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Skills for Work:

Energy
Intermediate 2

Employability and Careers

Support Material
August 2008
Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Acknowledgements
SFEU is grateful to the subject specialists in Scotlands Colleges and other
agencies and industry bodies who have been involved in the writing of this and
other support materials in the Skills for Work series. SFEU is also grateful for the
contribution of the Scottish Qualifications Authority in the compilation of these
materials, specifically for its permission to reproduce extracts from Course and
Unit Specifications and the Skills for Work Rationale.

We are also grateful to the following for permission to use photographs and
images of their equipment and components:

Ryan James King


Gary Honeyman
David Urquhart
RS Components
Scottish and Southern Electricity
Cascaid Ltd

Scottish Further Education Unit 2008

Scottish Further Education Unit (SFEU)


Argyll Court
Castle Business Park
Stirling
FK9 4TY

website: www.sfeu.ac.uk
e-mail: sfeu@sfeu.ac.uk

SFEU is a Registered Scottish Charity No. SC021876 and a


Company Limited by Guarantee No. SC143514 VAT No. 617148346

These support materials were produced with assistance from the European Social Fund.

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Energy (Intermediate 2)
Employability and Careers
F3FP 11

Introduction

These notes are provided to support teachers and lecturers presenting the
Scottish Qualifications Authority Course F3FP 11, Energy: Employability and
Careers (Intermediate 2).

Copyright for this pack is held by the Scottish Further Education Unit (SFEU).
However, teachers and lecturers have permission to use the pack and reproduce
items from the pack provided that this is to support teaching and learning
processes and that no profit is made from such use. If reproduced in part, the
source should be acknowledged.

Enquiries relating to this support pack or issues relating to copyright should be


addressed to:

Marketing Officer - Communications


The Scottish Further Education Unit
Argyll Court
Castle Business Park
Stirling
FK9 4TY

Website: www.sfeu.ac.uk

Further information regarding this Unit including Unit Specifications, National


Assessment Bank materials, Centre Approval and certification can be obtained
from:

The Scottish Qualifications Authority


Optima Building
58 Robertson Street
Glasgow
G2 8DQ

Website: www.sqa.org.uk

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Class Sets

Class sets of this pack may be purchased direct from the printer. Costs are
dependent on the size of the pack and the number of copies. Please contact:

Elanders Hindson
Merlin Way
New York Business Park
North Tyneside
NE27 0QG

Tel: 0191 280 0400


e-mail: info@elandershindson.co.uk

Disclaimer

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this support pack,
teachers and lecturers should satisfy themselves that the information passed to
candidates is accurate and in accordance with the current SQA arrangements
documents. SFEU will accept no responsibility for any consequences deriving
either directly or indirectly from the use of this pack.

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Contents

How to Use this Pack 10

Reference Section 11
What are Skills for Work Courses all about? 12
The Course in Energy (Intermediate 2) 15
Unit Outcomes, PCs and Evidence Requirements 18
Employability Skills Profile 20
Careers Scotland Support 21

Tutor Support Section 22


Learning and Teaching with Under 16s 23
General Guidance on Unit Delivery 27
Unit Induction 28
Signposting of Employability Skills 29
Generating Evidence and Assessment Opportunities for Employability Skills 31
Resources 37

Student Support Section 39


Tutor Note on Student Activities 40
Welcome to Energy: Employability and Careers 41
Introduction 42
Apprenticeships 44
Trades Work Activities, Personal Qualities and Skills 47
Electrician 47
Plumbers 53
Mechanical Fitter 59
Electricity Distribution Workers 64
Fuel and Energy Engineers 69
Mechanical Maintenance Fitter Wave Power 74
How Green Are You? 78
Skills Evaluation 81

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Employability Skills 84
Maintaining a Tidy Workplace 86
Working Co-operatively with Others 90
Selecting and Using Tools Correctly 92
Using Personal Protective Equipment Correctly 95
Willing to Learn New Skills or Techniques 101
Organising Work Effectively 102
Paying Attention to Quality and Working to Agreed Deadlines 104
Developing Investigation, Presentation and Creativity Skills 107
Glossary of Terms 109
Appendix 110

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How to Use this Pack


None of the material in this pack is mandatory. Rather, it is intended as a guide
and an aid to delivery of the Unit and aims to provide centres with a flexible set of
materials and activities which can be selected, adapted and used in whatever way
suits individual circumstances. It may also be a useful supplement to tried and
tested materials that you have developed yourself. The pack is available on the
SFEU website in Word format to enable you to customise it to suit your own
needs.

The pack is organised into several sections:

The Reference Section provides information on the rationale for, and ethos
behind, Skills for Work courses, the course rationale, the Unit Outcomes and
evidence requirements and the Employability Skills Profile for Energy
(Intermediate 2), showing where the specified employability skills and attitudes
can be evidenced and assessed throughout the Course and in this unit.

The Tutor Support Section contains a suggested approach to teaching the Unit,
advice on learning and teaching with under-16s, guidance on unit induction, unit
delivery and advice on integrating the development of employability skills
throughout the unit. The emphasis is on the student investigating and sourcing
information on careers in the energy sector and the skills and knowledge needed
to follow that career. Finally, this section suggests resources which may be useful
for tutors and students.

The Student Support Section contains guidance and instruction on a range of


activities to cover the investigative and evaluation requirements of the outcomes
of the unit.

The notes are not a detailed study of careers and the requirements for entry but
are intended as a catalyst to develop the students understanding of the skills and
knowledge required to follow a career as a tradesperson, in the first instance with,
the possibility of then taking their skills to a career in the energy sector.

You may wish to place material from the student notes on your own Intranet by
downloading this pack from the Skills for Work section of the SFEU website
http://www.sfeu.ac.uk/skills_for_work

Activities are identified with the symbol:

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Reference Section

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What are Skills for Work Courses all about?

Skills for Work Courses are designed to help candidates to develop:


skills and knowledge in a broad vocational area
Core Skills
an understanding of the workplace
positive attitudes to learning
skills and attitudes for employability.

A key feature of these Courses is the emphasis on experiential learning. This


means learning through practical experience and learning by reflecting on
experience.

Learning through practical experience


Teaching/learning programmes should include some or all of the following:
learning in real or simulated workplace settings
learning through role play activities in vocational contexts
carrying out case study work
planning and carrying out practical tasks and assignments.

Learning through reflecting at all stages of the experience

Teaching/learning programmes should include some or all of the following:


preparing and planning for the experience
taking stock throughout the experience - reviewing and adapting as necessary
reflecting after the activity has been completed - evaluating, self-assessing and
identifying learning points.

The Skills for Work Courses are also designed to provide candidates with
opportunities for developing Core Skills and enhancing skills and attitudes for
employability.

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Core Skills
The five Core Skills are:
Communication
Numeracy
Information Technology
Problem Solving
Working with Others

Employability
The skills and attitudes for employability, including self-employment, are outlined
below:
generic skills/attitudes valued by employers
understanding of the workplace and the employees responsibilities, for
example timekeeping, appearance, customer care
self-evaluation skills
positive attitude to learning
flexible approaches to solving problems
adaptability and positive attitude to change
confidence to set goals, reflect and learn from experience.
specific vocational skills/knowledge
Course Specifications highlight the links to National Occupational
Standards in the vocational area and identify progression opportunities

Opportunities for developing these skills and attitudes are highlighted in each of
the Course and Unit Specifications. These opportunities include giving young
people direct access to workplace experiences or, through partnership
arrangements, providing different learning environments and experiences which
simulate aspects of the workplace. These experiences might include visits, visiting
speakers, role play and other practical activities.

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A Curriculum for Excellence (Scottish Executive 2004) identifies aspirations for


every young person. These are that they should become:
successful learners
confident individuals
responsible citizens
effective contributors.

The learning environments, the focus on experiential learning and the


opportunities to develop employability and Core Skills in these Courses contribute
to meeting these aspirations.

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The Course in Energy (Intermediate 2)


Course Rationale
This Course is intended to equip candidates with the necessary knowledge and
skills which will enhance their prospects for employment in the wide range of
opportunities within energy sectors. The Course will allow candidates to develop a
range of employability skills which are of particular relevance to energy industries.
Core Skills of Information Technology and Problem Solving will also be developed
throughout the Course where opportunities arise. The Course will offer a variety of
approaches to learning and teaching and will include a strong element of
experiential learning. It is intended that some of the Course will be delivered and
assessed in a different learning environment to that of the school through a
partnership arrangement with a college, training provider, or employer.

There are many technologies used in the production of energy and this course
has been designed to contain both an electrical generation practical/skills element
using wind turbines and a heat generation practical/skills element using solar
panels. These elements were selected to ensure candidates received a range of
skills using different technologies that are involved in the generation of energy.
Other systems used to generate energy from both the traditional/conventional and
renewable systems will be discussed and evaluated during the Course.

The primary target group for this Course is school candidates in S3 and S4.
However, the Course is also suitable for S5/S6 candidates and adult candidates
who are seeking to enhance their employability and vocational skills in the energy
sector.

The general aims of the Course are to:

widen participation in vocationally-related learning for 1416 year olds


allow candidates to experience vocationally-related learning
provide candidates with a broad introduction to the energy sector
allow candidates the opportunity to develop skills relevant to the micro-
generation energy sector
develop the candidates engineering skills
encourage candidates to evaluate the impact of energy generation on the
environment
encourage candidates to foster a good work ethic, including timekeeping, a
positive attitude and other relevant employability skills
provide opportunities to develop a range of Core Skills in a realistic context
encourage candidates to take charge of their own learning and development
provide a range of teaching, learning, and assessment styles to motivate
candidates to achieve their full potential

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facilitate progression to further education and/or training

In particular, the specific aims of the Course are to:


encourage candidates to consider a career in the energy sector
develop an awareness of the role of conventional and renewable energy
systems in the UK
develop an awareness of what opportunities there may be within the sector in
terms of the types and range of career options
provide candidates with knowledge and skills which are directly relevant to
employment within the energy sector, eg. solar hot water and wind turbines
provide opportunities for the personal development of skills and attitudes which
will improve the candidates employment potential within the energy sector
develop the candidates awareness of their individual strengths and
weaknesses in relation to the requirements of the sector, and to reflect on how
this affects their employability potential
raise awareness of the impact of the energy sector on the environment
raise awareness of the responsibilities of the energy industry with regard to the
environment

Rationale for Course content

The production and use of energy is important in everyones life and is also an
important area of study and work. It is central to how we reduce our impact on the
environment when generating heat or electrical energy or power and to reducing
our CO2 emissions which are widely claimed to have an impact on climate change.

The generation of energy has traditionally been done through the use of fossil
fuels; oil, gas, and coal, with some renewable energy produced from hydro power.
Nuclear power was seen, and is still seen by some, as a method of generating
energy with zero carbon emissions, but the disposal of the radioactive spent fuel
is of major concern and this can counteract the advantages it has with zero
carbon emissions.

The development of most renewable energy systems is a recent innovation where


energy is generated from renewable energy sources, eg. wind, solar, geothermal,
bio-fuels, tidal, and wave. These systems have the advantage of generating
power with virtually zero carbon emissions. The bio-fuels and geothermal systems
can release power on demand, but most of the others depend of sources of
energy outwith the control of human beings, and consequently, do not have a
constant power output. For example, solar is not effective at night or when it is
particularly cold and cloudy; wind is not effective at low wind speeds or very high
wind speeds, and while tides are regular, they occur only a few times per week
and wind is required to generate waves in our oceans or seas.

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The main themes of the course are: conventional energy production, renewable
energy production, converting energy from one form to another, industrial or
domestic energy generation facilities, practical work with solar panels and wind
turbines (integrating team work into the assembly process), and investigating
careers within the energy sector.

Optional areas covered are the size of an individuals carbon footprint, oil and gas
extraction or conventional energy systems; their contribution to the total energy
generated in the UK and their environmental affects.

Candidates will study the overall status of energy in Scotland, and in the UK, in
general. They will explore the conventional methods of production, including their
efficiency levels, various energy conversion principles, and how energy can be
conserved. They will also explore the more recent developments in energy
production using renewable energy techniques and will develop practical skills in
the areas of plumbing, electrical, and mechanical engineering. Careers within the
energy sector have been integrated with employability skills which are developed
through practical activities.

The three optional Units offer different routes for candidates. They can opt for an
individual investigation and evaluation of their own carbon footprint, investigate
the size of the market segment taken up with conventional production techniques
and their sustainability, and explore the use of the national grid as a means of
transmitting electricity throughout the UK, or have an in-depth study into the
formation and extraction of one type of fuel in its raw state which is particularly
relevant to Scotland, ie. offshore oil and gas.

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Unit Outcomes, PCs and Evidence Requirements


National Unit Specification: statement of standards

Unit:
Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Acceptable performance in this Unit will be the satisfactory achievement of the


standards set out in this part of the Unit Specification. All sections of the statement
of standards are mandatory and cannot be altered without reference to the
Scottish Qualifications Authority.

Outcome 1

Review and evaluate own performance in specified employability skills.

Performance Criteria

a) Identify and review own strengths and weaknesses in relation to specified


employability skills.
b) Seek feedback on own performance in specified employability skills.
c) Identify action points for improvement of own performance taking account of
review and feedback.

Outcome 2

Investigate careers within the energy sector according to a given brief.

Performance Criteria

a) Gather information from a variety of sources on specified careers within the


energy sector.
b) Use information gathered to evaluate a selected career in relation to own
employability skills and attitudes.
c) Check that all steps have been completed in accordance with the given brief.

Evidence Requirements for this Unit

Evidence must be produced to demonstrate that all Outcomes and Performance


Criteria have been met.

The evidence for this Unit will be generated from candidate reviews and a folio.

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Candidate reviews

Candidates must complete a review of their employability skills on four occasions.


The reviews should be completed at regular intervals which allow the candidates
to demonstrate progress between reviews. The reviews should be completed in
supervised, open-book conditions and should be signed by both the candidate
and the assessor.

Folio

Each candidate should compile a folio to provide evidence that they have:

gathered information from a variety of sources


gathered information on three selected careers in the energy sector
used the information to evaluate a selected career against own employability
skills

Evidence for the folio should be gathered at appropriate points throughout the Unit
in supervised, open-book conditions.

The National Assessment Bank (NAB) pack for this Unit provides candidate
review sheets and an investigation brief. Centres wishing to develop their own
assessments should refer to the NAB to ensure a comparable standard.

NB Centres must refer to the full Unit Specification for detailed


information related to this Unit.

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Employability Skills Profile


In addition to the specific vocational skills developed and assessed in this Course,
employability skills are addressed as detailed in the table below. For the purposes
of the table, the Units are referred to as A, B, C and D as indicated.

Mandatory Units
Energy: Introduction =A
Energy: Domestic Solar Hot Water Systems =B
Energy: Domestic Wind Turbine Systems =C
Energy: Employability and Careers =D
Optional Units
Energy and the Individual =E
Energy: Oil/Gas Extraction =F
Energy: Conventional Production Technologies and the Grid =G
Employability skill/attitude Evidence
maintaining good timekeeping and attendance A, B, C, D, E/F/G
maintaining a tidy work place B, C
seeking feedback and advice A, B, C, D, E/F/G
following instructions B, C
working co-operatively with others A, B, C
selecting and using tools correctly and for the purpose B, C
they were designed
using Personal Protective Equipment correctly and A, B, C
working safely
following basic drawings correctly B, C
checking quality of work A, B, C, D, E/F/G
working to agreed deadlines A, B, C, D, E/F/G
organising work effectively A, B, C, D, E/F/G
working confidently A, B, C, D, E/F/G
willingness to learn new skills or techniques B, C
working independently A, B, C, D, E/F/G
reflecting on own performance B, C
learning from past experiences B, C
awareness of a range of careers and job roles D
developing investigation skills A, D, E/F/G
developing presentation skills A, B, C, D, E/F/G
developing creativity skills A, B, C, D, E/F/G

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Careers Scotland Support


for School/College Collaboration for Scotlands Colleges in
the Scottish Enterprise area

Since August 2006 Careers Scotland (SE and HI areas) has been funded by the
Scottish Government to support College/School Collaboration and encourage and
promote vocational educational choices for pupils in schools.

Careers Scotland (now part of Skills Development Scotland) has an important role
to play in selection, recruitment and pre-entry career guidance, as well as ongoing
support and pre-exit career guidance, to ensure the pupils experience of SfW is
capitalised upon in any future career planning.

Careers Scotland activity takes place locally and nationally under 4 objectives:

Providing careers advice, guidance and employability support to pupils and


their parents pre, during and post vocational education experience, focusing
primarily but not exclusively on SfW pupils - demonstrating how these
educational choices have implications for future career options, and support
the achievement of future career goals and supporting effective transitions
Providing targeted support to pupils at risk of becoming unemployed who
would benefit from undertaking a vocational course
Partnership working to ensure vocational study is given parity of esteem with
other school and post school options, focusing on recruitment / selection and
retention of pupils on vocational courses
Capacity building through relevant shared CPD events and resource
development to increase understanding of the process of uptake of vocational
options and facilitate more effective support to pupils navigating these options

For further information on Careers Scotland (SE)s involvement in school/college


collaboration locally, please get in touch with your Careers Scotland Regional
contact:

South East (Edinburgh & Lothians; Forth Valley; Borders)


Stephen Benwell 01786 452043 stephen.benwell@careers-scotland.org.uk

North East (Tayside; Grampian; Fife)


Val Ormiston 01592-631155 valerie.ormiston@careers-scotland.org.uk

South West (Dumfries & Galloway; Ayrshire; Lanarkshire)


Jean Geddes 01698 742192 jean.geddes@careers-scotland.org.uk

West (Glasgow; Dunbartonshire; Renfrewshire)


Sandra Cheyne 0141 242 8338 sandra.cheyne@careers-scotland.org.uk

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Tutor Support Section

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Learning and Teaching with Under 16s


Scotlands Colleges have made significant progress in meeting the needs of
young learners. Our knowledge of the learning process has increased significantly
and provides a range of strategies and approaches which gives us a clear steer
on how lecturers can add to their skill repertoire. Lecturers can, and do, provide a
stable learning environment where young students develop a sense of self-
respect, learn from appropriate role models and see an opportunity to progress.
There are basic enabling skills for practical application which can further develop
the learning process for this group of students. So what are the characteristics of
effective learning and teaching which will help to engage young learners?

Ten ways to improve the learning process for under 16s


(This list is not exhaustive!)

1. Activate prior knowledge and learning ascertain what the learner knows
already and teach accordingly. Young people do have life experience but it is
more limited than adult learners and they may not always be aware of how it
will assist them in their current learning.

Tips - Question and answer; Quick Quiz; Quick diagnostic assessment on


computer; present key words from the course or unit and see how many they
recognise or know something about.

2. Tune learners into the Big Picture the tutor knows the curriculum inside
out and why each lesson follows a sequence, however the young learner does
not have this information and is re-assured by being given the Big Picture.

Tips Mind map or concept map; use visuals, for example wall displays of
diagrams, photographs, flow charts; explain the learning outcomes in language
they will understand; We Are Learning Today (WALT) targets and What Im
Looking For (WILF) targets; give clear and visible success criteria for tasks.

3. Use Advance Organisers these are lists of the key concept words that are
part of the course or unit.

Tip Highlight on any text the concept words that you will be using; make a
visible list and put it on display concept words can be struck off or referred to
as they occur (NB this helps with spelling and independent learning as they do
not have to keep checking meaning); highlight essential learning and action
points.

4. Vary the teaching approaches. The two main approaches are instructing
and demonstrating, however try to provide opportunities to facilitate learning.

Tips Ask students what they know now that they did not know before, or
what they can do now they could not do before, at appropriate points in the
lesson or teaching block; ensure there are problem solving activities that can
be done individually or in groups; ask students to demonstrate what they have

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learned; use a range of question and answer techniques that allow


participation and dialogue, eg. provide hints and cues so that they can arrive at
answers themselves.

5. Preview and review of learning. This helps to embed previous learning and
listening skills and provides another opportunity to elicit learner understanding.
Consolidates and reinforces learning.

Tips At the beginning of each lesson, or session, review previous learning


and preview what is coming up; at the end of each lesson or session, review
what has taken place and what will be focussed on next time these can both
be done through question and answer, quizzes and mind mapping activities.

6. Language in the learning environment. Do not assume that the language


which is used in the learning environment is always understood by young
learners, some words may be familiar but do not have the same meaning
when used vocationally.

Tips - At appropriate points ask students what words mean; explore the
various meanings of words to find out if they may have come across this
language in another context; by looking at the structure and meaning of words
there is an opportunity for dialogue about learning and to build vocabulary.

7. Giving instructions in the learning environment. This is one of the most


difficult tasks a tutor has to do whatever the curriculum area. With young
learners this may have to be repeated several times.

Tips Ask a student to repeat back what you have asked them to do before
beginning a task; ask them to explain the task to one of their peers; use the
KISS principle Keep It Short and Simple so that they can absorb and process
the information.

8. Effective feedback. Feedback is very important for the learner to assess their
progress and to see how and what they can improve. Provide opportunities to
engage in dialogue about the learning function of assessment provide details
of the learners strengths and development needs either in written or spoken
form. With younger learners identifying one or two areas for development is
sufficient along with acknowledgement of what has been done well.

Essentially, learners are helped by being given a specific explanation of how


work can be improved. You can also use summative assessment formatively,
ie. as an opportunity to identify strengths, development needs and how to
improve.

Tips Ask students themselves to identify their own strengths and


development needs self evaluation; peer evaluation of work can be
successful once they have been taught how to do it; the tutor can produce a
piece of work and ask students to assess it anonymously; have a discussion
about the success criteria for the task and ensure the students are clear about

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them; allow learners to set criteria for success and then measure their
achievements against these.

9. Managing the learning behaviour. Under 16s are coming into Scotlands
Colleges and training establishments from largely structured and routine-driven
environments in schools and early feedback from those undertaking Skills for
Work courses indicates that they very much enjoy the different learning
environment that colleges and other training providers offer. Remember
though that these are still young learners. They will still expect tutors to
provide structure and routine, and will perform best in a calm, orderly learning
environment. Young students will respond to firm, fair, and consistent
management. Such routines have to be established quickly and constantly
reinforced.

Tips - Health and safety is non-negotiable and consequences of non-


compliance with the regulations should be made clear and adhered to at all
times; set out your expectations from day one and provide a consistent
message; have clear beginnings, middles and endings for each session; be a
positive role model for your students, ie. be there before they are and manage
the learners with respect; always deliver what you promise; build up good
relationships and get to know the learners, make the curriculum interesting and
stress the relevance of the learning; set up a positive behaviour management
system. By following these guidelines you will build up two-way respect,
which, while sometimes challenging to achieve, can be very powerful and work
to everyones benefit.

10. Care and welfare issues. School/college partnerships mean increasing


numbers of young learners in college. Tutors have to be aware of their
professional responsibilities and mindful of young peoples rights. However
tutors have rights too, in terms of feeling safe and secure in working with
young people and there are basic steps staff can take to minimise risks. It is
essential that colleges ensure that tutors have a working knowledge of the
Child Protection policies (local authority and college documentation) and follow
procedures and policies diligently. School/College Liaison Officers will be
familiar with these documents and can provide support and advice. There are
also training sessions on Child Protection available from SFEU (see the
following page).

Tips - Avoid one-to-one situations with young students in a closed area; do not
do or say anything that could be misinterpreted; if the opportunity arises, do
some observation in schools to see and discuss how teachers use the
guidelines for their own protection as well as the young persons.

Most young people are a delight to work with and they will positively enjoy the
experience of learning in college. However, there will inevitably be some who are
disengaged, disaffected and who have not yet had an opportunity to experience
success. Skills for Work is a unique educational initiative that young people can
be motivated to buy into you as the tutor are key to the success of these
programmes.

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Skills for Work Workshops


To take this 10 point plan forward and to add to it, you can attend one of SFEUs
Get Skilled Up half day workshops for tutors delivering Skills for Work Courses,
when we explore further the learning process and look at a range of specific
teaching and learning techniques to use with the under 16 age group. To find out
when the next event is visit our website www.sfeu.ac.uk or contact the Learning
Process team at SFEU on 01786 892000.

Child Protection Workshops


These are run on a regular basis by staff at SFEU in Stirling and also in colleges.
For more information on these workshops please contact members of the Access
and Inclusion team at www.sfeu.ac.uk or contact the team at SFEU on 01786
892000.

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General Guidance on Unit Delivery

The main purpose of this unit is to enable students to identify their own strengths
and weaknesses with respect to employability skills and match this information
with possible careers within the energy sector enable students. They will look at
the skill requirements for entering a trade and taking their careers further into the
energy sector. The unit gives students a flavour of the type of work a
tradesperson can progress to, providing they continually evaluate and update their
skills and knowledge.

Examples of careers which students might investigate are:

electrician allowing progression onto a PV solar panel system installer


high voltage engineer power distribution
plumber allowing progression onto solar hot water system installer or ground
source heat pump system installer
hydro engineer
oil/gas engineer
nuclear engineer
electrical engineer
control engineer
maintenance engineer various energy systems
systems design

Students will also develop self-evaluation skills through the process of reviewing
their own strengths and weaknesses throughout the Unit. Self-evaluation
however, can be a difficult task for someone with little life experience so it is
important for the tutor to flesh out the underlying skills.

Although this unit could be entirely presented in a classroom environment it would


be helpful if visits were arranged employers. Alternatively, you could invite
professionals who have progressed through an apprenticeship scheme and then
moved to the energy sector to come into the school/college.

Delivery of this Unit should focus as much as possible on practical tasks to involve
the student in investigating the variety of work that is possible through obtaining a
trade and the range of employability skills which can be readily transferred to the
energy sector. Students should be given adequate support and allowed the
opportunity to carry out the activities both individually and as a group.

The information is not presented in a sequential manner in accordance with the


outcomes. The students need to know what a tradesman is in the first place in
order to evaluate any specific skills relating to that job. The entrance
requirements to a trade are not an exact science and the qualifications entrance
criteria suggested here should only be taken as a guide.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

There is a wealth of information available via the Internet and the websites given
are only a flavour of the material available. It is at the discretion of the tutor which
web resources they choose to use.

Students should be encouraged to present their findings to the class in order to


promote confidence and improve attitudes to attainment.

Unit Induction
An induction session in week 1 will prepare students well for the unit and help to
clarify aims and expectations, what the unit is all about and any uncertainties they
may have about the unit and how it will be delivered. Induction may include the
following:

an outline of the Unit content what theyre going to be doing


how it fits in to the Energy (Intermediate 2) Course
your plans for teaching the Unit how theyll be learning the skills
assessment methods and schedule
where employability fits in start by asking them what they think!
you might also think about inviting a representative from a service provider to
speak to the class about the types of employment available in their
organisation, about careers, employment and educational opportunities
prospects in the energy industry, and to reinforce the value that employers put
on employability skills. This could be an appropriate point to invite
professionals who have progressed through an apprenticeship scheme and
then moved to the energy sector to come and meet the students and talk about
their route into the sector.
the importance of regular attendance and good timekeeping to encourage the
students to get into good habits as if they were at work and in employment!
at unit induction the students should be introduced to information literacy skills
including different search engines and the ways in which to search with key
words

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Signposting of Employability Skills


In addition to the specific vocational skills developed in this Unit, students will
have opportunities to develop and apply their knowledge and understanding of the
employability skills.

Throughout the pack there are numbered flags like the one shown
here, showing which specific employability skill can be highlighted 1, 5, 6, 7
and/or assessment evidence recorded when students are busy with
the various activities in the Unit.

Maintaining good
Following basic Reflecting on own
1 timekeeping and 8 15
drawings correctly performance
attendance *
Maintaining a tidy Checking quality of Learning from past
2 9 16
workplace work* experiences *

Seeking feedback Working to agreed Awareness of a


3 10 17
and advice* deadlines* range of careers
and job roles*
Following Organising work Developing
4 11 18
instructions effectively * investigation skills*
Work cooperatively Working Developing
5 12 19
with others confidently* presentation skills*
Selecting and using
Willingness to learn
tools correctly and Developing
6 13 new skills or 20
for the purpose they creativity skills*
techniques
were designed
Using Personal
Protective Working
14
7 Equipment correctly independently*
and working safely

The employability skills marked with an asterisk* are directly assessed in this Unit.
However opportunities to learn and develop all of these skills are distributed
throughout the course. Some of the skills can be delivered and assessed
discretely but there are also many opportunities for this to take place during group
activities.

You should be on the lookout for evidence of competence in any of the


employability skills which occur naturally. There are many opportunities for this
and plenty of overlap for any student who may have missed a specific lesson.
Evidence observed outwith a formal plan is also perfectly valid.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

It is strongly advised that course teams meet together to discuss and agree a co-
ordinated approach to the teaching and developing of the employability skills
throughout the Course and to ensure that the team has a common interpretation
of the skills and attitudes.

You will find or create countless opportunities to help students develop their
employability skills. The following pages show some ways of going about it to get
you thinking!

Further advice and approaches to integrating employability skills can be found in


the Energy Course Guidance support materials.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Generating Evidence and Assessment Opportunities for Employability Skills


Employability Delivery Advice Possible Activities/Contexts
Skills

Good timekeeping and attendance is relevant throughout the Course.


Turning up for classes on
Discuss the importance of good timekeeping within the energy sector and time
get students to assess their past timekeeping record. They should identify
what improvements, if any, are needed. This should take place at the start Returning from breaks on
of the Course and will set the expected standards. time
Staff should make their expectations clear right from the start of the course Arriving on time to visits
or Unit.
Sticking to planned work
A good initial activity is to have the students write the class guidelines schedules regarding timing of
1 themselves by identifying pros and cons of good and poor attendance and activities
timekeeping the benefits in the workplace of one and the consequences of
the other. Staying in class for the
duration of the planned
These guidelines or ground rules can be posted in the workshops and
Maintaining activity (no extended toilet
classes and referred to on a regular basis.
good breaks)
Relate the ground rules to the world of work, eg. arrive on time, back from
timekeeping
breaks on time etc. The measure of a students success in this aspect is for
and
them to be honest in their appraisal of their performance and in making
attendance
progress. Distance travelled should be adopted, rather than a particular
minimum percentage of classes attended.
Attendance and timekeeping should be monitored throughout the Course.
Students should be given feedback on their performance both good and
bad in this regard. If you take note of patterns of performance it should be
easy to give the students accurate feedback.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Discuss the benefits of getting feedback from staff and asking for advice.
This can increase the students level of confidence in what they are doing Ask questions
3 and can reinforce their views of the direction they are taking. Success can
Check work progress with
be greatly increased by using knowledge and experience gained from
staff
others.
Check tool safety with staff
Seeking Young students can be wary of seeking advice for fear of highlighting their
Seek tutor feedback
feedback and own lack of understanding or of being singled out for ridicule perhaps
advice based on past experience. Confirm instructions when
unsure
Staff should emphasise that in the workplace it is essential that they seek
advice if they are not sure about something as the consequences of not
12 doing so could be quite serious eg. misusing tools, poor techniques can
result in injury.
Students should be praised for seeking advice and making progress and
Working reassured that staff welcome their questions and it also helps them to
confidently demonstrate another employability skill: positive attitude to learning.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

9 Discuss how the checking of their tasks can lead to a higher quality of Quality checking as work
work and hence meet the standards required. progresses
Students should be made aware of acceptable standards in terms of the
Checking quality of practical, investigative and presentation work.
quality of work

Discuss the need to keep to deadlines and the effects that can result if Plan work schedule to meet
10 they are not maintained. Demonstrate the importance in the real world of deadlines
keeping to deadlines eg. industry employs project managers whose main
role is to keep work on schedule. Check progress against
schedule and deadlines
Working to Students made aware of the benefits of keeping to deadlines and of the
agreed possible outcomes of work going beyond deadlines.
deadlines Staff discuss with students their progress and ability to meet the
deadlines.

Particularly relevant in Outcome 2 of this Unit, where students can get Investigation planning and
10 carried away with investigating careers, throwing their timing out and
progress monitoring
leaving insufficient time to complete their work. They can also have
difficulty organising and structuring the material they have gathered. Keep work tidy, manageable and
easily accessible
Organising Tutors will need to guide students on the parameters of the investigation,
work effectively the method of investigation, the format and method of putting together
the folio of evidence.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

13 Discuss the benefits of learning new skills and how it is essential in a Listening to instructions
constantly changing world to maintain employment or gain promotion.
Applying feedback
Students will have an opportunity to demonstrate a positive attitude to
Willingness to Asking questions
learning in all Units in the Course.
learn new skills Discussions with tutor
or techniques A positive attitude to learning can also be stimulated by the enthusiasm
and expert knowledge of the staff member. Checking quality
Assisting others
Genuine participation in
review process
Perseverance
All of the other employability
skills

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of working individually, eg. Individual activities and
14 advantages could include taking full responsibility, having complete research
ownership and not depending on others; to disadvantages such as not
being able to share problems with others and having little social Discussions with tutor
interaction. Checking quality
Working
independently Self evaluation
Range of materials for
investigations
Individual presentations

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Discuss how past experiences can be a useful way of learning. These Practical tasks
16 experiences dont need to be successful - poor experiences or failure can
still be useful learning situations. Assembly tasks
Students should be aware that learning can come both from past Testing energy systems
Learning from experiences that were successful and fulfilling and from those that were Investigations
past unsuccessful or demoralising.
experiences Presentations
Tutors should try and bring out the positive when things go wrong.

Particularly relevant to this Unit.


Discussions on careers
Discuss the careers available within the energy sector and the routes, skills Investigations
Awareness of a and qualifications needed for these careers. Site visits
range of careers Students should be aware of the range of careers available within the External speakers
and job roles energy sector.
Careers advisors
Students should be aware of the qualifications needed for careers in the
energy sector. Individual presentations
Students should be aware of the employability skills required for a range of
careers in the energy sector.

Discuss the role of investigating to find out information. Students are very Investigations and Interviews
used to using the internet to find things out but they dont always see it as
carrying out investigations. Discuss the various methods of finding out Books, journals, Internet,
information using a wide range of sources e.g. internet, interviews, papers, papers, leaflets
TV, books, experiments etc. Validate Internet sites is it a reliable Extracting useful information
Developing website?
investigation
skills Use a full range of resources for investigations.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Students often find giving presentations a daunting task. They should


Short talks
progress from a group presentation onto individual presentations. Staff
should demonstrate how presentations should be planned and practised. Tutor support and
Students may feel comfortable using mobile phone technology to video a discussions
presentation, load it onto a computer and run it on the screen. Group presentation
Developing
presentation Staff should demonstrate how to give a presentation. Individual presentations
skills Give students opportunities to give very short talks throughout the Course Planning
to help develop these skills
Give encouragement to help them overcome fears.
Use a range of media to help overcome fears eg. PowerPoint or video.
Creativity should be introduced as a skill which comes up with novel
solutions to a problem. Creativity in design is the most usual way to
demonstrate this but other ways can be used to show creativity eg. a new Group presentations
procedure to assemble a system, giving a presentation, methods of Individual presentations
reducing their carbon footprint, integrating energy systems etc.
Creativity will be recognised when students give presentations, ie. the Planning work
methods they use should increasingly involve the use of technology eg. Use of technology
Developing from initially giving a simple talk, moving on to using PowerPoint, digital
creativity skills pictures or/and video etc.
e novel ways of doing things.
Encourage a wide range and imaginative ways of presentation.
Encourage the integration of presentation methods.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Resources

It is essential that computers are available for


teaching this unit as well as an overhead projector
and electronic white board.

Online resources and websites

Apprenticeships
http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/

SMART objectives Strengths and Weaknesses


http://www.coaching-life.co.uk/articles/smartgoals.html

Branches of Engineering and Careers Path Options


The Institution of Engineering and Technology
www.theiet.org

Apprenticeships
Learning and Skills Council England
www.apprenticeships.org.uk

Make Your Choice


Engineering Construction Industry Training Board
http://www.ecitb.org.uk/ecitbresources/114/

Apprenticeship framework
Engineering Construction England and Wales Sep 2007
http://www.ecitb.org.uk/documents/Guidance_for_Providers_on_Delivery_of
_Apprenticeship_Framework.pdf

Women into Engineering


WISE Women Into Science Engineering and Construction
http://www.wisecampaign.org.uk/

Green Energy Jobs recruitment for the renewable energy industries


http://www.greenenergyjobs.com/

Engineering Council UK engineering careers


www.engc.org.uk

British Energy - Careers


http://www.british-energy.com/pagetemplate.php?pid=262

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Radio Spares - Energy Measurement Devices


RS Components Ltd commercial site
http://uk.rs-online.com/web/home.html

Apprenticeship Directory (Learning and Skills Council)


http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/list/apprenticeshipsdirectory/adminandpr
of/learninganddvelopmentdrecttrainingandsupport.htm
Pelamis Wave Energy commercial renewable energy from ocean waves
http://www.pelamiswave.com/

Renewable Energy forum for Scotlands renewable energy industry


http://www.scottishrenewables.com/

British Wind Energy Association Carbon Reductions


UK wind energy database
http://www.bwea.com/ukwed/index.asp

Energy Efficiency Partnership for Homes home energy check


Glossary of Energy Efficiency Terms
http://www.eeph.org.uk/resource/glossary/

Commonwealth Games Jobs (BBC News item 30 Mar 2008)


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/glasgow_and_west/7321396.stm

Apprenticeship Training (City Building Glasgow commercial firm)


http://www.citybuildingglasgow.co.uk/

Health and Safety Executive


http://www.hse.gov.uk/

Safety Passport Health and Safety Executive


http://www.hse.gov.uk/press/2003/e03197.htm

Passport schemes for health safety and the environment: a good practice
guide
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg381.pdf

Scottish Further Education Unit 38


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Student Support Section

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Tutor Note on Student Activities

It is essential that computers are available for teaching this unit as well as an
overhead projector and electronic white board.

This section includes both student notes and activities. These materials are
offered to centres as a flexible set of materials and activities which can be
selected, altered and used in whatever way suits individual centres and their
particular situation. For example, in the case of the student activities you might
want to talk through the instructions with the learners and then give the
instructions out on paper as reminders. You are encouraged to adapt and use the
materials creatively in ways which will best engage your students.

It is not intended that the Student Support Section is issued to students as


complete pack.

There are some activities that require students to use Internet sources including
a range of online resources particularly in the investigation element in Outcome
2. Here it might be appropriate to allocate class time in a flexible learning
environment either within a dedicated IT room or within mainstream college
facilities. All students should have access to an Internet ready computer.

The online research and activities will provide students with a more blended
approach to teaching and learning. School students will be familiar with this
approach. For students returning to study, you may need to spend time supporting
them in the use of electronic resources. There are specific weblinks shown that
could be issued in paper format.

Scottish Further Education Unit 40


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Welcome to Energy: Employability and Careers


This unit is intended for students who may be interested in a career in the energy
sector. Youll also be involved in investigating careers in the energy sector,
reflecting on your own identified strengths and weaknesses and selecting which
career in the energy sector would suit you best. In addition, youll review your
performance of the employability skills undertaken throughout the Skills for Work
energy course and evaluate their own strengths and weaknesses.

Image Copyright Ryan James King From a beach in Lewis Scotland

In this unit we will look at some careers in the energy sector where we generate
power from sources such as the wind, waves, the sun (solar), and traditional
sources such as fossil fuels eg. gas and coal.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Introduction
The energy sector comprises many different areas of technology. However energy
provision falls into two main categories:

renewable, and
non-renewable

Non-renewable energy provision is the type supplied from coal-fired and nuclear
power stations.

Renewable energy comes from sources such as hydro, wind, and wave power
generation.

The energy sector provides the opportunity for employment in a wide range of
roles. The jobs will vary from non-technical to senior management and
engineering positions.

Some examples of the professions required by the energy industry are:


electricians, mechanical and electrical engineers, managers, planners,
draughtsmen, design engineers, commissioning engineers, geo-technical
surveyors, instrument technicians and many more.

Image courtesy of Scottish and Southern Electricity Two technicians working on


high voltage power lines

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

The Background to Trades-people

To become a time-served tradesperson you have to serve a recognised


apprenticeship.

The apprenticeship allows the person to gather skills and knowledge over a range
of work experience.

The apprenticeship allows the person to concentrate on particular skills like using
special tools and test equipment.

Image courtesy of Cascaid - Careers Scotland


An electrician using test equipment

In the past an electrician had to serve five years apprenticeship, but nowadays the
length of the apprenticeship is four years.

Timescales can vary from trade to trade.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Apprenticeships

Apprentices!

Employers advertise in the national newspapers and online for apprenticeships


and if you are successful, the usual start date is August. This means you usually
need to apply well before August. However you can get taken on at anytime
throughout the year by employers.

Most apprenticeships now take 4 years to complete.

The 1st year of the apprenticeship is usually spent in a training centre where the
apprentice will spend periods of time in different skill areas. For example:

Electrical installation and fitting


Mechanical fitting and turning
Plumbing brazing and welding
Electrical and mechanical engineering drawing

In this way, the apprentice will get a taste of a variety of skills across a range of
trades in the 1st year. After the 1st year the apprentice will concentrate on the skills
required for the specific trade for which he/she is employed.

One day a week will be spent at a college to learn the theory associated with the
trade.

When the first year is complete the apprentice will then spend the majority of their
time in the employers workplace:

4 days will be spent in the employers workplace

The 5th day will be spent at a college this is called day release.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

The employers training manager and a representative from the college called
the Modern Apprentice Advisor - will agree a four-year training plan with the
apprentice.

This is a joint agreement and the employer, the college representative and the
apprentice all sign up to completing their own part of that agreement.

When the four years are complete, the first year in the training centre and then
three years in the workplace, and all the requirements of the training and
education have been met, then the apprentice will become a fully qualified
tradesperson.

If you go through an apprenticeship you will then be issued with what is known in
the trade as papers. These papers are a record and recognition that you have
trained to become a tradesperson in a particular skills area. These papers should
be kept safe as new employers may ask to see them.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Once you have become a tradesperson you can progress your career to become
an engineer or an engineering manager at a senior level within the energy sector.

Tradesperson SVQ Level


3 or NC Practice award

Engineering Technician
Full NC / HN certificate +
Initial professional
development

Incorporated Engineer
HND / BSc qualifications +
professional development

Chartered Engineer
BEng (Hons) / MSc degree +
advanced professional
development

Lets look at the following trades to see what they do, and the entry requirements
required by employers. The above diagram is applicable to the energy sector.

Scottish Further Education Unit 46


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Trades Work Activities, Personal Qualities and Skills


Electrician

Image courtesy of Cascaid Limited

Installation electricians install and maintain electrical services such as lighting,


power and heating. They work in a wide range of buildings including houses,
offices, factories, hospitals and power stations.

Maintenance electricians locate electrical faults and repair them for domestic,
business and industrial premises.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Work Activities

Installation electricians install all the cables, wiring, meters, switchgear, conduit
(metal channel for cable), fitments and equipment needed in new buildings and
conversions of old buildings. They use technical drawings and plans that show
which areas of the building need electricity. They interpret the instructions,
deciding how to run cabling and where to place switches, sockets, lights and other
devices. On smaller projects, electricians may plan their own work.

Image courtesy of Cascaid Ltd

The work involves measuring, cutting, joining and fitting cabling using a variety of
hand and power tools, like pliers, screwdrivers, hacksaws and drills.

Image courtesy of RS Components

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

In conversions of old buildings, electricians must first remove the old system and
its wiring.

Installation electricians earth the system and then test it very thoroughly to make
sure all the circuits have been correctly and safely installed.

Image courtesy of RS Components


two ammeters used for measuring the amount of electricity flowing in a circuit

Service electricians repair faults in domestic and office appliances. This involves
travelling to the customer's home or business premises, locating and diagnosing
the fault, isolating the circuit and then making the repair. Some faults can only be
found when the supply is on, for example, faults within electronic circuits, so the
electrician will use insulated tools and special equipment to find the fault.

Image courtesy of RS Components


a Programmable Logic Controller panel used to change or install a program

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Maintenance electricians work in manufacturing companies, wind-farms, wave


power, and electricity companies servicing and repairing machines and
equipment.

Image courtesy of RS Components a digital tester for electrical circuits

Electricians may need to travel to work on different installations, involving staying


away occasionally.

Personal Qualities and Skills

To be an electrician, you must have practical skills because you will use a
variety of tools and equipment. You must be able to read and interpret
technical drawings.

Electricians need strong problem solving skills. You have to be well


organised, thorough and methodical and follow safety procedures very
carefully. You must enjoy seeing a job through from start to finish.

You will also need good communication and interpersonal skills to work well
with other electricians and other professionals. Also, you should be able to
explain your work clearly to customers and reassure them with your knowledge
in a calm, professional manner.

Electricians should be physically fit because the job usually involves


kneeling, bending and lifting heavy equipment. It may also involve working at
heights, in confined spaces, in damp and dusty atmospheres. Normal colour
vision is required.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Activity: Qualifications for Entry

Entrance qualifications, as well as other skills, are important to employers who


may consider you for an interview. This exercise is to help you plan for the
qualifications you will need if you are interested in becoming an electrician.

Use the internet, magazines and newspapers, or any other suitable sources of
information to help in this exercise.

At school what subjects would you choose to be considered for a career as an


electrician?

What grades should you aim for in each subject?

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: Qualifications for Entry

Standard Grade subjects: Maths, Physics, English, Technical Studies,


Graphical Communication, Metalwork.

You should always aim for the highest grades. The grades expected would be
grade 2 and above a combination of grades 2 and 3 for the above subjects
may be acceptable.

You can also join an access course at a college, eg. a pre-apprenticeship


scheme that offers vocational studies and progress from there.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Plumbers

Image courtesy of Cascaid


A plumber at work

Work Activities

Plumbers install, repair and maintain the water supply, drainage and central
heating in houses and other locations. They use a variety of tools to carry out their
work.

Plumbers install, maintain and repair hot and cold water systems, sanitary
services (baths, showers and toilets, for example), heating systems, and pipework
and controls for gas supply.

Plumbers work in a variety of locations including people's homes, and all kinds of
industrial and commercial buildings.

They use a variety of hand and power tools including wrenches, spanners, saws,
cutters and welding gear. They cut, bend, join and fix materials such as lead,
copper, aluminium, plastic, zinc and iron.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Installation work includes central heating systems and their controls and pipework,
sanitary systems, drainage systems, guttering and rainwater systems, and large
refrigeration systems for industry. When the equipment has been installed, the
plumber tests it to make sure that it is working efficiently and safely.

Image courtesy of RS Components Water Quality Tester

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Maintenance and repair work includes routine servicing and emergency repairs.
Repair work involves finding faults, replacing or repairing damaged parts, carrying
out tests and making sure that the system works properly.

Image courtesy of Cascaid


A plumber repairing pipes

Plumbers may be called out at short notice to do emergency repairs, especially in


winter if pipes freeze.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Personal Qualities and Skills

As a plumber you will need good practical skills and you must work carefully,
following specifications and often interpret plans and drawings correctly.

Image courtesy of Cascaid

As you will be meeting customers, usually in their own homes or business


premises, you must be polite.

You need to be physically fit. The work involves a lot of bending, kneeling
and working in cramped and awkward spaces. Plumbers use powered cutting
tools which can be very sharp and dangerous.

Sometimes plumbers work at height, so you must not suffer from any medical
condition, such as blackouts or dizziness, which could be a danger to yourself
or others.

Normal colour vision is required as there are many instances when you may
have to tell the difference between water pipes and gas pipes

Image courtesy of RS Components


A colour scheme used by plumbers to
identify pipes

Scottish Further Education Unit 56


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Activity: Qualifications for Entry

Entrance qualifications, as well as other skills, are important to employers who


may consider you for an interview. This exercise is to help you plan for the
qualifications you will need if you are interested in becoming a plumber.

Use the internet, magazines and newspapers, or any other suitable sources of
information to help in this exercise.

At school what subjects would you choose to be considered for a career as a


plumber?

What grades should you aim for in each subject?

Scottish Further Education Unit 57


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: Qualifications for Entry

Standard Grade subjects: Maths, English, Technical Studies, Graphical


Communication, Metalwork.

You should always aim for the highest grade. The grades expected would be
grade 4 and above a combination of grades 4 and 5 for the above subjects
may be acceptable.

You can also join an access course at a college eg. a pre-apprenticeship


scheme that offers vocational studies which will allow progression.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Mechanical Fitter

Work Activities

Mechanical fitters install, repair and maintain heavy industrial equipment in power
stations and the grid and at other locations. They use a variety of tools to carry out
their work.

Mechanical fitters install, maintain and repair steelwork, steam boilers, controls for
gas supplies, lifts and hoists, turbines, pistons and engines.

Mechanical maintenance fitters work in a variety of locations and all kinds of


industrial and commercial buildings.

They use a variety of hand and power tools including wrenches, spanners, saws,
cutters and welding gear. They cut, bend, join and fix materials such as steel,
copper, aluminium and iron.

Installation work includes controls and pipework for large industrial systems for
industry, eg. wind farm turbines, wave power generators, water turbines.

Image courtesy of RS components a safe pair of hands

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

When the equipment has been installed, the mechanical


maintenance fitters test it to make sure that it is working
efficiently and safely.

Maintenance and repair work includes routine servicing and


emergency repairs.

RS Components Data Recorders

Repair work involves finding faults, replacing or repairing damaged parts, carrying
out tests and making sure that the system works properly.

Mechanical maintenance fitters may be called out at short notice to do emergency


repairs eg. especially in winter if their equipment freezes and equipment can seize
up or leak oil.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Personal Qualities and Skills

As a mechanical maintenance fitter you will need good practical skills and
you must work carefully, following specifications and often interpreting plans
and drawings.

As you will be meeting customers usually at business premises, you must be


polite.

You need to be physically fit. The work involves a lot of bending, kneeling
and working in cramped and awkward spaces.

Mechanical maintenance fitters use sharp and powered cutting tools and,
sometimes, work at height, so you must not suffer from any medical condition,
such as blackouts or dizziness, which could be a danger to yourself or others.

Image courtesy of Cascaid

Scottish Further Education Unit 61


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Taking your career further - working in the energy sector

Electricians, mechanical fitters and plumbers can work in most areas within the
energy sector. Here are some examples:

Wind-farm

Wave Power

Hydro Power

Tidal power

Nuclear power stations

Coal-fired power stations

Oil / gas-fired power stations

PV solar installation, maintenance and repair

Micro-wind generation - wind turbine installation, maintenance and repair

Micro-hydro generation - wind turbine installation, maintenance and repair

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Activity

Researching careers

Click on the following links to search for careers:

http://www.greenenergyjobs.com/

http://www.scottishrenewables.com/

http://www.british-energy.com/pagetemplate.php?pid=262

http://www.scottish-
southern.co.uk/SSEInternet/PowerfulOpportunities/Public/Default.aspx?TierSlicer
1_TSMenuTargetID=124&TierSlicer1_TSMenuTargetType=4&TierSlicer1_TSMen
uID=6

There are many more websites you can use to broaden your research. Your tutor
may suggest others.

List the careers that might interest you and discuss these with your tutor so that
you can decide the type of trade you could investigate.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Electricity Distribution Workers

Pylon and power transmission cables


Image courtesy of Scottish and Southern Electricity

Electricity distribution workers maintain and repair electricity generating systems.


They may specialise in working on substation equipment, underground cables or
overhead power lines.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Work Activities

Electricity distribution workers maintain the local electricity generating systems


that supply homes and industry with heat, light and power. There are several
types of job within this area.

Electrical fitters install, repair and maintain all types of generating equipment
within substations, such as switchgear, and other types of equipment that are
used to control and monitor the flow of energy. Transformers are one of the main
components of a substation:

Electrical substation transformer


Image copyright James King

Cable jointers work on underground distribution cables, making connections to


overhead lines or other parts of the generating system. They also repair cables.

Linesmen/women build overhead electricity distribution lines, maintain equipment


and carry out repairs as necessary.

Image courtesy of Scottish and Southern Electricity

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Electricity can be very dangerous!

Image courtesy of RS Components

Electricity distribution workers will need a strict 'permit to work' before they can
begin the installation or repair of equipment or cables.

Personal Qualities and Skills

To be an electricity distribution worker, you must be able to follow safety


procedures as electricity supply plants can be highly dangerous.

You must have strong manual and mechanical skills.

Linesmen/women must have a head for heights, while jointers and general
duties assistants, who often work in trenches, must not mind working in
cramped and dirty conditions in all types of weather. You need to be
physically fit.

You should be good at fault finding and solving problems.

Scottish Further Education Unit 66


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Activity

Qualifications for Entry

Entrance qualifications, as well as other skills, are important to employers and one
of the requirements to be invited for an interview. This exercise is to help you plan
for the qualifications you will need if you are interested in becoming an electricity
distribution worker. Use the Internet, magazines and newspapers, or any other
suitable sources of information to help you in this exercise.

At school what subjects would you choose to be considered for a career as an


electricity distribution worker?

What grades should you aim for in each subject?

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: Qualifications for Entry

Standard Grade subjects: Maths, Physics, English, Technical Studies,


Graphical Communication, Metalwork.

You should always aim for the highest and the grades expected would be
Grade 3 and above a combination of Grade 2 and 3 for the above subjects.

You can also join an access course at a college eg. a pre-apprenticeship


scheme that offers vocational studies.

Scottish Further Education Unit 68


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Fuel and Energy Engineers

Image courtesy of Cascaid Ltd

Also known as:


Energy technologist
Oil technologist

Introduction

Fuel and energy engineers research and develop ways to improve the efficient
use of energy and to minimise environmental damage from its conversion into
usable forms. Many industries employ them to assess environmental impact and
to manage energy usage. They may also work in fuel production industries,
manufacturing companies (boilers, furnaces, gas turbines and engines), or as
consultants.

Work Activities

Fuel and energy engineers tackle the problem of providing us with safe and
reliable sources of energy. Without energy, we wouldnt have heating, lighting, or
the power we need to run manufacturing industries and transport systems. Most
energy is produced by the combustion of fossil fuels. However, atmospheric
pollution from power stations, transport and industrial processes causes problems
such as acid rain, global warming and the reduction of the ozone layer. For these
reasons, many fuel and energy engineers are developing renewable energy
technologies.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Many fuel and energy engineers work in the extraction of fossil fuels like coal,
oil and natural gas. Their aim is to use these existing fuels as efficiently as
possible, thereby conserving reserves for as long as possible. They also research,
test and develop techniques to minimise atmospheric pollution, for example,
reducing emissions of oxides from sulphur and nitrogen in the coal-fired power
generation industry. (Strict emission legislation is implemented by both the UK
and the European Union.)

In the oil industry, fuel and energy engineers may develop lubricants and
detergents to make sure combustion engines are clean and working efficiently.

Other fuel and energy engineers are based in educational research departments,
working on projects such as methods to improve diesel and gas turbine
combustion, and investigations into the formation of pollution. Fuel and energy
engineers also research, develop and test alternative sources of energy such
as tidal, wave, wind, solar and geothermal power.

In manufacturing, fuel and energy engineers design, research, test,


commission and install energy equipment like furnaces, boilers, gas turbines
and engines. In research work, technologists may use computer aided design
(CAD) to create 3-D models, and other computer systems to analyse fluid
dynamics. Fuel and energy engineers may also be involved in car manufacture,
helping to meet strict exhaust emission legislation and working on more efficient
catalytic converters.

Every area of industry uses a large amount of energy to power its production
processes. Some fuel and energy engineers work directly for industrial employers
while others are consultants advising employers on energy usage and pollution
control.

Image courtesy of RS Components

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Personal Qualities and Skills

You must have the ability to solve problems using a combination of logic and
creativity. Fuel and energy engineers need excellent knowledge of energy
and fuel engineering principles, as well as a strong awareness of
environmental issues.

You must be willing to:


o keep up-to-date with changes in technology
o learn the latest information on environmental issues
o apply new UK and European Union legislation governing emissions.

Excellent communication and interpersonal skills are needed to work in


teams alongside other engineers, and to explain complex ideas clearly to
people who do not have a technical background. Those fuel and energy
engineers who work in manufacturing companies may need marketing and
sales skills.

You will need a good knowledge of computers, including CAD, and strong
mathematical skills.

Fuel and energy engineers must have leadership skills to supervise teams of
engineering technicians. The ability to motivate and encourage others will be
an advantage.

Image courtesy of RS Components

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Activity

Qualifications for Entry

Entrance qualifications, as well as other skills, are important to employers who


may invite you for an interview. This exercise is to help you plan for the
qualifications you will need if you are interested in becoming a fuel and energy
engineer. Use the Internet, magazines and newspapers, or any other suitable
sources of information to help you in this exercise.

At school what subjects would you choose to be considered for a career as a fuel
and energy engineer?

What grades should you aim for in each subject?

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: Qualifications for Entry

Higher grade subjects: Maths, Physics, English, Technical Studies, Graphical


Communication. Standard grade metalwork.

You should always aim for the highest and the grades expected would be
Highers at Grade C and above.

You can also study for a Higher National qualification (HNC) at a college.

Scottish Further Education Unit 73


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Mechanical Maintenance Fitter Wave Power

Work Activities

Mechanical maintenance fitters install, repair and maintain heavy industrial


equipment in power stations and the grid and at other locations. They use a
variety of tools to carry out their work.

Mechanical maintenance fitters install, maintain and repair steelwork, steam


boilers, controls for gas supplies, lifts and hoists, engines, turbines and pistons.

Part of the wave power Pelamis


device used for generating electricity
from waves at sea.

Floor tile removed to perform


maintenance
Image courtesy of Gary Honeyman

Mechanical maintenance fitters work in a variety of locations and all kinds of


industrial and commercial buildings.

They use a variety of hand and power tools including wrenches, spanners, saws,
cutters and welding gear. They cut, bend, join and fix materials such as steel,
copper, aluminium and iron.

Installation work includes controls and pipework for large industrial systems for
industry, eg. wind farm turbines and wave power generators.

When the equipment has been installed, the mechanical maintenance fitters test
it to make sure that it is working efficiently and safely.

Maintenance and repair work includes routine servicing and emergency repairs.
Repair work involves finding faults, replacing or repairing damaged parts, carrying
out tests and making sure that the system works properly. Mechanical
maintenance fitters may be called out at short notice to do emergency repairs eg.
oil leaks, and especially in winter if the equipment freezes and seizes up.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Personal Qualities and Skills

Image courtesy of Cascaid Ltd

As a mechanical maintenance fitter you will need good practical skills and
you must work carefully, following specifications and often interpreting
plans and drawings.

As you will be meeting customers usually at business premises, you must


be polite.

You need to be physically fit. The work involves a lot of bending, kneeling
and working in cramped and awkward spaces. Mechanical maintenance
fitters use sharp and powered cutting tools and, sometimes, work at
height, so you must not suffer from any medical condition, such as
blackouts or dizziness, which could be a danger to yourself or others.

Scottish Further Education Unit 75


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Activity

Qualifications for Entry

Entrance qualifications, as well as other skills, are important to employers who


may invite you for an interview. This exercise is to help you plan for the
qualifications you will need if you are interested in becoming a mechanical
maintenance fitter. Use the Internet, magazines and newspapers, or any other
suitable sources of information to help you in this exercise.

At school what subjects would you choose to be considered for a career as a


mechanical maintenance fitter?

What grades should aim for in each subject?

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: Qualifications for Entry

Standard Grade subjects: Maths, Physics, English, Technical Studies,


Graphical Communication, Metalwork.

You should always aim for the highest grade and the grades expected would
be Grade 2 and above a combination of 2 and 3 for the above subjects may
also be acceptable.

You can also join an access course at a college eg. a pre-apprenticeship


scheme that offers vocational studies.

Scottish Further Education Unit 77


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

How Green Are You?

Self Evaluation

Manufacturers of the standard electric light bulb will stop production within the
next 10 years. The reason for this is that we are starting to use a new type of light,
the low energy light bulbs, also known as compact fluorescent lamps. These
new lights use around a tenth of the energy of the light bulb shown below.

Scottish Further Education Unit 78


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

16

Activity

What things do you do every day to save energy?

This will help you think about energy awareness - its surprising the number of
ideas and actions you can come up with.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: What things do you do every day to save energy?

Possible answers:

switch off your computer if not in use

switch off the lights if no longer in the room

use the shower at half power

close a window or a door to retain the heat

only fill a kettle with enough water for its purpose.

These are not necessarily skills, but it does show your awareness. Youve used
when you use a process of reflection and self evaluation to come up youre
your ideas.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Skills Evaluation
To gain employment in the energy sector you will need to do a self evaluation of
your skills to identify any strengths and weaknesses in personal and technical
skills and knowledge.

Strengths

Weaknesses

You need to think about strengths and weaknesses - both are equally important
because:

your strengths and weaknesses will be highlighted during review and feedback
meetings which you will have with your employer

your weaknesses can be improved or eliminated and strengths developed.

This is sometimes referred to as a skills gap analysis where you should identify
and record your strengths and weaknesses.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

As a result of the skills gap analysis a set of SMART objectives should be


drawn up. The evidence for these SMART objectives could be from a variety of
sources such as industry representatives, teachers and mass media.

If you click on the following link it will help you understand goals, aims and
objectives:
http://www.coaching-life.co.uk/articles/smartgoals.html

Here is a simple explanation:

Your objectives should be specific set firm goals eg. I want to get a
job at technician engineering level.

You should be able to measure whether you can achieve these


goals. How would you know if you were on the right path to get a trade that would
enable entry to the energy sector? Take it in small steps and choose the technical
subjects that will allow entry to any industry sector. From here you can then move
to the energy sector at a later date.

Can you get there? Can you achieve? Identify what may prevent
you from gaining entry; for example, you may need more qualifications.

Are they realistic? - You may have set your aims too high. Does
your lifestyle allow you take on more pressure because you will need to work
much harder?

Can you use your time in a positive way and achieve the goals on
time? Can you give up your spare time for extra study and work?

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Activity

Make a list of your strengths and weaknesses. You should think about the
following and work out how you can practise to improve some of these
skills.

Do you need to practise your writing skills such as completing application


forms?

You should have good oral communications skills as these are very important
to employers. Practise by doing a presentation to a small group of students.

What qualifications do you have already?

What qualifications would you like to gain?

Have you done any voluntary work or been involved in a youth movement? If
so youll have gained skills like communication and planning.

Have you planned a trip?

Do you care for somebody?

What hobbies do you have?

You will need to keep a note of these theyll be used at the end of this unit.

Scottish Further Education Unit 83


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Employability Skills
As well as qualifications, employers will look for skills and knowledge and factors
dealing with your personality and attitudes, so you need to think about the
following:

Maintaining good timekeeping, attendance and appearance

An employer will expect you to arrive on time eg. if the start time is 9am, then five
past is regarded as lateness!

Some employers use what is called a flexi-time system where they allow you to
start between certain hours you could ask about this at an interview.

Plan ahead to make sure that youre not late due to public transport problems or
traffic jams.

Your appearance will give your employer and their customers a lasting impression
- dont turn up crumpled!

Activity

How can you plan ahead?

Think of ways of planning ahead for your journey to and from work.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answer How can you plan ahead?

Make sure you have a watch or mobile for checking the time.

Use GPS (global positioning system) to plan alternative road routes.

Use the AA route guide:


(http://www.theaa.com/travelwatch/planner_main.jsp?database=B) to find
alternative routes.

Car share this is good for the environment and for team building.

Get a copy of the train timetable some routes have multiple trains
running.

Get a copy of the bus timetable many buses use similar routes.

Weather permitting use a bicycle.

Walk if you can it is cheaper and healthier.

Scottish Further Education Unit 85


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Maintaining a Tidy Workplace

A tidy workplace makes it safer for everybody. If your tools and equipment are
locked away safely then you will know exactly where they are the next time you
need to use them. Some workshops have designated tool areas or racks.

Toolrack
Image courtesy of RS Components

2
Activity

What can you do to maintain a tidy workplace?

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answer - What can you do to maintain a tidy workplace?

Always clean up after you keep a small hand-brush in your toolbox.

Keep cleaning wipes in your toolbox.

Put your tools back in their proper place eg. a locked toolbox.

Make sure there is an area where you can store your tool box eg.
cupboard.

Identify your tools so that you can easily see them eg. use reflective tape.

Set up a weekly rota with your colleagues to clean the work area before the
end of each day.

Use the correct bin to discard waste material eg. keep a bin for scrap
metal.

File away all documentation, drawings and manuals.

Put up signs to remind people.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Seeking advice and following instructions

Asking for advice is not a weakness.

It shows that you are interested and willing to get help.

It shows you are keen to show that you can carry out a task in a clear and
accurate manner.

Staff are usually very willing to help other staff members regardless of who
they may be.

Its normal practice for an employer to review your performance and give
you feedback. Any feedback given to you should be recorded, written down
and at the time of the review ask how you might improve.

Feedback from customers is very important, both for you and for the
employer. Ask the customer if they are happy with the work carried out.

Image courtesy of RS Components

Activity

What can you do to make it easy to seek advice and follow instructions?

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: What can you do to make it easy to seek advice and follow
instructions?

Make sure you have a list of telephone contacts - both landline and mobile.

Ensure you have an e-mail address set up.

You could design your own business card, so you and the customer will now
have a two-way communication link.

Talk to your colleagues and managers.

Listen to instructions and pay attention to the detail.

When you complete a set of instructions you should write down your
experience and keep a logbook of the tasks you performed. This will help you
learn from your mistakes.

As well as writing down the instructions you could record them on your mobile
phone.

Try to obtain remote access to your department from your home computer
this will help you plan the next days activities.

Scottish Further Education Unit 89


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Working Co-operatively with Others

Working co-operatively is essential for all workplaces. Employers are very keen to
have all their workers working together in a positive way. It is often the case that
you will not be working on your own.

Image courtesy of RS Components

Activity 5

Think of ways in which you could improve your working relationships


with others.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: Improving your working relationships with others

Respect respect all your colleagues no matter what level or position they
hold in the company.

Show good manners please and thank you.

Be friendly a smile goes a long way.

Be flexible and helpful eg. if somebody asks for help, assist them in
whatever way you can.

Attend regular team meetings each morning to discuss the days work
ahead.

Take turns making the tea or coffee.

Singing or whistling is not always a good idea especially if you cant sing
or whistle!!

Scottish Further Education Unit 91


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Selecting and Using Tools Correctly


and for the purpose they were designed for

A very important set of skills that every tradesperson needs to have is to select
the correct tools to do the job. For example there are many types of hammers and
if the wrong one is chosen then you could cause damage to equipment.

All of these tools will be used by a variety of trades people


eg. plumbers and electricians

Image courtesy of RS components

Scottish Further Education Unit 92


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Activity

For the following two tools select whether they will be used with one hand or two
hands and whether they can be used on wood, metal or concrete.

Use the Internet to do this exercise: a useful website to see the range of tools
available is:

http://uk.rs-online.com/web/home.html

1. Hammers

2. Power drills

Scottish Further Education Unit 93


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: Tool Selection

Hammers

Sledgehammers are for heavy work eg. hammering in metal or


wooden posts hold with two hands.

Ball pein hammers are for light work eg. shaping


metal - use single handed.

Power drills

A hammer drill use this two handed for


drilling holes through concrete and walls.

A cordless power drill driver use this single handed for


drilling small holes in metal or wood, or for inserting
screwnails.

Scottish Further Education Unit 94


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Using Personal Protective Equipment Correctly

Personal Protective Equipment is also known as PPE. It is mandatory to wear this


PPE and if you do not comply you can be asked to leave the place of work and in
some cases you will lose your job.

It is the responsibility of the employer to provide you with the correct PPE and
give you the training to use it.

It is the responsibility of the employee (thats you!) to wear and use this PPE at
all times in areas designated as a safety zone.

A safety barrier

Image courtesy of RS Components

There are standard items of PPE that are generally issued to workers on
construction sites and other work areas.

Scottish Further Education Unit 95


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

7
Activity

Safety PPE

Make a list of PPE that could be used by an electrician and a plumber.

Scottish Further Education Unit 96


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: Safety - PPE

All of the PPE shown below could be worn by both plumbers and electricians.

Steel toe cap safety boots

Safety glasses

Safety gloves

Knee pads

Face mask and visor

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

High visibility jacket and


harness

Hard hat with ear protectors attached

Overalls (also known as boilersuit)

High visibility clothing

Images courtesy of RS Components

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Once you have been issued with the PPE you need to behave and work in a
safe manner. Just because youre wearing the PPE, it doesnt mean that you are
behaving or working in a safe manner!

For example, you shouldnt walk about with your hands in your pockets. If your
hands are free then there is more chance that you could stop serious injury with
the help of your hands.

Activity

Working and behaving in a safe manner

In groups discuss safe working practice and acceptable behaviour. Make a list
and compare the list with other groups

Look at the safety passport to help you click on the following link:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg381.pdf

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answers: Working and behaving in a safe manner

Behaviour

Dont walk about with your hands in your pockets you are a danger to
yourself and others.

Dont run in the workshop you could knock someone down or trip and fall.

Dont throw tools or equipment pass them hand to hand.

Vandalism report anybody you see damaging tools or equipment.

Dont Smoke. Smoking is forbidden in work areas .It is only acceptable in a


designated smoking area if you smoke this is a good opportunity for you
to give up completely!

Dont shout loudly you may well startle somebody working at heights or
working on other dangerous tasks.

Never approach somebody from behind to surprise them when they are
working.

Some of these practices may cause you to get an official warning from your
employer.

Working in a Safe Manner

Use correct PPE as instructed and make sure you are trained to do the job
asked of you.

Make sure a risk assessment has been carried out on the task you will be
performing eg. If you are working with chemicals make sure you have a
barrier cream on as well as gloves as the chemicals can penetrate them.

Hygiene is important for your health and you should get into the habit of
regularly washing your hands.

Report hazards that may cause an accident eg. spilt oil.

If the job requires two people, dont try to do it alone.

Use and obey safety signs.

Report any abuses of safety eg. working at heights without a harness.

If you are given or issued with tools or equipment that are damaged do
not use them return them to stores and label them as unsafe.

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Willing to Learn New Skills or Techniques


You should follow the training plan agreed with your employers training officer.

You need to have a flexible attitude you could stay on longer at work to
complete a job or come in earlier in the morning.

Ask for additional training or work to help you practise your skills eg. for
electrical you can practise stripping cable. For plumbing you can practise
joining two pipes together by a joining method called brazing.

Complete your logbook daily, and write down any new skill or technique you
have learned. Highlight any areas where you think you could improve and
draw sketches to help remind you. Make a point of practising them.

During apprenticeship training from the 2nd year to the 4th year you would
normally be working with a fully qualified tradesperson. You would gain a lot of
extra knowledge if you ask questions regularly. If the tradesperson does not know
the answer you find out!

Practice makes perfect.

An apprentice practises his electrical installation skills

Courtesy of Carnegie College School of Engineering and Technology


Dave Urquhart

Scottish Further Education Unit 101


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Organising Work Effectively

Organising work effectively and working in a confident manner.

One way to organise your work effectively is to plan ahead. If you plan ahead
and are well prepared for the job, then you will perform that task confidently.

Note: Its good to be confident but dont be over confident as this could lead to
dangerous situations particularly where high voltages or gases are
involved. There is a difference between confidence and competence.

Activity

Discuss with your tutor the difference between confidence and competence.

In groups, discuss how you could organise your work more effectively.

You could think about some of the following questions:

What is the job you are to complete?

How many people will be working together?

Who is required to complete the work?

What equipment will you need?

When will the job start and finish?

How is the job going to be carried out?

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Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answer: Confidence versus Competence

Confidence means you feel and think you can do something

Competence means you can do something. You will have gained a high level of
skills and have practised them over many years so that that you are able to plan
and complete complex tasks effectively.

Answer: Organising work Effectively

You need to have a plan sometimes known as a planning schedule


similar to a school timetable.

The plan should include where the work will be carried out, the number of
people who are performing the work and who they are, what job they are
doing, how long are they have to do it and on what dates/ times:

For example:

School building - Two people an electrician and a plumber installing a shower


unit lasting 2 days starting on the 1st day of July ending on 2nd of July.

You know the task is on a particular day or week and then make sure that
the correct PPE, tools and equipment are available for that day. You should
visit the work site and perform a risk assessment and look at the layout and
access to the building.

For example:

Working at heights depending on how high you may be working you will have a
choice of equipment that needs to be readily available. These may have to be
booked or hired from other businesses for example:

ladders
cherry-picker
scaffolding

Transport will be required, so a company van should be prepared and all the tools
and equipment necessary to carry out the job should be ready and waiting.

Scottish Further Education Unit 103


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Paying Attention to Quality and Working to Agreed


Deadlines

An employer will expect you to produce the highest quality of work within a
specified time.

Two examples are:

Example 1:

An electrician rewiring a house in 5 working days in accordance with the IEEE


regulations.

The IEEE standards are the quality standards that electricians work to in all their
installations.

Example 2:

A plumber or gas-fitter installing a gas central heating system in accordance with


CORGI standards. CORGI is the national watchdog for safety in the UK.

The CORGI standards are the quality standards that plumbers or gas-fitters need
to comply with for any work on gas installations. You need to gain CORGI
certification.

Corgi Registered

Scottish Further Education Unit 104


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Activity

Quality and Deadlines

Write down two reasons why deadlines are important?

Write down three things you can think of that an employer would regard as quality
work?

Scottish Further Education Unit 105


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Answer: Quality and Deadlines

Deadlines:

The customer will be very happy if you finish on time.

Your employer will be very happy if you finish on time.

A deadline means completing the job as per your plan it meets your
employers scheduled plan.

If you complete the job on time, it means that other planned work can go
ahead.

The customer is more likely to give your employer more work.

Quality:

If the work meets the required standards it will pass any inspection or
testing so your employer will not be breaking the law.

If the work exceeds the required standards your employer will probably
get more work from that customer due to the very high standards.

It means you have completed the work up to the required standards, with
no extra cost and time.

A clean and functional product you have not left a mess and whatever
you are building or installing will operate correctly and looks good.

Scottish Further Education Unit 106


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Developing Investigation, Presentation and Creativity


Skills
During this unit you are expected to develop these skills. Equally, an employer
might expect you to have these skills.

Investigation skills are a form of research, where you might use many sources of
information such as books, journals, Internet, papers and other people.

Presentation skills take some time to develop. One of the most common is a
Power-Point presentation. Throughout your career you may be asked to make
presentations to a variety of audiences. Sometimes you might be asked to make a
10 minutes spoken presentation using Power-Point at an interview for example.

Creativity skills are wide and varied. It could be that you have very good practical
skills and can create high quality parts or artefacts with your hands. It could also
mean you have a very good imagination and mathematical knowledge to design
large structures.

Activity

This is an individual task that requires you to research material on a topic dealing
with a career in energy, put the information into a Power-Point presentation, and
then present it to the class. You need to obtain feedback from your tutor and your
classmates on how you performed during the presentation.

If you imagine you have been invited for a job interview, you should practise and
prepare for the interview.

Scottish Further Education Unit 107


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Now that you have thought about many of the employability skills you should
produce a plan to improve your chances of gaining employment.

Activity

Formulate a plan to improve future performance and a list of corrective actions to


improve or remove the identified weaknesses.

You could create a table to show

Column 1 Your Strengths

Column 2 Your Weaknesses

Column 3 Feedback on employability skills

Columns 4 Action points showing how you think you can improvement your
performance

Scottish Further Education Unit 108


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Glossary of Terms
You can add to this list as you come across new terms

Term Meaning
CAD Computer Aided Design
CORGI Council for Registered Gas Installers
Cherry-picker A large portable hydraulic lift
IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
PPE Personal Protective Equipment
PV Photo voltaic

Scottish Further Education Unit 109


Energy: Employability and Careers (Intermediate 2)

Appendix

Interview Practice Job Vacancy energy advisor

This exercise should give students practice in the technical aspects of a job
interview where they may be interviewed by a small group of people.

The group will consist of 5 people.

4 students will be the interviewers and the 5th student will be the person being
interviewed.

This will involve all 5 students investigating aspects of the key issues for the
energy sector. Suggested topics:

Energy efficiency
Renewable energy
Nuclear power

As a result of this, the students will accumulate a bank of interview questions and
possible answers.

All five students will rotate their roles such that everybody gets opportunity to be
the interviewee.

The interview should be formal and imitate the current settings as expected in a
real life situation, eg. the student would be expected to make a 5-10 minute
presentation to the interviewers.

This is an opportunity for developing some key aspects of the energy units:

Seeking information
Peer evaluation
Presentation skills
Portfolio collation

Scottish Further Education Unit 110