  7  42 60  6  54

7  6  42 6  9  54 8  7  56

Multiply.
1. 7  5  2. 8  6  3. 9  8 

4. 8  8  5. 9  7  6. 7  7 

7. 9  9  8. 7  9  9. 8  10 
McGraw-Hill School Division

10. 3  8  11. 7  4  12. 9  2 

13. 5 14. 8 15. 4 16. 3 17. 6 18. 4


9 9 7 9 7 8

19. 10 20. 4 21. 5 22. 4 23. 10 24. 9


 9 6 8 9  7 8

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 5, pages 148149. (119) NS 3.2, 4.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
45 Page
Multiply by 7, 8, and 9 E ENRICH

Multiplication Game
Play with a partner. You will need:
Cut out the game markers. Two sets of number cards. Each set
One player puts the glove on START. contains number cards from 0 through
The other puts the baseball on START. 10. Label one set A and the other set B.

Take turns.
Pick a card from A and a card from B. Find the product of the two numbers.
Have your partner check the product. If the product is correct, move
forward two spaces. If the product is wrong, move back one space.

The first player to get to the field wins.

Ball is Lost in Woods.


Go to equipment box.
x nt
Bo me
uip

Woods
Eq

Ball bounced Tripped


in puddle. over feet.
Go back to Go back
Start. 3 spaces.

Puddle
pa ack ud.
Go e in ped
3s b m
v p
glo Dro

s.
ce
McGraw-Hill School Division

Field

Markers

Start

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 5, pages 148149. (120) NS 3.2, 4.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
46 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Choose an Operation Reading


Skill
Solve. Tell how you chose the operation.
1. Georgia puts coins in an album. There are 8 pages in the album. Each page
has slots for 8 coins. How many coins can Georgia put in the album?

2. Dina has 37 international dolls. Maxine has 26 international dolls.


Who has more dolls? How many more does she have?

3. Ben buys 9 packs of dinosaur stickers. There are 6 stickers in each


pack. How many stickers does Ben buy?

4. Melanie has a collection of 242 stamps. At a stamp convention, she


buys 19 more stamps. How many stamps does Melanie have now?

5. James collects model cars. He has 48 model cars. On his birthday,


James gets 7 more cars. How many model cars does James have in all?
McGraw-Hill School Division

6. Wendy has 10 flower stickers. She gives away 7 flower stickers.


How many flower stickers does Wendy have left?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 6, pages 150151. (121) MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
46 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Choose an Operation Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
Juan buys 6 packs of stickers. Each pack has 4 stickers.
How many stickers does Juan buy in all?
1. Which of the following statements 2. Which of the following can you use
is true? to solve the problem?
A Juan has 4 packs of stickers. F 64
B Juan has 10 stickers. G 64
C Juan has 24 packs of stickers. H 64
D Juan has 24 stickers. J 64

Warren has 9 silver dollars. At a coin show, he buys 3 silver dollars.


How many silver dollars does Warren have now?
3. What do you have to do to solve 4. How many silver dollars does
this problem? Warren have?
A find how many silver dollars are left F 3 silver dollars
B find the total of 2 unequal groups G 6 silver dollars
of silver dollars H 12 silver dollars
C find the total of 3 equal groups of J 27 silver dollars
silver dollars
D find how many silver dollars there
are when you split 9 into 3 equal
groups

Nadia collects souvenir flags. She puts the flags in her bookcase in 3 rows.
There are 7 flags in each row. How many flags does Nadia have?
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. What do you have to do to solve 6. How many flags are there?


this problem? F 21 flags
A find the total of 2 unequal groups G 10 flags
of flags H 4 flags
B find the total of 2 equal groups J 3 flags
of flags
C find the total of 3 equal groups
of flags
D find how many flags are left
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 6, pages 150151. (122) MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
46 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Choose an Operation Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
Selena has 42 movie posters. Her brother has 26 movie posters.
How many movie posters do they have in all?
7. What operation could you use to 8. How many movie posters do Selena
solve this problem? and her brother have in all?
A addition F 16
B subtraction G 26
C multiplication H 68
D division J 78

Solve.
9. Lois sells 10 rock-star posters. She 10. Morris has 16 kites. He buys 4 more
gets $8 for each poster. How much kites. How many kites does Morris
money does Lois receive? have now?

11. Janell has 472 baseball cards. Lou 12. Kevin buys 7 packs of football cards.
has 397 baseball cards. How many There are 4 football cards in each
more baseball cards does Janell have pack. How many football cards does
than Lou? Kevin buy?
McGraw-Hill School Division

13. Brian displays his trophies in his 14. Barbara puts photos of France in
bedroom. He puts his trophies in a photo album. The photo album
3 rows. There are 6 trophies in can hold 94 photos. Barbara has
each row. How many trophies 78 photos. How many more photos
does Brian have? can she put in the album?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 6, pages 150151. (123) MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
47 Page
Multiplication Table and Patterns P PRACTICE

Complete the table.


 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
0 0
1 0 1 2 4 8
2 2 4 12
3 3 9 21 27 36
4 8 20
5 15 30 40 50 60
6 36 66 72
7 7 77
8 16 32 96
9 54 108
10
11 22 55 88 99 121 132
12 24 84 120 144

Use the table to multiply.


1. 9  8  2. 3  12  3. 11  11  4. 4  12 

5. 12 6. 12 7. 12 8. 10 9. 11 10. 12
 8  12  7  10  7  9
McGraw-Hill School Division

11. What is the pattern of odd and even 12. What is the pattern of odd and even
numbers in the 3 row or 3 column? numbers in the 4 row or 4 column?

Compare. Write , , or .
13. 6  3 33 14. 15  7 27 15. 4  8 25  4

16. 9  7 6  11 17. 9  7 44 18. 12  4 23

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 7, pages 152153. (124) NS 4.1, 4.2, MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
47 Page
Multiplication Table and Patterns R RETEACH

To find 8  9, draw arrows to show where the 8 row and the


9 column meet in the table. The 8 row and the 9 column meet
at 72. So, 8  9  72.
 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24
3 0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36
4 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48
5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60
6 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 66 72
7 0 7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63 70 77 84
8 0 8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 80 88 96
9 0 9 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81 90 99 108
10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120
11 0 11 22 33 44 55 66 77 88 99 110 121 132
12 0 12 24 36 48 60 72 84 96 108 120 132 144

Multiply. You can use the multiplication table to help you.


1. 6  8  2. 8  12  3. 8  4 

4. 7  7  5. 10  5  6. 9  11 

7. 7  4  8. 3  8  9. 4  9 
McGraw-Hill School Division

10. 7  12  11. 9  9  12. 6  7 

13. 9 14. 8 15. 8 16. 9 17. 12 18. 11


 12 7  11 8  10  7

19. 11 20. 8 21. 9 22. 12 23. 11 24. 11


 12 8 7  12  3  11

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 7, pages 152153. (125) NS 4.1, 4.2; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
47 Page
Multiplication Table and Patterns E ENRICH

Twisted Tables
Complete each multiplication table. Fill in the missing factors.
1. 2.
 
10 15 20 42 14 28
12 18 24 18 6 12
14 21 28 30 10 20

3. 4.
 
36 42 54 24 12 28 0 8
6 7 9 4 24 56 0 16
12 14 18 8 3 7 0 2
30 35 45 20 9 21 0 6

5. 6.
 
72 63 42 21
28 24 72 40
27 6 18 9
7 6 2 0

7. 8.
 
McGraw-Hill School Division

56 28 15 35
16 18 0 18
16 36 21
24 6 42

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 7, pages 152153. (126) NS 4.1, 4.2; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
48 Page
Multiply Three Numbers P PRACTICE

Multiply.
1. (2  5)  4  2. 3  (2  8)  3. (4  2)  3 

4. 6  (3  2)  5. 4  (4  2)  6. 7  (2  5) 

7. (5  2)  4  8. (2  2)  2  9. (9  3)  0 

10. (8  2)  3  11. 7  (3  3)  12. (6  2)  2 

13. 2  (7  2)  14. (8  4)  2  15. (9  2)  4 

16. 5  (3  3)  17. 4  (8  1)  18. 7  (2  3) 

19. 9  (2  3)  20. (8  1)  9  21. 5  (3  2) 

22. (8  3)  0  23. 9  (3  3)  24. (7  2)  4 

25. 2  (4  3)  26. (3  3)  3  27. (7  2)  2 

Complete the multiplication sentence.


28. 5  4  5 29. (  8)  7  0

30. (9  3)   27 31. 5  6  5  (3  )

 (3  5)  9  5 33. 4  4  2  (2  )  (4  2)
McGraw-Hill School Division

32.

Problem Solving

34. The school gives each basketball 35. In a baseball game of 9 innings,
player 2 shirts. Each shirt costs $8. each of the 2 teams gets 3 outs
What is the total cost of shirts for per inning. How many outs are there
6 players? in a game?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 8, pages 156157. (127) AF 1.3


Print This Page
Name

Print This
48 Page
Multiply Three Numbers R RETEACH

Find: (3  5)  2 Think: 3  2 is a known fact.


(5  3)  2 Use the Commutative Property to change the order.
5  (3  2) Use the Associative Property to regroup the numbers.
56 Multiply inside the parentheses first.

Think: 3 twos

5  6  30 Multiply again.

Think: 5 sixes

Multiply.
1. (2  5)  4 2. 3  (4  3) 3. (2  6)  3

(5  )4 3(  ) (6  )3


5(  ) (  )4 6(  )
5 4 6

4. 2  (2  3)  5. (2  4)  3  6. (5  2)  3 
McGraw-Hill School Division

7. (7  1)  3  8. (4  8)  1  9. 3  (3  2) 

10. (5  4)  2  11. 9  (2  3)  12. (3  3)  3 

13. (8  2)  4  14. 3  (3  5)  15. (9  2)  2 

16. (9  6)  1  17. (2  7)  3  18. 5  (4  3) 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 8, pages 156157. (128) AF 1.3


Print This Page
Name

Print This
48 Page
Multiply Three Numbers E ENRICH

The Search for 48


Circle each combination of numbers that has a product of 48. You
can multiply up to four numbers. Look across, up, down, and
diagonally. Can you find all 26 combinations?

4 3 4 2 3 7 8

4 9 2 2 4 6 4

5 2 3 2 4 8 8

6 6 6 7 6 6 3

7 4 9 4 3 4 2

2 2 2 8 3 2 9
McGraw-Hill School Division

Choose one of these numbers: 24, 36, 64, or 72. Make your own
number search and give it to a friend to solve. Be sure to keep a
copy with the solution!

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 8, pages 156157. (129) AF 1.3


Print This Page
Name

Print This
49 Page
Relate Multiplication P PRACTICE

and Division Facts


Write a related multiplication fact and complete the
division sentence.
1. 18  9 2. 15  3 3. 16  4

9  18 3  15 4  16
18  9  15  3  16  4 

Divide.
4. 6  2  5. 18  2  6. 15  5 

7. 8  4  8. 27  3  9. 14  2 

10. 28  7  11. 18  3  12. 63  7 

13. 48  6  14. 35  7  15. 42  7 

7 3 8 6 5
16. 3 21 17. 7 21 18. 2 16 19. 3 18 20. 5 25

9 8 3 6 3
21. 5 45 22. 7 56 23. 8 24 24. 9 54 25. 3 9

7 5 9 4 8
26. 8 56 27. 9 45 28. 9 81 29. 9 36 30. 8 64

9 9 6 9 7
McGraw-Hill School Division

31. 7 63 32. 6 54 33. 4 24 34. 4 36 35. 9 63

Problem Solving

36. It takes 4 horses to pull a coach. How 37. Groups of 6 visitors can take tours of
many coaches can 20 horses pull? an old western town. How many
groups can 24 people make?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 9, pages 160161. (130) NS 3.2; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
49 Page
Relate Multiplication R RETEACH

and Division Facts


Find 15  5. Think: How many groups of 5 are in 15?

5  ?  15 5  3  15
There are 3 groups of 5 in 15. So, 15  5  3.
Write a related multiplication fact and complete the division sentence.
1. 18  6 2. 16  8 3. 12  3

6  18 8  16 4  12
18  6  16  8  12  3 

4. 20  5 5. 21  7 6. 24  6

20  5  21  7  24  6 

7. 30  5 8. 27  9 9. 28  4
McGraw-Hill School Division

30  5  27  9  28  4 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 9, pages 160161. (131) NS 3.2; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
49 Page
Relate Multiplication and E ENRICH

Division Facts
Word Puzzle
Use the letters in the table below to complete the word puzzle.
Words have to connect as they do in a crossword puzzle.

Letter Values

Letter Value Letter Value

A 10  3  ? L 45  5  ?

B 25  5  ? N 49?

D 12  6  ? O 30  3  ?

E 36? S 55?

F 45? T 67?

G 36  4  ? U 42  7  ?

J 10  4  ? Y 54  6  ?

Rules
Use each letter in the table only once.
You cannot move the vowels in the puzzle.
Try to get the highest score you can. To find your score, complete
the multiplication or division to find the value of each letter you
used. For example, if you placed the letter B in the top left square,
you would get 5 for that square (25  5  5). Then add to find
the value of each word. Finally, add the values of all four words.
McGraw-Hill School Division

J O G
E U
T A N
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 9, pages 160161. (132) NS 3.2; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
410 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy P PRACTICE

Act It Out
Use act it out to solve.
1. The Rare Book Club invites its 2. Len delivers 16 bottles of juice and
25 members to a dinner. Square soda. A small box will hold 6 bottles
tables seat 4 people and round and a large box will hold 8 bottles.
tables seat 5 people. If the club Which box should Len use if he
wants full tables, which tables wants to put an equal number of
should the club use? How many of bottles in each box? How many
these tables will be needed? boxes will he need?

3. Courtney is making a display of 4. The Sailing Club puts 12 of its 48


42 shells. She arranges the shells in trophies in a large display case. There
rows of 6. How many rows does are 6 smaller cases. How can the
Courtney make? club arrange the rest of the trophies
so that each smaller case has an
equal number of trophies?

Mixed Strategy Review


Solve. Use any strategy.
5. Yoki has 20 posters of science-fiction 6. Art For posters, Nancy has a piece
movies. She puts an equal number of of poster paper that is 9 feet by
these posters on each of 4 walls. 2 feet. She cuts 3-foot by 1-foot
How many posters does Yoki put on rectangles from it. How many
each wall? posters does she make?
McGraw-Hill School Division

Strategy: Strategy:
7. Dinner starts at 6:00 P.M. It will take 8. Create a problem which you could
Robert 45 minutes to get there. On act out to solve. Share it with others.
his way, he wants to stop at the
library for 30 minutes. What time
does Robert need to leave to get to
the dinner on time?

Strategy:
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 10, pages 162163. (133) NS 3.2; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
410 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Act It Out
Page 163, Problem 2

For placemats, Meg is going to cut 2-foot by 1-foot rectangles from a


piece of fabric with a starry background. The fabric is 4 feet wide and 3
feet long. How many placemats can she cut from one piece of fabric?

Step 1
Be sure you understand the problem.
Read Read carefully.
What do you know?
The placemats are by .

Meg is going to cut the placemats from a piece of


fabric that is by .
What do you need to find?
You need to find how many
.

Step 2
Make a plan.
Plan Choose a strategy.
Make a Table To solve the problem, you can act it out
or List
using models.
Write a Number
Sentence
Draw a rectangle that represents the
Work Backward
piece of fabric. A rectangle that is 4
Act it Out
McGraw-Hill School Division

feet by 3 feet would be very large, so


Find a Pattern
draw a rectangle that is 4 centimeters
Make a Graph
by 3 centimeters to represent the
Guess and Check
piece of fabric.
Logical Reasoning
Solve a Simpler Make rectangles that represent the
Problem
placemats. Since the placemats are
Draw a Picture
2 feet by 1 foot, cut out rectangles that
are 2 centimeters by 1 centimeter.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 10, pages 162163. (134) NS 3.2; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
410 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Act It Out

Step 3
Carry out your plan.
Solve
Fill the large rectangle with small rectangles.

The large rectangle represents .


Each small rectangle represents .
Meg can cut placemats from the piece of fabric.

Step 4
Is the solution reasonable?
Look Back Reread the problem.
Does your answer make sense? Yes No
Did you answer the question? Yes No
What other stategies could you use to solve the problem?

Practice
McGraw-Hill School Division

1. Randy wants to cut name tags from 2. Ted has 54 model train cars. He has
a piece of poster paper. The poster large boxes that will each hold 8
paper is 18 inches by 24 inches. Each train cars. He has small boxes that
name tag will be 3 inches by 4 inches. will each hold 6 train cars. Which
How many name tags can Randy cut type of box should Ted use if he
from the piece of poster paper? wants to put an equal number of
cars in each box? How many of
those boxes will he need?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 10, pages 162163. (135) NS 3.2; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
411 Page
Divide by 2 Through 12 P PRACTICE

Divide.
1. 12  2  2. 24  3  3. 32  4 

4. 35  5  5. 54  6  6. 56  7 

7. 64  8  8. 81  9  9. 40  8 

10. 48  6  11. 49  7  12. 27  3 

13. 30  5  14. 36  4  15. 72  9 

16. 90  10  17. 121  11  18. 144  12 

9 6 6 2 2
19. 2 18 20. 3 18 21. 4 24 22. 7 14 23. 8 16

9 7 7 9 9
24. 7 63 25. 6 42 26. 9 63 27. 5 45 28. 8 72

6 7 8 9 9
29. 12 72 30. 11 77 31. 10 80 32. 11 99 33. 12 108

Algebra & Functions Find the rule. Then complete the table.
34.
Rule:
0 9
0 1 2 3 4 5 6

35.
Rule:
0 7
McGraw-Hill School Division

0 1 2 3 4 5 6

Problem Solving

36. There are 42 tomato plants in rows of 37. There are 45 tomatoes on 5 tomato
6 plants in each row. How many rows plants. Each tomato plant has the
of tomato plants are there? same number of tomatoes. How
many tomatoes are on each plant?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 11, pages 164167. (136) NS 3.2; MR 1.1, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
411 Page
Divide by 2 Through 12 R RETEACH

Find 48  6. Think: How many groups of 6 are in 48?

6  ?  48 6  8  48
There are 8 groups of 6 in 48. So, 48  6  8.
Complete the division sentence.
1. 2. 3.

30  5  24  8  16  4 

Divide. Draw models if you wish.


4. 12  2  5. 21  3  6. 20  5 

7. 14  7  8. 24  6  9. 16  2 

10. 32  8  11. 18  3  12. 28  4 

9 9 12
13. 2 18 14. 4 36 15. 3 36

3 6 5
McGraw-Hill School Division

16. 5 15 17. 7 42 18. 9 45

3 3 3
19. 10 30 20. 11 33 21. 12 36

9 8 8
22. 6 54 23. 5 40 24. 10 80

9 2 9
25. 9 81 26. 12 24 27. 11 99

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 11, pages 164167. (137) NS 3.2; MR 1.1, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
411 Page
Divide by 2 Through 12 E ENRICH

Win the Division


Play this division football game with a partner. Youll need a number
cube and 2 two-color counters to use as game pieces.
Rules
Place your game pieces at the START positions on the 50-yard
line. Each player can only move in the direction of the arrow.
Take turns rolling the number cubes. Add the number cubes to
get a divisor.
If the number in the circle on the next 10-yard line can be evenly
divided by the divisor, move to that circle.
Keep rolling the number cubes until one of you scores a touchdown.

42 TOUCHDOWN!
16
G

28
10

15
20

36
30

12
40

Start
50
Start
24
40
McGraw-Hill School Division

18
30

30
20

54
10

10
G
TOUCHDOWN! 35

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 11, pages 164167. (138) NS 3.2; MR 1.1, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
412 Page
Fact Families P PRACTICE

Complete each fact family.


1. 4  8  q 2. 9  5  a 3. 8  9  m
8  r  32 5  b  45 8  n  72
32  8  s 45  5  c 72  8  o
32  t  8 45  d  5 72  p  8

Find the missing factor.


4. 5  k  30 5. h  7  56 6. 9  g  72
30  5  k 56  7  h 72  9  g

7. 9  w  54 8. 9  y  63 9. d  8  48
54  9  w 63  9  y 48  8  d

Write a multiplication and division fact family for each group of numbers.
10. 8, 5, 40 11. 3, 9, 27 12. 6, 7, 42 13. 9, 8, 72

14. 5, 7, 35 15. 4, 5, 20 16. 6, 9, 54 17. 5, 9, 45


McGraw-Hill School Division

Divide. What patterns do you see?


18. 4  4  88 99 66

19. 0  7  08 01 05

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 12, pages 168171. (139) NS 3.2; AF 1.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
412 Page
Fact Families R RETEACH

Multiplication and division sentences that are related make up a


fact family. Every sentence in a fact family uses the same numbers.
Fact Family Fact Family
3  4  12 5  2  10
4  3  12 2  5  10
12  3  4 10  5  2
12  4  3 10  2  5

Complete each fact family.


1. 2.

3  5  15 9 
5   
15  5  4
15    [9] 

Write the fact family for each set of numbers.


3. 4, 6, 24 4. 3, 7, 21 5. 35, 7, 5 6. 54, 6, 9
McGraw-Hill School Division

Find the missing numbers.

7. 5  n  30 8. n  7  56 9. n  8  64 10. 3 n  27
30  5  n 56  7  n 64  8  n 27  3  n
n n n n

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 12, pages 168171. (140) NS 3.2; AF 1.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
412 Page
Fact Families E ENRICH

Chain Reaction
Write the missing numbers to complete each chain.

1. 24  6  4 6 24 3 8 5 40

2. 98 72  12  6 6 1 0 0

3. 8 6  48  4  12 4 48 6 8

4. 66  11    30  6  9
6 5 5 45

5. 5  12  60  10 69 54 6 9
McGraw-Hill School Division

6.
81 9 93 3 3 9 9 81

7. 45  9  5  9  45  5  9 3 27

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 12, pages 168171. (141) NS 3.2; AF 1.1; MR 1.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


413
Problem Solving: Application Part
A WORKSHEET

Decision
Applying Multiplication and Division Making

Record your data.

Capacity: Number
Number of
Storage Unit of trophies or Total Cost
Units Used
medals per unit

Shelf

Frame
(small or large)

Your Decision
McGraw-Hill School Division

What is your recommendation for Lily? Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 13, pages 174175. (142) NS 3.1, 3.3; MR 1.1, 1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


413
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

Ramp races: How does height affect distance? Math &


Science

Record your data.

Ramp height Distance traveled Use division.


How many times farther
did the crayon travel on
this ramp than it did on
the 1-book ramp?
Round to the nearest
whole number.

1 book

2 books

3 books
McGraw-Hill School Division

4 books

5 books

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 13, pages 176177. (143) NS 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


413
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

Ramp races: How does height affect distance? Math &


Science

1. On which ramp did the crayon travel the farthest? On which ramp
did the crayon travel the shortest distance?

2. Use division to calculate how many times farther the crayon


traveled for the 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-book ramps than it did for the
1-book ramp. Do your calculations in the table and then list your
answers here. Round to the nearest whole number.

3. Do you see a pattern? Describe it.

4. If the pattern continues, how far will a crayon travel if released from a
10-book ramp? a 20-book ramp? Explain how you made these estimates.
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Explain the activity in terms of speed.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 4, Lesson 13, pages 176177. (144) NS 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
51 Page
Patterns of Multiplication P PRACTICE

Complete.

1. 3  2  a a 2. 5  8  e e
3  b  60 b 5  c  400 f
c  200  600 c g  800  4,000 g
3  2,000  d d 5  8,000  h h
Multiply. Use mental math.

3. 80 4. 70 5. 40 6. 60 7. 90
6 8 5 7 6

8. 400 9. 800 10. 700 11. 2,000 12. 3,000


 5  6  9  4  6

13. 90  5  14. 4  90  15. 5  600 

16. 700  8  17. 9  600  18. 700  4 

19. 2,000  8  20. 5,000  7  21. 8  4,000 

Find each missing number.

22. a  5  300 23. b  4  320 24. 2  c  180


a a c
25. 3  a  900 26. 6  b  3,600 27. c  8  72,000
McGraw-Hill School Division

a b c
Problem Solving

28. Stamps are sold in rolls of 100. How 29. A ream of paper is 500 sheets of
many stamps are in 9 rolls? paper. How many sheets are in
7 reams?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 1, pages 192193. (145) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
51 Page
Patterns of Multiplication R RETEACH

Using basic facts and patterns can help you multiply mentally.

2  4 ones  8 ones 2  4 tens  8 tens 2  4 hundreds  8 hundreds


248 2  40  80 2  400  800

Complete the pattern.

1. 3  3  2. 6  3  3. 4  5 

3  30  6  30  4  50 
3  300  6  300  4  500 
3  3,000  6  3,000  4  5,000 

Multiply. Use mental math.

4. 70 5. 90 6. 70 7. 60 8. 800
8 4 4 7  9

9. 200 10. 500 11. 3,000 12. 7,000 13. 6,000


 8  7  8  3  8
McGraw-Hill School Division

14. 9  60  15. 6  50  16. 8  200 

17. 8  800  18. 6  800  19. 5  900 

20. 6  600  21. 8  400  22. 9  700 

23. 4  600  24. 8  5,000  25. 3  4,000 

26. 7  2,000  27. 5  6,000  28. 4  4,000 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 1, pages 192193. (146) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
51 Page
Patterns of Multiplication E ENRICH

History Riddles
Find each missing number. Then find the letter in the table that
matches that number. Solve the riddles. Write the letter in the blank
above the same exercise number.
1.  5  100 2. 60   24,000 3. 7   350

4. 4   2,000 5.  9  1,800 6.  8  400

7. 7   21,000 8.  5  1,000 9.  6  3,000

10. 3   1,200 11. 7   1,400 12.  6  1,200

13.  6  240 14. 6   480 15. 6   3,000

16.  3  600 17. 9   18,000 18.  5  100

19. 6   2,400 20.  8  4,000 21. 9   180

22.  7  2,100 23. 6   4,800 24. 7   210

20 30 40 50 80 200 300 400 500 800 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 8,000

E N B A M T S H O I F W U K Y

What did Paul Revere say at the end of his ride?

7. 2. 9. 3.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Where was the Declaration of Independence signed?

6. 11. 12. 10. 1. 13. 15. 5. 8. 4. 14.

When Columbus discovered America, where did he first stand?

20. 24. 19. 23. 22. 17. 18. 21. 16.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 1, pages 192193. (147) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
52 Page
Explore Multiplying 2-Digit Numbers P PRACTICE

by1-Digit Numbers
1. Multiply 4  15. Draw squares to multiply.

Find each product.


2. 62 3. 38 4. 91 5. 46 6. 78
2 4 3 5 6

7. 98 8. 76 9. 24 10. 56 11. 48
5 6 9 7 8

12. 66 13. 77 14. 94 15. 59 16. 44


6 7 3 4 9

17. 24 18. 19 19. 67 20. 84 21. 76


7 8 5 4 7

22. 5  26  23. 37  8  24. 45  6 

25. 38  4  26. 7  22  27. 9  49 


McGraw-Hill School Division

28. 8  67  29. 35  4  30. 99  3 

Problem Solving

31. Katy arranges oranges in 5 layers in a 32. Band members march in 24 rows.
crate. Each layer has 24 oranges. There are 8 members in each row.
How many oranges does she put in How many members are in the
the crate? band?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 2, pages 194195. (148) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
52 Page
Explore Multiplying 2-Digit Numbers R RETEACH

by 1-Digit Numbers
Find 5  21.
You can draw an array to multiply.
Find the total number of dots.

5 dots 5  21  105

21 dots

Draw an array to multiply.


1. 4  18  2. 5  24 

4 dots 5 dots

18 dots 24 dots

Find each product.

3. 19 4. 24 5. 25 6. 13 7. 12
6 5 8 9 9

8. 46 9. 37 10. 58 11. 28 12. 23


3 4 5  7  6
McGraw-Hill School Division

13. 33 14. 21 15. 18 16. 30 17. 18


4 5 3 6 9

18. 4  17  19. 22  6  20. 7  14 

21. 20  6  22. 5  31  23. 26  4 

24. 3  13  25. 4  50  26. 5  15 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 2, pages 194195. (149) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
52 Page
Explore Multiplying 2-Digit Numbers E ENRICH

by1-Digit Numbers
The Abacus
The abacus is a computing tool that is thousands of years old.
To multiply 3  32 H T O Next, multiply H T O
using a Russian 3 tens by 3. Move
abacus, first 9 beads to the
multiply 2 ones by bottom of the tens
3. Move 6 beads to column to show
the bottom of the 3  3 tens  9 tens.
ones column to
Count the beads in
show 3  2  6.
each column.

There are 9 tens 6 ones, so 3  32  96.


Use the abacus to find each product. Show the answer by drawing
the beads you moved down. Cross out the beads you moved down
from the top.
1. 4  22  2. 2  34  3. 3  31 

H T O H T O H T O
McGraw-Hill School Division

4. 5  43  5. 4  212  6. 3  304 
H T O H T O H T O

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 2, pages 194195. (150) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
53 Page
Multiply 2-Digit Numbers P PRACTICE

by 1-Digit Numbers
Multiply.

1. 73 2. 44 3. 31 4. 68 5. 32
3 5 7 8 9

6. 65 7. 33 8. 96 9. 88 10. 74
5 6 3 4 5

11. 85 12. 77 13. 97 14. 66 15. 94


4 6 2 8 3

16. 44 17. 77 18. 18 19. 38 20. 99


4 7 9 8 6

21. 55  5  22. 75  6  23. 8  47 

24. 6  39  25. 2  98  26. 84  6 

27. 4  52  28. 63  7  29. 29  9 

30. Multiply 63 by 8. 31. Multiply 78 by 4.

32. Multiply 37 by 6. 33. Multiply 45 by 5.


McGraw-Hill School Division

34. Multiply 56 by 7. 35. Multiply 82 by 3.

Problem Solving
36. A rectangle is 5 tiles wide by 37. Books are stacked in 3 stacks with
13 tiles high. How many tiles are 17 books in each stack. How many
in the rectangle? books are in the stacks?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 3, pages 196199. (151) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
53 Page
Multiply 2-Digit Numbers by R RETEACH

1-Digit Numbers
You can multiply using models or pencil and paper.

Find 4  26. You can record


Show 4 groups of 26. this way:

Step 1 26
4
Multiply the ones.
24
4  6 ones  24 ones

26
Step 2 4
Multiply the tens. 24
4  2 tens  8 tens  80

26
Step 3 4
Add. 24
 80
104

Complete to find the product. You may use models to help you.
1. 23 2. 44 3. 31 4. 52 5. 45
5 3 8 7 9
McGraw-Hill School Division

6. 45 7. 64 8. 78 9. 86 10. 92
5 6 3 4 5

11. 9  52  12. 72  7  13. 68  3 

14. 5  83  15. 2  88  16. 48  6 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 3, pages 196199. (152) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
53 Page
Multiply 2-Digit Numbers E ENRICH

by 1-Digit Numbers
Lattice Multiplication
You can use lattice multiplication to multiply. Multiply 7  48.
Write 48 over the top Multiply 7  8. Write Multiply 7  4. Write 28 in
boxes. Write 7 on the 56 in the first box. the second box. Add on the
right. diagonals. Start at the right.
Regroup as you would in
any addition problem.

4 8 4 8 4 8
48
5 2 5
7 7 3 7  7
6 8 6 336

3 6

Use lattice multiplication to find the products.


1. 2  27  2. 5  34  3. 4  56 
2 7 3 4 5 6

1 1 2 2 2
2 1 5 2 4
4 4 5 0 0 4
5 4 7 0 2 4

4. 8  37  5. 8  63  6. 7  79 
McGraw-Hill School Division

3 7 6 3 7 9

2 5 4 2 4 6
2 8 5 8 5 7
4 6 8 4 9 3
9 6 0 4 5 3

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 3, pages 196199. (153) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
54 Page
Estimate Products P PRACTICE

Estimate each product.

1. 5  21  2. 3  39  3. 7  $46 

4. 85  6  5. 17  9  6. 81  3 

7. 2  $298  8. 4  305  9. 478  6 

10. 5  784  11. 612  9  12. 6  556 

13. 2  1,987  14. 3  $2,126  15. 7  1,905 

16. 8  3,495  17. 4,723  4  18. 5  $7,118 

19. 41 20. 28 21. 96 22. 17 23. 31


 6  7  2 8 9

24. 255 25. 488 26. 563 27. 2,307 28. 7,596
 4  3  5  5  6

Algebra & Functions Estimate. Write  or .

29. 2  36 1  49 30. 96  3 68  4 31. 6  28 5  41

32. 97  1 89  2 33. 6  105 4  209 34. 396  4 106  9

35. 5  423 6  523 36. 3  666 2  366 37. 4  712 3  412


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving

38. The volunteer ambulance group 39. An ambulance travels about 386
orders 6 first aid kits. Each kit costs miles a day. About how many miles
$39. About how much does it cost does it travel in a week?
for 6 kits?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 4, pages 200201. (154) NS 1.4, 3.2; 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
54 Page
Estimate Products R RETEACH

You can round to estimate products. Round the greater factor to its
greatest place and multiply using patterns.

Estimate 8  287.
Round 287 to the 8  287
nearest hundred.
8  300
287

200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 290 300

Multiply using the


rounded number 8  300  2,400 So, 8  287 is about 2,400.

Estimate each product.

1. 2  74 2. 3  42 3. 6  36

4. 6  $58 5. 9  18 6. 3  71

7. 3  198 8. 2  $405 9. 4  378

10. 5  2,987 11. 8  2,126 12. 7  $2,905

13. 31 14. 58 15. $66 16. 17 17. 51


2 3  4 5 6

18. $454 19. 512 20. 498 21. $637 22. 845
 7  8  9  4  2
McGraw-Hill School Division

23. 7,809 24. $6,047 25. 4,524 26. $2,107 27. 8,596
 6  3  8  6  4

28. 2,537 29. 5,088 30. $6,409 31. 3,623 32. $7,522
 4  2  7  8  9

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 4, pages 200201. (155) NS 1.4, 3.2; 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
54 Page
Estimate Products E ENRICH

Target Practice
Estimate to find the factors whose product is closer to the target
number. Circle the letter of the answer.
1. Target Number: 150 2. Target Number: 160 3. Target Number: 180

S. 57  3 H. 37  4 D. 3  67

T. 52  3 I. 32  4 E. 3  61

4. Target Number: 540 5. Target Number: 420 6. Target Number: 560

S. 88  6 T. 7  62 O. 76  8

T. 83  6 U. 7  68 A. 72  8

7. Target Number: 2,700 8. Target Number: 630 9. Target Number: 4,500

T. 3  879 T. 79  9 E. 9  490

U. 3  849 U. 72  9 F. 9  430

10. Target Number: 3,600 11. Target Number: 5,600 12. Target Number: 6,000

N. 849  4 E. 770  8 L. 2,181  3

O. 889  4 F. 680  8 M. 2,898  3

13. Target Number: 6,400 14. Target Number: 7,200 15. Target Number: 2,400

I. 839  8 A. 711  9 E. 303  8

J. 899  8 B. 782  9 F. 352  8

16. Target Number: 25,000 17. Target Number: 32,000 18. Target Number: 35,000

Q. 4,175  5 T. 7,825  4 Y. 4,762  7


McGraw-Hill School Division

R. 4,899  5 U. 7,239  4 Z. 4,097  7

Write the circled letters above each exercise number to


answer the question.
I lift my lamp beside the golden door! Who am I?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 4, pages 200201. (156) NS 1.4, 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
55 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Use an Overestimate or Underestimate Reading


Skill
Form a conclusion about whether you would use an overestimate or
an underestimate. Then solve each problem.
1. On Wednesday, a group of 98 students will visit the national forest.
Each student will get a nature guide fact book. These books come
in boxes of 32. The park rangers have 3 boxes of fact books. Are
there enough fact books so each student can get a book?
Should you use an overestimate or an underestimate to solve this
problem? Explain.

Are there enough fact books so each student can get a book?
2. The park charges $16 per day to use a campsite. The Nolans want
to use a campsite for 4 nights. They have $80 set aside for using a
campsite. Have the Nolans set aside enough money?
Should you use an overestimate or an underestimate to solve
this problem? Explain.

Have the Nolans set aside enough money?


3. A total of 184 people are taking a desert hike. Each hiking group
can have up to 36 people. There are enough hike leaders and
helpers to lead 6 groups. Are there enough hike leaders and helpers
McGraw-Hill School Division

so that all of the people can go on a hike?


Should you use an overestimate or an underestimate to solve
this problem? Explain.

Are there enough hike leaders and helpers so that all of the
people can go on a hike?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 5, pages 202203. (157) MR 1.1, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
55 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Use an Overestimate or Underestimate Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
There are 146 students going on a trip to the desert. The school has
3 buses. Each bus can hold 48 students. Should a fourth bus be
ordered for the trip?
1. Which statement is true? 2. To make sure that 3 buses are enough
A There are 48 students going on a to hold 148 students, you should
trip to the desert. F underestimate the number of
B Each bus can hold 48 students. students the buses can hold.
C Three buses can hold exactly 150 G overestimate the number of
students. students the buses can hold.
H underestimate the number of
students going on the trip.

The cafeteria in the national forest visitors center has 23 tables.


Each table seats 6 people. A group of 120 is visiting the forest. Are
there enough tables so that all 120 people can eat in the cafeteria
at once?
3. Which statement is not true? 4. To make sure there are enough tables
A Each table can seat 23 people. to seat 120 people, you should
B The cafeteria has 23 tables. F overestimate the number of seats.
C Each table can seat 6 people. G underestimate the number of
tables.
H overestimate the number of tables.

There are 7 river tours per day. Each river tour has room for
48 people. Each person on the river tour receives a pamphlet.
McGraw-Hill School Division

The tour leaders have 400 pamphlets. Are there enough pamphlets
for a day of river tours?
5. How would you use estimation to 6. Which estimate would you use to
solve this problem? solve the problem?
A overestimate the number of F 7  40  280
people G 6  50  300
B underestimate the number of H 7  50  350
tours
C underestimate the number of
people
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 5, pages 202203. (158) MR 1.1, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
55 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Use an Overestimate or Underestimate Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
The Wildlife Committee is selling books to raise $400. The
committee makes $8.75 on each book it sells. If the committee
sells 50 books, will that be enough to raise $400?
7. How would you use estimation to 8. Which estimate would you use to
solve this problem? solve the problem?
A overestimate the amount made on F $9 x 50 = $450
each book
G $8 x 50 = $400
B underestimate the amount made
H $8 x 40 = $320
on each book
C underestimate the number of
books

Solve.
9. The river tour has 4 boats. Each boat 10. There are 5 groups of 25 students
has room for 24 people. Are there each. The rangers have 150 forest
enough boats to take 76 people T-shirts. Do they have enough T-shirts
on a tour? to give a T-shirt to each student?

11. The forest rangers have 5 boxes of 12. Phyllis takes 118 photos of the
wildlife guides. Each box contains desert. She buys a photo album
36 pamphlets. The rangers need with 24 pages. Each page can hold
200 pamphlets. Should they order 6 photos. Can all the photos fit in
McGraw-Hill School Division

another box? the album?

13. The motel in the national park costs 14. It costs $89 to rent a sport utility
$39 per night. Nick sets aside $150 vehicle (SUV) for one day. Will $650
to pay for the motel. Is this enough be enough to rent an SUV for a
money to pay for 5 nights? 7-day trip through the desert?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 5, pages 202203. (159) MR 1.1, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
56 Page
Multiply Greater Numbers P PRACTICE

Multiply. Check for reasonableness.


1. 693 2. 907 3. 368 4. $601
 4  5  9  3

5. 2,901 6. 1,999 7. 8,072 8. $38.88


 2  7  8  4

9. 6  2,369  10. 7 5,786 

11. 3  4,964  12. 9  $1,288 

13. 5  19,091  14. 8  12,967 

15. Multiply 3,687 by 8. 16. Multiply 1,096 by 9.

Algebra & Functions Complete the table.


17.
Input 12 15 18 21 24

Output 48 60

18.
Input 1 2 3 4 5

Output 37 74
McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving

19. Maria made 9 trips between 20. A company buys 8 computers. Each
New York City and Los Angeles. Each computer costs $2,245. How much
trip cost $498. How much did the does the company spend on the
9 trips cost? 8 computers?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 6, pages 206209. (160) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
56 Page
Multiply Greater Numbers R RETEACH

You can use models to help you multiply greater


numbers.
Find 2  357.
Show 2 groups of 357. You can record
this way:
Step 1
1
Multiply the ones.
357
2  7 ones  14 ones
Regroup.  2
14 ones  1 ten 4 ones 4

Step 2
Multiply the tens. 11
2  5 tens  10 tens 357
Add the tens.  2
10 tens  1 ten  11 tens 14

Step 3
Multiply the hundreds. 11
2  3 hundreds  6 hundreds 357
Add the hundreds.  2
6 hundreds  1 hundred  7 hundreds 714

Multiply. Check for reasonableness.


1. 234 2. 146 3. 357 4. $4.62
 5  3  4  6
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. 3,548 6. $6,164 7. 2,781 8. 4,862


 2  7  8  9

9. $1,530 10. 2,681 11. 9,275 12. $7,452


 4  2  6  5

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 6, pages 206209. (161) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
56 Page
Multiply Greater Numbers E ENRICH

Deducing Digits
Find the missing digits. Write them in the boxes.

1. 3 2. 1 3. 4. 3
 8  7  3 
184 98 174 111

5. 4 6. 3 7. 2 8.
 5    7
1 0 138 416 434

9. 1
4 10. 1 4 11. 3 12. 3 1
 6   7 
744 770 1,666 1,564

13. 2 14. 46 15. 25 16.


 3  4  9  3
735 , 64 7, 5 2,400

17. $1,0 8 18. ,6 2 19. 6, 7 20. 8, 76


McGraw-Hill School Division

 5   9 
$5, 9 7, 56 5 ,06 7 ,184

21. 4,38 22. 29, 75 23. $3 ,3 3 24. 0,3 9


 7   4 
31 ,6 5 74,450 $1 3, 32 82,472

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 6, pages 206209. (162) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
57 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy P PRACTICE

Find a Pattern
Use find a pattern to solve.
1. Annie makes an arrangement of 2. In one desert area, the rabbit
chestnuts. She puts 3 chestnuts in the population is estimated at 25 in one
first row, 6 chestnuts in the second year, 50 the next year, 100 the third
row, and 9 chestnuts in the third row. year, and 200 the next year. Describe
Describe the pattern. How many the pattern. Then estimate the rabbit
chestnuts will be in the fourth row? population for the fifth year.

3. Rangers examine trees that fell 4. Stan counts robins nests on his
during a storm. The first tree has block. One year he counts 4 nests.
3 annual rings. The second tree has The next year he counts 9 nests. The
9 rings. The third tree has 27 rings. third year Stan counts 14 nests. The
The fourth tree has 81 rings. If the fourth year he counts 19 nests. If the
pattern continues, how many annual pattern continues, how many nests
rings does the fourth tree have? will he count in the fifth year?

Mixed Strategy Review


Solve. Use any strategy.
5. Nick took 40 photos of the desert. 6. Social Studies Colorados state
He has one photo album with 8 parks cover 347,000 acres.
pages and another with 12 pages. Connecticuts state parks cover
Nick wants to put the same number 176,000 acres. How many more
of photos on each page. Which acres do state parks cover in
McGraw-Hill School Division

album should he use? Colorado than in Connecticut?

Strategy: Strategy:

7. Create a problem for which you


would find a pattern to solve. Share
it with others.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 7, pages 210211. (163) NS 3.2; MR 1.1, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
57 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Find a Pattern
Page 211, Problem 1

As a plant cell grows, one cell divides into two cells. Two cells divide
into four cells, four into eight, and so on. Describe the pattern. How
many cells will there be after seven divisions?

Step 1
Be sure you understand the problem.
Read Read carefully.
What do you know?
One cell divides into cells, two cells divide into
cells, and four cells divide into cells.
What do you need to find?
You need to find how many
.

Step 2
Make a plan.
Plan Choose a strategy.
Find a Pattern Finding a pattern will help you solve the problem.
Guess and Check
Work Backward Start 1st cell 2nd cell 3rd cell 4th cell 5th cell 6th cell 7th cell
Make a Graph division division division division division division division
Make a Table Number
or List of Cells 1 2 4 8
Write a Number
McGraw-Hill School Division

Sentence
Find the pattern in the number of cells after the 1st, 2nd,
Draw a Picture
and 3rd cell divisions.
Solve a Simpler
Problem
Continue the pattern to find the number of cells after the
Logical Reasoning
7th cell division.
Act it out

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 7, pages 210211. (164) NS 3.2; MR 1.1, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
57 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Find a Pattern

Step 3
Carry out your plan.
Solve
You know the number of cells after the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd
cell divisions.
1st cell 2nd cell 3rd cell 4th cell 5th cell 6th cell 7th cell
Start division division division division division division division

Number
of Cells 1 2 4 8

Find the pattern in the number of cells after the 1st, 2nd,
and 3rd cell divisions.

What pattern do you see?

Continue the pattern to complete the chart. If the pattern


continues, there will be cells after the 7th cell division.

Step 4
Is the solution reasonable?
Look Back Reread the problem.
Did you find a pattern and continue it? Yes No
What other strategies could you use to solve the problem?
McGraw-Hill School Division

Practice
1. Kate hikes 2 miles the first day, 2. The Support-Our-Forests Fund has
5 miles the second day, and 8 miles goals of $3,000, $6,000, $12,000, and
the third day. If the pattern $24,000 for its first four fund drives. If
continues, how many miles will the pattern continues, what will the
she hike the fourth day? goal be for the fifth fund drive?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 7, pages 210211. (165) NS 3.2; MR 1.1, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
58 Page
Functions and Graphs P PRACTICE

Complete each table. Then write an equation.

1. Roger runs 7 miles more each week 2. One plant produces 8 times more
than another boy. peppers than another plant.
x 1 2 3 4 5 r 1 2 3 4 5
y 8 9 s 8 16

3. One number is 4 less than 3 times 4. One number is 8 greater than 2 times
another number. another number.
c 4 5 6 7 8 m 1 2 3 4 5
d 8 11 n 10 12

Complete each table. Then graph the function.


5. Stella works 4 times as many hours as 6. Liz swims 2 more than 2 times as
Jana does. many laps as Sunny does.
y  4x a  2b  2
x 0 1 2 3 4 b 0 1 2 3 4
y 0 4 a 2 4

7. s  2r  2 8. n  3t  1
r 1 2 3 4 5 t 1 2 3 4 5
s 0 2 n 4 7
McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving

9. Each of 4 people orders a $8.95 10. Ben buys 3 toys that cost $3 each.
lunch. How much do the 4 lunches How much do the toys cost? Write
cost? Write and solve an equation. and solve an equation.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 8, pages 212215. (166) AF 1.1, 1.5; SDP 2.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
58 Page
Functions and Graphs R RETEACH

The numbers in a function table relate to one another to form a pattern.


One number is 1 greater than 2 times a number.
x 1 2 3 4 5
y 3 5 7 9 11
Think: How can I find the value of y?
x 1 2 3 4 5

Equation  2x  1 2x  1 2x  1 2x  1 2x  1

y 3 5 7 9 11
In each case, multiply by 2 and add 1.

The values in the table form ordered pairs.


x 1 2 3 4 5
y 3 5 7 9 11
(x, y) (1, 3) (2, 5) (3, 7) (4, 9) (5, 11)
You can graph these ordered pairs

Complete each table. Then write an equation.


1. One number is 2 greater than 2. One number is 4 times another
another number. number.
Think: Add 2 to x to get y. Think: Multiply x by 4 to get y.
x 1 2 3 4 5 x 1 2 3 4 5
y 3 4 y 4 8
McGraw-Hill School Division

Complete each table. Write the ordered pairs. Then graph the function.

3.y  2x 4.y  2x  2
x 0 1 2 3 4 x 0 1 2 3 4
y 0 2 y 2 4

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 8, pages 212215. (167) AF 1.1, 1.5; SDP 2.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This
58 Page
Functions and Graphs E ENRICH

When Are Houses Like Books?


To answer this riddle, find the points on the grid. Then write the
letter for each point on the lines.

(1, 3) (7, 8) (0, 6) (7, 1) (3, 0) (7, 8) (0, 6) (4, 4)

(7, 8) (4, 7) (2, 2) (0, 6) (6, 5) (3, 0) (1, 1) (6, 2) (9, 5) (0, 6) (6, 5)

12
11
10
9
H
8
A
7
E
6
S I
5
Y
4
W
3
V R
McGraw-Hill School Division

2
O N
1
T
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

If you are given the points (2, 2) and (6, 2), name two other points
that would make a square.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 8, pages 212215. (168) AF 1.1, 1.5; SDP 2.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


59
Problem Solving: Application Part
A WORKSHEET

Decision
Analyze and Make Decisions Making

Record your data.

Item Name Cost of Number of Total Cost Total Cost


Item per Units of Item of Meal or
Unit Snack

Breakfast
Items

Lunch
Items

Dinner
Items

Snack
Items
McGraw-Hill School Division

Your Decision
What is your recommendation for the menus (one breakfast, one lunch,
one dinner, and snacks)?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 9, pages 216217. (169) NS 1.2, 3.2; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


59
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

How much water do you use each day? Math &


Science

Record your data.

Place You Number of Times Amount of Water Total Amount


Use Water a Day You Use This for Each Use of Water
Source of Water
McGraw-Hill School Division

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 9, pages 218219. (170) NS 1.2, 3.2; MR 1.1, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


59
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

How much water do you use each day? Math &


Science

1. How much water do you use each day?

2. If a cup of water costs $0.10, how much money do you spend on


water each day? Show your work.

Work Space

3. How much water is being used by your whole class each day?

4. Is clean water a renewable or nonrenewable resource? Explain.


McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Give some other examples of renewable and nonrenewable resources.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 5, Lesson 9, pages 218219. (171) NS 1.2, 3.2; MR 1.1, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
6-1 Page
Patterns of Multiplication P PRACTICE

Complete.
1. 6  8  s s 2. w  3  21 w
60  t  480 t 70  3  x x
60  80  u u y  30  2,100 y
60  800  v v 70  300  z z

Multiply. Use mental math.


3. 60  70  4. 20  60  5. 80  800 

6. 30  200  7. 50  40  8. 400  30 

9. 600  50  10. 90  70  11. 20  4,000 

12. 9,000  30  13. 3,000  70  14. 900  60 

15. 80  5,000  16. 7,000  80  17. 40  800 

18. 30  6,000  19. 20  500  20. 6,000  90 

21. 700  40  22. 80  2,000  23. 50  5,000 

Algebra & Functions Find each missing number.


24. 30  j  9,000 j 25. s  70  2,800 s
26. 60  b  24,000 b 27. 400  t  12,000 t
28. 90  q  8,100 q 29. p  600  30,000 p 
McGraw-Hill School Division

30. n  300  6,000 n  31. r  800  40,000 r

Problem Solving
32. ABC Hardware has 50 cartons of 33. Handy Hardware has 500 boxes of
nails. There are 4,000 nails in each hinges. Each box has 90 hinges. How
carton. How many nails does the many hinges does the store have?
store have?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 1, pages 234235. (172) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
61 Page
Patterns of Multiplication R RETEACH

You can use basic facts and patterns to help you multiply.

2  3  6 basic fact 4  5  20 basic fact

20  30  600 40  50  2,000
1 zero 1 zero 2 zeros 1 zero 1 zero 2 zeros
20  300  6,000 40  500  20,000
1 zero 2 zeros 3 zeros 1 zero 2 zeros 3 zeros
20  3,000  60,000 40  5,000  200,000
1 zero 3 zeros 4 zeros 1 zero 3 zeros 4 zeros

Complete the pattern.

1. 4  3  2. 7  2 

40  30  70  20 
40  300  70  200 
40  3,000  70  2,000 

3. 5  6  4. 8  5 

50  60  80  50 
50  600  80  500 
50  6,000  80  5,000 

Multiply. Use mental math.


5. 3  6  6. 30  60  7. 30  600 
McGraw-Hill School Division

8. 4  9  9. 40  90  10. 40  900 

11. 80  30  12. 700  30  13. 20  50 

14. 300  9  15. 80  600  16. 70  800 

17. 30  8,000  18. 2,000  90  19. 4,000  50 

20. 70  7,000  21. 7,000  60  22. 90  8,000

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 1, pages 234235. (173) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
61 Page
Patterns of Multiplication E ENRICH

Clueless Puzzle
This puzzle has all the answers, but no clues. Each answer is a
product of two factors.
Make up clues for each answer.

3 4

Across Down
1. 80  8,000 1. 70  90,000
McGraw-Hill School Division

2. 2.

3. 3.

4. 4.

5. 5.

6. 6.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 1, pages 234235. (174) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Explore Multiplying Print This


P 62 Page
PRACTICE
by 2-Digit Numbers
Multiply.
1. 36 2. 27 3. 38 4. 23 5. 49
 12  41  14  22  13

6. 47 7. 46 8. 17 9. 45 10. 48
 34  14  25  35  20

11. 38 12. 32 13. 45 14. 14 15. 26


 27  15  25  15  34

16. 32 17. 31 18. 12 19. 36 20. 28


 18  25  46  36  44

21. 16 22. 17 23. 37 24. 19 25. 49


 40  17  26  27  30

26. 15  23  27. 30  13  28. 14  22 

29. 26  21  30. 30  24  31. 42  17 

32. 63  15  33. 50  23  34. 13  13 

35. 70  14  36. 32  20  37. 25  25 


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving

38. The art teacher wants to decorate 39. There are 35 buses waiting for
each classroom with 28 balloons. students after school. Each bus carries
How many balloons does he need for 45 students. How many students
18 classrooms? ride the buses?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 2, pages 236237. (175) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
62 Page
Explore Multiplying R RETEACH

by 2-Digit Numbers 19
An array can help you multiply. 2
Find 12  19. Think: 12  10  2

19
 12
10
38 2 19
 190 10 19
228

38  190  228
Find each product. Draw an array diagram to help you.
1. 14  15  2. 11  19 

Multiply.
McGraw-Hill School Division

3. 28 4. 35 5. 42 6. 49 7. 32
 14  26  33  27  18

8. 18 9. 23 10. 24 11. 45 12. 27


 41  17  52  28  27

13. 32  21  14. 41  32  15. 26  17 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 2, pages 236237. (176) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
62 Page
Explore Multiplying by 2-Digit Numbers E ENRICH

Napiers Bones
In the seventeenth century, John Napier invented a simple calculator
that multiplied by adding. It became known as Napiers Bones.
Here is a way to use Napiers Bones to multiply 49  37.
Place the strips headed 4 Fold the strips so that Add diagonally to find
and 9 next to each other. the rows headed 3 and 7 the product. Start at
Place the index beside on the index are the bottom with the
the two strips. next to each other. ones. Remember to
carry.
INDEX INDEX INDEX
4 9 1 4 9 1 4 9 1
1 1 2 1 2
8 8 2 2 7 3 2 7 3
1 2 2 6 2 6
2 7 3 8 3 7 8 3 7
1 3
6 6 4
2 4
0 5 5
2 5
4 4 6 37
2 6
8 3 7
3
2
7
2 8  49
3 8
6 1 9

Cut out the ten strips of Napiers Bones below. Use them to find each product.
1. 57  34  2. 61  76  3. 85  29 

4. 32  33  5. 94  65  6. 56  48 

7. 39  68  8. 75  38  9. 89  21 

Napiers Bones

INDEX
McGraw-Hill School Division

1 1 1 1 1
8 6 4 2 0 8 6 4 2
2 2 2 1 1 1
7 4 1 8 5 2 9 6 3
3 3 2 2 2 1 1
6 2 8 4 0 6 2 8 4
4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1
5 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 5
5 4 4 3 3 2 1 1
4 8 2 6 0 4 8 2 6
6 5 4 4 3 2 2 1
3 6 9 2 5 8 1 4 7
7 6 5 4 4 3 2 1
2 4 6 8 0 2 4 6 8
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 2, pages 236237. (177) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
63 Page
Multiply by Multiples of 10 P PRACTICE

Multiply.

1. 26 2. 47 3. 91 4. 87 5. 23
 40  30  20  10  90

6. 17 7. 135 8. 207 9. 399 10. 756


 80  50  60  50  30

11. 498 12. 1,038 13. 2,226 14. 3,510 15. 5,503
 70  40  20  60  50

16. 2,375 17. 4,009 18. 2,490 19. 6,967 20. 9,075
 20  40  70  10  80

21. 51  30  22. 39  80  23. 67  20 

24. 325  60  25. 40  608  26. 999  10 

27. 712  30 28. 10  3,116  29. 80  1,185 

30. 90  4,090  31. 2,111  70  32. 50  5,549 

Algebra & Functions Find the missing number.


33. 34  j  680 j 34. q  72  2,160 q
McGraw-Hill School Division

35. 99  a  7,920 a 36. 56  m  1,680 m


37. 861  b  77,490 b 38. 1,002  n  70,140 n
39. s  2,108  63,240 s  40. 898  c  53,880 c
Problem Solving
41. Classroom chairs cost $39. 42. A computer costs $2,345.
How much will 30 chairs cost? How much will 20 computers cost?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 3, pages 238239. (178) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
63 Page
Multiply by Multiples of 10 R RETEACH

An expanded form can help you multiply.

Find 20  37. Think: 37  30  7


20  (30  7) 37
(20  30) (20  7)  20
6 0 0  1 4 0  740 740

Complete to find each product.


1. 10  28 2. 30  33

10  (  8) (  3)

(  20)  (  8) (  ) (  )

   

3. 80  27 4. 50  64

 (20  )  (60  )

(  )(  ) (  ) (  )

   

Multiply.
5. 34 6. 27 7. 38 8. 43 9. 18
 40  30  40  10  50
McGraw-Hill School Division

10. 24 11. 35 12. 19 13. 22 14. 57


 80  20  30  10  60

15. 40  18  16. 28  30  17. 30  32 

18. 10  39  19. 16  30  20. 20  39 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 3, pages 238239. (179) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
63 Page
Multiply by Multiples of 10 E ENRICH

Missing Digits
Find each missing digit.
1. 7 4 2. 8 3. 6 2 4. 3
 1  3 0  0  5 0
7 4 0 2, 4 9 0 3, 7 2 0 1, 6 5 0

5. 9 6. 4 6 7. 8 1 8. 4
 9 0  0  0  7 0
6, 2 1 0 1, 8 4 0 1, 6 2 0 6, 5 8 0

9. 4 8 10. 5 8 4 11. 9 1 12. 7 2 1


 8 0  0  9 0  0
3 8, 6 4 0 3 5, 0 4 0 8 2, 0 8 0 2 1, 6 3 0

13. 2 1 1 14. 53 15. 6 7 16. 8 6


 0  6 0  3 0  8 0
1 0, 5 5 0 3 3, 7 8 0 2 0, 1 9 0 6 6, 8 8 0

17. 4 6 18. 8 3 19. 7 8 20. 5 6


 7 0  4 0  8 0  9 0
5 2, 2 2 0 3 3, 5 6 0 3 8, 2 4 0 5 0, 4 9 0

21. 1 4 22. 9 5 23. 7 1 6 24. 6 5


McGraw-Hill School Division

 8 0  2 0  0  7 0
2 5, 1 2 0 1 8, 5 0 0 6 4, 4 4 0 4 7, 2 5 0

25. 2 5 26. 5 4 27. 6 3 6 28. 7 4


 8 0  4 0  0  5 0
7 4, 0 0 0 2 1, 7 6 0 5 7, 2 4 0 3 9, 2 0 0

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 3, pages 238239. (180) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
64 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Solve Multistep Problems Reading


Skill
Circle the hidden question that can help you solve the problem.
Then solve the problem.
1. A group of travelers rents 5 boats for 8 hours each. Boats cost
$12 an hour to rent. What is the total fee for this rental?
What is the total number of hours that the 5 boats are rented for?
What is the total number of boats that are rented in a day?
Solution:

2. A swimming instructor has 4 classes with 8 students in each class.


Each student pays a total of $50 for the classes for the season. How
much money does the swimming instructor receive?
What amount does the instructor charge per hour?
How many students in all does the swimming instructor have?
Solution:

3. Burkes Bluff Beach sells 25 guest passes in one day. Condor Cove
Beach sells 2 times as many guest passes that same day. Estimate
the total number of guest passes that beaches will sell in 3 days.
How many guest passes does Condor Cove Beach sell in 1 day?
How many guest passes will Burkes Bluff Beach sell in 2 days?
Solution:
McGraw-Hill School Division

4. Miguel charges $30 per hour to take people on his boat. Miguel
rents his boat for 3 hours per day for 12 days. How much money
does Miguel receive?
How many hours in all does Miguel rent his boat?
How much would Miguel receive if he rented his boat
12 hours per day?
Solution:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 4, pages 240241. (181) MR 1.2, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
64 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Solve Multistep Problems Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
Lana and Ken rent 2 sets of scuba equipment for $16 an hour each.
They rent a boat for $24 per hour. They use the boat and the
equipment for 7 hours.
1. Which of the following statements 2. One hidden question you must
is true? solve is:
A Lana and Ken pay $40 per hour F How much do they pay to rent
to rent a boat. 2 sets of scuba equipment for
B Lana and Ken pay $168 to rent 7 hours?
the boat. G How many hours do they use
C Lana and Ken rent the boat and the boat?
equipment for 16 hours. H How much do they pay for the
boat each hour?
On a school trip, 3 buses of students go to Ocean Land. Each bus
has 44 students. Each student spends $10 on admission and a
special show. How much money do the students spend altogether?
3. Which question do you have to answer 4. How much money do the students
before you can solve the problem? spend altogether?
A How many students are in each F $1,320
bus? G $440
B How many hours are the students H $10
at Ocean Land?
C How many students in all visit
Ocean Land?
Olive catches 3 fish in 1 hour. Her sister catches 3 times as many fish.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Estimate the number of fish the girls will catch if they fish for 3 hours.
5. Which of the following statements 6. One hidden question you must
is true? solve is:
A Olive and her sister catch 9 fish. F How many fish did Olive catch
B Olives sister catches 3 fish. in 1 hour?
C Olives sister catches 3 times as G How many fish did Olives sister
many fish as Olive does. catch in 1 hour?
H How many hours have they fished
so far?
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 4, pages 240241. (182) MR 1.2, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
64 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Solve Multistep Problems Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
The Beach Shack rents out 12 umbrellas for 5 hours each. Umbrellas
cost $6 per hour. How much money does The Beach Shack make?
7. Which question do you have to 8. How much money does The Beach
answer before you can solve the Shack make?
problem?
F $30
A How much does it cost to rent
G $72
1 umbrella for 12 hours?
H $360
B How much does it cost to rent
1 umbrella for 5 hours?
C How many umbrellas does The
Beach Shack have?

Solve.
9. The Diving Club offers 4 beginning 10. A fishing guide charges $25 per
diving classes each day. Each class hour. He works 6 hours per day for
has room for 6 people. How many 5 days. How much money does the
people can take classes in 30 days? guide earn?

11. During one week, 5 sailboats are 12. The aquarium charges $12 admission
rented for a total of 16 hours each. and $6 for a tour. A group of 20
The rental cost is $25 per hour. people goes to the aquarium and
Altogether, how much is paid for takes the tour. How much money
these rentals? does the group spend?
McGraw-Hill School Division

13. Amanda rents a canoe and a life 14. Jenny rented a rowboat from
preserver from 2:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. 10:45 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. After lunch,
A canoe costs $12 per hour. A life she rented another rowboat from
preserver costs $2 per hour. How 1:45 P.M. to 4:45 P.M. For how many
much does Amanda spend? minutes did she rent the boat?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 4, pages 240241. (183) MR 1.2, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
6-5 Page
Multiply by 2-Digit Numbers P PRACTICE

Find each product


1. 26 2. 73 3. 44 4. $0.56 5. 29
 35  51  87  83  19

6. $46 7. 59 8. 77 9. 55 10. 44
 35  47  22  15  46

11. 79 12. 94 13. $0.63 14. 68 15. 51


 73  61  58  24  34

16. 18  92  17. 28  19  18. 86  43 

19. 74  33  20. 48  26  21. 31  $0.18 

22. 77  94  23. 88  62  24. 27  34 

Algebra & Functions Find each product.

25. (30  7)  (10  8)  n 26. (60  4)  (20  9) = v

27. (80  1)  (40  2)  p 28. (50  6)  (70  3) = r

29. (90  5)  (10  1)  q


30. (60  6)  (50  5)  c
McGraw-Hill School Division

31. (20  8)  (70  7)  s 32. (40  3)  (80  4)  b

Problem Solving
33. A fence has 28 sections with 34. Horses on a ranch eat 28 bales
18 boards in each section. How of hay each day. How many bales
many boards are in the fence? do they eat in 31 days?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 5, pages 242245. (184) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
65 Page
Multiply by 2-Digit Numbers R RETEACH

You can use a place-value chart to help you multiply 2-digit numbers.

Multiply 47  25.
Step 1 Step 2 Step 3
Multiply by the ones. Multiply by the tens. Add the products.
Regroup if necessary.

TH H T O TH H T O TH H T O
2 2
3 3 3
2 5 2 5 2 5
 4 7  4 7  4 7
1 7 5 1 7 5 1 7 5
  1 0 0 0  1 0 0 0
1 1 7 5

Complete. Find each product.


1. 2. 3.
H T O TH H T O TH H T O

1 5 3 2 5 9
 4 5  8 7  9 3
5 2 4 7 7
 6 0 0  2 5 6 0  5 3 1 0

4. 16 5. $15 6. 23 7. $0.27 8. 38
 23  42  39  51  26
McGraw-Hill School Division

9. 46 10. 67 11. 59 12. $31 13. 72


 44  29  31  28  53

14. 85  43  15. 96  35  16. $0.39  66 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 5, pages 242245. (185) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
65 Page
Multiply by 2-Digit Numbers E ENRICH

Patterns for Eleven


Multiply 11 by a 1-digit number.
1. 2  11  2. 3  11  3. 4  11  4. 5  11 

5. 6  11  6. 7  11  7. 8  11  8. 9  11 

What pattern do you see?

Multiply 11 by a 2-digit number.


9. 11 10. 11 11. 11 12. 11
 31  32  33  34

13. 11 14. 11 15. 11 16. 11


 53  62  27  18

What pattern do you see?

Use the pattern to find these products.


17. 11 18. 11 19. 11 20. 11
 41  22  38  16
McGraw-Hill School Division

21. 44  11  22. 55  11 

23. 64  11  24. 72  11 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 5, pages 242245. (186) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
66 Page
Estimate Products P PRACTICE

Estimate each product.


1. 49  59 2. 55  65

3. 41  52 4. 18  29

5. 98  402 6. 71  874

7. 61  $216 8. 42  605

9. 81  350 10. 23  999

11. 85  1,211 12. 71  2,118 

13. 19  6,302 14. 29  7,907

Algebra & Functions Estimate to compare. Write  or .

15. 98  27 3,000 16. 37  196 8,000 17. 42  84 3,200

18. 498  16 100,000 19. 21  423 8,000 20. 589  36 24,000

21. 59  689 22. 49  188 23. 224  41


McGraw-Hill School Division

42,000 10,000 8,000

24. 26  42 34  21 25. 15  47 59  68 26. 34  82 37  58

Problem Solving
27. The price of a bus ticket is $58. 28. An airline ticket costs $375.
About how much will tickets for a About how much will tickets cost
group of 62 passengers cost? for a group of 25 people?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 6, pages 246247. (187) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
66 Page
Estimate Products R RETEACH

You can round to estimate products. Round each number to its


greatest place. Then multiply using patterns with zeros
Estimate 42  59. Estimate 74  229.
42 40 1 zero 227 200 2 zeros
 59  60  1 zero  74  70  1 zero
2,400 2 zeros 14,000 3 zeros

Estimate each product by rounding.


1. 2. 3.
54 $29 788
 19  32  51

Estimate each product.


4. 37  49 5. 23  51

6. 69  19 7. 26  $72

8. 19  315 9. 85  263

10. 72  803 11. 48  1,056


McGraw-Hill School Division

12. 92  2,228 13. 57  $5,698

14. 76  6,419 15. 12  9,058

16. 55  4,830 17. 92  1,568

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 6, pages 246247. (188) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
66 Page
Estimate Products E ENRICH

Estimation Maze
Estimate to find your way out of the maze. First, estimate to find
the box in which the answer could be 858. Start in that box. Then,
in order, estimate to find and go through the boxes in which the
answers are:
3,060 7,308 3,822 2,278 16,910 6,123 15,092 33,888 52,416 36,344

78 34 42 57
 11  90  19  14

I M P C

26 87 39 67
 34  84  98  34

B O U T

172 178 157 196


 24  95  39  77

R H F O

953 706 819 616


 48  48  64  59

W E R E
McGraw-Hill School Division

Write the letters from the boxes you go through in order. What message do you find?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 6, pages 246247. (189) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
67 Page
Multiply Greater Numbers P PRACTICE

Multiply. Check that each answer is reasonable


1. 653 2. 908 3. 412 4. 714
 27  43  65  36

5. 279 6. 309 7. $1.26 8. 305


 64  32  98  77

9. 4,084 10. 7,016 11. 9,148 12. $50.09


 43  25  16  31

13. 2,007 14. $39.85 15. 6,618 16. $82.35


 75  74  91  72

17. 21,107 18. 46,118 19. 92,306 20. $123.95


 42  27  31  18

21. 53  36,219  22. 26  $591.05 

23. 36  19,962  24. 71  23,401 

Algebra & Functions Given each set of digits, make the greatest
and least product possible by multiplying by a 2-digit number. Use
each digit one time.
McGraw-Hill School Division

25. 5, 2, 6, 1 26. 7, 9, 2, 0

Problem Solving
27. A box holds 250 ping pong balls. 28. Pencils are packaged with 144 pencils
How many ping pong balls can be in a box. How many pencils are there
packaged in 85 boxes? in 50 boxes?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 7, pages 250253. (190) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
67 Page
Multiply by Greater Numbers R RETEACH

You can use a place-value chart to multiply greater numbers.

Multiply 25  3,188.
Estimate: 30  3,000  90,000
Step 1 Step 2 Step 3
Multiply by the ones. Multiply by the tens. Add the products.
Regroup if necessary. Regroup if necessary.
Thousands Ones Thousands Ones Thousands Ones
1.
H T O H T O H T O H T O H T O H T O

1 1 1 1
3 4 3 4 3 4
3 1 7 8 3 1 7 8 3 1 7 8
 2 5  2 5  2 5
1 5 8 9 0 1 5 8 9 0 1 5 8 9 0
  6 3 5 6 0  6 3 5 6 0
7 9 4 5 0

Since 79,450 is close to the estimate of 90,000, the answer is reasonable.

Multiply.
Thousands Ones Thousands Ones Thousands Ones
1. 2. 3.
H T O H T O H T O H T O H T O H T O

2
1 4 5 7 1 2 9 3 2 0 0 6
 2 5  1 8  1 3
McGraw-Hill School Division

  

4. $3.69 5. 518 6. 6,735 7. 8,098


 18  49  37  66

8. 4,484  72  9. 85  $116.95  10. 52  19,071

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 7, pages 250253. (191) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
67 Page
Multiply Greater Numbers E ENRICH

Quick Check
Here is a quick way to check the product for 14  1,456.
Step 1
Add the digits in each number.
Add again if the sum has two digits.
1,456 1  4  5  6  16, 167
 14 1  4  5
20,384 2  0  3  8  4  17, 178

Step 2 Step 3
Multiply the two numbers you got from Compare the sum you got from adding the
adding the factors. digits in the product for 14  1,456 to the
Then add the digits in the product. sum you got in Step 2.
8  8, so the product 20,384 is correct.
7 3
5 5
35 8

Use the method shown above to check each problem. Draw an X


next to any incorrect product. Then find the correct product.
1. 314 2. 815 3. 742 4. 689
 57  32  68  24
17,896 26,090 50,456 16,536
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. 537 6. 496 7. 2,214 8. 3,418


 49  71  88  92
26,213 35,216 193,832 314,456

9. 4,372 10. 8,432 11. 7,498 12. 9,455


 15  37  45  76
65,480 311,984 337,410 707,580

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 7, pages 250253. (192) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
68 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy P PRACTICE

Make a Graph
Make a graph for the data in the table. Use data from the graph to
solve problems 1 and 2.

Boat Rentals at Lake Willow in July and August


Type of Boat Income from Boat Rentals
Sailboats $1,300
Rowboats $1,100
Paddle boats $800
Canoes $1,000

1. Which type of boat generated the 2. Which type of boat generated the
most income? least income?

3. A beach sells 1,000 passes in 1998; 4. Suppose you make a graph for the
1,200 passes in 1999; and 1,100 passes data in problem 3 in which each
in 2000. Suppose you make a symbol stands for 100 passes.
pictograph in which each symbol stands How many symbols would you
for 200 passes. How many symbols make for each year?
would you make for each year?

Mixed Strategy Review


Solve. Use any strategy.
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Time Elliot returns from the beach at


4:30 P.M. He spent 2 hours at the 6. Create a problem for which you
beach. It takes 15 minutes for Elliot would make a graph to solve.
to travel from his home to the Share it with others.
beach. What time did Elliot leave
home to go to the beach?

Strategy:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 8, pages 254255. (193) SDP 1.1; MR 2.3, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
68 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Make a Graph
Page 255, Problem 2
Sandcastle Building Contests
Which contest had the
most people? The least? Location Number of People
Port Aransas, TX 1,250
Wenatchee, WA 1,675
Seal Beach, CA 1,775
Atlantic City, NJ 1,525
Malibu, CA 1,375

Step 1
Be sure you understand the problem.
Read Read carefully.
What do you know?
You know how many
.
What do you need to find?
You need to find
.

Step 2
Make a plan.
Plan Choose a strategy.
Find a Pattern A graph can help you compare data quickly.
Guess and Check
McGraw-Hill School Division

Work Backward Make a bar graph to solve the problem.


Make a Graph
Make a Table or
List
Write a Number
Sentence
Draw a Diagram
Solve a Simpler
Problem
Logical Reasoning
Act it Out

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 8, pages 254255. (194) SDP 1.1; MR 2.3, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
68 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Make a Graph

Step 3
Carry out your plan. Make a bar graph.
Solve
Sandcastle Building Contest

Port
Aransas,TK
Wenatchee,
WA
Location

Seal Beach,
CA

Atlantic
City, NJ

Malibu, CA
100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800

Number of People

The contest at:


has the most people.
has the least people.
Step 4
Is the solution reasonable?
Look Back Reread the problem.
Does your answer match the data given in
the problem? Yes No
What other kind of graph could you use to compare the data?
McGraw-Hill School Division

Practice
1. The Lakefront Swim Club had 400 2. In which year did the Lakefront Swim
members in 1970, 250 members in Club have the most members? the
1980, 600 members in 1990, and least members?
550 members in 2000. Make a
graph that displays this data.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 8, pages 254255. (195) SDP 1.1; MR 2.3, 2.4, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
69 Page
Multiply Using Mental Math P PRACTICE

Multiply. Use mental math.


1. 12  30  2. 40  21  3. 34  11 

4. 55  18  5. 60  14  6. 70  31 

7. 44  22  8. 80  51  9. 90  9 

10. 25  50  11. 30  26  12. 24  40 

13. 44  15  14. 52  11  15. 15  16 

16. 35  22  17. 61  30  18. 20  48 

19. 30  19  20. 65  40  21. 48  40 

22. 16  21  23. 25  28  24. 59  61 

25. 50  14  26. 35  21  27. 70  49 

28. 11  62  29. 90  42  30. 22  55 

Algebra & Functions Complete each table.


31.
Rule: Multiply by 35.
Input 20 31 42 110 130
Output 700 1,085 1,470 3,850 4,550

32.
Rule: Multiply by 16.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Input 15 25 75 100 220


Output 240 400 1,200 1,600 3,520

Problem Solving
33. Teams of 16 students are helping 34. Students are going on a field trip
clean the park. There are 21 teams. in 20 buses. Each bus carries 35
How many students in all are helping students. How many students are
clean the park? going on the field trip?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 9, pages 256257. (196) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
69 Page
Multiply Using Mental Math R RETEACH

You can multiply using mental math.

Compensation Compatible Numbers


Multiply one factor by a number. Break apart one number and multiply.
Divide another factor by the same number. Then add.
25  16  (25  2)  (16  2) 25  16  (25  10)  (25  6)

50  8  400 250  150  400

Multiply mentally. Use compensation.

1. 35  40  (35  )  (40  ) 2. 60  25  (60  )  (25  )

     
Multiply mentally. Use compatible numbers.

3. 15  16  (  16)  (5  ) 4. 22  30  (  30)  (  30)

     
Multiply. Use mental math.

5. 20  45  6. 15  28  7. 11  72 

8. 75  20  9. 36  40  10. 50  23 

11. 44  25  12. 70  18  13. 59  71 

14. 99  10  15. 60  73  16. 45  36 


McGraw-Hill School Division

17. 53  11  18. 32  26  19. 80  61 

20. 70  19  21. 65  16  22. 35  90 

23. 25  25  24. 80  18  25. 26  23 

26. 11  37  27. 55  27  28. 75  30 

29. 62  10  30. 25  45  31. 50  88 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 9, pages 256257. (197) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
69 Page
Multiply Using Mental Math E ENRICH

Circle Race
You will need:
Play with a partner. 10 index cards
Write each of these numbers on an index card:
12 15 18 25 30 35 50 60 200 400
Mix up the cards and then place them facedown between you
and your partner. Draw a card. Write the number in the center
of your circle. Use mental math to multiply each number on the
circle by the number in the center. The first person to complete
the circle with correct answers scores 1 point.
Erase the number in the center. Repeat the activity until all the
cards have been drawn.
The person with the greater number of points wins.

18 33
24 14

16 40
McGraw-Hill School Division

300 22

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 9, pages 256257. (198) NS 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


610
Problem Solving: Application Part
A WORKSHEET

Decision
Applying Multiplication Making

Record your data.

Sailboats Rowboats Paddle boats Canoes


McGraw-Hill School Division

Your Decision
Which boat or boats will the family rent? How long will they ride? Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 10, pages 258259. (199) NS 1.2, 3.3; MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


610
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

How many times does your heart beat each day? Math &
Science

Record your data in the table below.

Time Estimate Actual Heart Beats

Each minute

Each hour

Each day

Each year

Show how you estimated the number of heart beats in each hour,
each day, and each year.

Each hour Each day Each year


McGraw-Hill School Division

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 10, pages 260261. (200) NS 3.2, 3.3; MR 1.1, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


610
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

How many times does your heart beat each day? Math &
Science
1. Why would it be difficult to count the number of heart beats in a
day? Explain how math made your job easier.

2. Round the number of beats for a day to the nearest 10,000. Collect
the data for the whole class. What was the range of heartbeats?

What number was most common?

3. Make a bar graph to display the data 4. Martys heart beats 70 times each
from the class. minute. Tamaras heart beats 60
times each minute. How many more
times does Martys heart beat each
day? Show your work.
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Explain how exercise can reduce the


number of times your heart beats
each day.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 6, Lesson 10, pages 260261. (201) NS 3.2, 3.3; MR 1.1, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
71 Page
Division Patterns P PRACTICE

Complete.
1. 48  6  2. 35  5  3. 16  4 
480  6  350  5  160  4 
4,800  6  3,500  5  1,600  4 
Divide.
206 R2 50 $70 80
4. 3 620 5. 5 250 6. 6 $420 7. 7 560

80 $90 60 70
8. 2 160 9. 3 $270 10. 4 240 11. 8 560

800 700 700 $700


12. 9 7,200 13. 5 3,500 14. 4 2,800 15. 6 $4,200

$600 400 600 4,000


16. 7 $4,200 17. 9 3,600 18. 3 1,800 19. 2 8,000

20. 120  2  21. $240  3  22. 810  9 

23. $450  5  24. 630  7  25. 540  9 

26. 3,000  6  27. $7,200  8  28. 4,800  8 

29. 3,200  8  30. 5,600  7  31. $3,600  4 

Algebra & Functions Write the missing number.


32. 200   50 33. 450  5  34. 630   90
35.  6  40 36. 200   40 37.  8  80
McGraw-Hill School Division

38.  4  600 39. 1,500   500 40. 3,000  5 

Problem Solving
41. There are 150 students in 3 buses. Each 42. A pet shop has 160 fish in
bus carries the same number of students. aquariums. Each aquarium has
How many students are on each bus? 40 fish. How many aquariums
of fish are there?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 1, pages 276277. (202) NS 3.2, 3.4; MR 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
71 Page
Division Patterns R RETEACH

You can divide mentally by using basic division facts and looking for
a pattern.

Divide. Count the zeros.


Think: Think:
The basic fact is 12  3  4. The basic fact is 40  8  5.

12  3  4 no zeros 40  8  5 no extra zeros

120  3  40 1 zero 400  8  50 1 extra zero

1,200  3  400 2 zeros 4,000  8  500 2 extra zeros

Complete.
1. 15  3  2. 20  5 

150  3  200  5 
1,500  3  2,000  5 

3. 32  4  4. 30  6 

320  4  300  6 
3,200  4  3,000  6 

5. 35  5  6. 45  9 

350  5  450  9 
3,500  5  4,500  9 

7. 48  8  8. 64  8 
McGraw-Hill School Division

480  8  640  8 
4,800  8  6,400  8 

9. 180  2  10. 360  4  11. 700  7 

1 2. 360  6  13. 540  9  14. 1,400  2 

15. 4,200  7  16. 2,700  9  17. 4,900  7 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 1, pages 276277. (203) NS 3.2, 3.4; MR 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
71 Page
Division Patterns E ENRICH

Geography Riddles
Find each missing number. Solve the riddles by placing the letter
from each exercise in the blank above the matching answer number.

1. 140  7  M 2.  9  40 U
3. 4,200  700 O 4.  2  800 A
5. 3,500   700 H 6.  4  30 N
7.  3  700 E 8. 320   80 A
9. 2,800   400 S 10.  9  90 R
11. 5,600   700 S 12. 240   80 I
13. 5,400   600 L 14. 2,700  3  E
15. 720  9  I 16. 800   400 R
17. 150  3  M 18.  7  60 E
19. 120  2  S 20.  8  400 I
21.  5  800 C 22. 810  9  N

What state reminds you of part of a lion?


20 4 3 120 420
McGraw-Hill School Division

What city likes to wander?


2 6 50 900

Which people are always in a hurry?


810 360 60 7 3,2001,600 90 8

What country is always cold?


4,000 5 80 9 2,100

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 1, pages 276277. (204) NS 3.2, 3.4; MR 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
72 Page
Explore Division P PRACTICE

Write a division sentence for each model.


1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6.

Find each quotient. You may draw place-value models.

3 R2 3 R5 9 R1 3 R6
7. 6 20 8. 8 29 9. 4 37 10. 9 33

12 R3 13 R1 13 11 R6
11. 4 51 12. 5 66 13. 6 78 14. 7 83

16 R3 14 27 R1 49 R1
15. 6 99 16. 7 98 17. 2 55 18. 2 99

19. 41  9  20. 62  9  21. 59  7 

22. 88  3  23. 73  5  24. 58  4 

25. 67  6  26. 77  7  27. 43  2 


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving

28. Books are packed in boxes of 9. 29. Ping pong balls are packed in boxes
If 67 books are packed, how many of 6. If 59 ping pong balls are packed,
full boxes will there be? How many how many full boxes will there be?
books will be left over? How many ping pong balls will be
left over?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 2, pages 278279. (205) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
72 Page
Explore Division R RETEACH

You can use models to help you divide.

Divide 86  3.

Show 86. Place 2 tens in each of 3


groups. Regroup the 2
tens that are left as 20
ones. You can divide the
26 ones into 3 groups of
8 with 2 left over.

You can divide 86 cubes


into 3 groups of 28 with
2 left over.
So, 86  3  28 R2.

Divide. You may use models to help you.


1. 2.

58  4  37  2 

3. 4.
McGraw-Hill School Division

49  4  68  3 

Divide.
5. 43  2  6. 25  2  7. 42  4 

8. 82  5  9. 48  4  10. 78  9 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 2, pages 278279. (206) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
72 Page
Explore Division E ENRICH

Remainder Rules
You can use divisibility rules to find out if a number will have a remainder.
Divisibility Rules
A number is divisible by:
2 if the ones digit is 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8. 6 if it is divisible by both 2 and 3.
3 if the sum of its digits is divisible by 3. 9 if the sum of its digits is divisible by 9.
5 if the ones digit is 0 or 5. 10 if the ones digit is 0.

1. If you divide 315 by 5, will there be a remainder?


How do you know?

Divide to prove your answers.

2. If you divide 691 by any 1-digit number, will there be a remainder?


How do you know?

Divide to prove your answer.


McGraw-Hill School Division

3. Think about dividing a 3-digit number by each of the following


1-digit numbers: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.
Which divisions will have remainders?
Which divisions will not have remainders?
Prove your answers.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 2, pages 278279. (207) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
73 Page
Divide 3-Digit Numbers P PRACTICE

Divide. Check your work.

349 $135 130 R1 112 R1


1. 2 698 2. 5 $675 3. 3 391 4. 7 785

111 R2 28 R7 $0.67 124 R3


5. 5 557 6. 8 231 7. 4 $2.68 8. 8 995

99 R2 $1.12 311 R2 91 R2
9. 4 398 10. 6 $6.72 11. 3 935 12. 5 457

129 361 R1 119 R3 93 R1


13. 7 903 14. 2 723 15. 7 836 16. 8 745

111 62 R5 $37 111 R2


17. 9 999 18. 6 377 19. 8 $296 20. 7 779

21. 215  3  22. 367  5  23. 467  2 

24. 593  4  25. 298  6  26. 506  7 

27. Divide 726 by 7. 28. Divide 834 by 5. 29. Divide 909 by 8.

Algebra & Functions Find each missing number.


30. 1,065  n  213 31. c  4  168 32. 690  m  345

33. b  8  116 34. 585  d  195 35. t  9  111

36. (250 + 14)  x  44 37. (700 + y)  7  106 38. 756  (r + 3)  126


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
39. Morgan is planting 906 pine seedlings 40. The school bought 2,880 tickets to
in rows. She plants 8 pine seedlings in the circus. The tickets will be divided
each row. How many rows are there? equally among 9 classes. How many
How many seedlings are left? tickets will each class get?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 3, pages 280283. (208) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
73 Page
Divide 3-Digit Numbers R RETEACH

Divide 8 425 .
Step 1 Step 2 Step 3
Divide the hundreds. Divide the tens. Divide the ones.
Think: 4  8. Bring down the tens. Bring down the ones.
There arent enough Divide the tens. Divide the ones.
hundreds.
5 53 R1
8 425 8 425 8 425
40 Multiply: 8  5  40 40
2 Subtract: 42  40  2 25
24 Multiply: 8  3  24
1 Subtract: 25  24  1
The remainder is 1.
Check your answer: 53  8  1  425
Complete.
1. 2. 3.
2 2 8 1 4 3 R 2 8 9 R 1
36 8 4 57 1 7 76 2 4
6 5 5 6
8 2 1 6 4
 6  2 0  6 3
2 4 1 7 1
 2 4  1 5
0 2
Find each quotient.

143 R1 69 R4 152 R4 41 R6
McGraw-Hill School Division

4. 4 573 5. 5 349 6. 5 764 7. 7 293

248 R1 139 94 R8 288 R2


8. 3 745 9. 7 973 10. 9 854 11. 3 866

12. 662  5  13. 571  8  14. 927  4 

15. 745  3  16. 680  5  17. 571  6 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 3, pages 280283. (209) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
73 Page
Divide 3-Digit Numbers E ENRICH

Short Division
Short division is a quick way to divide. Here is how it works.

Divide 6 892 .
Step 1 Step 2 Step 3
Divide the hundreds. Divide the tens. Divide the ones.
Multiply and subtract Multiply and subtract Multiply and subtract
mentally. Write the mentally. Write the mentally. Write the
difference in front of the difference in front of the remainder as part of the
digit in the tens place. digit in the ones place. quotient.
1 14 1 4 8 R4
6 8292 Think: 6  1  6 6 82952 Think: 6  4  24 6 82952 Think: 6  8  48
862 29  24  5 52  48  4

Divide 8 653 .
Step 1 Step 2 Step 3
Divide the hundreds. Divide the tens. Divide the ones.
8 8 1R5
8 653 Think: 8  1  8, not 8 6513 Think: 8  8  64, 8 6513 Think: 8  1  8,
enough hundreds. 65  64  1. 13  8  5.

Use short division to divide.


171 253 R2 155 R3
1. 2 342 2. 3 761 3. 4 623

164 R3 157 131 R1


4. 5 823 5. 6 942 6. 7 918
McGraw-Hill School Division

111 R6 96 R3 73 R5
7. 8 894 8. 9 867 9. 6 443

72 52 R1 61 R4
10. 6 432 11. 7 365 12. 7 431

65 R2 69 R3 61 R4
13. 5 327 14. 9 624 15. 8 492

118 95 R7 131 R5
16. 8 944 17. 9 862 18. 6 791

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 3, pages 280283. (210) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
74 Page
Zeros in the Quotient P PRACTICE

Divide. Check your answer.


1. 206 R2 2. 209 R1 3. 10 R2 4. 209 R3
3 620 2 419 9 92 4 839
5. 6. 7. 8.
$105 $1.07 $1.09 102
6 $630 8 $8.56 7 $7.63 9 918
9. 10. 11. 12.
109 R4 106 R6 101 R4 409 R1
5 549 7 748 8 812 2 819
13. 14. 15. 16.
103 R2 10 R8 70 R1 206 R3
6 620 9 98 3 211 4 827
17. 18. 19. 20.
108 R4 106 R7 109 R3 305 R2
5 544 8 855 6 657 3 917
21. 490 R1 22.
208 R3 23.
103 R6 24.
50 R6
2 981 4 835 7 727 8 406

25. 823  4  26. 704  5  27. 981  2 

28. 920  3  29. 916  7  30. 845  6 

31. 885  8  32. 954  5  33. 965  6 

Find only those quotients that are greater than 200.


34. 992  3  35. 920  9 

36. 619  3  37. 747  4 


McGraw-Hill School Division

38. 818  2  39. 540  2 

Problem Solving
40. Jenna earns $636 in 6 months by 41. A family of 4 spent $824 during their
babysitting. If divided evenly, how vacation. If divided evenly, how much
much is that a month? is that per person?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 4, pages 284285. (211) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
74 Page
Zeros in the Quotient R RETEACH

Divide 3 629 . Follow the steps below.

Step 1 Step 2 Step 3


Divide the hundreds. Divide the tens. Divide the ones.
Think: 3  2  600 Bring down the tens. Bring down the ones.
The first digit is in There are not enough Divide the ones.
the hundreds place. tens to divide. Trade 2
tens for 20 ones.

2 20 209 R2
3 629 Multiply: 3  2  6 3 629 There are not enough 3 629
6 Subtract: 6  6  0 6 tens to divide. Write 6
0 Compare: 0  6 02 a 0 in the quotient. 029
Compare: 0  4 27 Multiply: 3  9  27
2 Subtract: 29  27  2

Check your answer: 209  3  2  629

Complete.
1. 2. 3.
3 0 8 R 2 1 0 7 2 0 R 3
39 2 6 66 4 2 71 4 3
9 6 1 4
2 6 4 2 3
 2 4  4 2
2 0
Divide.

$204 109 R2 105 R1 109 R2


4. 4 $816 5. 4 438 6. 3 316 7. 7 765
McGraw-Hill School Division

307 R1 180 R1 209 R1 $70


8. 2 615 9. 2 361 10. 3 628 11. 3 $210

12. 912  9  13. 452  5  14. 662  3 

15. 965  6  16. 905  3  17. 734  7 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 4, pages 284285. (212) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
74 Page
Zeros in the Quotient E ENRICH

Pick a Winner
Pick divisors from the list below to create 20 division exercises.
Then complete the exercises. If you have a zero in the quotient,
give yourself 2 points. If you do not have a zero in the quotient,
give yourself 1 point.
Divisors: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

302 390 R1 106 R4 101 R4 103 R1


1. 2 604 2. 2 781 3. 8 852 4. 5 509 5. 6 619

110 R5 105 R3 170 109 R3 201R6


6. 7 775 7. 4 423 8. 1 170 9. 8 875 10. 9 1,815

90 R3 120 R5 70 R1 160 R1 50 R4
11. 4 363 12. 6 725 13. 3 211 14. 2 321 15. 7 354

20 R4 109 40 R3 302 403


16. 5 104 17. 5 545 18. 8 323 19. 3 906 20. 2 806

Total Points Earned:


21. Think about dividing a 3-digit number by a 1-digit number.
McGraw-Hill School Division

When will you get a quotient with a zero in the tens place?
Give an example.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 4, pages 284285. (213) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
75 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Interpret the Remainders Reading


Skill
Circle the correct word(s) or number(s) to make each statement true.
1. The Art Club sells T-shirts for $8. Ms. Demming has $92.
1
Ms. Demming can buy 11 11 2 12 T-shirts.
If Ms. Demming buys the greatest possible number of
T-shirts, she will have $ 0 $4 $8 left.
Explain your thinking:

2. There are 124 people at the Howard School Sports Dinner. They sit
at tables that have 8 seats each.
The school needs 15 16 tables.
There are 7 7 or 8 people at each table.
Explain your thinking:

3. Manny and two friends are paid $100 for setting up a new computer
in the schools math lab. They each do the same amount of work.
Manny earns more than the same as his friends.
Each friend earns more than less than $30.
Explain your thinking:
McGraw-Hill School Division

4. There are 75 students going to the art museum. They will ride in
vans that can hold 6 students.
There will be 12 13 vans.
There are 5 5 or 6 students in each van.
Explain your thinking:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 5, pages 286287. (214) NS 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.4, 2.6, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
75 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Interpret the Remainders Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.

There are 94 people who volunteer to clean the park. They will form as
many groups of 4 as possible. How many groups of 4 can they make?
1. Which of the following statements 2. How do you interpret the remainder
is true? to solve this problem?
A They will make 4 groups. F Use only the quotient.
B Everyone can be in a group of 4. G Use only the remainder
C There are 94 volunteers. H Add 1 to the quotient.

The after-school baseball league wants to buy 250 baseballs. The


baseballs come in boxes of 6. How many boxes will the league need?
3. How do you interpret the remainder 4. How many boxes will the
to solve this problem? league need?
A Use only the quotient. F 41 boxes
B Use only the remainder. G 42 boxes
C Add 1 to the quotient. H 43 boxes

The Computer Club has $80 to buy disks. A box of disks costs $7. There
is no sales tax. How many boxes of disks can the club buy?
5. Which of the following statements 6. How do you interpret the remainder
is false? to solve this problem?
McGraw-Hill School Division

A Each box of disks costs $7. F Add 1 to the quotient.


B All of the money will be spent. G Use only the quotient.
C The computer club has $80 to buy H Use only the remainder.
disks.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 5, pages 286287. (215) NS 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.4, 2.6, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
75 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Interpret the Remainders Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.

The Art Club makes $4 on each T-shirt it sells. How many shirts does the
club need to sell to raise $75?
7. How do you interpret the remainder 8. How many shirts does the club need
to solve this problem? to sell to raise $75?
A Add 1 to the quotient. F 3 shirts
B Use only the quotient. G 18 shirts
C Use only the remainder. H 19 shirts

Solve.
9. There are 72 students in the Hockey 10. The Hockey Club buys 128 ounces of
Club. How many teams of 5 can juice. How many 7-ounce cups can
they make? they pour?

11. Paint sets cost $6. The Art Club has 12. There are 132 students at a meeting.
$93. If the club buys as many paint The seats are arranged in rows of 8.
sets as it can, how much money will How many rows of seats are needed?
be left over?

13. There are 64 members in the Science 14. There are 83 students. They will sit in
Club. They travel to the science fair rows of 6 seats each. They will start
in cars that can hold 5 members at the front row and fill as many
McGraw-Hill School Division

each. How many cars are needed? rows as they can. How many
students will be in the last row?

15. Each song played by a DJ is 16. The DJs assistant distributes neon
4 minutes long. How many songs sunglasses to 50 people at a party.
does he play in a music set that is There are 6 glasses in a box. How
30 minutes long? many boxes should she open?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 5, pages 286287. (216) NS 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.4, 2.6, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
76 Page
Estimate Quotients P PRACTICE

Estimate. Choose compatible numbers.


1. 20 2. 20 3. 90 4. 70
2 43 4 71 6 521 7 501
5. 50 6.
40 7. 70 8. 30
3 159 4 171 2 131 9 286

9. 80 10. 40 11. 90 12. 300


8 650 5 209 9 831 7 2,011

13. 500 14. 800


6 3,124 4 3,105

15. 2,000 16. 5,000


3 5,896 9 46,999
17. 65  3 18. 98  5 19. 22  3

20. 381  8 21. 555  6 22. 640  7

23. 468  9 24. 309  5 25. 481  7

26. 281  3 27. 349  4 28. 412  5

29. 4,124  6 30. 1,912  9 31. 1,714  2


McGraw-Hill School Division

32. 2,186  4 33. 2,904  7 34. 4,711  8

Problem Solving
35. Marta travels a total of 850 miles every 36. Jeff went on a bike trip of
month to San Francisco for business. If 173 miles to Austin. It took him
she goes 3 times a month, about how 9 days. About how many miles
many miles is each round trip? did he travel each day?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 6, pages 288289. (217) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
76 Page
Estimate Quotients R RETEACH

Compatible numbers are numbers you can divide easily.


You can use compatible numbers to estimate quotients.
Estimate 351  4. Estimate 435  7.
Think: What basic division fact is Think: What basic division fact is
close to 35  4? close to 43  7?
36  4  9 42  7  6
360  4  90 420  7  60
So, 351  4 is about 90. So, 435  7 is about 60.

Complete.
1. Estimate 430  9. 2. Estimate 279  3.
Division fact: 45  9  Division fact: 27  3 
Estimate: 450  9  Estimate: 270  3 
3. Estimate 299  5 4. Estimate 319  4.
Division fact: Division fact:
Estimate: Estimate:
5. Estimate 562  6. 6. Estimate 631  8.
Division fact: Division fact:
Estimate: Estimate:

Estimate. Circle the letter of the division sentence with the


compatible number. Then complete the division.

7. 122  4 a. 120  4  b. 100  4 


McGraw-Hill School Division

8. 349  7 a. 360  7  b. 350  7

9. 272  9 a. 270  9  b. 280  9 

10. 292  5 a. 300  5  b. 290  5 

11. 453  9 a. 480  9  b. 450  9 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 6, pages 288289 (218) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
76 Page
Estimate Quotients E ENRICH

The Treasure State


Rewrite each exercise using compatible numbers.
Write the estimated quotient.

1. 60 2. 200 3. 80
7 428 420 3 605 600 4 316 320
4. 900 5. 1,000 6. 500
9 8,140 8,100 5 5,165 5,000 8 3,999 4,000
7. 600 8. 100 9. 20
6 3,546 3,600 2 196 200 4 85 80
10. 10 11. 90 12.
1,100
9 98 90 8 725 720 5 5,620 5,500
13. Write the estimated quotient beside each exercise number
below. The first one is done for you. Then cross out the
letters above quotients with two digits. Circle the letters
above quotients with three or more digits.

H I A D N N

11. 90 9. 5. 10. 2. 4.

T M O B P A
McGraw-Hill School Division

6. 8. 7. 1. 3. 12.

14. Rearrange the circled letters to spell the name of the Treasure State.

15. Show how to estimate 605  3.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 6, pages 288289. (219) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
77 Page
Divide 4-Digit Numbers P PRACTICE

Divide. Check your answer.

1. 2. 3. 4.
1,487 $4,028 1,306 R3 2,027 R2
5 7,435 2 $8,056 4 5,227 3 6,083

5. 6. 7. 8.
303 431 901 R5 $811
7 2,121 8 3,448 6 5,411 9 $7,299

9. 5,647  4  10. 3,409  2 

11. $6,456  8  12. 3,568  6 

13. 5,598  5  14. 1,841  2 

15. 9,049  7  16. $1,350  5 

17. Divide $4,032 by 8. 18. Divide 1,526 by 3. 19. Divide 5,732 by 9.

Compare. Write  or .
20. 1,6442 1,9323 21. 2,814 7 2,4186 22. 4,9497 3,598  4

Problem Solving
McGraw-Hill School Division

23. The mountain bike club wants to 24. The Lets Grow club makes and sells
raise $4,464 for 9 new bicycles. If hot sauce. The club grows 1,083
each bicycle costs the same amount, peppers. Each jar of hot sauce
how much does each bicycle cost? contains 3 peppers. How many jars
can the club make?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 7, pages 290293. (220) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
77 Page
Divide 4-Digit Numbers R RETEACH

When you divide 4-digit numbers, begin by deciding


where to place the first digit in the quotient.
You can see the
Divide 3,154  6. quotient will have
3 digits.

Think: You cannot 5_ _


divide 3 by 6. Divide 31 by 6. 6 3,154
Write 5 in the quotient
above the 1.

Complete.
1. 2. 3.
5 1 6 R 1 1 9 1 3 R 1 4 7 8 1 R 1
3 1, 5 4 9 4 7, 6 5 3 2 9, 5 6 3
1 5 4 8
4 3 6 1 5
 3  3 6  1 4
1 9 0 5 1 6
 1 8  4  1 6
1 1 3 0 3
 1 2
 2
1 1
Divide.
4. 5. 6. 7.
694 R2 712 R2 $656 457 R2
McGraw-Hill School Division

5 3,472 7 4,986 4 $2,624 3 1,373

8. 9. 10. 11.
1,159 R3 1,009 R1 2,558 R1 1,090 R8
8 9,275 6 6,055 2 5,117 9 9,818

12. 1,671  8  13. 7,087  5 

14. 3,393  4  15. $6,426  3 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 7, pages 290293. (221) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
77 Page
Divide 4-Digit Numbers E ENRICH

Greatest Remainder Game


Play with a partner. Take turns.
Place your marker on START. Solve one of the exercises below. Then
move your marker the same number of spaces as the remainder.
The winner is the first player to reach END.

203 R1 868 R3 1,165 R4 653 R3


6 1,219 8 6,947 5 5,829 7 4,574

965 R3 285 R7 863 R7 1,084 R3


4 3,863 8 2,287 9 7,774 4 4,339

967 R2 606 R5 985 451 R4


6 5,804 6 3,641 7 6,895 5 2,259

674 R1 1,222 R5 904 R3 921 R4


4 2,697 6 7,337 4 3,619 9 8,293

349 R3 877 R1 709 R2 665 R5


5 1,748 3 2,632 8 5,674 6 3,995

1,377 R1 1,151 R2 607 R3 430 R3


7 9,640 5 5,757 5 3,038 4 1,723
McGraw-Hill School Division

T D
AR EN
ST

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 7, pages 290293. (222) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
78 Page
Divide 5-Digit Numbers P PRACTICE

Divide. Check your answer.

1. 2. 3. 4.
13,168 19,208 26,994 $15,064
5 65,840 4 76,832 2 53,988 6 $90,384

5. 6. 7. 8.
4,220 R7 6,447 R2 $6,475 3,056 R1
8 33,767 7 45,131 3 $19,425 9 27,505

9. 10. 11. 12.


7,073 R1 5,333 4,615 R4 9,316 R1
2 14,147 6 31,998 5 23,079 7 65,213

13. $19,328  4  14. 73,895  9 

15. 54,620  5  16. 41,183  2 

17. 16,697  6  18. 37,986  8 

Algebra & Functions Find each missing number.


19. $26,480  n  $5,296 20. 71,910  v  7,990 21. 44,356  r  11,089

Problem Solving
McGraw-Hill School Division

22. The King School held Junior Olympic 23. The King School raised $75,288 by
games in its sports stadium for selling Junior Olympic banners. Each
3 days. Each day, every seat in the banner cost $6. How many banners
stadium was full. A total of 17,748 did the school sell?
people sat in the stadium. How
many seats does the stadium have?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 8, pages 294295. (223) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
78 Page
Divide 5-Digit Numbers R RETEACH

Divide 19,834  4.

Step 1: Decide where to place the first digit in the quotient.

Think: You cannot


divide 1 by 4. Divide 19 by 4.
Write 4 in the quotient
above the 9. The quotient will have 4 digits.

Step 2: Divide. 4,958 R2


4 19,834
 16
38
36
23
 20
34
 32
2

Step 3: Check your work. 4,958  4  19,832; 19,832  2  19,834

Divide.

1. 2. 3. 4.
5 68,084 3 94,391 4 52,273 2 $26,856

5. 6. 7. 8.
7 23,042 6 44,738 5 31,619 9 82,445
McGraw-Hill School Division

9. 15,275  8  10. 39,021  9 

11. $45,222  3  12. 19,217  3 

13. 74,472  8  14. $33,496  4 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 8, pages 294295. (224) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
78 Page
Divide 5-Digit Numbers E ENRICH

Crossnumber Puzzle
Divide to complete the crossnumber puzzle.
Then create and solve your own Across and Down clues.
Across Down
1. 37,351  6  1. 43,393  7 

31. 47,338  5  4. 20,150  4 

54. 65,829  3  6. 17,037  9 

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.

31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40.

41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50.

51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60.

61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70.

71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80.
McGraw-Hill School Division

81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90.

91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 8, pages 294295. (225) NS 3.2, 3.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
79 Page
Find the Better Buy P PRACTICE

Find each unit price. Compare to find the better buy.


1. 2 ounces for $6.80 2. 3 gallons for $59.91

4 ounces for $14.00 5 gallons for $94.90


Better buy: Better buy:

3. 4 pounds for $10.92 4. 6 pints for $7.14

7 pounds for $19.53 9 pints for $14.31


Better buy: Better buy:

5. 3 yards for $157.44 6. 5 inches for $48.40

4 yards for $199.80 9 inches for $78.21


Better buy: Better buy:

7. 2 quarts for $99.50 8. 4 feet for $2.08

6 quarts for $315.00 5 feet for $2.10


Better buy: Better buy:
Solve. Use the ad to answer exercises 912.

9. What is the unit price for a 2-pound


bag of wild bird seed? Sa
Wild le on
Bird
Seed
2-pou !
nd ba
10. What is the unit price for a 5-pound g
$3.96 for
bag of wild bird seed?
McGraw-Hill School Division

5-pou
nd ba
g for
$9.4
5
11. What is the unit price of a 9-pound bag 9-pou
nd ba
of wild bird seed? g for
$15.7
5

12. Which bag of wild bird seed is the best


buy?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 9, pages 298299. (226) NS 3.2, 3.4; MR 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
79 Page
Find the Better Buy R RETEACH

Products often come in different sizes. You can find the


better buy by comparing the unit price of each size.

Find the better buy: a 6-ounce jar of pickles for $1.92, or


an 8-ounce jar of pickles for $2.80.

Step 1 Step 2
Find the unit prices. Compare the unit prices.
Divide the price by the number of ounces. $0.32  $0.35

So, the 6-ounce jar of


$0.32 $0.35 Think: Write the
6 $1.92 8 $2.80 pickles is the better buy.
18 24 dollar sign and the
12 40 decimal point
 12  40 in the quotient.
0 0

Find each unit price. Compare to find the better buy.


1.
3 gallons of paint 5 gallons of paint
for $43.62 for $75.00

unit price: unit price:


Better buy:

2. 2 pints for $2.98 3. 3 gallons for $3.69

4 pints for $4.96 5 gallons for $6.60


Better buy: Better buy:
McGraw-Hill School Division

4. 4 yards for $12.72 5. 5 feet for $46.25

6 yards for $20.70 7 feet for $63.35


Better buy: Better buy:

6. 3 cups for $11.22 7. 6 quarts for $55.38

8 cups for $31.52 9 quarts for $80.01


Better buy: Better buy:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 9, pages 298299. (227) NS 3.2, 3.4; MR 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
79 Page
Find the Better Buy E ENRICH

Beat This Price!


Two grocery stores, the Food Barn and Best Foods, are across the street
from each other. The Food Barn placed the ad below in the newspaper.

Food Barn s Weekend Specials!


Greek olives Cheddar cheese Six-pack of
$2.60 for a $34.75 for a cranberry juice
O lives 4-ounce jar

ice

ice
5-pound wheel boxes $4.74

Ju

Ju
$0.65/ounce $6.95/pound $0.79/box

Dog food Three cans NEW! Fresh


Dog pasta $3.15
Food $10.88 for a T UNA of tuna

a
st
pa
8-pound bag T UNA $4.86 for 9 inches
$1.36/pound T UNA $1.62/can $0.35/inch

Best Foods says its prices are lower than the Food Barns prices. Find
the unit price for each item in the Food Barn ad. Then create an ad
for Best Foods. Use the same items, but different amounts; for
example, a 7-ounce jar of Greek olives.

Best FoodsOur Prices Are Always Lower!

Item/Amount Our Price Our Unit Price


McGraw-Hill School Division

Greek olives: oz

Cheddar cheese: pounds

Cranberry juice: boxes

Dog food: pounds

Tuna: cans

Fresh pasta: inches

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 9, pages 298299. (228) NS 3.2, 3.4; MR 3.2, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
710 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy P PRACTICE

Guess and Check


Use the guess-and-check strategy to solve.
1. Teri is putting 57 dolls in a display 2. A group of friends choose cards
case. She puts the same number on equally from a deck of 52 cards.
each shelf and has 3 dolls left. The There are more than 6 friends. After
case has more than 7 shelves. How they have chosen, 4 cards are left.
many shelves does the case have? How many friends are there? How
How many dolls does each shelf hold? many cards does each friend have?

3. Jamal buys 59 stickers. Stickers come 4. There are 36 students in an


in packs of 5 or 8. How many of auditorium. There are twice as many
each kind of pack does Jamal buy? girls as boys. How many girls are
there? How many boys are there?

Mixed Strategy Review


Solve. Use any strategy.
5. Warren is making a display. He puts 6. Social Studies Each of the 50
1 photo in the first row, 4 photos in states in the United States has a
the second row, 7 in the third row, state flag. Evelyn wants to make a
and 10 in the fourth row. If the drawing of each state flag. She has
pattern continues, how many photos 3 more flags to draw. How many
will Warren put in the fifth row? flags has Evelyn drawn?
McGraw-Hill School Division

Strategy: Strategy:
7. Sally wants to arrive 20 minutes early 8. Create a problem which can be
for her job. She starts work at 4:15 P.M. solved by using the guess-and-check
It will take her about 20 minutes to strategy. Share it with others.
walk from school to the job. When
should Sally leave?

Strategy:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 10, pages 300301. (229) NS 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
710 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Guess and Check


Page 301, Problem 2

Jenny is making sand art. A bottle holds 8 inches of sand. Jenny


wants to have 2 inches more of red sand than blue sand. How
many inches of sand will she pour?

Step 1
Be sure you understand the problem.
Read Read carefully.
What do you know?
A bottle holds inches of sand.
There will be of red sand than
blue sand.
What do you need to find?
You need to find how many
.

Step 2
Make a plan.
Plan Choose a strategy.
Find a Pattern List the information you know.
Work Backward
Use Logical Use what you know to make a guess.
Reasoning
Guess how many inches of each color sand can be used to
McGraw-Hill School Division

Write a Number
Sentence make a total of 8 inches.
Make a Table Check your guess.
or List
Revise the guess and try again if it is wrong.
Guess and Check
Make a Graph Guess, check, and revise until you find the answer that
Solve a Simpler makes sense.
Problem
Draw a Diagram
Act it Out

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 10, pages 300301. (230) NS 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
710 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Guess and Check

Step 3
Carry out your plan.
Solve
You know that the bottle holds inches of sand.
You know that Jenny wants to have more
inches of sand than sand.
Guess Start with two numbers that have a sum of 8. Try 6 and 2.
Check 6 + 2 = 8
inches of red sand, inches of blue sand
There are more inches of red sand.
Does that answer fit the problem?
Revise 5 + 3 = 8
inches of red sand, inches of blue sand
There are more inches of red sand.
Does that answer fit the problem?

Step 4
Is the solution reasonable?
Look Back Reread the problem.
Does your answer make all of the statements true?
McGraw-Hill School Division

Practice
1. A group of friends share 30 stickers 2. Erica bought 9 pens. Each pen costs
equally, with 3 stickers left over. either $2 or $3. If the total cost was
There are more than 5 friends. How $23, how many $2 and $3 pens did
many friends are there? How many Erica buy?
stickers does each friend get?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 10, pages 300301. (231) NS 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.3, 2.4, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
711 Page
Explore Finding the Mean P PRACTICE

Use the connecting cubes to find the mean.


Redraw the cubes so that the rows are all the same length.
1. 4, 9, 5 2. 7, 6, 3, 4 3. 5, 6, 4, 3, 2

Mean: Mean: Mean:

Find the mean. You may use connecting cubes.


4. 2, 2, 9, 9, 8 5. 15, 0, 6 6. 1, 9, 12, 5, 3

7. 5, 10, 15, 20, 0 8. 1, 9, 2, 8, 3, 7 9. 4, 6, 3, 7, 2, 9, 1, 8

10. 10, 10, 30, 30 11. 1, 1, 1, 9, 9, 9, 8, 2 12. 24, 36

13. 20, 15, 20, 25 14. 4, 3, 2, 5, 1, 6, 2, 9 15. 5, 5, 6, 6, 9, 9, 2

16. 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 17. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 18. 10, 8, 6, 4, 2


McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
19. The students in Homeroom 101 20. Alison played in a basketball
collected soup labels this week. tournament this week. She scored
The number of labels brought in to the following numbers of points
class each day were 8, 6, 10, 6, and in 5 games: 20, 17, 12, 8, and 18.
5. What was the mean number of What was her average point total?
labels brought in each day?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 11, pages 302303. (232) NS 3.4; SDP 1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
711 Page
Explore Finding the Mean R RETEACH

You can find the mean of a set of numbers by


finding the sum of the numbers and then
dividing the sum by the number of addends.

Here is how to find the mean of 2, 3, 5,


and 6 using connecting cubes.

Connect cubes to represent each number.

Connect the cubes into one long row.


You should have 16 cubes connected together.

Divide the cubes into 4 equal groups.


You should have 4 cubes in each group.

So, the mean of 2, 3, 5, and 6 is 4.

Find the mean. You may draw cubes to help you.


McGraw-Hill School Division

1. 5, 6, 8, 1 2. 4, 8, 5, 7 3. 12, 10, 2

4. 2, 9, 3, 5, 6 5. 11, 5, 2, 2, 10 6. 5, 5, 3, 3, 9

7. 7, 6, 3, 4 8. 7, 8, 2, 4, 3, 6 9. 10, 15, 5

10. 5, 5, 0, 1, 4, 3 11. 10, 20, 40, 2, 10, 20

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 11, pages 302303. (233) NS 3.4; SDP 1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
711 Page
Explore Finding the Mean E ENRICH

January in Los Angeles


In Los Angeles, California, from 1961 to 1990, the average,
or mean, high temperature in January was 68 Fahrenheit.
1. Imagine that the average high temperature for the month below is 68F.
Complete the calendar by writing different temperatures for the days.
When you add the temperatures and divide by 31, you should have an
average temperature of 68F.

January

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday


1 2 3 4 5 6 7

70
8 9 10 11 12 13 14

73
15 16 17 18 19 20 21

63
22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31
McGraw-Hill School Division

68

2. Explain how you chose the temperatures.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 11, pages 302303. (234) NS 3.4; SDP 1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
712 Page
Find the Mean P PRACTICE

Find the mean.


1. 8, 4, 6, 7, 5 2. 11, 18, 13, 14

3. $25, $48, $77 4. 33, 72, 67, 88

5. $120, $308, $446, $506 6. 823, 665, 482, 619, 781

7. Number of minutes Jason practiced 8. Number of miles traveled each day:


violin this week: 30, 40, 20, 40, 20. 125, 85, 115, 100, 85, 90

9. Number of rolls of film used each day 10. Number of gallons of gas used
to take class pictures: 6, 4, 8, 3, 2, 1, 4 each day: 8, 6, 9, 11, 11, 9

11. Number of miles Dorothy ran each 12. Number of miles a pilot flew each
day: 6, 8, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 day: 980, 760, 590, 910, 630

13. Number of books Emily read each 14. Height of six boys in inches: 60, 54,
month: 2, 3, 5, 6, 1, 1. 62, 64, 66, 60

15. Number of bottles of juice on 16. Number of boxes of cereal eaten by


each shelf: 60, 80, 120, 40, 70, campers each week: 24, 14, 18, 26, 13
80, 90, 140
McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
17. Kathy trades baseball cards. 18. From Thursday through Sunday, Pizza
She traded 42, 38, and 40 cards Guy sold 97, 116, 208, and 151
the last three Saturdays. What is pizzas. What is the average number
the mean number of cards she of pizzas sold each day?
trades on a Saturday?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 12, pages 304305. (235) NS 3.4; SDP 1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
712 Page
Find the Mean R RETEACH

You can use connecting cubes to help you record the steps for finding a mean.
Find the mean of 7, 6, 3, and 4.
Using Connecting Cubes Using Pencil and Paper

Step 1 Step 1
Build each number with connecting cubes. Add the numbers.
7
6
3
4
20
Connect the cubes into one long row. You
should have 20 cubes connected together. Step 2
Divide the sum by the number of addends.
5
4 20
Step 2
Divide the cubes into 4 equal groups. So, the mean of 7, 6, 3, and 4 is 5.
You should have 5 cubes in each group.

So, the mean of 7, 6, 3, and 4 is 5.


Find the mean.
1. 4, 5, 7, 4, 5 2. 12, 10, 2 3. 16, 13, 12, 15
McGraw-Hill School Division

4. 21, 15, 12, 12, 20 5. 3, 14, 12, 11 6. 16, 15, 19, 13, 27

7. Weight of five dogs in pounds: 42, 8. Number of miles Lance bicycled each
35, 21, 38, 54 day: 74, 69, 80, 57

9. Number of hawks the ranger saw 10. Number of cars that used the parking
each day: 19, 7, 22, 8, 9, 13, 13 garage each day: 563, 709, 661,
842, 805

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 12, pages 304305. (236) NS 3.4; SDP 1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
712 Page
Find the Mean E ENRICH

Missing Pins
The computer at the bowling alley is down, so teams have to keep track
of their scores on cards. The scorecards below show the scores for the
first five frames, or rounds. A cat with muddy paws ran across the cards.
Complete the scorecards by writing the correct numbers in the paw
prints. Then fill in the teams total score and mean score.
Team A
Jason Deanna Serena eric
12 21 6 6
4
22
13 5 9
19
10 18 4 30
7 16 Total: 15
8 5 10
Total: 50 Total:
45 Total:
Mean: 65 Mean: 80
10 Mean: 13 9 Mean: 16

Team As Total Score: Mean Score per Person:


Team B
Steven Annie Chris Lindsey
12 5 16 20
13 12 18
9 11
10 12
17
16
9 18
McGraw-Hill School Division

Total: 10 15
10 12 15
60 Total: 50 Total: Total:
Mean: Mean: 65 85
12 10 Mean: 13 Mean: 17

Team Bs Total Score: Mean Score per Person:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 12, pages 304305. (237) NS 3.4; SDP 1.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


713
Problem Solving: Application Part
A WORKSHEET

Decision
Applying Division Making

Record your data and notes.

Cost Advantages and Disadvantages

Bus

Train

Car

Your Decision
McGraw-Hill School Division

What is your recommendation for the club? Should they take a bus, train,
or car to the aquarium? Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 13, pages 306307. (238) NS 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.1
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


713
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

Do light or heavy objects fly farther? Math &


Science

Safety: Wear goggles to protect your eyes and work away from
other people.

Record your data in the table below.

Distance Traveled

Object 1 2 3 4 5 Mean

Paper Clip

Eraser

1. Show how you found the mean or average distance for


each object.

Paper Clip Eraser


McGraw-Hill School Division

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 13, pages 308309. (239) NS 1.2; SDP 1.2; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


713
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

Do light or heavy objects fly farther? Math &


Science
2. Which object traveled farther? How do you know?

3. Use division to decide how many times farther one object


traveled than the other. Show your work.

Work Space

4. In your own words, explain what gravity is.


McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Explain the results of the activity in terms of gravity.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 7, Lesson 13, pages 308309. (240) NS 1.2; SDP 1.2; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
81 Page
Division Patterns P PRACTICE

Complete.
1. 36  9  n 2. 64  8  s 3. 18  b  6

360  90  n 640  80  s b  30  6
3,600  90  n 6,400  80  s 1,800  30  b
36,000  90  n 64,000  80  s 18,000  30  b
360,000  90  n 640,000  80  s 180,000  30  b

Divide. Use mental math.


4. 5. 6. 7.
2 70 500 7,000
60 120 40 2,800 70 35,000 80 560,000
8. 9. 10. 11.
$40 $300 $50 5,000
10 $400 70 $21,000 40 $2,000 90 450,000

12. 150  30  13. 16,000  80 

14. 2,700  90  15. 18,000  20 

16. 1,200  20  17. 56,000  70 

18. 810  90  19. 42,000  70 

20. 3,600  40  21. 45,000  50 

Algebra & Functions Find each missing number.


22. 140  a2 23. d  70  7 24. 3,000  60  x
McGraw-Hill School Division

25. t  60  70 26. 28,000  b  400 27. 40,000  50  y

Problem Solving
28. A box of 400 stickers is to be divided 29. If 6,300 books are divided equally
equally among 80 students. How many among 90 libraries, how many
stickers will each student receive? books will each library get?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 1, pages 324325. (241) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
81 Page
Division Patterns R RETEACH

To divide mentally, you can use basic division facts and look for a pattern.

Find the basic division fact. Then count and subtract zeros.
This will tell you how many zeros the quotient will have.

The basic fact is 6  2  3.


60  20  3 1 zero  1 zero  0 zeros
600  20  30 2 zeros  1 zero  1 zero
6,000  20  300 3 zeros  1 zero  2 zeros

The basic fact is 20  4  5.


200  40  5 1 extra zero 1 zero  0 zeros
2,000  40  50 2 extra zeros 1 zero  1 zero
20,000  40  500 3 extra zeros 1 zero  2 zeros

Complete the pattern. Count and subtract the zeros.


1. 24  3  2. 12  4 

240  30  120  40 
2,400  30  1,200  40 
24,000  30  12,000  40 

3. 63  9  4. 30  5 

630  90  300  50 
6,300  90  3,000  50 
63,000  90  30,000  50 
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. 9  3  6. 90  30  7. 900  30 

8. 18  3  9. 180  30  10. 1,800  30 

11. 42  6  12. 420  60  13. 4,200  60 

14. 40  8  15. 400  80  16. 4,000  80 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 1, pages 324325. (242) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
81 Page
Division Patterns E ENRICH

Move Along
Circle the correct answer for each exercise. Then use the remaining
two answers to write the next division sentence. Repeat until you
finish the page.

1. 8,000  10 = 800 2. 3,200  80 =

a. 3,200 b. 800 c. 80 a. 40 b. 4,000 c. 50

3. 4.

a. 90 b. 80 c. 4,500 a. 4,200 b. 60 c. 50

5. 6.

a. 70 b. 4,000 c. 80 a. 50 b. 2,800 c. 40

7. 8.

a. 54,000 b. 60 c. 70 a. 900 b. 90 c. 81,000

9. 10.

a. 900,000 b. 900 c. 90 a. 10 b. 10,000 c. 100,000

11. 12.
McGraw-Hill School Division

a. 100,000 b. 10,000 c. 20 a. 5,000 b. 500 c. 50

13. Look at exercise 12. How did you decide how many zeros were in the quotient?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 1, pages 324325. (243) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
82 Page
Explore Dividing by 2-Digit Numbers P PRACTICE

Divide.
1. 2.

130  10  143  30 
3. 4.

121  14  156  18 

Divide. You may use place-value models.


5. 6. 7. 8.
6 R9 9 R2 7 R9 8 R13
13 87 15 137 12 93 14 125

9. 10. 11. 12.


18 R5 13 R14 13 R11 17 R16
16 293 17 235 19 258 25 441

13. 135  16  14. 134  14  15. 115  15 


McGraw-Hill School Division

16. 282  18  17. 230  19  18. 269  24 

Problem Solving
19. The dividend is 280. The divisor is 23. 20. The dividend is 160. The divisor is 12.
What are the quotient and What are the quotient and
remainder? remainder?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 2, pages 326327. (244) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
82 Page
Explore Dividing by 2-Digit Numbers R RETEACH

You can use estimation and models to help you divide.

Find 148  12. Think: How many groups of 12 are there in 148?

Show 148 using Exchange Divide the tens. Exchange tens for
place-value 1 hundred for Make as many ones so you can
models. 10 tens. groups of 12 as keep grouping
you can. 1 ten and 2 ones.
You can make
12 equal groups
of 12 with 4 ones
remaining.

So, 148  12  12 R4.

Divide. You may use place-value models to help you.


McGraw-Hill School Division

1. 163  13  2. 158  10  3. 214  12 

4. 285  14  5. 352  16  6. 385  15 

7. 183  17  8. 268  11  9. 376  18 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 2, pages 326327. (245) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
82 Page
Explore Dividing by 2-Digit Numbers E ENRICH

Stick Division
What if we used a number system that used symbols instead of numerals?
In this Chinese system, numbers are written using the symbols shown.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 20 50 60 70 90 100

Using these symbols, 21 is shown as and 8,946 is shown as .

Example:
426
21 8,946

Use the number system above to create four division exercises


where the divisor is a 2-digit number. Then exchange exercises with
a partner and find the quotient using symbols.

1. 2.

3. 4.
McGraw-Hill School Division

5. Is it easier or harder to divide using the number system above? Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 2, pages 326327. (246) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Divide 2-Digit Numbers by Multiples of 10 Print


P This
83 Page
PRACTICE

Divide.
1. 82  20  2. 75  10  3. 51  20 

4. 94  30  5. 88  20  6. 87  10 

7. 93  40  8. 71  30  9. 97  20 

10. 74  20  11. 52  10  12. 67  30 

13. 91  10  14. 62  40  15. 94  40 

16. 17. 18. 19.


3 R1 1 R28 2 R1 2 R3
20 61 50 78 40 81 30 63

20. 21. 22. 23.


7 R6 4 R15 1 R24 1 R9
10 76 20 95 60 84 40 49

24. 25. 26. 27.


9 R6 1 R29 2 R4 1 R9
10 96 30 59 20 44 50 59

Algebra & Functions Find the missing number.


28. 27  m  2 R7 29. 51  k  1 R21

30. 63  a  1 R13 31. 74  p  3 R14

32. 71  y  3 R11 33. 90  r  2 R10


Problem Solving
McGraw-Hill School Division

34. Sam needs to put 76 pencils in 35. Kenya needs to put 84 cans of
packages. Each package should have tennis balls in boxes. Each box should
10 pencils. How many packages will have 20 cans. How many boxes will
there be? How many pencils will be Kenya fill? How many cans will she
left over? have left over?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 3, pages 328329. (247) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Divide 2-Digit Numbers by Multiples of 10 Print


R This
83 Page
RETEACH

You can use models to help you divide by multiples of 10.

Find 74  20. Think: How many groups of 20 are in 74?

Using Models Using Pencil and Paper


Show 74 using place-value models. Step 1: Divide 74 by 20.
Then make as many groups of 20 as Think: 60  20  3.
you can. 3
20 74
 60

Step 2: Subtract. Write the remainder


in the quotient.

3 R14
20 74
 60
14
You can make 3 equal groups of 20 with
14 remaining.

Divide. You can use place-value models.


1. 63  30  2. 88  40  3. 55  10 

4. 48  20  5. 74  10  6. 93  30 

7. 85  30  8. 81  20  9. 76  10 
McGraw-Hill School Division

10. 51  30  11. 63  50  12. 84  60 

13. 90  40  14. 74  20  15. 71  20 

16. 27  10  17. 59  50  18. 59  30 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 3, pages 328329. (248) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
83 Page
Divide 2-Digit Numbers by Multiples of 10 E ENRICH

Winning Start
Label the faces of a number cube 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70.
Place a marker on 72, the starting position. Take turns tossing
the number cube. Divide the number your marker is on by the
number tossed. Find the whole number quotient. Move
forward that number of spaces.

Continue moving forward until you have gone around the


board once. After passing "Start", you may move forward or
backward. The winner is the person who lands directly on
"Start".

Start
72 85 97 100 115 120

260 138

253 149

250 150
McGraw-Hill School Division

235 164

226 219 205 197 186 173

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 3, pages 328329. (249) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
84 Page
Divide by 2-Digit Divisors P PRACTICE

Divide.
1. 2. 3. 4.
43 R6 25 R9 $0.11 14 R4
22 952 31 784 66 $7.26 54 760
5. 6. 7. 8.
11 17 R3 12 R2 13 R9
81 891 29 496 44 530 75 984

9. 10. 11. 12.


75 R4 $0.67 61 R2 83
26 1,954 17 $11.39 39 2,381 46 3,818

13. 14. 15. 16.


96 R1 71 $0.89 74 R6
93 8,929 51 3,621 62 $55.18 88 6,518

17. 895  24  18. 907  31 

19. 367  14  20. $7.08  59 

21. 814  36  22. 531  45 

23. 1,467  24  24. $37.76  64 

25. 4,780  77  26. $48.59  43 

27. 7,900  84  28. 8,930  92 

Algebra & Functions Solve.


29. (1,700  53)  37  w 30. (1,000  160)  46  d
31. (1,900  100)  29  v 32. (1,600  240)  83  x
33. (2,300  70)  (12  4)  n
McGraw-Hill School Division

34. (1,500  80)  (11  5)  c


Problem Solving
35. Mrs. Tallos class made 234 ribbons for 36. Mr. Willows class wants to sell
the Sports Fair. Each student made the 200 tickets to the Winter Sports Fair.
same number of ribbons. There are There are 25 students in the class.
18 students in the class. How many How many tickets will each student
ribbons did each student make? need to sell?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 4, pages 330333. (250) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
84 Page
Divide by 2-Digit Divisors R RETEACH

You can use models to help you understand dividing by 2-digit numbers.

Find 165  25.

Using Models Using Pencil and Paper


Use place-value models to show 165. Step 1: Divide, Think: 180  30  6
6
25 165

Exchange the one hundred for 10 tens. Step 2: Multiply.

6
25 165
 150 6  25  150

Then make as many groups of 25 as Step 3: Subtract. Write the remainder


you can. Exchange tens for ones. You in the quotient.
can make 6 equal groups of 25 with 6 R15
15 remaining. 25 165
 150
15 165  150  15
McGraw-Hill School Division

Divide. You can use place-value models.


1. 164  12  2. 174  18  3. 318  21 

4. 135  14  5. 372  23  6. 243  17 

7. 212  24  8. 435  16  9. 166  13 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 4, pages 330333. (251) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
84 Page
Divide by 2-Digit Divisors E ENRICH

What Number Am I?
Solve. What number am I?
1. I am a number between 10 and 20. 2. I am a number between 10 and 20.
If you divide either 61 or 73 by me, If you divide either 45 or 56 by me,
the remainder is 1. the remainder is 1.

3. I am a number between 20 and 30. 4. I am a number between 20 and 30.


If you divide either 107 or 128 by If you divide either 68 or 134 by me,
me, the remainder is 2. the remainder is 2.

5. I am a number between 20 and 30. 6. I am a number between 30 and 40.


If you divide either 76 or 126 by me, If you divide either 147 or 255 by me,
the remainder is 1. the remainder is 3.

7. I am a number between 10 and 20. 8. I am a number between 40 and 50.


If you divide either 74 or 110 by me, If you divide either 221 or 265 by
the remainder is 2. me, the remainder is 1.

9. I am a number between 20 and 30. 10. I am a number between 30 and 40.


If you divide either 175 or 204 by If you divide either 74 or 214 by me,
me, the remainder is 1. the remainder is 4.

11. I am a number between 10 and 20. 12. I am a number between 20 and 30.
McGraw-Hill School Division

If you divide either 69 or 88 by me, If you divide either 131 or 154 by


the remainder is 12. me, the remainder is 16.

13. I am a number between 10 and 20. 14. I am a number between 20 and 30.
If you divide either 110 or 144 by If you divide either 295 or 322 by
me, the remainder is 8. me, the remainder is 25.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 4, pages 330333. (252) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
85 Page
Estimate Quotients P PRACTICE

Estimate the quotient. Choose compatible numbers.


1. 19 389 2. 17 211 3. 18 586

4. 16 789 5. 49 1,585 6. 72 6,280

7. 32 8,920 8. 61 3,256 9. 68 34,912

10. 2,806  38 11. 7,903  86 12. 1,113  31

13. 7,160  93 14. 2,806  56 15. 2,210  48

16. 21 1,732 17. 63 546 18. 53 2,612

19. 41 1,512 20. 78 4,106 21. 86 1,709

Algebra & Functions Estimate to compare. Write  or .


22. 396  21 914  31 23. 492  68 556  71
24. 1,947  38 2,011  48 25. 1,300  21 2,300  13
McGraw-Hill School Division

26. 5,106  82 6,206  91 27. 3,100  82 4,700  71

Problem Solving
28. Karen drove 283 miles at a speed of 29. A jet flew 3,116 miles in 6 hours.
46 miles per hour. About how many About how many miles per hour
hours did she drive? did it fly?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 5, pages 334335. (253) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
85 Page
Estimate Quotients R RETEACH

Compatible numbers are numbers you can divide easily.


You can use compatible numbers to estimate quotients.

Estimate 3,463  73.


3,463  73 Think: A basic fact that is close is 35  7.
3,500  70  50
So, 3,463  73 is about 50.

Complete.
1. Estimate 1,785  31. 2. Estimate 2,880  29.

Division fact: 18  3  Division fact: 27  3 


Estimate: 1,800  30  Estimate: 2,700  30 
3. Estimate 5,726  72. 4. Estimate 3,952  79.

Division fact: Division fact:


Estimate: Estimate:

Use compatible numbers to estimate each quotient.


5. 1,482  33 6. 6,512  78

7. 7,164  89 8. 2,207  68

9. 3,512  42 10. 2,587  53


McGraw-Hill School Division

11. 3,123  64 12. 4,132  71

13. 2,712  32 14. 1,789  27

15. 2,797  43 16. 6,432  92

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 5, pages 334335. (254) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
85 Page
Estimate Quotients E ENRICH

Box Estimation
Choose the best estimate from each box to complete the sentence.
Then write the answer next to the letter of the box to make a code.
Use the code to answer the question.
Who was the first American in space?
A. 24 33 D. 63 53 E. 82 75

42 51 71 48 64 92

2,430  is about 80. 4,356  is about 70. 3,575  is about 40.


H. 27 44 L. 24 32 N. 31 42

52 38 58 44 52 28

2,277  is about 40. 12,250  is about 600. 15,880  is about 400.


P. 68 72 R. 68 74 S. 7 81

84 91 47 59 72 64

25,370  is about 300. 29,790  is about 500. 34,841  is about 500.

A D E
H L N
McGraw-Hill School Division

P R S

B. , JR.
33 24 33 42 72 52 92 84 33 59 63
Explain how you estimated the divisors.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 5, pages 334335. (255) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
86 Page
Adjust the Quotient P PRACTICE

Divide.
1. 2. 3. 4.
7 R11 7 R7 8 R21 8 R39
34 249 26 189 56 469 41 367

5. 6. 7. 8.
2 R44 7 R38 4 R34 3 R49
51 146 84 626 79 350 63 238

9. 10. 11. 12.


8 R74 3 R70 5 R35 7 R11
92 810 75 295 39 230 25 186

13. 14. 15. 16.


8 R28 7 R24 5 R86 3 R75
56 476 69 507 92 546 88 339

17. 18. 19. 20.


8 R19 5 R9 3 R52 4 R56
44 371 24 129 65 247 57 284

21. 22. 23. 24.


5 R77 8 R10 8 R35 8 R11
81 482 22 186 45 395 36 299

Algebra & Functions Divide only those with quotients


between $5.00 and $8.00.
25. 26. 27. 28.
$5.25 $6.15 no no
18 $94.50 16 $98.40 14 $60.90 25 $93.75

29. 30. 31. 32.


$7.15 no no $7.76
McGraw-Hill School Division

13 $92.95 11 $99.11 15 $56.25 12 $93.12

Problem Solving
33. Candy wants to walk 220 miles in 34. Jason wants to save $180 in
30 days. If she walks 7 miles every 12 months. How much should he
day, will she meet her goal? save each month?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 6, pages 336337. (256) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
86 Page
Adjust the Quotient R RETEACH

When you divide, sometimes your first estimate is too


high or too low. Then you must adjust the quotient.

Divide 125  43.

Step 1:
3
Estimate: 120  40  3 43 125

Step 2:
Use your estimate to divide. 3
43 125
 129 Multiply: 3  43  129

Compare: 129  125.

You cannot subtract. The estimate of 3 is too high.

Step 3:
Adjust your estimate and divide. Multiply to
check the answer.

2 R39 43
43 125 2
 86 Multiply: 2  43  86 86
39 Subtract: 125  86  39  39
Compare: 39  43 125

Divide. Check your answer.


1. 2. 3. 4.
4 R14 7 R1 5 R3 1 R59
McGraw-Hill School Division

24 110 27 190 29 148 61 120

5. 6. 7. 8.
6 R8 8 R1 6 R1 1 R61
57 350 16 129 37 223 63 124

9. 173  19  10. 293  44  11. 208  25 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 6, pages 336337. (257) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Adjust the Quotient Print This


86 Page
Hi Lo
E ENRICH

Estimate each quotient. Write your estimate. Then divide. If your


estimate was too high, circle "Too High." If your estimate was too
low, circle "Too Low." Use the circled answers to complete the maze
below.
1. 2. 3. 4.
3 R71 9 R10 7 R30 $3.25
73 290 65 595 31 247 21 $68.25

Too High Down Too High Left Too High Down Too High Left
Too Low Up Too Low Right Too Low Up Too Low Right
5. 6. 7. 8.
6 R2 $2.13 7 R7 7 R2
88 530 91 $25.56 48 343 26 184

Too High Down Too High Right Too High Up Too High Left
Too Low Up Too Low Left Too Low Down Too Low Right

What is the fastest fish, the tallest tree, the biggest dog, and the
smallest bird?

To find out, begin at Start. Move one space in the direction given
next to each circled answer.

Start
McGraw-Hill School Division

sailfish
redwood
St. Bernard
hummingbird

swordfish Maple dolphin oak


greyhound parakeet Great Dane sparrow

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 6, pages 336337. (258) NS 3.2


Print This Page
Name

Print This
87 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Use an Overestimate or Underestimate Reading


Skill
Form a conclusion about whether you would overestimate or
underestimate. Then solve the problem.
1. A group of 118 people have signed up for the 5-kilometer run.
Each person will receive a special cap. Caps are sold in boxes of 36.
How many boxes are needed?
Should you overestimate or underestimate to solve this problem? Explain.

How many boxes are needed?

2. The Flying Disk Club has saved $90 to buy Disks for its
members. A package of 2 Disks costs $8. How many
packages of Disks can the club buy?
Should you overestimate or underestimate to solve this problem? Explain.

How many packages of Frisbees can the club buy?

3. Trophies cost $9 each. The tournament organizers have $60


budgeted for trophies. How many trophies can they buy?
Should you overestimate or underestimate to solve this problem? Explain.
McGraw-Hill School Division

How many trophies can they buy?

4. A group of 24 students is playing catch. They share 7 softballs.


What is the least number of students who can share each softball?
Should you overestimate or underestimate to solve this problem? Explain.

What is the least number of students who can share a softball?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 7, pages 338339. (259) MR 1.1, 2.1, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
87 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Use an Overestimate or Underestimate Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
There are 95 volunteers working at the marathon. Each volunteer
will get a water bottle. A box contains 24 water bottles. How many
boxes are needed?
1. Which of the following statements 2. To be sure there are enough water
is true? bottles for the volunteers, you should:
A There are not enough water F underestimate the number of
bottles for the volunteers. volunteers.
B A box contains 24 water bottles. G overestimate the number of
volunteers and underestimate the
C There are 95 water bottles.
number of boxes needed.
D Four water bottles are needed.
H underestimate the number of
boxes needed.
J overestimate the number of
boxes needed.

At the game, there are 44 color guards. Each color guard will help
carry flags. There are 21 flags on 6-foot poles. What is the greatest
number of students that will have to share a flag?
3. Which of the following is not 4. To find the greatest number of students
important to solving the problem? who will share a flag, you should:
A There are 44 students carrying flags. F overestimate the number of
students per flag.
McGraw-Hill School Division

B Each color guard will help carry


a flag. G underestimate the number of
students per flag.
C There are 21 flags.
H overestimate the number of flags
D The flags are on 6-foot poles.
and underestimate the number of
students.
J underestimate the number of
flags per student.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 7, pages 338339. (260) MR 1.1, 2.1, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
87 Page
Problem Solving: Reading for Math P PRACTICE

Use an Overestimate or Underestimate Math Skills


Test Prep
Choose the correct answer.
The sports committee buys a piece of fabric that is 60 feet long.
Underestimate the number of 9-foot banners that can be made
from the fabric.
5. To underestimate the number of 6. How many 9-foot banners can be
banners that can be made, you: made from the fabric?
A use 63 feet for the length of the F 5
fabric. G 6
B round down the length of the H 7
fabric to 50 feet. J 8
C round up the length of each
banner to 10 feet.
D use 6 feet for the length of each
banner.

Solve.
7. Travis is making first-place ribbons 8. The soccer club makes 100 cups of
for Sports Day. He has 111 inches of fruit drink. There are 46 students in
blue ribbon. Each blue ribbon will be the soccer club. Is there enough fruit
8 inches long. Underestimate the drink for each student to have 2
number of ribbons he can make. cups? Explain.

9. There are 152 people at the Sports 10. Mark wants to buy baseball shirts of
Night Dinner. There are 33 tables. different teams. Each shirt costs $18.
What is the greatest number of Mark has $62. How many shirts can
McGraw-Hill School Division

people that can sit at a table? Explain. he buy? Explain.

11. A pack of 3 pennants costs $8. 12. A box of gold medals costs $56. The
Maryanne has $30. Is this enough to Sports Committee has $185 to spend
buy 4 packs of pennants? Explain. on medals. How many boxes can the
committee buy? Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 7, pages 338339. (261) MR 1.1, 2.1, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2
Print This Page
Name

Print This
88 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy P PRACTICE

Choose a Strategy
Choose a strategy. Use it to solve the problem.
1. The Sports Committee buys 30 yards 2. The Sand Trap Golf Shop has 132 golf
of material. The material will be cut balls in stock. The golf balls are
into banners that are 5 feet long. packed in tubes of 6. How many tubes
How many banners can be made? of golf balls does the store have?

3. Liam is building a fence around his 4. There are 115 students who want to
backyard. The backyard is 24 feet wide go to the basketball tournament.
and 60 feet long. If Liam uses sections One bus can carry 26 students. How
of fencing that are 12 feet long, how many buses will be needed?
many sections will he need?

Mixed Strategy Review


Solve. Use any strategy.
5. Art Tina makes a display of 36 6. Francine uses a pattern to make a
autographed baseballs. She puts 12 window display for a sneaker store.
baseballs in a large display case. Tina The first row has 2 sneakers, the
also has 4 smaller display cases. How second row has 6 sneakers, the third
can she arrange the baseballs in the row has 10, and the fourth row has
smaller cases so that each smaller case 14. How many sneakers will be in
has an equal number of baseballs? the fifth row?

Strategy:
McGraw-Hill School Division

Strategy:

7. The Stadium Store sells 450 team 8. Create a problem which you could
photos and 369 individual photos. solve by drawing a diagram or by
How many photos does it sell in all? writing a division sentence. Share it
with others.

Strategy:

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 8, pages 342343. (262) NS 3.2; MR 2.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
88 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Choose a Strategy
Page 343, Problem 1

Camille wants to practice sharper turns. She uses the same 20-yard
distance in the driveway and begins at the starting line. This time
she places the cones 3 feet apart. How many cones will she use?

Step 1
Be sure you understand the problem.
Read Read carefully.
What do you know?
The total distance is yards.

Camille will start at the starting line and place cones


feet apart.
What do you need to find?
You need to find the number of feet in yards.

You need to find how many .

Step 2
Make a plan.
Plan Choose a strategy.
Find a Pattern To find the answer, you may draw a diagram.

Work Backward Find the number of feet in 20 yards.
Use Logical
Reasoning Show a distance that is that many feet long.
Write a Number Count by 3s to see how many cones Camille will use if
McGraw-Hill School Division

Sentence
they are placed 3 feet apart.
Make a Table
or List
Guess and Check To find the answer, you can also write a number sentence.
Make a Graph All the cones are the same distance apart.
Solve Simpler Use division to find how many cones Camille will use.
Problem

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 8, pages 342343. (263) NS 3.2; MR 2.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This
88 Page
Problem Solving: Strategy R RETEACH

Choose a Strategy
Step 3
Carry out your plan.
Solve
How many feet are in 20 yards?
1 yard  3 feet
20  3  60
Draw a diagram. Show a 60-foot distance. Count by
3s to see how many cones Camille will use.

0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 60

Count. Camille will use a total of cones.


Write a number sentence.
The distance is feet. There will be 1 cone every feet.
Write a division sentence.  
Camille will use a total of cones

Step 4
Is the solution reasonable?
Look Back Reread the problem.
Does your answer make sense? Yes No
Which method do you prefer? Explain.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Practice
1. The parks department builds stands 2. Ed has 4 packs of sports stickers.
next to a baseball field. There will be There are 24 stickers in each pack.
5 rows of stands. Each row will be He divides the stickers among 3
20 feet long. How many 10-foot friends. How many stickers does
long boards will they need to build each friend get?
the stands?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 8, pages 342343. (264) NS 3.2; MR 2.4
Print This Page
Name

Order of Operations Print This


89 Page
P PRACTICE

Write which operation should be done first.


1. 2  8  7 2. 2  3  9 3. 4  10  2

4. 9  2  3 5. (3  2)  9 6. 8  (2  2)

7. 6  2  1 8. 1  3  5 9. 10  5  2

10. 7  8  2 11. (12  4)  2 12. 9  2  6

Simplify. Use order of operations.


13. 3  2  7  14. 10  2  1 

15. 9  6  2  16. 24  2  8 

17. (2  6)  7  18. 12  12  3 

19. (4  6)  5  20. 12  3  9 

21. 20  5  2  22. 18  9  6 

23. 2  8  4  24. 20  5  4 

25. 2  6  4  3  26. 20  2  3  6 

27. (2  9)  (7  3)  28. 4  (14  6)  2  5 

29. 2  9  10  5  (3  2) 
McGraw-Hill School Division

Problem Solving
30. Tamara buys 6 apples for $0.40 each. 31. Steven has 126 photos to put in an
She has a $0.50 off coupon. Write an album. He finds 18 more photos.
expression and simplify to find her Each page holds 12 photos. Write an
final cost. expression and simplify to find how
many pages Steven will fill.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 9, pages 344345. (265) AF 1.3


Print This Page
Name

Print This
89 Page
Order of Operations R RETEACH

Always use the order of operations to simplify expressions. The rules


for the order in which you should perform operations are given below.

Simplify (20  8)  4  2.

Step 1: Step 2: Step 3:


Do the operations in Multiply and divide from Add and subtract from left
parentheses first. left to right. to right.

(20  8)  4  2 28  4  2 72
28  4  2 72 5

Which operation should you do first?


1. 12  4  2 2. 4  (10  2) 3. 2  8  4

4. (3  7)  2 5. 9  3  2 6. 8  2  4

7. 6  (8  5) 8. 8  4  2 9. 12  (2  2)

Simplify. Use the order of operations.


10. 3  (2  5)  11. 14  7  2 

12. 9  (6  2)  13. 4  2  5 
McGraw-Hill School Division

14. 8  2  2  15. 10  8  4 

16.12  3  2  17. (1  5)  4 

18. 8  8  4  19. (5  5)  2 

20. 14  10  2  21. 16  4  2 

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 9, pages 344345. (266) AF 1.3


Print This Page
Name

Print This
89 Page
Order of Operations E ENRICH

Order Counts
Rewrite each number sentence. Put in parentheses to make each
number sentence true.

1. 3  8  2  1  21

2. 5 x 16 + 14 + 6 2 = 153

3. 6 9 8 = 6

4. 22 3 x 5 + 2 = 1

5. 18 2 + 1 + 1 = 7

6. 6 x 5 + 9 3 = 28

7. 5 x 10 + 1 11 = 5

8. 3 + 40 8 x 5 = 4

9. 10 6 4 = 1

10. 4 x 5 2 = 12

11. 40 10 2 = 5

12. 20 + 8 4 = 7

13. 6 + 2 x 7 = 56

14. 16 6 + 2 = 8
McGraw-Hill School Division

In your own words describe the rules for the order of operations.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 9, pages 344345. (267) AF 1.3


Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


810
Problem Solving: Application Part
A WORKSHEET

Decision
Applying Multiplication Making
Record your data.

Profit per bar for Sales needed to


Cost to the club the club at a sale reach goal for
price of $1 $110 in profits

Home-made
hiker bars

Boxed hiker bars

Your Decision
McGraw-Hill School Division

What is your recommendation for the hiking club? Explain.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 10, pages 346347. (268) NS 1.2, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.4
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


810
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

Does eating improve performance? Math &


Science

Safety: Wait at least 30 minutes after eating before doing


vigorous exercise.

Record your data.

Number of Sit-ups

Student Before Lunch After Lunch

1. Did you do more sit-ups before or after lunch?

2. How many more sit-ups did you do? Show your work.
McGraw-Hill School Division

Work Space

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 10, pages 348349. (269) NS 1.2, 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This Page


810
Problem Solving: Application Part
B WORKSHEET

Does eating improve performance? Math &


Science
3. How many times more sit-ups did you do? Round to the nearest
whole number. Show your work.

Work Space

4. Can you conclude that the food from lunch gave you more energy?
Why or why not?

5. In what ways could you improve this activity?


McGraw-Hill School Division

6. Explain the activity in terms of energy conversion.

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 8, Lesson 10, pages 348349. (270) NS 1.2, 3.4; MR 1.1, 2.3, 3.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
91 Page
Explore Customary Length P PRACTICE

Estimate and then measure. Tell what unit and tool you use.

1. length of a pencil

2. height of a desk

3. width of the classroom

4. length of a book

5. distance you go in a stride

Circle the letter of the correct estimate.

6. distance you can ride your bike A. 2 mi B. 2 ft C. 2 yd

7. length of a car A. 10 in. B. 10 ft C. 10 yd

8. height of a fourth-grader A. 4 in. B. 4 ft C. 4 yd

9. height of a tree A. 40 mi B. 40 yd C. 40 ft

10. height of a cat A. 1 yd B. 1 mi C. 1 ft

11. length of a worm A. 3 in. B. 3 ft C. 3 yd

12. height of a refrigerator A. 2 ft B. 2 yd C. 2 mi

13. length of a crayon A. 4 ft B. 4 yd C. 4 in.


McGraw-Hill School Division

14. length of a football field A. 100 ft B. 100 yd C. 100 mi

Problem Solving
15. Jane can walk a mile in about 16. Marta measures the length of her
15 minutes. About how long notebook. To the nearest quarter
would it take her to walk 5 miles? 3
inch, it is 12 4 in. What does it
measure to the nearest inch?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 9, Lesson 1, pages 364365. (271) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
91 Page
Explore Customary Length R RETEACH

An inch (in.) is used to measure short lengths in


the customary system. Customary Units of Length

You can use a ruler to measure in inches. 1 foot (ft)  12 inches (in.)

0 1 2 3
1 yard (yd)  3 feet (ft)
1 mile (mi)  1,760 yards (yd)
1 mile (mi)  5,280 feet (ft)

3 14 in.

The foot (ft) and yard (yd) are used to


measure larger units in the customary system.
1 yd

1 ft

Use an inch ruler to measure each object. Measure to the


nearest 14 inch.
1. 2.

3.
McGraw-Hill School Division

4.

Circle the letter of the correct estimate.


5. length of a persons foot A. 8 in. B. 8 ft C. 8 yd
6. length of a bed A. 6 in. B. 6 ft C. 6 yd
Use with Grade 4, Chapter 9, Lesson 1, pages 364365. (272) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
91 Page
Explore Customary Length E ENRICH

Early Measurements
In early times, distances were measured using fingers, hands,
and arms.
span
digit

cubit
digit: the width of span: the width of a cubit: the distance from
a finger stretched hand fingertip to elbow

Choose digit, span, or cubit as the appropriate unit of


measure. Then estimate.
1. width of your desk 2. thickness of your math book

3. length of your notebook 4. diameter of an apple

5. height of the classroom 6. length of a car

7. your friends height 8. length of your foot

9. What is an advantage of this system? What is a disadvantage?


McGraw-Hill School Division

10. What kinds of distance would be difficult to measure using this system
of measurement?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 9, Lesson 1, pages 364365. (273) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
92 Page
Customary Capacity and Weight P PRACTICE

Estimate and then measure the capacity of each object.


1. a water glass 2. a large pot

3. a cereal bowl 4. a milk carton

5. Order the objects above from least to greatest capacity.

Estimate and then measure the weight of each object.


6. an apple 7. four potatoes

8. two envelopes 9. a pencil

10. Order the objects above from least to greatest weight.

Circle the letter of the correct estimate.


11. A. 5 c B. 5 pt C. 5 gal

12. A. 1 c B. 1 pt C. 1 qt

13. A. 6 c B. 6 qt C. 6 gal

14. A. 2 fl oz B. 2 c C. 2 pt

15. A. 500 oz B. 500 lb C. 500 T


McGraw-Hill School Division

16. A. 3 oz B. 3 T C. 3 lb

Problem Solving
17. A box of Krispy Krunch cereal holds 18. Sarah buys a 48 fl oz bottle of apple
20 oz. Kyle pours 3 oz of cereal into his juice. How many cups of juice can
bowl. How much cereal is left in the box? she pour from the bottle?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 9, Lesson 2, pages 366369. (274) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
92 Page
Customary Capacity and Weight R RETEACH

Capacity is the measure of dry or liquid


Customary Units of Capacity
volume of a container. Pour water into
empty milk cartons to model the 8 fluid ounces (fl oz)  1 cup (c)
equivalent units of capacity shown below. 2 cups (c)  1 pint (pt)
2 pints (pt)  1 quart (qt)
4 quarts (qt)  1 gallon (gal)

2 cups  1 pint 2 pints  1 quart 4 quarts  1 gallon


(c) (pt) (pt) (qt) (qt) (gal)

Weight is the measure that tells how heavy an Customary Units of Weight
object is.
16 ounces (oz)  1 pound (lb)
2,000 pounds (lb)  1 ton (T)

A card and envelope weigh about 1 ounce. A book weighs about 1 pound.

Circle the letter of the correct estimate.


McGraw-Hill School Division

1. weight of an apple A. 5 oz B. 2 lb C. 12 T

2. weight of a fourth grader A. 12 T B. 20 oz C. 60 lb

3. amount of water in a bathtub A. 25 qt B. 25 gal C. 25 pt

4. weight of a refrigerator A. 100 oz B. 100 lb C. 5 T

5. amount of water in a pail A. 5 qt B. 50 gal C. 500 c

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 9, Lesson 2, pages 366369. (275) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
92 Page
Customary Capacity and Weight E ENRICH

Reasonable Measure Maze


Shade each box that contains a reasonable measure. The shaded
boxes will form a path from start to finish.

In an hour, an A horse
A living room Your smile is
Finish is 6 yards long. 1 yard wide.
airplane flew weighs
1,780 miles. 827 oz.

A song is A goldfish An automobile The pitcher


A pizza weighs
about 3 bowl holds 18 might weigh holds 3 qt of
144 oz.
minutes long. cups of water. 2,545 lb. lemonade.

A girls braid A football field Jen held her


A frog can 1 A dog can
was 3 yards is 4 mile breath for
jump 475 feet. jump 17 yards.
long. long. 63 seconds.

A gallon of
You could The gate is 40 The kitten The movie
paint is enough
walk a mile in inches high. drank an lasted 107
to paint a large
20 seconds. wall. ounce of milk. minutes.

The climbing A TV
The punch A bathtub
Pat rode his rope to the commercial
bowl holds 24 holds 18 pints
bike 12 mph. tree fort was lasts about
cups of punch. 37 inches long. 600 seconds. of water.

It took about
The diving The subway A light bulb
3 yards of The train was
pool was 4 yd sandwich was weighs
fabric to 125 yd long.
McGraw-Hill School Division

deep. 12 yd long. 2 ounces. make a cape.

The newborn Beth ran a


A banana is A sneaker
baby drank
9 inches long.
distance of
weighs 40 oz. Start
7 oz of milk. 10,525 ft.

How did you decide if running a distance of 10,525 feet was reasonable?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 9, Lesson 2, pages 366369. (276) MR 1.1, 2.3
Print This Page
Name

Print This
93 Page
Convert Customary Units P PRACTICE

Complete.
1. 7 ft  in. 2. 21 ft  yd 3. 2 mi  yd
4. 60 in.  ft 5. 13 yd  ft 6. 2 mi  ft
7. 8 qt  gal 8. 144 in.  ft 9. 3 pt  c
10. 36 ft  yd 11. 4 ft  in. 12. 12 ft  yd
13. 12 pt  qt 14. 2 lb  oz 15. 48 oz  lb
16. 3 T  lb 17. 10,000 lb  T 18. 2 c  fl oz
19. 3 gal  qt 20. 2 qt  pt 21. 10 c  pt
22. 1 lb 10 oz  oz 23. 1 gal 2 pt  pt 24. 10 ft  yd ft
25. 4 T 800 lb  lb 26. 5 ft 8 in.  in. 27. 13 qt  gal qt

Algebra & Functions Complete the table.


28. 29.
Gallons 1 Yards 1
Quarts 12 Feet 9
Pints 16 Inches 72
Cups 64

30. 31.
Ounces Pounds Tons 1
1
2 Pounds 6,000
3
4
16
McGraw-Hill School Division

32
48

Problem Solving
32. Amy cuts a piece of ribbon 60 in. 33. The 6 members of the Brown family
long. How many feet long is the drink a total of 3 gallons of milk each
piece of ribbon? week. How much is that per person?

Use with Grade 4, Chapter 9, Lesson 3, pages 370373. (277) AF 1.3; MR 1.1, 2.3