Board Special Meeting

Operations Committee
Thursday, November 2, 2017, 4:30-6:30pm
Board Office Conference Room, John Stanford Center
2445 – 3rd Avenue South, Seattle WA 98134

Agenda

Call to Order 4:30pm

1. Roll Call
2. Approval of agenda
3. Approval of meeting minutes – October 5, 2017

Monthly Capital Financial Report – none this month due to yearend closing

Board Action Reports (Discussion and/or Action)

1. BTA IV: Magnolia Elementary School Mahlum contract modification (R. Best)
2. BEX IV: Approval of the Value engineering report for the Wing Luke Elementary
School replacement project (R. Best)
3. BEX IV: Modification No. 2 to contract P1481 with Radixos LLC for consulting
services for K-12 furniture (R. Best)
4. BEX IV: Final acceptance of contract P5043 with Spee West Construction for the
Genesee Hill Elementary School replacement project (R. Best)
5. BTA III-BEX IV: Final Acceptance of contract K5062, Holmberg Company for
McGilvra Elementary HVAC Upgrades (R. Best)
6. Multi-funded: Final acceptance of contract P5055 with Bayley Construction for the
Seattle World School at T.T. Minor Modernization Project (R. Best)
7. Approval of the 2018-19 Student Assignment Transition Plan (Herndon, Davies)

Adjourn 6:30pm

Upcoming Meetings

• December 7, 2017
• January 4, 2018

(As School Board Committees are working committees, the documents presented to the Board can
change up to the time of the meeting. The Board Executive Committee has approved a pilot program to
post to the website committee agendas and approved minutes only. Full meeting materials for Regular
Board Meetings will still be posted. If you would like access to any of the materials for this meeting, you
may call 206-252-0040 or email boardoffice@seattleschools.org and the Board Office staff will send
committee materials to you promptly.)
Board Special Meeting
Operations Committee
October 5, 2017, 4:30pm
Board Office Conference Room, John Stanford Center
2445 – 3rd Avenue South, Seattle WA 98134

Minutes

Call to Order

The meeting was called to order by Director Blanford at 4:30pm. Directors Geary and Pinkham were also
in attendance. The meeting was staffed by Associate Superintendent Flip Herndon and Assistant
Superintendent Pegi McEvoy.

The agenda was approved. There were minor grammatical issues that were corrected in the minutes,
which were then approved as revised.

Monthly Capital Financial Report: Melissa Coan reviewed the various funds and said that with where
the district is in the fiscal year, Capital Projects will be closing year in the black. Unspent capital dollars
are rolled over into the next year as Capital Projects has multi-year projects. BTA III funds have been
steadily increasing over the months due to interest earnings. There were no questions.

MLK Jr Way property: As a follow-up to an executive session report the previous night, Bruce
Skowyra presented the board action report. This property the district is interested in acquiring would
house some buses and facilities equipment as well as warehousing functions. He said the process to
handle the acquisition might be another 120 days. The committee moved this item forward to the full
board with a recommendation for approval.

Approval of the 2018-19 growth boundaries: Ashley Davies described the one small area moving into
the Loyal Heights attendance area that is being recommended for change for next year’s boundaries. This
change came out of 2013 boundary adjustments to accommodate relocation of students during multiple
capacity management projects. It is designed to ease crowding at Whittier as well as Viewlands, where it
was originally scheduled to move. Community engagement opportunities were provided in June 2016
and a few weeks ago. Committee members raised questions and discussion followed about travel
distance, amount of community testimony, and associated transportation costs. The committee then
moved this item forward to the full board with a recommendation for approval.

2018-19 Student Assignment Transition Plan - discussion: Ashley Davies and Nate Van Duzer
participated in the discussion about the changes to the SAP transition plan, noting that changes were in
response to last year’s request by the board to getting the various stages of the process into one document
and be able to drop the transition label. Nate reviewed the memorandum on going section by section in
the 2009 document to see where things lived to support this action.

Director Pinkham asked about assignment and staffing and capacity and how it supports growing schools
(like Licton Springs) or programs (like IB schools that do not have the funding to support the program).
Dr. Herndon said steps include staffing appropriately within budget constraints, placing programs in
schools and the resource allocation that goes with that action. He said that the SAP document addresses
Page 1 of 2
rules to assign students in a way that parents understand them but does not address allocation and
budgeting.

Director Geary spoke about the district’s need to put people on notice of changes. The move away from
“transition” will not notify that there are continuing changes that help families as they make long-range
decisions based on school attendance areas. This needs to be flagged somehow. Dr. Herndon said there
may be ways to flag it on the Look-Up tool online as well as highlighting areas in the assignment plan
that are in a state of flux. Ashley noted that getting as close as possible in the areas of capacity, school
choice, staffing capacity, open enrollment and projections will provide more stability in staffing for
schools, as well as better information for families and choice.

Directors and staff discussed the upcoming meeting October 25th and what would help getting the board
to a place where there would not be several amendments during the introduction-action process; those
kinds of amendments do not generally have the analysis done ahead of time to support a decision.

Adjourn

This meeting adjourned at 5:23pm.

jd

Page 2 of 2
SCHOOL BOARD ACTION REPORT
DATE: October 11, 2017
FROM: Dr. Larry Nyland, Superintendent
LEAD STAFF: Dr Lester Herndon, Associate Superintendent of Facilities and Operations
(206) 252-0644 ltherndon@seattleschools.org

For Introduction: November 15, 2017
For Action: December 6, 2017

1. TITLE

BTA IV: Modification to Contract K1243, for Architectural and Engineering Services, Mahlum
Architects for the Magnolia Elementary School Renovation and Addition project

2. PURPOSE

This Board Action Report requests approval of a contract modification in the amount of
$508,646 for Mahlum Architects, Contract No. K1243, for the Magnolia Elementary School
Renovation and Addition project.

3. RECOMMENDED MOTION

I move that the School Board authorize the Superintendent to execute a contract modification
with Mahlum Architects in the amount of $508,646 for the Magnolia Elementary School
Renovation and Addition project with any minor additions, deletions, and modifications deemed
necessary by the Superintendent, and to take any necessary actions to implement the contract
modification.

4. BACKGROUND INFORMATION

a. Background
This contract modification is being requested for additional scope of work resulting from:
• An increase in the Maximum Allowable Construction Cost (MACC) – The
MACC was increased to align with the cost estimate performed at the Schematic
Design phase. Because the architect’s basic fee is a percentage of the MACC, the
architect’s fee also needs to be increased.
• Direction given to the design team to explore strategies for achieving net-zero
energy consumption – Based on the guidance and recommendations by the BEX
Oversight Committee, strategies for achieving net-zero energy consumption were
explored and several were incorporated into the design.
• Providing expert testimony – The State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA)
threshold Determination of Non-Significance was appealed. The architect
provided expert testimony and other support on behalf of the School District at
the appeals hearing. This expense was not anticipated at the time of original fee
negotiation and was therefore not covered in their original contract.

1
• Requirements of the Landmarks Preservation Board – Much of the Magnolia
School building and site was designated a landmark by the Landmarks
Preservation Board (LPB). All proposed work affecting the designated elements
of the building and site had to be reviewed and approved by the LPB. Since the
LPB controlled the review process, they requested many more meetings than were
anticipated. Mahlum’s fee included two (2) review meetings with the LPB, but in
the end there were six (6).
• Cost reduction, redesign, and rebidding effort – When the project was first bid on
May 16, 2017, there were two bidders. The lowest bid was $4,839,080 over the
construction budget. Subsequently, Mahlum was directed to recommend cost
reduction strategies and provide corresponding costs. Many of the cost reduction
strategies were accepted and incorporated into the documents, which included
redesigning, additional coordination between members of the design team, and
preparation of the documents for rebidding. These tasks were not anticipated so
therefore, the cost to perform them was not included in the original fee.

The architect has already completed the foregoing described work. Board approval of
this contract modification was not requested earlier because suspension of the work for
the length of time required to execute a contract modification would have adversely
impacted the ability to receive jurisdictional approvals and impeded the achievement of
critical milestones for staying on schedule to re-open the school in 2019.

b. Alternatives
No alternatives were considered.

c. Research
No research was conducted for this action.

5. FISCAL IMPACT/REVENUE SOURCE

Fiscal impact to this action will be $508,646.

The revenue source for this motion is Buildings, Technology and Academics/Athletics IV (BTA
IV) Capital Levy Fund.

Expenditure: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

Revenue: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

6. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

With guidance from the District’s Community Engagement tool, this action was determined to
merit the following tier of community engagement:

Not applicable

Tier 1: Inform

2
Tier 2: Consult/Involve

Tier 3: Collaborate

The development of the BTA IV projects list underwent extensive community engagement.

7. EQUITY ANALYSIS

This motion was not put through the process of a full racial equity analysis. The list of projects to
be funded in the BTA IV Levy was developed with the goal of providing equitable access to
school facilities across the District.

8. STUDENT BENEFIT

By approving this action, the architect will be compensated for ensuring the design of Magnolia
Elementary School meets the educational specifications, technical building standards, and the
goals of the Landmarks Preservation Board while creating an inspiring, long-lasting learning
environment for all students.

9. WHY BOARD ACTION IS NECESSARY

Amount of contract initial value or contract amendment exceeds $250,000 (Policy No. 6220)

Amount of grant exceeds $250,000 in a single fiscal year (Policy No. 6114)

Adopting, amending, or repealing a Board policy

Formally accepting the completion of a public works project and closing out the contract

Legal requirement for the School Board to take action on this matter

Board Policy No. _____, [TITLE], provides the Board shall approve this item

Other: _____________________________________________________________________

10. POLICY IMPLICATION

Per Board Policy 6220, Procurement, all contracts for more than $250,000 initial value,
excluding sales tax and contingencies, and changes or amendments of more than $250,000,
excluding sales tax and contingencies, must be approved by the School Board.

11. BOARD COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

This motion was discussed at the Operations Committee meeting on November 2, 2017. The
Committee reviewed the motion and _____________.

3
12. TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION

Upon approval of this motion, the Superintendent will sign and execute the contract
modification.

13. ATTACHMENTS

• None

4
SCHOOL BOARD ACTION REPORT
DATE: October 9, 2017
FROM: Dr. Larry Nyland, Superintendent
LEAD STAFF: Dr. Lester Herndon, Associate Superintendent, Facilities and Operations
(206) 252-0644, ltherndon@seattleschools.org

For Introduction: November 15, 2017
For Action: December 06, 2017

1. TITLE

BEX IV: Wing Luke Elementary School Replacement Project: Value Engineering Report State
Funding Assistance

2. PURPOSE

The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) Form D-7, Application to Proceed
with Bid Opening, requires the School Board’s acceptance of the Value Engineering Report, and
the Architect’s Response and Recommendation Matrix.

3. RECOMMENDED MOTION

I move that the School Board accept the Value Engineering Report dated June 2017, and the
Architect’s Response and Recommendation Matrix, for the Wing Luke Elementary School
Replacement project.

4. BACKGROUND INFORMATION

1. Background
During the month of May, 2017, SAZAN group performed an independent Value
Engineering study of the Schematic Design drawings for the Wing Luke Elementary
School project, as designed by NAC Architecture.

The study was undertaken by a team of professional architects, engineers, and cost
estimators who analyzed the design and developed suggestions for adding value to the
project. Value Engineering is defined by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC)
392-343-080 as a: cost control technique which is based on the use of a systematic,
creative analysis of the functions of the facility with the objective of identifying
unnecessary high costs or functions and/or identifying cost savings that may result in
high maintenance and operation costs.

The Value Engineering study suggestions were accepted if they added value and/or
reduced costs without negatively affecting the educational program and goals or the long-
term operation of the building. The study provided the design team and District with
information and strategies necessary to keep construction costs within budget.

1
The Value Engineering consultant made 56 different value recommendations, of which
21were accepted or partially accepted and had potential cost savings, and 35 were
rejected for various reasons, including not meeting District educational and program
goals, District maintenance goals, or District sustainability goals. The total anticipated
cost savings from the suggested proposals that the design team and District accepted is
approximately $887,419. The potential savings will be retained within the project design
budget for further development of the design as the design was approximately 30%
complete at the time of the study.

2. Alternatives
Do not accept the Value Engineering Report and implementation of the report: This is not
recommended. If Board acceptance is not approved, it would delay the issuance of the D-
8 form which allows the District to open bids and could impact the District’s ability to
receive State Funding Assistance. Not having the ability to open bids could potentially
negatively impact the schedule for the Wing Luke Elementary School project.

3. Research
Research was performed by the SAZAN group which consists of professional architects,
engineers, and cost estimators, Findings were reviewed by NAC Architecture and Heery
International Inc. Criteria for research and review consisted of design, budgeting,
scheduling, bidding, construction and construction management best practices from all
firms involved.

Also adhered to and consulted were the following:
• WAC 392-343-080
• WAC 392-344-065
• American Institute of Architects (AIA): www.aia.org

5. FISCAL IMPACT/REVENUE SOURCE

This action helps to secure up to $2 million in state funding assistance for the project.

The revenue source for this motion is BEX IV Capital Levy and anticipated state assistance
funding.

Expenditure: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

Revenue: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

6. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

With guidance from the District’s Community Engagement tool, this action was determined to
merit the following tier of community engagement:

Not applicable

Tier 1: Inform

2
Tier 2: Consult/Involve

Tier 3: Collaborate

The development of the BEX IV projects list underwent extensive community engagement. The
community involvement in the Wing Luke Elementary School follows the Community Outreach
Plan published in the BEX IV monthly report.

7. EQUITY ANALYSIS

This motion was not put through the process of a full racial equity analysis. The list of projects to
be funded in the BEX IV Program was developed with the goal of
providing a safe and functional learning environment to school facilities across the District.
The replacement is primarily due to deficiencies within the existing buildings.

8. STUDENT BENEFIT

It is the goal of the District to continue the process of implementing the BTA and BEX Capital
Levy programs and provide students with safe and secure school buildings.

9. WHY BOARD ACTION IS NECESSARY

Amount of contract initial value or contract amendment exceeds $250,000 (Policy No. 6220)

Amount of grant exceeds $250,000 in a single fiscal year (Policy No. 6114)

Adopting, amending, or repealing a Board policy

Formally accepting the completion of a public works project and closing out the contract

Legal requirement for the School Board to take action on this matter

Board Policy No. 6100, Revenues from Local, State, and Federal Resources provides the
Board shall approve this item

Other: Requirement of the State’s D-Form application process

10. POLICY IMPLICATION

This action is consistent with School Board Policy No. 6100, Revenues from Local, State, and
Federal Resources. This is a requirement of the State D-7 Application for Assistance.

11. BOARD COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

This motion was discussed at the Operation Committee meeting on November 2, 2017. The
Committee reviewed the motion and _____________.

3
12. TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION
Implementation of the accepted recommendations is immediate. The Value Engineering
study does not specifically require community review.

13. ATTACHMENTS

• Value Engineering Summary ( for full report please contact the Board Office)
• Architect’s Response and Recommendation Matrix

4
.. .. Value Analysis Study
SAZAN Wing Luke Elementary School
i._ •v1 '-' 111•.._, ,~._., ._.,t.,I VIU'C.-~, ,__,.,__.
Seattle Public Schools June 2017

Key Findings
• The completion of the construction and startup of the school in August 2020 appears workable, pending
satisfactory permitting efforts and demo/abatement of the existing school facilities.
• It may be feasible to permit, bid and complete the demo/abatement work under an early-start, Phase 1
contract. Depending upon the permitting approvals, an early start contract package could be bid in late 2017.
The main building construction project could then bid in early spring 2018 assuming a 16-month construction
schedule. This schedule option would accelerate the demo/abatement effort and allow for some flexibility in
the bidding and award of the building. It also would hopefully eliminate some of the risk exposure from the
permitting/abatement issues so that more accurate budget management measures could be implemented.
• The estimate appears to be appropriate in most areas, but does not address the regional market conditions
currently facing projects in the greater Seattle area. Communication with contractors in the area reveal that
they are experiencing increases in prices primarily from:
Lack of skill tradesman, including plumbers, electricians, brick masons and IT/communications
specialists
Increases in prime and sub-contractor overhead and profit due to many newer and less experienced staff
members.
Lack of experienced construction managers, superintendents and project engineers to staff contractor in-
house and field operations.
Inexperienced subcontractor office and field personnel due to a high volume of construction in the area.
• Estimated cost of $320/sf for a new elementary school is appropriate based upon historical as well as recent
school bid prices, but results in the project being more than $3.3 million over the project budget of $31.7
million.
• The cost estimate prepared by The Robinson Company does not identify any allowance for market
conditions other than a standard 4%/year escalation factor. However, budget risk exposures exist from the
factors noted above. To clarify the risk event impacts, a Monte Carlo risk model was prepared using 3-point
range estimates on each estimate line item, augmented with several global risks for schedule and market
conditions. The analysis generated a PSO (50% probability) of $36.9 million, yielding a budget shortfall of
$5.2 million.
• The Leaming Commons areas are 1,169SF more than the Space Program.
• There is some opportunity to optimize the exterior skin by modifying the material palate, i.e. brick, etc.
• The removal of unsuitable soil appears to add cost to the project; alternatives including FFE grade and
structural fill adjustments should be explored to optimize the earthwork quantities and foundation
improvements.
• There are pockets around the building exterior on the pods which may create security problems.
• It may be possible to reuse unsuitable soil to raise the grade of the playfield.
• Glazing appears to be reasonable in consideration to percentage of exterior surface; however, the storefront
by the Gym appears to be excessive as it extends down to the floor level.

Key Recommendations
• Allow 18 months for Phase 1 and 6 months for Phase 2
• Split the phasing of the gym building improvements between Summer 2018 and Summer 2019
• Change from three 2-story pods to two 3-story pods to reduce structural fill requirements.
• Relocate the Mech. Room 260 and move it under the Commons/Stage.
• Increase the number of boiler rooms from one to two; place the second under the basement area under the
south Pod, between col. lines R-S/N1 - C3.
• Move Mechanical Room 302 and 303 under basement space under the south classroom pod.
• Consider VRF on the HVAC system and controls.
• Shift the building complex approximately 1Oft to the north to minimize earthwork.
.. ..
Value Analysis Study
SAZAN Wing Luke Elementary School
Seattle Public Schools June 2017

• Relocate the Child Care space to a stand-alone wood structure on the NW corner; shift the Gym/Commons
further north.
• Reduce the main electrical service size from 2,000A to 1,600A.
• Reduce the number of data drops in the classrooms from 14 + 2, to a maximum of 8 data drops.
• Delete the fire alarm voice annunciation.
• Use a 3-inch domestic water tap for the site and a 2-inch meter.
• Use the playfield as repository for unsuitable material, but improve the surface soils to facilitate drainage and
usability in the winter.
• Develop a workable traffic control plan along both Kenyon and 37th to manage truck traffic.
• Optimize the exterior skin palette to retain the aesthetic qualities but optimize the capital cost.
• Reduce and simplify window system.
• Eliminate horizontal brick courses between glazing units.
• Eliminate brick courses between glazing units and use composite access panels.
• Use double hung windows in lieu of awning windows for the full height of the window.
• Reconfigure the ceiling at the Commons/Stage area to reflect sound out into the audience area.
• Reduce distance between modules; reconfigure the circulation ramps.
• Allow temporary sedimentation ponds in lieu of Baker Tanks as assumed in the project cost estimate.
• Use the penthouse walls as shear walls rather than extending the BRB's up into the penthouse.
• Before implementing any significant design changes to reduce cost, revisit the cost estimate and consider
adding a risk allowance for market conditions.
• Utilize additive bid alternates to manage the bid results relative to the available budget.
Architect’s Response and
Recommendation Matrix
Architect’s Response and Recommendation Matrix

Seattle Public Schools is committed to making its online information accessible and usable to all
people, regardless of ability or technology. Meeting web accessibility guidelines and standards is
an ongoing process that we are consistently working to improve.

While Seattle Public Schools endeavors to only post documents optimized for accessibility, due
to the nature and complexity of some documents, an accessible version of the document may
not be available. In these limited circumstances, the District will provide equally effective
alternate access.

For questions and more information about this document, please contact the following:

Ziyao Yang
Project Assistant Capital Projects
ziyang@seattleschools.org

The Value Engineering Recommendation Matrix is the culmination of the study undertaken by a team
of professional architects, engineers, and cost estimators who analyzed the design and developed
suggestions for adding value to the project. Value Engineering is defined by the Washington
Administrative Code (WAC) 392-343-080 as a: cost control technique which is based on the use of a
systematic, creative analysis of the functions of the facility with the objective of identifying unnecessary
high costs or functions and/or identifying cost savings that may result in high maintenance and
operation costs.
VALUE IMPROVEMENT MATRIX

Wing Luke Elementary School
Seattle, WA June 2017

VETeam
Function Recommendation & Owner lmpI.mentatlon &
Idea No Idea Potential Proposed Mit Accepted Mit Comments

Control -—

CB-79A Exterior material changes 20% Masonry! 80% CFB -209,916 - - PA -150,119 This reduced the square footage of
masonry and replaced it with
prefinished sheet metal panels. The
district prefers prefinished materials
over field painted ones.
CB-79B Delete classroom shades -91,526 - R 0
The sunshades will reduce solar heat
gain, an important consideration given
that there is no mechanical cooling
CB-79C Substitute fiberglass nail flange windows -75,896 - A -1,800 Our estimator believes that the price of
fiberglass windows is higher than
initially estimated. They believe the
cost of fiberglass windows is
comparable to aluminum windows. The
indicated savings comes from
eliminating the labor and materials
associated with window flashing
materials and installation.
CB-79D Delete Library Hallway -107,292 - A -74,000 Glazing reduction savings pulled out
- and included in ES-59
CB-79E Lower ceilings to 9-0” I Reduce building height 1’ per -385,013 - A -306,000 Glazing reduction savings pulled out
floor and included in ES-59
CB-79F 50% effective flat plate heat recovery -256,324 - R 0 The district believes the long-term
operational energy savings with the
90% heat recovery has value
outweighs the first costs.
CB-79G Core and shell 1 classroom cluster (6 classrooms) -905,385 - A 0 these savings are listed separately as
a possible bid alternate. Reduced
savings for some basic mechanical and
- amergency lighting costs
CB-79H Delete childcare suite -843,238 - R 0 f he district believes it s important to
incorporate the Childcare into the new
construction but this could be bid as an
ltemate
CB-97 Remove ceilings from MDF, electrical rooms and 4,000 A 4,000 A -4,000 -

compute storage rooms.

Control Climate
CC-53 -9,000 A R 0 The district standard is to install Type 1
Use a Type 2 hood in lieu of a Type 1 Hood in the hoods in the Kitchen for future flexibility
Kitchen.
CC-69 Use double hung windows in lieu of awning windows for -28,000 C -28,000 C 0 The design team wiN review this option
the full height of the window, with the district to determine which is
the more durable operable sash for an
academic setting in their experience.
CC-lb Consider VRF on the HVAC system and controls. -235,000 C -235,000 R 0 The district has concerns about the life
cycle costs of this mechanical system
relative to the anticipated lifespan of
the facility (50-75 yeats). Additionally,
they have concerns about their ability
to operate and maintain this
mechanical system with current
Cl-86 Eliminate the gate on the east end of the parking lot, +1,000 A R 0 This access will be used regulariy for
adjacent to the service road; replace with removable kitchen deliveries, supply deliveries,
bollards. and trashlrecycling!compost removal.
A gate is easier to operate for this
— purpose.

Construct Project —

CP-51 Develop a workable traffic control plan along both +71,000 A +71,000 PA 27,800 Adjust cost for 6 weeks and $45 for 2
Kenyon and 37th to manage truck traffic. — flaggers and 8 hr!day.
CP-f 08 Allow temporary sedimentation ponds in lieu of Baker -155,000 A -155000 PA -77,500 Use 1/2 the number of Baker Tanks
Tanks as assumed in the project cost estimate. and use Rain Gardens as Temp
— Sediment Ponds.

Circulate Students
C-,

VE Team
Function Recommendation & Owner Implementation &
Idea No Idea Potential Proposed Mit Accepted Mit Comm.nta
CS-22 Eliminate the elevator stop at the Mechanical -29,000 A -29,000 R 0 The elevator stop is more useful and

Mezzanine and continue Stair 118 and 134 to the more safe compared to stairs!roof

mechanical penthouses. hatches for bringing tools and
equipment to the mechanical
,nihn, icc
CS-80 Reduce distance between modules; reconfigure the .158,000 A -158,000 PA -39,700 We are not able to reduce the width
circulation ramps. between the classroom pods by 12 feet
without significantly reducing the
amount of daylight into academic
spaces. Additionally, the narrower
courtyards would not longer be usable
for bioflitration, a low impact design
(LID) strategy required by the
stormwater code. We are able to
reduce the width of the courtyards by 3
CS-88 Add a covered walkway to delineate the building entry +117,000 A +117,000 R 0 The entry is clear from the exterior.

point The second floor overhangs the first
floor at the entry so there is ample
nvered gner sit the entry silrnHv

Distribute Power
DP-33 Use aluminum feeders in heu of copper for 200A and -13000 A -13000 R 0 The district standard is to use copper.
above.
DP-34 Use aluminum bus bars for switchboard panels and -11000 A -11000 R 0 The district standard is to use copper.
transformers.
DP-35 Reduce the main electrical service size from 2,000A to 4,000 A -8,000 C 0 The project requires more
1 ,600A. development to know if accepting this
VE item is advisable.
DP-37 Use MC cable in lieu of conduit and wire. 43,000 A 43,000 R 0 The district standard is to use conduit
and wire.
DP-38 Use MC cable for branches in classrooms. -8,000 A -8,000 R 0 The district standard is to use conduit
and wire.
DP-39 Use a central battery inverter in heu of battery packs. -14,000 A -14,000 C 0 The project requires more
development to know if accepting this
— VE item is edvisable.
DP42 Reduce the number of data drops in the classrooms -77,000 A -77,000 R 0 The district standard is to have full data
from 14 + 2, to 8 data drops. drops and data cabling for WAP5.

DP43 Delete the fire alarm voice annunciation. -33,000 A -33,000 C 0 The state only recently eliminated this
requirement. If Seattle AH]s eliminate
this requirement as well, the design
— team will accept this VE item.

Enclose Space —

ES-i Change from three 2-story pods to two 3-story pods. -b41 ,uuu A -b41 ,UUU K ö’The design team has previously
reviewed a three story option with the
district. Due to the scale of the building
and the impact that exiting
requirements have on the academic
spaces and the impact that rated
shafts and dampers would have on
facilities maintenance, the district

ES-12 Take Mech. Room 260 and move it under the +96,000 R +0 R 0 This option adds cost and does not

‘Dommons/Stape. — have value.
ES-14 Increase the boiler rooms from one to two;
number of +133,000 R +0 R 0 This option adds cost and does not

place the second under the basement area under the have value.

south Pod, between ccl. lines R-SINI C3. -

ES-15 Move Mechanical Rooms 302 and 303 under basement +14,000 A +14,000 R 0 This option adds cost Because a

space under the south classroom pod. penthouse mechanical space is
considered a part of the floor below it,
ductwork runs currently do not require
fire dampers when exiting the unrated
mechanical chases. Because
basements count as a separate level,
this VE item would add fire dampers
and rated mechanical shafts to the

ES-17 Reconfigure the Learning Commons core to look like -56,000 A -56,000 PA -17,000 This VE item will not allow for a

Rm. 214, eliminate Stair #4; maintain access to decision point to two separate exits

mechanical penthouse. along a non-converging path within 75
feet of all points of the redesigned
classroom pod. The design team has
eliminated the Stair 4 run from level 2
to the mechanical penthouse in lieu of
gitemating tread stair r.pss
VETeam
Function R.commendatlon & Owner Implementation &
Idea No Idea Potential Proposed Amt Accepted Amt Comments
ES-25 Cantilever the 2nd floor over the Admin area, move the -3,000 R +0 R 0-
whole building approximately 12ft north. —

ES-32 Move Child Care into a stand-alone wood structure on -175,000 C -175,000 C 0 As with CB-79H, the design team
the NW corner; shift the Gym/Commons further north. explore if it is possible to leave the
existing Childcare in the SW corner of
thn sitp s VF stmtnv
ES.49 Use galvanized steel handrails in lieu of painted 47,000 A 47,000 A -10,000 Savings reduced based on input from
alvantred. estimator.
ES-57 Optimize the exterior skin palette. -311,000 A -311,000 A 0 The cost savings for this VE item have
been included with those for CB-79A.

ES-59 Reduce and simplify the amount of glazing. -85,000 A -85,000 PA -229,100 The glazing has been redesigned from
horizontal strips to vertical punched
openings. Along with reducing the
building height and eliminating the
hallway on the North side of the
Library, the total cost savings for
reducing glazing are substantial.
ES-61 Use cement board siding instead of a mix of cement -364,000 A -364000 PA 0 The savings for this VE item have
board lap siding and metal panel. — been included in CB-79A.
ES-89 Consider lowering the FFE of the middle Kindergarten -113,000 A -113,000 C 0 The play field will be redesigned to
Pod by 2ff and the FFE of the lower south Pod by 4ff. provide additional hard surface play
area and to better balance cut and fill
ES-94 Move the covered play function to under the Stage Area -270,000 A -270,000 R 0 There is a concern about creating a
(as a basement area). cave” that is not easily monitored
during or after school hours.
Additionally, the savings do not
account for the need to provide a dry
sprinkler system, insulated soffit or

Improve Site
lS46 Use the playfleld as repository for unsuitable material, -123,000 A -123,000 R 0 No additional unsuitable soils will be
but improve the surface soils to facilitate drainage and available for this use on site. The
usability in the winter. geotechnical report states that soils
can be reconditioned and used as
structural fill, which is incorporated in
lS47 Reduce the amount of landscaping and shrubs by 50% -96,000 A -96,000 R 0 Non-lawn landscaping has been
and replace with grass. planted in areas with biofiftration
requirements, or grades steeper than
1A I,,
lS-50 Replace existing curb/gutter on 37th. +23,000 A +23,000 R 0 The curb and gutter were installed lö --

years ago and appeared to be in good
,nnr1dir,n +, tho dnn tom

Maximize Daylight
MD-62 Eliminate horizontal brick courses between glazing -18,000 A -18,000 PA 0 The savings for this VE item have
units. been included in CB-79A.
MD-63 Eliminate brick courses between glazing units and use -12,000 A -12,000 PA 0 The savings for this VE item have
composite accent panels. — been included in CB-79A.
MD-64 Eliminate the trapezoidal windows and change to -6,000 A -6,000 PA 0 The trapezoidal windows have been
rectangular windows. simplified so that there is only a sloping
sit. The savings for this VE itme have
imn inrIiidpd in FS-5
MD-65 Use storefront in lieu of curtain-wall. 41,000 A 41,000 A 0 The savings for this VE item have
been included in ES-59
MD-67 Eliminate the “odd offset windows. -11,000 A -11,000 PA 0 The glazing has been redesigned from
horizontal strips to vertical punched
openings. The savings for this VE item
have been included in ES-59.
MD-72 Use window frame mounted sunshades, in lieu of -86,000 A -86,000 R 0 The glazing has been redesigned from
custom sunshades. horizontal strips to vertical punched
openings. The windows have been
changed from aluminum windows to
fiberglass windows. Frame mounted
sunshades come in discrete sizes that
do not align with window spacing.
Frame mounted sunshades are not
suitable for fiberglass windows.

Maximize —
VE Team
Function Recommendation & Owner Impl.mentation &
idea No Idea Potential Proposed Mit Accepted Mit Comments
MF-73 Include roof walk pads with parapet ramps in the +17,000 A +17,000 C 0 The SD esimate included an allowance
baseline. for roof walk pads and ladders. The
design team will consider the best
approach to roof transit within the
iiInwnt’A

Support Loads
SL-101 Use the penthouse walls as shearwalls rather than -16,000 A -16,000 C 0 The design team will weigh the costs in
extending the BRB’s up into the penthouse. more detail and use the most efficient
system to laterally support the
penthouses. Steel HSS braces may
end up being more cost effective than
BRB’s or shearwalls to laterally support

SL-2f Provide an access hatch and overhead support for the +42,000 A +42,000 R 0 This option adds cost. The mechanical
mechanical penthouses. penthouses are accessible by
alternating tread stair. Overhead
supporting beam is not required since
equipment can be walked tolfrom a
penthouse from the penthouse

Support Occupants
8045 Use a 3-inch domestic water tap for the site and a 2- 42,000 A 42,000 A 42,000 Confirmed with Mech Engineer that a
inch meter. —
9” miutor will hA fficicint
80-54 Use a gas water heater in lieu of electric in Child Care +27,000 R +0 R 0
Center.

80-95 Add a 200 gal. storage tank for the domestic hot water. +7,000 A +7,000 R 0 VE item adds cost and the additional
capacitance of a storage tank is not
required due to the lack of gymnasium
showers and other high flow fixtures
that would operate simultaneously.

80-96 Add drinking fountains near the Library and Gym +6,000 A +6,000 A 6,000 Two drinking fountains added in the
spaces. gymnasium. Deleting the Library
hallway puts the entry to the library
close to a drinking fountain located in
*kA,.A.,+

Educate Students
ST-74 Reconfigure the ceiling at the performance/Commons +64,000 C +64,000 R 30,000 Acoustic shaping and absorption will be
area to reflect sound out into the audience area. added to the design to make the
Commons space functional for

TOTAL SAVINGS -857,419

Implementation Code
A Accept
PA Partially Accept
C Consider Further
R Reject
VALUE tMPROVEMENT MATRIX
Wing Luke Elementary School
Seattle, WA June 2017
VE Team Owner
Function Recommendation & Implementation &
Idea No Idea Potential Proposed Amt Accepted Amt Comments
Control Climate
CC-69 Use double hung windows in lieu of awning windows for -28,000 C -28,000 +0
the full height of the window.
CC-I 10 Consider VRF on the HVAC system and controls. -235,000 C -235,000 +0
Construct Project
CP-51 Develop a workable traffic control plan along both +71,000 A +71,000 +0
Kenyon and 37th to manage truck traffic.
CP-108 Allow temporary sedimentation ponds in lieu of Baker -155,000 A -155,000 +0
Tanks as assumed in the oroiect cost estimate.
Circulate Students
CS-80 Reduce distance between modules; reconfigure the -158,000 A -158,000 • +0
circulation ramps.
Distribute Power
DP-35 Reduce the main electrical service size from 2,000A to -8,000 A -8,000 +0
1,600A.
DP-42 Reduce the number of data drops in the classrooms -77,000 A -77,000 +0
from 14 + 2, to 8 data drops.
DP-43 Delete the fire alarm voice annunciation. -33,000 A -33,000 +0
Enclose Space
ES-1 Change from three 2-story pods to two 3-story pods. -641,000 A -641,000 +0
ES-12 Take Mech. Room 260 and move it under the +96,000 R +0 +0
Commons/Stage.
ES-I4 Increase the number of boiler rooms from one to two; +133,000 R +0 +0
place the second under the basement area under the
ES-15 Move Mechanical Rooms 302 and 303 under basement + 14,000 A + 14,000 +0
space under the south classroom pod.
VE Team Owner
Function Recommendation & Implementation &
Idea No Idea Potential Proposed Amt Accepted Amt Comments
ES-25 Cantilever the 2nd floor over the Admin area, move the -3,000 R +0 +0
whole buildinQ approximately l2ft north.
ES-32 Move Child Care into a stand-alone wood structure on -175,000 C -175,000 +0
the NW corner; shift the Gym/Commons further north.
ES-57 Optimize the exterior skin palette. -311,000 A -31 1,000 +0
ES-59 Reduce and simplify the amount of glazing. -85,000 A -85,000 +0
ES-89 Consider lowering the EFE of the middle Kindergarten -113,000 A -113,000 +0
Pod by 2ft and the FFE of the lower south Pod by 41t.
ES-94 Move the covered play function to under the Stage -270,000 A -270,000 +0
Area (as a basement area).
Improve Site
IS-46 Use the playfield as repository for unsuitable material, -123,000 A -123,000 +0
but improve the surface soils to facilitate drainage and
usability in the winter.
Maximize Daylight
MD-62 Eliminate horizontal brick courses between glazing -18,000 A -18,000 +0
units.
Support Loads
SL-101 Use the penthouse walls as shearwalls rather than -16,000 A -16,000 . +0
extending the BRB’s up into the penthouse.
Support Occupants
SO-45 Use a 3-inch domestic water tap for the site and a 2- -42,000 A -42,000 +0
inch meter.
SO-54 Use a gas water heater in lieu of electric in Child Care +27,000 R +0 +0
Center.
Educate Students
ST-74 Reconfigure the ceiling at the performance/Commons +64,000 C +64,000
• area to reflect sound out into the audience area. . +0
Implementation Code
yE Team Owner
Function Recommendation & Implementation &
Idea No Idea Propoaed Amt Accepted Mit Comment.
A Accept
PA Partially Accept
C Consider Further
R Reject
S
SCHOOL BOARD ACTION REPORT
DATE: October 16, 2017
FROM: Dr. Larry Nyland, Superintendent
LEAD STAFF: Dr Lester Herndon, Associate Superintendent of Facilities and Operations
(206) 252-0644 ltherndon@seattleschools.org

For Introduction: November 15, 2017
For Action: December 6, 2017

1. TITLE

BEX IV: Approval of Modification No. 2 to Contract P1481 with Radixos LLC, for Consulting
Services for K-12 Furniture Selection

2. PURPOSE

This Board Action Report requests approval of contract modification No. 2 in the amount of
$373,288 for Contract No. P1481 with Radixos LLC, to provide for an expanded scope of
services.

3. RECOMMENDED MOTION

I move that the School Board authorize the Superintendent to execute a contract modification with
Radixos LLC to increase the base contract by the amount of $373,288 for K-12 Furniture
Selection with any minor additions, deletions, and modifications deemed necessary by the
Superintendent, and to take any necessary actions to implement the contract modification.

4. BACKGROUND INFORMATION

a. Background

The District issued a Request for Proposal (RFP) in November 2015 to select a firm that would
assist the District in updating the District’s educational specifications for all grade levels and
the related technical specifications for Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment (FF&E) and
facilitate the District’s furniture selection process. As a result of the competitive process, the
District awarded the contract to Radixos LLC in January 2017.

The original contract scope includes: (a) Review and update SPS’s current furniture
specifications and conduct a staff survey of recent furniture installation; (b) review and update
current SPS furniture room layouts coordinated with the educational specifications; (c) provide
Capital support to facilitate the Request for Qualifications process in conjunction with the
District’s Contracting Services Department; (d) facilitate Furniture Samples, Furniture Fair
and Evaluation; (e) & (f) provide support for the Bid Process and Analysis; and (g) prepare a
final Furniture Catalog.

Contract modification No. 1 was later issued to account for the reimbursable expenses
($5,000) that were mistakenly omitted in the initial contract total.
1
Contract modification #2 is being requested for three significant adjustments:

1. Furniture Specification Development: including expanding participants requiring
additional meetings, expanding duration of the meetings and the frequency of advisory
group meetings to keep the steering committee informed of project status; user group
meetings were not anticipated in the original contract and were deemed needed to align
furniture requirements with square footage requirements identified in the educational
specifications for all content areas within K-12 and program areas including Special
Education, Science, Performing and Visual Arts, Career Technical Education (CTE),
Library, Physical Education, Athletics and Support Services; expanded on-line staff
survey of furniture placed in major projects opening in 2016 and added additional
survey for Wilson Pacific project 2017; coordinate revisions to furniture specification
and bid groupings to align with competitive bid process.
2. Room Layouts in Educational Specifications: Increase room layouts from quantity of
60 to a quantity of 183; provide updated layouts to reflect revised furniture standards
groupings and confirm “test fit” with square footage requirements outlined in
educational specifications.
3. Request for Qualifications (RFQ) from Furniture Manufacture’s, Furniture Fair, Bid
Package and Catalog: Provide additional coordination with Contracting Services to
revise RFQ and Bid templates due to revised furniture groupings; provide additional
clarification to Furniture Manufacturer’s and Supplier’s, information collection and
review; additional coordination required for Furniture Fair due to extended duration,
revised specifications and site preparation requirements; additional coordination and
meetings to facilitate scheduling revisions and extended durations; expansion and
modification to Furniture Catalog based on revised specifications; additional scope for
post submittal follow-up.

These adjustments will result in a more cohesive furniture product selection, increasing value
and cost savings by creating continuity for SPS through furniture product standardization,
selection of higher quality components, reduction in administration of product procurement
and enhancement of full service vendor partnerships. Mod #2 will also extend the timeline to
Dec. 2018

Original Contract Sum $ 216,960
Modification No. 1 $ 5,000
Modification No. 2 $ 373,288
Net Contract Sum incl. Mod 1 & 2 $595,248

b. Alternatives
No alternatives were considered.

c. Research
No research was conducted for this action.

5. FISCAL IMPACT/REVENUE SOURCE

Fiscal impact to this action will be $373,288.
2
The revenue source for this motion is Building Excellence (BEX IV) Capital levy fund.

Expenditure: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

Revenue: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

6. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

With guidance from the District’s Community Engagement tool, this action was determined to
merit the following tier of community engagement:

Not applicable

Tier 1: Inform

Tier 2: Consult/Involve

Tier 3: Collaborate

7. EQUITY ANALYSIS

This motion was not put through the process of a full racial equity analysis. The list of projects to
be funded in the BEX IV levy was developed with the goal of providing equitable access to school
facilities across the District.

8. STUDENT BENEFIT

Students will benefit from high quality furniture and equitable learning spaces throughout the
district.

9. WHY BOARD ACTION IS NECESSARY

Amount of contract initial value or contract amendment exceeds $250,000 (Policy No. 6220)

Amount of grant exceeds $250,000 in a single fiscal year (Policy No. 6114)

Adopting, amending, or repealing a Board policy

Formally accepting the completion of a public works project and closing out the contract

Legal requirement for the School Board to take action on this matter

Board Policy No. _____, [TITLE], provides the Board shall approve this item

Other: _____________________________________________________________________

3
10. POLICY IMPLICATION

Per Board Policy 6220, Procurement, all contracts for more than $250,000 initial value, excluding
sales tax and contingencies, and changes or amendments of more than $250,000, excluding sales
tax and contingencies, must be approved by the School Board.

11. BOARD COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

This motion was discussed at the Operations Committee meeting on November 2, 2017. The
Committee reviewed the motion and _____________.

12. TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION

Upon approval of this motion, the Superintendent will sign and execute the contract modification.

13. ATTACHMENTS

• Contract Modification No. 2 Memo
• Revised Project Schedule Mod #2

4
MEMO
TO: ANITA HORNBY DATE: 10/12/2017

SEATTLE SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 1
2445 THRID AVENUE SOUTH
SEATTLE, WA 98124

FROM: RADIXOS LLC
JOHN WATERS

RE: CONTRACT FOR CONSULTING SERVICES
K-12 FURNITURE SELECTION
CONTRACT NO. P1481
MODIFICATION REQUEST #2

CC: DEBI SMITH

Attachment: Summary Additional Services Request Estimated Cost by Scope Phase

Please review and approve this revision to our Contract for Consulting Services. The attachment contains the
detailed additional services request estimated costs by contract phase.

Radixos current scope of services is to: (1) Review and update SPS’s current furniture specifications; (2) Room
layouts; (3) Request for Qualifications; (4) Furniture Samples, Furniture Fair and Evaluation; (5) & (6) Bid Process
and Analysis; (7) Furniture Catalog.

These contracted services are fully underway. Modifications to the scope of services requested by SPS will result in
the need to revise the original estimate. A summarized request by scope phase follows with the cost detailed in the
attachment. Three main adjustments requested by SPS are:
 Increase SPS staff participation in the process
 Increase coordination, updating and incorporation of the Educational Specifications
 Revise the RFQ and Bid Package approaches related to standardized furniture groupings

These adjustments will result in a better standards product and program for SPS with increased value and cost
savings through streamlining new project furniture design requirements through standardization, vendor
partnerships, greater staff participation and district ownership of the process.

Request 1 – Review and update SPS’s current furniture specifications.
 Increase district staff participation: original scope listed SPS Advisory Group Meetings, including Steering
Committee to review processes and objectives, and Selection Committee to review and evaluate product
introductions.
 Advisory Group Meetings - expand the number of participants, duration and frequency. This will result
in additional meeting preparation, lengthier meeting time and extra follow-up/ meeting minute reviews.
 User Group Meetings - expand to include all major areas within a typical K-5, Middle School, High
School, plus all other areas such as Special Education, Science, Performing and Visual Arts, Career
Technical Education (CTE), Library, Physical Education, Athletics and Support Services as well as

P 206.209.5100 F 206.209.5135
13975 INTERURBAN AVENUE SOUTH, SUITE 200, TUKWILA, WA 98168
WWW.RADIXOS.COM
staff involvement in the capital project delivery process. Schedule meetings to ensure the appropriate
staff is available.
 Educational Specifications - add detailed coordination with ongoing district updating of education
specifications which is running concurrently with this scope. The Education Specification updating and
reviews to be integrated into the Furniture Standards meetings and processes.
 Survey –
o Use an online survey approach to facilitate district operational staff time constraints; expand to
include furniture specifications and details with supporting documentation and graphics. Add
time for additional staff response on initial survey, survey timeframe extensions and second
analysis.
o Prepare survey for Wilson Pacific. Develop and edit specific questions and images. Collate and
submit respondent feedback

 Revise the specification approach into (3) main standard groupings with a single source for
workplace/secondary areas, primary classroom areas and specialties. Will be time consuming to align
specifications to meet current standards with Vendors to satisfy competitive bid process.

Request 2 – Room Layouts
 Educational Specifications – update the previous ‘template’ layouts from earlier versions to new
templates. Increase estimated layouts required from 60 to 183
o Groupings – updating ‘template’ layouts to reflect revised furniture standard groupings.
o Integrate updated Educational Specifications
o Increase # of layouts

Request 3 – Request for Qualifications
 Revise the specifications approach for significant updating of SPS RFQ template from Purchasing.
 Advisory Meetings & User Group Meetings – gather input from user meetings to include evaluation
criteria, contract durations and Furniture Fair requirements. Will require additional coordination with
Purchasing and other SPS staff.
 Vendor Outreach/Input – Due to standard grouping approach, initial responses received will require
additional information from vendors and increased district staff participation for review process.

Request 4 – Furniture Fair
 Additional meetings, to accommodate RFQ responses, increased duration of fair, site coordination and
organization to facilitate revised specification approach, vendor requests and other ongoing SPS projects.

Request 5 & 6 – Bid Process and Evaluations
 Revise Bid documents to incorporate RFQ evaluations/results, groupings, contract duration and approach
with vendors.
 Increase duration due to schedule revisions. Anticipated bid pushed out (2-3) months to facilitate RFQ and
Furniture Fair revisions.

Request 7 – Furniture Catalog
 Expanded and modified to incorporate revisions from scope sections 1-6.

Request 8 – Post Submittal Follow-Ups
 Add additional time (through December 2018) for questions, coordination and modifications from district
post submittal

2
The FF&E Consultant Revised Project Schedule Mod #2:

• Approx. February 2017 (Contract executed 2/2/17) kick off meetings, SPS document
review
• Approx. March - December 2017 Review/update SPS specifications and furniture
selection list
• Approx. March - January. 2018 Room Layouts and education specification coordination
• Approx. June - December 2017. RFQ and Furniture Fair
• Approx. July - August. 2017 Issue RFQ
• Approx. September - October. 2017 Receive and evaluate manufacturer submittals
• Approx. October 2017 Send notifications to manufacturers re: Furniture Fairs
• Approx. November - December. 2017 Furniture Fair
• Approx. December 2017 Review Furniture Fair evaluations, Advisory Committee
recommendations
• Approx. November 2017 - April 2017 RFP/Bid Documents/Contracts
• Approx. April 1, 2018 Bid Contract Award Start date
• Approx. Jan 2018 - April 2018 Compile furniture catalog
• Approx. May 2018 - December 2018 post submittal follow-up
SCHOOL BOARD ACTION REPORT
DATE: October 4, 2017
FROM: Dr. Larry Nyland, Superintendent
LEAD STAFF: Dr. Lester Herndon, Associate Superintendent, Facilities and Operations
206-252-0644, lherndon@seattleschools.org

For Introduction: November 15, 2017
For Action: December 6, 2017

1. TITLE

BEX IV: Final Acceptance of Contract P5043 with Spee West Construction Co. for the Genesee
Hill School Replacement project

2. PURPOSE

Board action is required to approve final acceptance of Contract P5043 with Spee West
Construction Co., and allows the district to formally accept the work and close out the contract.

3. RECOMMENDED MOTION

I move that the School Board accept the work performed under Contract P5043 with Spee West
Construction Company for the Genesee Hill School Replacement project.

4. BACKGROUND INFORMATION

a. Background

This project relocated the Schmitz Park School to the new Genesee Hill School. The
scope of the project originated from the Meng Building Conditions Report issued April,
2009 and from extensive engagement with the Schmitz Park School Design Advisory
Team (SDAT). The scope of work completed within this project included demolition of
the existing Genesee Hill Elementary School building and site utilities and construction
of a new 91,281 square foot building with a capacity of 660 students and new site
improvements.

The contractor, Spee West Construction Company, has satisfactorily completed the
contracted work and the consulting architect, BLRB Architects, is in agreement and
recommends acceptance of the completed work. Spee West Construction Co. has met all
of the contractual requirements including the 15% apprenticeship participation.

b. Alternatives

Not accepting the project in a timely manner could put the District in a position subject to
litigation. Therefore, this alternative is not recommended.

1
c. Research

• Building Condition Survey, Meng Analysis, April 2009
• Seattle Public Schools Technical Building Standards dated December 2012

5. FISCAL IMPACT/REVENUE SOURCE

All payments have been made to the contract from Building Excellence (BEX) IV Capital levy
funds. No outstanding invoices remain.

Change Order expenditures for this project were in the average range. The most significant
expenditures were associated with Seattle Department of Construction and Inspection code
revisions on environmentally critical areas which resulted in additional steep slope shoring and a
delay to the building permit release. This was in response to the Oso landslide event. Weather
delays also impacted the project requiring owner approved overtime to mitigate the delays.
Contractor: Spee West Construction Co.
Contract Amount $ 25,793,000
Change Orders $ 2,250,342
Sales Tax $ 2,686,110
Total Contract $ 30,729,452
Retention $ Bond

Amy Fleming: ______________________________________ Date:______________
Director of Accounting

Expenditure: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

Revenue: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

6. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

With guidance from the District’s Community Engagement tool, this action was determined to
merit the following tier of community engagement:

Not applicable

Tier 1: Inform

Tier 2: Consult/Involve

Tier 3: Collaborate

2
7. EQUITY ANALYSIS

This motion was not put through the process of a full racial equity analysis. The selection of
projects in the BEX IV program was designed to provide equitable access to safe school facilities
across the city.

8. STUDENT BENEFIT

This project helps ensure a safe, secure learning environment for every student.

9. WHY BOARD ACTION IS NECESSARY

Amount of contract initial value or contract amendment exceeds $250,000 (Policy No. 6220)

Amount of grant exceeds $250,000 in a single fiscal year (Policy No. 6114)

Adopting, amending, or repealing a Board policy

Formally accepting the completion of a public works project and closing out the contract

Legal requirement for the School Board to take action on this matter

Board Policy No. _____, [TITLE], provides the Board shall approve this item

Other: _____________________________________________________________________

10. POLICY IMPLICATION

For purposes of avoiding disputes over the timing of the filing of liens, the School Board should
accept the work on a construction project as finally complete prior to the release of retention.

11. BOARD COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

This motion was discussed at the Operations Committee meeting on November 2, 2017. The
Committee reviewed the item and __________________________________.

12. TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION

Acceptance of Completed Project by School Board December 6, 2017
Release of Retainage Bond Approx. January 2018
Contractor’s One-Year Warranty period ends July 22, 2017

13. ATTACHMENTS

• None

3
SCHOOL BOARD ACTION REPORT
DATE: September 20, 2017
FROM: Dr. Larry Nyland, Superintendent
LEAD STAFF: Dr. Lester Herndon, Associate Superintendent, Facilities and Operations
206-252-0644, lherndon@seattleschools.org

For Introduction: November 15, 2017
For Action: December 6, 2017

1. TITLE

BTA III/BEX IV: Final Acceptance of Contract P5062 with Holmberg Construction for the
McGilvra Elementary School Mechanical, Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
Upgrades project

2. PURPOSE

Board action is required to approve final acceptance of Contract P5062 with Holmberg
Construction and allows the district to formally accept the work and close out the contract.

3. RECOMMENDED MOTION

I move that the School Board accept the work performed under Contract P5062 with Holmberg
Construction for the McGilvra Elementary School Mechanical, Heating, Ventilation and Air
Conditioning (HVAC) Upgrades project.

4. BACKGROUND INFORMATION

a. Background

The McGilvra Elementary School Mechanical HVAC Upgrades project was funded by
Buildings, Technology and Athletics/Academics (BTA III) and Building Excellence
(BEX IV) Capital levy funds. This project consisted of Mechanical HVAC upgrades of
the existing classroom buildings, which included a new hydronic heating system,
ventilation systems and building automation system

The contractor, Holmberg Construction, has satisfactorily completed the contracted work
and the consulting architect, Integrus Architects, is in agreement and recommends
acceptance of the completed work.

b. Alternatives

Not accepting the project in a timely manner could put the District in a position subject to
litigation. Therefore, this alternative is not recommended.

c. Research

1
• Meng Analysis Facility Assessment Report dated August 2014
• Seattle Public Schools Technical Building Standards dated December 2012

5. FISCAL IMPACT/REVENUE SOURCE

All payments have been made to the contract from BTA III and BEX IV Capital levy funds. No
outstanding invoices remain. The majority of the change order work was due to unforeseen
conditions that included additional hazmat work, installation and repair of existing duct
insulation and casework, electrical revisions, and a jurisdiction-required install of an earthquake
gas meter.
Contractor: Holmberg Construction
Contract Amount $ 1,427,349
Change Orders $ 84,372
Sales Tax $ 145,362
Total Contract $ 1,657,083
Retention $0

Amy Fleming: ______________________________________ Date:______________
Director of Accounting

Expenditure: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

Revenue: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

6. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

With guidance from the District’s Community Engagement tool, this action was determined to
merit the following tier of community engagement:

Not applicable

Tier 1: Inform

Tier 2: Consult/Involve

Tier 3: Collaborate

7. EQUITY ANALYSIS

This motion was not put through the process of a full racial equity analysis. The selection of
projects in the BTA and BEX programs was designed to provide equitable access to safe school
facilities across the city.

8. STUDENT BENEFIT

This project helps ensure a safe, secure learning environment for every student.

2
9. WHY BOARD ACTION IS NECESSARY

Amount of contract initial value or contract amendment exceeds $250,000 (Policy No. 6220)

Amount of grant exceeds $250,000 in a single fiscal year (Policy No. 6114)

Adopting, amending, or repealing a Board policy

Formally accepting the completion of a public works project and closing out the contract

Legal requirement for the School Board to take action on this matter

Board Policy No. _____, [TITLE], provides the Board shall approve this item

Other: _____________________________________________________________________

10. POLICY IMPLICATION

For purposes of avoiding disputes over the timing of the filing of liens, the School Board should
accept the work on a construction project as finally complete prior to the release of retention.

11. BOARD COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

This motion was discussed at the Operations Committee meeting on November 2, 2017. The
Committee reviewed the item and __________________________________.

12. TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION

Acceptance of Completed Project by School Board December 06, 2017
Release of Retainage Bond N/A
Contractor’s One-Year Warranty period ends August 26, 2017

13. ATTACHMENTS

• None

3
SCHOOL BOARD ACTION REPORT
DATE: October 3, 2017
FROM: Dr. Larry Nyland, Superintendent
LEAD STAFF: Dr. Lester Herndon, Associate Superintendent, Facilities and Operations
(206) 252-0644, ltherndon@seattleschools.org

For Introduction: November 15, 2017
For Action: December 06, 2017

1. TITLE

Multiple Funding Sources: Final Acceptance of Contract P5055 with Bayley Construction for the
Seattle World School at TT Minor Modernization Project

2. PURPOSE

Board action is required to approve final acceptance of Contract P5055 for the Seattle World
School at TT Minor Modernization project for purposes of avoiding disputes over the timing of
the filing of liens prior to the release of retention.

3. RECOMMENDED MOTION

I move that the School Board accept the work performed under Contract P5055 with Bayley
Construction for the Seattle World School at TT Minor Modernization project as final.

4. BACKGROUND INFORMATION

a. Background
The $694.9 million Building Excellence IV (BEX IV) Capital Levy was approved by
more than 72 percent of Seattle voters in February 2013. It supports the district’s long-
range plans to upgrade and renovate aging school facilities and address enrollment
growth.

This project provides a permanent location for the existing Seattle World School option
school, which has been relocated to allow a new Middle School program to occupy the
Meany Middle School building.

The Contractor, Bayley Construction, has satisfactorily completed the contracted work
and the consulting Architect, TCF Architecture, agrees and recommends acceptance of
the completed work.

In accordance with WAC 392-344-160, School district board of director’s approval of
final acceptance is required to complete the Office of Superintendent of Public
Instruction D-11 application to release retainage.

1
b. Alternatives
Not accepting the project in a timely manner could put the District in a position subject to
litigation. Therefore, this alternative is not recommended.

c. Research
• Building Condition Survey, Meng Analysis, April 2009
• Seattle Public Schools Technical Building Standards dated December 2012
• Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, Form D-11 Application to Release
Retainage
• Construction Contract P5055

5. FISCAL IMPACT/REVENUE SOURCE

There is no fiscal impact to this action. No outstanding invoices remain.

Contractor: Bayley Construction
Contract Amount $ 13,542,750
Change Orders $ 1,203,676
Sales Tax $ 1,416,833
Total Contract $ 16,163,259
Retention $ Bonded

Amy Fleming: ______________________________________ Date:______________
Director of Accounting

Expenditure: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

Revenue: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

6. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

With guidance from the District’s Community Engagement tool, this action was determined to
merit the following tier of community engagement:

Not applicable

Tier 1: Inform

Tier 2: Consult/Involve

Tier 3: Collaborate

7. EQUITY ANALYSIS

This motion was not put through the process of a full racial equity analysis. The selection of
projects in the BTA and BEX IV programs was designed to provide equitable access to safe
school facilities across the city.

2
8. STUDENT BENEFIT

This project provides a safe and secure learning environment for every student.

9. WHY BOARD ACTION IS NECESSARY

Amount of contract initial value or contract amendment exceeds $250,000 (Policy No. 6220)

Amount of grant exceeds $250,000 in a single fiscal year (Policy No. 6114)

Adopting, amending, or repealing a Board policy

Formally accepting the completion of a public works project and closing out the contract

Legal requirement for the School Board to take action on this matter

Board Policy No. _____, [TITLE], provides the Board shall approve this item

Other: _____________________________________________________________________

10. POLICY IMPLICATION

For purposes of avoiding disputes over the timing of the filing of liens, the School Board should
accept the work on a construction project as finally complete prior to the release of retention.

11. BOARD COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

This motion was discussed at the Operations Committee meeting on November 2, 2017. The
Committee reviewed the item and_______________________.

12. TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION

Acceptance of Completed Project by School Board December 6, 2017
Release of Retainage January 2018
Contractor’s One-Year Warranty Period Ends September 12, 2017

13. ATTACHMENTS

• None

3
SCHOOL BOARD ACTION REPORT
DATE: October 31, 2017
FROM: Dr. Larry Nyland, Superintendent
LEAD STAFF: Flip Herndon, Associate Superintendent of Facilities and Operations
ltherndon@seattleschools.org, (206) 252-0644
Ashley Davies, Director of Enrollment Planning
aedavies@seattleschools.org, (206) 252-0358

For Introduction: November 15, 2017
For Action: December 6, 2017

1. TITLE

Approval of the Student Assignment Plan for 2018-19

2. PURPOSE

This Board Action Report updates the Student Assignment Plan for 2018-19.

3. RECOMMENDED MOTION

I move that the Board approve the Student Assignment Plan, as attached to the Board Action
Report.

4. BACKGROUND INFORMATION

The New Student Assignment Plan was approved by the School Board in 2009 to provide greater
predictability for families while still offering opportunities for school choice. Annual updates to
the Plan have subsequently been approved by the School Board within the Student Assignment
Transition Plan. The 2009 New Student Assignment Plan was created when major changes to
assignment policies took place, but the information in that document is now updated and
maintained in recent documents. This Board Action would update the most recent Student
Assignment Transition Plan.

The provisions of the attached document, the Student Assignment Plan for 2018-19, will prevail
in the case of any conflicts with previously approved Plans, boundaries, and/or GeoZones.

The purpose of this action is to update information in the Student Assignment Plan. The Plan for
2018-19 continues most of the assignment rules in effect during 2017-18 and highlights
upcoming changes for 2019-20 which will be further elaborated in next year’s Student
Assignment Plan. Some highlights and changes are:
 Clarifying space available as it applies to choice seats allocated in the School Choice
Process;
 Updating language to clarify current Special Education services and placement;
 Aligning the School Choice deadlines for students opting into HC or continuing in the
dual language immersion pathway with the general education timelines.

1
 Updating high school HC pathways for students entering 9th grade in the 2019-20 school
year school; and
 Updating advanced learning assignment language to reflect the fact that all schools offer
AL programming and eligible students will be assigned to AL at their attendance area
school.

5. FISCAL IMPACT/REVENUE SOURCE

There will be no fiscal impact to the changes outlined in the updates to the Student Assignment
Plan for 2018-19.

The revenue source for this motion is N/A

Expenditure: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

Revenue: One-time Annual Multi-Year N/A

6. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

With guidance from the District’s Community Engagement tool, this action was determined to
merit the following tier of community engagement:

Not applicable

Tier 1: Inform

Tier 2: Consult/Involve (for the high school HC pathways)

Tier 3: Collaborate

The changes in the Student Assignment Plan for 2018-19 clarify language and align timelines in
support of creating processes that are clearer for families and help to create more predictability
for schools around staffing. The district is hosting five open house meetings, one meeting in each
region, to inform families of the changes. At these meetings, families can also ask questions and
give feedback to various departments around ways the district can continue to improve its service
to students. The meeting dates and locations are listed below. All meetings will be held from
6:30pm-8:00pm and interpretation services will be available. Families can come at any time
during that window.

 Monday, Oct. 23, Eckstein Lunchroom
 Thursday, Oct. 26, Ballard Commons
 Monday, Oct. 30, McClure Gym
 Wednesday, Nov. 8, Cleveland Lunchroom
 Thursday, Nov. 9, West Seattle HS Lunchroom
Additionally, the Communications and Engagement team, together with the Student Supports
team, launched a two-way community engagement project using the newly adopted tool,

2
ThoughtExchange. This is a new tool for the district, and it is different from a traditional survey.
Staff used open-ended questions to surface ideas and then families engaged with other people’s
thoughts – scoring them on a scale of 1-5. Top thoughts were themed and are described below.
The exchange was provided in English and Spanish to K-12 families and promoted through a
new Community Engagement webpage and social media. Numerous reminders were provided
directly to families throughout the exchange period as well as direct technical assistance
provided by communications staff. The exchange lasted one week, closing on October 4.
In addition, Advanced Learning, ELL and the Engagement Departments hosted four home
language meetings focused on advanced learning. Invitations were provided through email, home
language phone calls, community partners, and principal invitations. Over 100 family members
participated in the focus group meetings run in Chinese, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Somali.
Families were asked the same open ended questions used during the online ThoughtExchange.
Groups of families identified priorities and top ideas were shared with the larger group and
School Board.
More information on the engagement process and outcomes is included in several attachments
with the BAR.

7. EQUITY ANALYSIS

The Racial Equity Analysis Tool was used to develop the 2018-19 Student Assignment Plan
recommended changes and the high school HC pathway recommended changes for the 2019-20
school year. The proposed changes to the Student Assignment Plan for the 2018-19 school year
do not disparately impact historically underserved students. For students receiving special
education the proposed changes increase choice at the middle school level for students who have
attended an elementary school outside of their attendance middle school feeder pattern, and by
clarifying school choice capacity, the district aims to stabilize enrollment and staffing in all
schools – working to ensure students of color and students historically underserved have access
to robust educational programming driven by stable enrollment. In addition, the HC pathway
changes for 2019-20 create more opportunities for HC qualified and future qualified students to
access advanced placement courses closer to home. One concern from the equity analysis is
ensuring that students in Southwest and Southeast pathways have a sufficient number of
advanced placement offerings and staff have professional development to ensure that they can
adequately serve the HC students who will be at the school. The Advanced Learning department
has over a year of planning to ensure that the proper supports are in place to make sure students’
needs are met. By providing services close to home, the district’s intent is to make sure students
do not need to leave their community to receive the educational opportunities they need. This
recommendation is made in direct response to the requests we heard from our ELL families.

8. STUDENT BENEFIT

This action clarifies language and aligns timelines in support of creating processes that are
clearer for families and help to create more predictability for schools around staffing. Feedback
was received from families during the 2017-18 school choice process that certain policies were
not clear, and these updates provide more clarification.

The creation of additional high school HC pathways creates greater access to rigorous
curriculum and greater opportunities for college and career readiness for students across the
3
district. The regional pathways create opportunities closer to home for families which will allow
for greater access.

9. WHY BOARD ACTION IS NECESSARY

Amount of contract initial value or contract amendment exceeds $250,000 (Policy No. 6220)

Amount of grant exceeds $250,000 in a single fiscal year (Policy No. 6114)

Adopting, amending, or repealing a Board policy

Formally accepting the completion of a public works project and closing out the contract

Legal requirement for the School Board to take action on this matter

Board Policy No. _____, [TITLE], provides the Board shall approve this item

Other: The existing plan requires any changes to be Board approved.

10. POLICY IMPLICATION

Board Policy No. 3130, Student Assignment, states that students shall have the opportunity to
attend an elementary, middle, or high school based in a designated attendance are based upon
home address, unless the school designated by a student’s home address does not have the
appropriate services for the student’s needs, as determined by the District.

Any changes to boundaries, geographic zones, or assignment rules subsequent to implementation
of the Student Assignment Plan require Board action.

Board Policy No. 2200, Equitable Access to Programs and Services, states, “It is the policy of
the Seattle School Board that programs and services be developed, replicated, and placed in
support of district-wide academic goals that address systemic needs and support quality
education for all students within the context of the current student assignment plan.”

Board Policy No. H13.00, Capacity Management, discusses the need to take actions to match
capacity and enrollment, including the addition, relocation or removal of programs.

11. BOARD COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

This motion was discussed at the Operations Committee of the Whole meeting on October 25,
2017. The Committee requested changes and those adjustments be presented at the Operations
Committee on November 2, 2017. The Committee reviewed the motion and _____________.

12. TIMELINE FOR IMPLEMENTATION

Upon approval of this motion, the Student Assignment Plan will go into effect for the 2018-19
school year, and all school years subsequent until further action is taken by the School Board.
4
The Plan will be uploaded to the District’s Enrollment Planning and Admissions webpages for
access by the public. Any changes made to high school advanced learning and HC pathways
would go into effect in 2019-20 in alignment with new high school boundaries.

13. ATTACHMENTS

 Student Assignment Plan for 2018-19 (Clean for approval)
 Student Assignment Plan for 2018-19 (Tracked changes for reference)
 Attachment A: Advanced Learning Community Engagement Summary
 Attachment B: Advanced Learning ThoughtExchange Summary
 Attachment C: Advanced Learning Native Language Feedback
 Attachment D: Advanced Learning Garfield PTSA FAQ

5
STUDENT ASSIGNMENT
PLAN FOR 2018-19
Operations Committee: November 2, 2017
TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION I Overview and Highlights…………………………………………... Page 1

SECTION II Standard Assignments.……………………………………………… Page 3
A. Summary
B. Students Entering Kindergarten
C. Students Entering 6th Grade
D. Students Entering 9th Grade
E. Students Who Move

SECTION III Access to Programs and Services……………………………… Page 8
A. Special Education
B. English Language Learners
C. Advanced Learning
D. Montessori
E. International Schools with Dual Language Immersion
F. Programs and Services

SECTION IV School Choice............................................................ Page 11
A. Open Enrollment
B. Tiebreakers
C. Waitlists
D. Siblings and School Choice

APPENDICES ………………………………………………………………………………... Page 14

Appendix A Attendance Areas and Feeder Patterns
Appendix B Geographic Zones for Option School Tiebreakers
Appendix C Service Schools
Appendix D Alternative Learning Experience Schools

Note: For information about transportation eligibility, see the approved Transportation Service
Standards.

i
SECTION I: OVERVIEW AND HIGHLIGHTS
The Student Assignment Plan was approved in 2009 to provide greater predictability for families while
still offering opportunities for school choice. The 2009 document continues to serve as an important
reference tool, containing fundamental definitions and Plan development principles. Annual Transition
Plans have guided a phased approach to implementation.1

The provisions of this Plan will prevail in the case of any conflicts with previously-approved plans,
attendance area boundaries, and/or GeoZones. Unless otherwise specified, boundaries, feeder patterns,
option school GeoZones, and assignment rules will remain in effect until there are changes approved by
the School Board. It is anticipated that changes will be needed to address capacity management issues as
district enrollment continues to grow.

School assignments are based on School Board-approved attendance area boundaries. Every student has an
attendance area elementary, middle, and high school based on residence. Elementary attendance areas are
combined to create middle school attendance areas, resulting in feeder patterns from elementary to middle
school.

Boundary changes are anticipated to Adams, Whittier, and Loyal Heights in fall 2018 when Loyal Heights
Elementary School moves into its new larger building. The district also anticipates boundary changes for a few
additional elementary schools to address overcapacity issues at those schools and is working with potentially
impacted communities on those changes. Additional boundary changes are anticipated in the fall of 2019
when Magnolia Elementary school opens as a new elementary school and when Lincoln High School opens as
an attendance area high school in Northwest Seattle. More information regarding the planning, boundaries,
services, and programs associated with these schools will be available through the district website and other
forms of communication.

In most instances, the middle school attendance area is also a service area for elementary and middle
school students. Various services are provided for students who live within a service area. Most
specialized services for middle and high school students are provided at their attendance area school. If
required special education services are not available at a student’s attendance area school, the school will
be linked with a nearby school with the required services.2

School Choice allows students to apply for other schools during an annual Open Enrollment period through
the end of May. A student may apply for any combination of attendance area and/or option schools. The
District anticipates making all waitlist moves by May 31,3 pending program placement and student
eligibility notification. Waitlists will be maintained until August 31 in the event that program notifications
have not been completed or if there are unanticipated adjustments that need to be made after May 31.
Waitlists for the 2018-19 school year will be dissolved on August 31, 2018.

This Transition Plan continues most of the assignment rules in effect during 2017-18. Some highlights and
changes are:
 Clarifying space available as it applies to choice seats allocated in the School Choice Process;
 Updating language to clarify current Special Education services and placement;
 Aligning the School Choice deadlines for students opting into the Highly Capable Cohort (HCC) or
continueing in the dual language immersion pathway with the general education timelines

1
Assignment rules apply to resident students only. Different rules apply for non-resident students.
2
There will continue to be a limited number of programs or services that are unique enough, and that serve such a
limited population, that they cannot be offered in every attendance or service area area.
3
The end of the waitlist period is referenced as May 31 throughout this document. No students will be added to
the waitlist after May 31, but waitlists will be maintained until August 31.
1
 Updating high school HC pathways for students entering 9th grade in the 2019-20 school year
school; and
 Updating advanced learning assignment language to reflect the fact that all schools offer
Advanced Learning (AL) programming and students can be assigned to AL at their attendance
area school.

2
SECTION II: STANDARD ASSIGNMENTS

A. Summary

Assignments to attendance area schools are based on residence. Students new to the district start with
an assignment to their attendance area school.

After May 31, assignments for new students are to their attendance area school or to an option school
with space available and without a waitlist. New students in grades 6-8 may also choose a K-8
attendance area school if they live within that school’s attendance area, pending space availability.

Space availability depends on the seats available given the staffing capacity at the school. To determine
the total number of seats available at a grade level in a school, the district will multiply the target class
sizes across each classroom given the number of teachers at each grade based on the staffing allocated
by the Budget Office.

K-12 students with a choice assignment may transfer to their attendance area school for the next school
year during Open Enrollment through May 31, as long as the student’s services needs can be met at that
school.

K-8 students with a choice assignment who live outside of their assigned school’s walk zone and are not
eligible for transportation may transfer to their attendance area school at any time, as long as the
students’ service needs can be met.

Continuing Assignments

The following students will automatically receive a continuing assignment to the same school, as long as
the school offers the grade and services the student needs:
 Students who have not moved and whose current school includes their next year grade and
current program
 Students at option schools will be continued at that school through the highest grade served by
the school, as long as the school offers the services the student needs
 Students with a choice assignment to an attendance area school that is not the student’s
attendance area school
 Students at a K-8 school rising to 6th grade

New Assignments

The following students will receive a new assignment:
 A “new student” is a student who has not attended a SPS attendance area or option school at
any time during the current or previous school year. New students will be assigned to their
attendance area school. Students may also apply to any school with space available during Open
Enrollment through May 31. After May 31, assignments for new students are to their attendance
area school or to an option school with space available and without a waitlist.
 Students who apply for and receive a choice assignment will receive a new assignment to that
choice school (or program). Students with a choice assignment will be continued at that school
through the highest grade served, as long as the school offers the services the student needs.

3
 Students whose current school does not include their next year grade or required special
education services. Students will be automatically assigned to their attendance area school for
the upcoming school year, except as noted for certain pathway assignments and to meet
required special education services; no application is required.
 Students who have moved out of their school’s attendance area (except students grandfathered
at the school); no application is required.

Grandfathered Assignments

All students enrolled with a grandfathered assignment who stay at the school are continued
(grandfathered) at that school through the highest grade served by the school, as long as the school
offers the services the student needs; no application is required.

B. Students Entering Kindergarten

Students entering kindergarten will have an initial assignment to their attendance area school, as long as
the school offers the services the student needs.
 This includes students currently receiving special education developmental preschool services
who will be five years old by August 31, unless their individualized education program (IEP) calls
for services not available at their attendance area school.
 Students attending PreK at South Shore will be assigned to continue at South Shore for
kindergarten.
 Students who meet eligibility requirements for early entrance to kindergarten are assigned to
their attendance area school upon request, and may apply for other schools on a space available
basis through May 31.

For information on assignment of siblings to the same school, see Section IV-D (Siblings and School
Choice).

C. Students Entering 6th Grade

New Students

New students to the district will be assigned to their attendance area middle school. Upon request,
middle school students who live in the attendance area of a K-8 attendance area school may be assigned
to that K-8 school, subject to space availability. Students may also apply to any school with space
available during Open Enrollment through May 31. After May 31, assignments for new students are to
their attendance area middle school, to a K-8 attendance area school if they live within that school’s
attendance area and there is space available, or to an option school with space available and without a
waitlist.

If a student becomes HC-eligible after Open Enrollment and applies for HC, they will be assigned to their
HC pathway school. This occurs when a student is newly eligible after ontime Open Enrollment, new to
the district after the testing deadline has passed, or enrolls from another public school district, and can
document comparable eligibility and participation in that district’s similar program for gifted students.
Eligibility is determined by the Advanced Learning department.

4
Students Currently Attending an Elementary School

Students entering 6th grade from a K-5 school will generally receive an initial assignment to their
attendance area middle school, except:

 Highly Capable Cohort (HCC): Students enrolled as HCC receive an initial assignment to their HCC
pathway middle school based on where they live. If they apply for their attendance area middle
school during Open Enrollment through May 31, they will be assigned to that school (unless they
apply for and are assigned to a higher ranked choice).

Students eligible, but not enrolled as HCC, are not automatically assigned to their HCC pathway
school; they must apply during the on-time Open Enrollment period. If they apply for HCC during
the on-time Open Enrollment period, they will be assigned to their HCC pathway school. HCC
applications received after the on-time Open Enrollment period are subject to seat availability.
Assignment to the non-pathway school depends on seats available; tiebreakers apply during on-
time Open Enrollment. Assignment to the non-pathway school may be requested through May
31 and depends on seats available.

 Advanced Learners: 5th grade students enrolled as Advanced Learners (Spectrum) will receive an
initial assignment to their attendance area middle school for 6th grade; no application is required.

Any student qualified as Advanced Learner may apply for another attendance area school or K-8
school during Open Enrollment through May 31; assignment is based on seats available within
the staffing capacity ; tiebreakers apply during on-time open enrollment

 International Schools: Non-attendance area students who are eligible for continuation in a dual
language immersion pathway, and who apply during the on-time Open Enrollment period, will be
assigned to the relevant pathway school (unless they apply for and are assigned to a higher
ranked choice).4 For students who apply after Open Enrollment but by May 31, assignment is
based on seats available within the staffing capacity.

 Special Education: When a student with an IEP is assigned an elementary school that is not the
attendance area school, the student may chose to attend the attendance area middle school or the
middle school in that elementary school’s feeder pattern.

Students may also apply for any school during Open Enrollment through May 31, including K-8,
attendance area, and option schools. Assignment depends on seats available within the staffing capacity;
tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment.

Students Currently Attending a K-8 School

Students entering 6th grade and attending K-8 schools will be assigned to continue at their current K-8
school for 6th grade, as long as the school offers the services the student needs.5

 If they apply for their attendance area middle school during Open Enrollment through May 31,
they will be assigned to their attendance area school, as long as the school offers the services the

4
One of the choices listed must be for the pathway school without designation of Advanced Learner (or HC if
applicable).
5
Students enrolled as an Advanced Learner at their K-8 school will be continued without having to reapply.
5
student needs. This is subject to seat availability (unless they apply for and are assigned to a
higher ranked choice).

Students may apply for any school with space available during or after Open Enrollment through
May 31.

 HC: Students eligible, but not enrolled as HCC, are not automatically assigned to their HCC
pathway school. If they apply for HCC during the on-time Open Enrollment period, they will be
assigned to their HCC pathway school. Assignment to the non-pathway school is subject to seat
availability; tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment.

If a student becomes HC-eligible after the on-timeOpen Enrollment period and applies for HCC,
they will be assigned to their HCC pathway school. This occurs when a student is newly eligible
after on-time Open Enrollment, new to the district after the testing deadline has passed, or
enrolls from another public school district, and can document comparable eligibility and
participation in that district’s similar program for gifted students. Assignment to the non-
pathway school may be requested through May 31 and depends on seats available within the
staffing capacity.

Students may also apply for any school during Open Enrollment through May 31, including K-8,
attendance area, and option schools. Assignment depends on seats available within the staffing capacity;
tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment.

D. Students Entering 9th Grade
Current and new students will generally be assigned to their attendance area high school, as long as the
school offers the services the student needs. Students may also apply to any school during Open
Enrollment through May 31. After May 31, assignments for new students are to their attendance area
school or to an option school with space available and without a waitlist.
 HC: Students enrolled in HC in 8th grade will receive an initial assignment to Garfield. They may
also apply for the HC/IBX program at Ingraham; assignment to Ingraham depends on space
available and tiebreakers. If not assigned to HC/IBX at Ingraham they retain their seat at Garfield
(unless they apply for and are assigned to a higher ranked choice). Students eligible, but not
enrolled as HCC, may also apply for the HC/IBX program at Ingraham. Assignment depends on
space available; tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment.
If they apply for their attendance area high school during Open Enrollmentthrough May 31, they
will be assigned to their attendance area school (unless they apply for and are assigned to a
higher ranked choice).

In 2019-2020 students enrolled in HCC in 8th grade will receive an initial assignment to the
regional pathway school for HC services. They may also apply for the IBX program at Ingraham;
assignment to Ingraham depends on space available and tiebreakers. If not assigned to IBX at
Ingraham, they retain their seat at the regional pathway school.

Students eligible, but not enrolled as HC, will receive an initial assignment to their attendance
area high school. These students may also apply during Open Enrollment to attend their
regional pathway high school and will receive placement at this site. These students may also
apply during the Open Enrollment process for the IBX program at Ingraham. Assignment
depends on space available; tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment.

6
 International Schools: Non-attendance area students who are eligible for continuation in a dual
language immersion pathway and who apply during Open Enrollment will be assigned to the
relevant pathway school (unless they apply for and are assigned to a higher ranked choice).
Students may also apply to any school with seats available during or after Open Enrollment through May
31. After May 31, assignments for new students are to their attendance area school or to an option
school with seats available within the staffing capacityand without a waitlist.

E. Students Who Move
When students move, they may have the option of or be required to get a new school assignment,
depending on when and where they move.
In general, students must change to their new attendance area schools if they are assigned to their
attendance area school, are not grandfathered, and they move to a new attendance area. If they move
before the school year starts, they must change schools for the new school year. If they move during the
school year, they may finish the year at their current school, but they must change schools the next year.
In all cases, reassignments are subject to any special education services a student may require.
Detailed move rules are available in the Superintendent’s Procedures for Student Assignment.6

6
Available on the district website: http://www.seattleschools.org/admissions
7
SECTION III: ACCESS TO PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Seattle Public Schools offers a variety of programs and services to meet a range of student needs,
including English Language Learners (ELL), students eligible for special education services, students who
are homeless, and students eligible for advanced learning. Many students are assigned to their
attendance area school regardless of most service needs. For required special education services not
available at every attendance area school, a linked school is designated. This provides predictable
assignments for students who need these services.

Schools and services are also available for students who have various behavioral, attendance, or
academic challenges as well as for students who self-select into certain unique programs. Students are
assigned to these schools or programs individually based on specific needs and circumstances, not
through the standard assignment process.

A. Special Education

The Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) requires the district to ensure that “a continuum
of alternative placements is available to meet the needs of children with disabilities for special education
and related services.” IDEA does not require the full continuum of placement be available at each school
in the district. If a student’s IEP requires services that are not available at the student’s attendance area
school, the student may be assigned to another school that can offer the services that are included in the
IEP and necessary for the student to receive a free, appropriate public education. Per the Washington
Administrative Code (WAC), “Unless the IEP of a student with a disability requires some other
arrangement, the student shall be educated in the school that he or she would attend if nondisabled. In
the event the student needs other arrangements, placement shall be as close as possible to the student’s
home.” Special Education Services are provided in a continuum throughout the district.

Resource level special education services are available at every school and follow the general education
student assignment process. Students who are eligible for other special education continuum services
(Access, Focus, Social/Emotional, SM2, Distinct) are assigned to their attendance area or linked school,
and may apply for assignment to another school that offers those services through School Choice. Linked
schools, which include Option Schools, for Special Education services are posted online prior to Open
Enrollment, along with linked schools for other programs and services, and provide assignment
predictability.7 A very small number of students with exceptional circumstances may require individual
assignments based on their IEP. Please refer to the Special Education Change of School Procedure Guide
for further information.

Standard assignment rules and tiebreakers apply.

Students who receive centralized special education service assignments to meet their specific IEP driven
needs (DHH, Vision, Medically Fragile) are assigned individually based on student needs, and may also
apply for assignment to another school offering the same services through School Choice.
These assignments are in alignment with approved boundaries and feeder patterns, to the extent
possible, depending on capacity, proximity, and individual service needs. Assignments are made
individually to ensure that each student’s IEP requirements can be met and that the appropriate services
are available at the assigned school. Transportation for students with disabilities is based on individual
IEP service needs.

7
If warranted by student needs, intensive special education services may be added at other locations and times.
8
B. English Language Learners

Most students who need ELL services are assigned to their attendance area school. Students who need
ELL services may also apply for other schools through School Choice. Bilingual Orientation Center services
are available for newcomers.

C. Advanced Learning8

There are several services and programs to meet the needs of advanced learners. Some students may be
served at their attendance area school; others will follow pathways with their peers.

Highly Capable Cohort (HCC)

HCC assignment pathways are based on where students live, not where they attend school. (See Appendix A
for attendance areas and feeder patterns.)
 HCC students entering grades 1-8, who apply during on-time Open Enrollmentperiod , will be
assigned consistent with the approved HCC pathways, based on where they live.
 Students entering grades 1-8 who become HC-eligible after Open Enrollment will be assigned
consistent with the HCC pathways, based on where they live.
 Students entering 6th grade will be assigned to a middle school consistent with the approved HCC
pathways, based on where they live.
 Assignment to the non-pathway school may be requested during Open Enrollment through May
31 and depends on space available.
 All 9th graders will be assigned to Garfield and may apply for the HC/IBX program at Ingraham.
If students enrolled in HCC apply for their attendance area school during the on-time Open Enrollment
through May 31, they will be assigned to their attendance area school.

HC/IBX Program at Ingraham High School
A second advanced learning option for high school students who are HC-eligible is offered at Ingraham.
Qualified HC students will generally take core classes together and then enroll in International
Baccalaureate classes beginning in 10th grade – a year earlier than usual. An accelerated curriculum leads
to an early IB diploma, allowing seniors to complete internships, college classes, and further electives.

Advanced Learning Opportunities (ALO)
Students in grades 1-8 who are AL or HC eligible and enroll at their attendance area school will receive
ALO services at their attendance area school. Eligibility for HC or AL services will be maintained as long as
the student is continuously enrolled in Seattle Public Schools.

Advanced Learners (AL)
Advanced Learning (Spectrum) is offered for elementary and middle school students identified through
district testing. For elementary and middle school students, AL is offered at each school site. Newly-
eligible elementary students must apply for AL during Open Enrollment through May 31.

AL eligible students in grades 6-8 are guaranteed services at their attendance area middle school.
Advanced Learners in 5th grade at elementary schools will be automatically assigned to their attendance
area middle school. Students newly eligible for advanced learning who are already assigned to their

8
See additional information in Sections II-C and II-D.
9
attendance area middle school will be automatically assigned to AL at that school.9 Students who are AL-
eligible may also apply for an AL program at any other school through School Choice, during Open
Enrollment through May 31; assignment depends on space available; tiebreakers apply during Open
Enrollment. After waitlists have been dissolved, program changes within the same school will be at
principal discretion.

D. Montessori
Montessori programs are offered at two attendance area elementary schools (Daniel Bagley and Graham
Hill). Students, including those who live in a school’s attendance area, must apply for Montessori.
Students who live in other attendance areas may also apply through the regular School Choice process.
Assignment depends on space available; tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment. After waitlists have
been dissolved, program changes within the same school will be at principal discretion. Leschi offers a
blended (contemporary and Montessori) program to all students.

E. International Schools with Dual Language Immersion
There are feeder pathways for dual language immersion students at international schools. Dual language
immersion pathways are implemented as each cohort of students is ready to move to the next level.
Assignment pathways are based on where students attend school (not where they live):
John Stanford & McDonald > Hamilton > Ingraham
Beacon Hill & Dearborn Park > Mercer > Chief Sealth
Concord > Denny > Chief Sealth

Assignment is guaranteed for non-attendance area dual language immersion students who apply for
their pathway school during Open Enrollment; after Open Enrollment, assignment is based on seat
availability.10

F. Programs and Services
Information about locations of programs and services that could impact family choices will be available
to families prior to the Open Enrollment period. Decisions will also be reflected in the designation of
linked attendance area schools and will specify the services or program(s) for which the schools are
linked.11 Information is also provided in quarterly reports to the Board, available online. (See School
Board Policy # 2200 for additional information.)

Service schools provide specific services or unique academic programs that are not offered at attendance
area or option schools (See Appendix C).

9
Unless the student is already assigned to a program other than General Education, such as HCC
10
One of the choices listed must be for the pathway school without designation of AL (or HCC, if applicable).
11
Changes not connected to the Open Enrollment process are adjusted as needed. If warranted by student needs,
intensive special education services may be added at other locations and times.
10
SECTION IV: SCHOOL CHOICE
A. Open Enrollment

School Choice allows students to apply for any school(s) beginning during the Open Enrollment period
through the end of May. A student may apply for any combination of attendance area schools and/or
option schools. Students who apply for and receive a choice assignment will receive a new assignment to
that choice school (or program). Students with a choice assignment will be continued at that school
through the highest grade served, as long as the school offers the services the student needs. Open
Enrollment applications will be processed as follows:

 All first choices will be processed first, then second choices next, etc.
 If more students apply than can be assigned, the approved tiebreakers are used.
 Waitlists established during Open Enrollment processing are based on the same processing
sequence and tiebreakers used when making assignments.
 Each student may have one assignment and, if desired, be on one waitlist. Waitlists stay active
through May 31 and will be dissolved on August 31, after which there are no further waitlist
moves for the school year. 12
 If a student submits an application and gets assigned to the first choice school, the previous
assignment is dropped and the student is not on any waitlist.
 If a student submits an application and gets assigned to one of the choices other than the first
choice, the previous assignment is dropped and the student is put on the waitlist for the first
choice.
 If a student submits an application and doesn’t get assigned to any of the choices, the previous
assignment is still in place, and the student is put on the waitlist for the first choice.

After Open Enrollment through May 31, students will be assigned to available choice seats on a first-
come, first-served basis. Space available is based on both the physical space within the school and within
the staffing allocation of a school. Waitlist moves will be made if they are budget neutral. After May 31,
assignments for new students are to their attendance area school, or to an option school with space
available and without a waitlist.

B. Tiebreakers

If more students apply for a school during Open Enrollment than can be assigned based on the staffing
capacity of a school, tiebreakers determine assignment and waitlist status.

STANDARD TIEBREAKERS
for available seats after assignment of attendance area students
Attendance Area Option Schools
Attendance Area Attendance Area
Elementary / K-8 (all grades)
Middle Schools High Schools
Schools
1. Attendance Area 1. Sibling 1. Sibling 1. Sibling
(Montessori Only) 2. Feeder School 2. Lottery 2. GeoZone
2. Sibling 3. Lottery 3. Lottery
3. Lottery

12
The District anticipates making all waitlist moves by May 31. No students will be added to the waitlist after May
31, but waitlists will be maintained until August 31.
11
C. Waitlists

Waitlists established during Open Enrollment processing are based on the same processing sequence and
tiebreakers used when making assignments.

After Open Enrollment assignments are made and waitlists are established:

 Students may be added to the end of any waitlist through May 31, but no student may be on
more than one waitlist at a time.

 Waitlists stay active through May 31.13

 If there are multiple students added to the same school/grade/program waitlist on the same day,
those students only will be sequenced by lottery. (They will not move ahead of students already
on the waitlist from Open Enrollment or from a previous day.)

 If a school does not have a waitlist, assignments for space available are first come, first served
through May 31.

D. Siblings and School Choice

SPS provides a variety of options for families who would like to have siblings assigned to the same school.
Some options are guaranteed and some are not. A student’s designated school is their attendance area
school, or a linked school to which the student is assigned because the attendance area school does not
have the required special education or ELL services the student needs.

1. New students who are siblings in the same grade span will start out assigned together at their
designated school:
 If siblings have different designated schools due to different service needs, the sibling
without required special education or ELL service needs can be assigned to the other
sibling’s school upon request until May 31 (or at the time of enrollment, if later).

2. Siblings in the same grade span who are assigned to different schools:
 All siblings receive a tiebreaker priority during Open Enrollment when applying for a school
which another sibling currently attends and will attend the following year.
 After Open Enrollment through May 31, any student will be assigned to their attendance
area school upon request. If siblings have different designated schools due to different
service needs, the sibling(s) without required special education or ELL service needs can be
assigned to the other sibling’s school upon request until May 31.

3. Siblings who are already assigned together, but who apply for reassignment together to one or
more schools for the following school year:
 If the siblings apply for the same schools in the same order during Open Enrollment, the
applications will be processed using the “keep siblings together” rule: If all siblings cannot
be assigned together to one of the schools listed, they will keep their original school
assignments and all will be waitlisted for the first choice school. (No siblings are reassigned
unless all siblings can be reassigned to the same school.)

13
The District anticipates making all waitlist moves by May 31. No students will be added to the waitlist after May
31, but waitlists will be maintained until August 31.
12
 Siblings may apply for different programs at the same school (e.g. one of the siblings
applies for AL at a school, while the other does not apply for any special program), as long
as they apply for the same schools in the same order.

4. Twins14 who apply for assignment together to one or more schools:
 If they apply for the same schools in the same order during Open Enrollment, the resulting
school and program assignment of the student with the highest SPS student ID number will
determine the assignment of the twin, as long as that school provides all required services
for both students.
 They may apply for different programs at the same school (e.g. one of the siblings applies
for the AL program at a school while the other does not apply for any special program) as
long as they apply for the same schools in the same order. A twin who is not eligible for the
assigned program of the sibling with the highest student ID number will be assigned to the
General Education program at the same school (or the appropriate Special Education
program, if applicable).
 If the siblings are waitlisted for the same school and program during Open Enrollment, the
twin with the lower student ID number will be placed on that waitlist immediately after the
twin with the highest ID number.

14
This includes triplets and other multiples, as well as siblings in the same grade.
13
APPENDIX A
Attendance Areas and Feeder Patterns
HIGH SCHOOLS
Attendance Area High Schools: Ballard, Franklin, Garfield, Nathan Hale, Ingraham, Rainier Beach, Roosevelt,
Chief Sealth, West Seattle
Option High Schools: The Center School, Cleveland STEM

ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOLS
Attendance Area Middle Schools: Aki Kurose, Denny, Eagle Staff, Eckstein, Hamilton, Jane Addams, Madison,
Meany, McClure, Mercer, Washington, Whitman
Each middle school attendance area has a group of elementary schools that feed into the middle school.

MIDDLE ELEMENTARY FEEDER SCHOOLS OPTION SCHOOLS15 HCC PATHWAYS16
SCHOOLS (Including K-8 Attendance Area Schools)

Aki Kurose Dunlap, Emerson, Graham Hill, Martin Luther King Jr., Rainier South Shore PK-8 Thurgood Marshall
View, Wing Luke Washington
Garfield
Denny Arbor Heights, Concord, Highland Park, Roxhill, Sanislo, West STEM K-8 Thurgood Marshall
Seattle ES Madison
Garfield
Eagle Staff Broadview-Thomson (K-8), Daniel Bagley, Greenwood, Licton Springs K-8 Cascadia
Northgate, Olympic View*, Viewlands* Eagle Staff
Garfield
Eckstein Bryant, Green Lake*, Laurelhurst, Sand Point, View Ridge, Thornton Creek Decatur17
Wedgwood Jane Addams
Garfield
Hamilton B. F. Day, Green Lake*, West Woodland John Stanford Cascadia
McDonald Hamilton
Garfield
Jane John Rogers, Olympic Hills, Olympic View*, Sacajawea, Cedar Park Cascadia
Addams Hazel Wolf K-8 Jane Addams
Garfield
Madison Alki, Fairmount Park, Gatewood, Genesee Hill, Lafayette Pathfinder K-8 Thurgood Marshall
Madison
Garfield
Meany Leschi, Lowell, Madrona, McGilvra, Montlake, Stevens TOPS K-8 Thurgood Marshall
Washington
Garfield
McClure Catharine Blaine (K-8), Coe, John Hay, Lawton Queen Anne Cascadia
Hamilton
Garfield
Mercer Beacon Hill, Dearborn Park, Hawthorne, Kimball, Maple, Van Orca K-8 Thurgood Marshall
Asselt Washington
Garfield
Washington Bailey Gatzert, John Muir, Thurgood Marshall Thurgood Marshall
Washington
Garfield
Whitman Adams, , Loyal Heights, North Beach, Viewlands*, Whittier Salmon Bay K-8 Cascadia
Eagle Staff
Garfield
*Elementary schools with an asterisk feed into multiple middle schools. Assignment to attendance area middle schools is based on student address.

15
Option schools are located in proximity to attendance area schools. Living within an option school’s GeoZone is
not a guarantee of assignment.
16
Ingraham also offers the advanced HC/IBX program, but is not an HC pathway high school.
17
HCC students living in the Green Lake attendance area will be assigned to Cascadia for HCC.
14
HIGH SCHOOL HC PATHWAYS

Beginning in the 2019-20 school year, there will be regional HC pathways for students entering 9th grade. Students
in a high school HC pathway in 2018-19 will be grandfathered in their current pathway school. The regional
pathways are based on your attendance area high school.

HC PATHWAY SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AREA HIGH SCHOOLS

Ballard Ballard and Ingraham

Franklin Franklin and Rainer Beach

Garfield Garfield and Lincoln18

Roosevelt Roosevelt and Nathan Hale

West Seattle West Seattle and Chief Sealth

18
Lincoln High School will begin serving students in the 2019-20 school year.
15
APPENDIX B
Geographic Zones for Option School Tiebreakers

The tiebreakers for option schools are:
1. Sibling
2. Geographic Zone (GeoZone)
3. Lottery

GeoZones give tiebreaker priority for students who live near the school and serve as a tool for capacity
management. In some cases, they can also be used to improve diversity. GeoZones are not a guarantee
of assignment to the requested option school, and are likely to change periodically.

Maps of GeoZones are available on the School Directory page of the www.seattleschools.org website.

High School Option Schools
 Center School
 Cleveland STEM

K-8 Option Schools
 Hazel Wolf
 Licton Springs
 Orca
 Pathfinder
 Salmon Bay
 South Shore PK-8
 STEM K-8
 TOPS

K-5 Option Schools
 Cedar Park
 John Stanford
 McDonald
 Queen Anne
 Thornton Creek

16
APPENDIX C
Service Schools
Students are usually placed in a service school based on individual assessment. Assignments to service
schools are choice assignments except for the Secondary Bilingual Orientation Center (SBOC), which is a
designated assignment. Additional information is available in the Superintendent’s Procedures for
Student Assignment19.

Service Schools:
 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute School
 Head Start
 South Lake
 Education Admission Centers
 Seattle World School (including SBOC)
 Skills Center
 Special Education Consortium (Children’s Home Society, McGraw Center, Ryther Center,
Experimental Education Unit, Birth to 3 Contracts, Private School Services, and other non-SPS
services)

19
Available online at www.seattleschools.org/admissions
17
APPENDIX D
Alternative Learning Experience Schools
Alternative Learning Experience (ALE) schools offer learning experiences for public school students
developed and supervised by a student learning plan and certified teachers. ALE schools generally follow
the same enrollment timelines and procedures as service schools.

ALE Schools:
 Cascade Parent Partnership Program
 Interagency Programs
 Middle College High School
 Nova

18
STUDENT ASSIGNMENT
TRANSITION PLAN FOR 20172018-
1819
Approved January 11, 2017Operations Committee: November 2, 2017
TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION I Overview and Highlights…………………………………………... Page 1

SECTION II Standard Assignments.……………………………………………… Page 3
A. Summary
B. Students Entering Kindergarten
C. Students Entering 6th Grade
D. Students Entering 9th Grade
E. Students Who Move

SECTION III Access to Programs and Services……………………………… Page 78
A. Special Education
B. English Language Learners
C. Advanced Learning
D. Montessori
E. International Schools with Dual Language Immersion
F. Programs and Services

SECTION IV School Choice............................................................ Page 1011
A. Open Enrollment
B. Tiebreakers
C. Waitlists
D. Siblings and School Choice

APPENDICES ………………………………………………………………………………... Page 1314

Appendix A Attendance Areas and Feeder Patterns
Appendix B Geographic Zones for Option School Tiebreakers
Appendix C Service Schools
Appendix D Alternative Learning Experience Schools

Note: For information about transportation eligibility, see the approved Transportation Service
Standards.

i
SECTION I: OVERVIEW AND HIGHLIGHTS
The Student Assignment Plan was approved in 2009 to provide greater predictability for families while
still offering opportunities for school choice. The 2009 document continues to serve as an important
reference tool, containing fundamental definitions and Plan development principles. Annual Transition
Plans have guided a phased approach to implementation.1

The provisions of this Plan will prevail in the case of any conflicts with previously-approved plans,
attendance area boundaries, and/or GeoZones. Unless otherwise specified, boundaries, feeder patterns,
option school GeoZones, and assignment rules will remain in effect until there are changes approved by
the School Board. It is anticipated that changes will be needed to address capacity management issues as
district enrollment continues to grow.

School assignments are based on School Board-approved attendance area boundaries. Every student has an
attendance area elementary, middle, and high school based on residence. Elementary attendance areas are
combined to create middle school attendance areas, resulting in feeder patterns from elementary to middle
school.

On November 16, 2016, the School Board approved several boundary changes for the 2017-18 school year.
Additional Boundary changes are anticipated to Adams, Whittier, and Loyal Heights in fall 2018 when Loyal
Heights Elementary School moves into its new larger building. The district also anticipates boundary changes
for a few additional elementary schools to address overcapacity issues at those schools and is working with
potentially impacted communities on those changes. and Additional boundary changes are anticipated in the
fall of 2019 when Magnolia Elementary school opens as a new elementary school and in fall 2019 when
Lincoln High School opens as an attendance area high school in Northwest Seattle. More information
regarding the planning, boundaries, services, and programs associated with these schools will be available
through the district website and other forms of communication.

In most instances, the middle school attendance area is also a service area for elementary and middle
school students. Various services are provided for students who live within a service area. Most
specialized services for middle and high school students are provided at their attendance area school. If
required special education services are not available at a student’s attendance area school, the school will
be linked with a nearby school with the required services.2

School Choice allows students to apply for other schools during an annual Open Enrollment period through
the end of May. A student may apply for any combination of attendance area and/or option schools. The
District anticipates making all waitlist moves by May 31,3 pending program placement and student
eligibility notification. Waitlists will be maintained until August 31 in the event that program notifications
have not been completed or if there are unanticipated adjustments that need to be made after May 31.
Waitlists for the 20172018-18 19 school year will be dissolved on August 31, 20172018.

This Transition Plan continues most of the assignment rules in effect during 20162017-187. Some highlights
and changes are:
 Opening Cedar Park Elementary, Meany Middle, and Robert Eagle Staff Middle schools;
 Truncating grades at Madrona - this school becomes a K-5, instead of a K-8;
 Establishing a GeoZone for Licton Springs K-8;

1
Assignment rules apply to resident students only. Different rules apply for non-resident students.
2
There will continue to be a limited number of programs or services that are unique enough, and that serve such a
limited population, that they cannot be offered in every attendance or service area area.
3
The end of the waitlist period is referenced as May 31 throughout this document. No students will be added to
the waitlist after May 31, but waitlists will be maintained until August 31.
1
 Modifying HCC pathways;
 Adding Chief Sealth as the southeast dual language immersion pathway high school;
 Removing conflicting assignment guarantees for new 6-8th grade students living within the
boundary of an attendance area K-8 schoolClarifying space available as it applies to choice seats
allocated in the School Choice Process;
 Moving the date when waitlists are dissolved, from August 15 to August 31;
 AddingUpdating language to clarifying current Special Education services and placement;
 Aligning the School Choice deadlines for students opting into the Highly Capable Cohort (HCC) or
continueing in the dual language immersion pathway with the general education timelines
 Updating high school HC pathways for students entering 9th grade in the 2019-20 school year
school; and
 Updating advanced learning assignment language to reflect the fact that all schools offer
Advanced Learning (AL) programming and students can be assigned to AL at their attendance
area school.
 Transitioning Nova High School from option school to service school enrollment timelines;
 Adding appendices for service schools and alternative learning experience (ALE) schools; and
 Updating school and program names and locations.

2
SECTION II: STANDARD ASSIGNMENTS

A. Summary

Assignments to attendance area schools are based on residence. Students new to the district start with
an assignment to their attendance area school.

After May 31, assignments for new students are to their attendance area school or to an option school
with space available and without a waitlist. New students in grades 6-8 may also choose a K-8
attendance area school if they live within that school’s attendance area, pending space availability.

Space availability depends on the seats available given the staffing capacity at the school. To determine
the total number of seats available at a grade level in a school, the district will multiply the target class
sizes across each classroom given the number of teachers at each grade based on the staffing allocated
by the Budget Office.

K-12 students with a choice assignment may transfer to their attendance area school for the next school
year after during Open Enrollment through May 31, as long as the services thethe student’s services
needs can be met are available at that school.

K-8 students with a choice assignment who live outside of their assigned school’s walk zone and are not
eligible for transportation may transfer to their attendance area school at any time, as long as the
services the students’ service needs can be met.are available at that school.

Continuing Assignments

The following students will automatically receive a continuing assignment to the same school, as long as
the school offers the grade and services the student needs:
 Students who have not moved and whose current school includes their next year grade and
current program
 Students at option schools will be continued at that school through the highest grade served by
the school, as long as the school offers the services the student needs
 Students with a choice assignment to an attendance area school that is not the student’s
attendance area school
 Students at a K-8 school rising to 6th grade

New Assignments

The following students will receive a new assignment:
 A “new student” is a student who has not attended a SPS attendance area or option school at
any time during the current or previous school year. New students will be assigned to their
attendance area school. Students may also apply to any school with space available during Open
Enrollment through May 31. After May 31, assignments for new students are to their attendance
area school or to an option school with space available and without a waitlist.

3
 Students who apply for and receive a choice assignment will receive a new assignment to that
choice school (or program). Students with a choice assignment will be continued at that school
through the highest grade served, as long as the school offers the services the student needs.
 Students whose current school does not include their next year grade or required special
education services. Students will be automatically assigned to their attendance area school for
the upcoming school year, except as noted for certain pathway assignments and to meet
required special education services; no application is required.
 Students who have moved out of their school’s attendance area (except students grandfathered
at the school); no application is required.

Grandfathered Assignments

All students enrolled with a grandfathered assignment who stay at the school are continued
(grandfathered) at that school through the highest grade served by the school, as long as the school
offers the services the student needs; no application is required.

B. Students Entering Kindergarten

Students entering kindergarten will have an initial assignment to their attendance area school, as long as
the school offers the services the student needs.
 This includes students currently receiving special education developmental preschool services
who will be five years old by August 31, unless their individualized education program (IEP) calls
for services not available at their attendance area school.
 Students attending PreK at South Shore will be assigned to continue at South Shore for
kindergarten.
 Students who meet eligibility requirements for early entrance to kindergarten are assigned to
their attendance area school upon request, and may apply for other schools on a space available
basis through May 31.

For information on assignment of siblings to the same school, see Section IV-D (Siblings and School
Choice).

C. Students Entering 6th Grade

New Students

New students to the district will be assigned to their attendance area middle school. Upon request,
middle school students who live in the attendance area of a K-8 attendance area school may be assigned
to that K-8 school, subject to space availability. Students may also apply to any school with space
available during Open Enrollment through May 31. After May 31, assignments for new students are to
their attendance area middle school, to a K-8 attendance area school if they live within that school’s
attendance area and there is space available, or to an option school with space available and without a
waitlist.

If a student becomes HC-eligible after Open Enrollment and applies for HC, they will be assigned to their
HC pathway school. This occurs when a student is newly eligible after ontime Open Enrollment, new to
the district after the testing deadline has passed, or enrolls from another public school district, and can
document comparable eligibility and participation in that district’s similar program for gifted students.
Eligibility is determined by the Advanced Learning department.
4
Students Currently Attending an Elementary School

Students entering 6th grade from a K-5 school will generally receive an initial assignment to their
attendance area middle school, except:

 Highly Capable Cohort (HCC): Students enrolled as HCC receive an initial assignment to their HCC
pathway middle school based on where they live. If they apply for their attendance area middle
school during Open Enrollment through May 31, they will be assigned to that school (unless they
apply for and are assigned to a higher ranked choice).

Students eligible, but not enrolled as HCC, are not automatically assigned to their HCC pathway
school; they must apply during the on-time Open Enrollment period through May 31. If they
apply for HCC during the on-time Open Enrollment period through May 31, they will be assigned
to their HCC pathway school. HCC applications received after the on-time Open Enrollment
period are subject to seat availability. Assignment to the non-pathway school depends on
seatsspace available; tiebreakers apply during on-time Open Enrollment. Assignment to the non-
pathway school may be requested through May 31 and depends on seats available.

If a student becomes HC-eligible after May 31 and applies for HCC, they will be assigned to their
HCC pathway school.4 Assignment to the non-pathway school may be requested through May 31
and depends on space available.

 Advanced Learners: 5th grade students enrolled as Advanced Learners (Spectrum) will receive an
initial assignment to AL at their attendance area middle school for 6th grade; no application is
required.

Any student qualified as Advanced Learner student may apply for another attendance area
school or K-8 school during Open Enrollment through May 31; assignment is based on seats
available within the staffing capacity space available; and tiebreakers apply during on-time open
enrollment.

 International Schools: Non-attendance area students who are eligible for continuation in a dual
language immersion pathway, and who apply during the on-time Open Enrollment period
through May 31, will be assigned to the relevant pathway school (unless they apply for and are
assigned to a higher ranked choice).5 For students who apply after Open Enrollment but by May
31, assignment is based on seats available within the staffing capacity.

 Special Education: When a student with an IEP is assigned an elementary school that is not the
attendance area school, the student may chose to attend the attendance area middle school or the
middle school in that elementary school’s feeder pattern.

4
This occurs when a student is new to the district after the testing deadline has passed, enrolls from another public
school district, and can document comparable eligibility and participation in that district’s similar program for
gifted students. Eligibility is determined by the Advanced Learning department.
5
One of the choices listed must be for the pathway school without designation of Advanced Learner (or HCC if
applicable).
5
Students may also apply for any school during Open Enrollment through May 31, including K-8,
attendance area, and option schools. Assignment depends on seats available within the staffing
capacityspace available; tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment.

Students Currently Attending a K-8 School

Students entering 6th grade and attending K-8 schools will be assigned to continue at their current K-8
school for 6th grade, as long as the school offers the services the student needs.6

 If they apply for their attendance area middle school during Open Enrollment through May 31,
they will be assigned to their attendance area school, as long as the school offers the services the
student needs. This is subject to seat availability (unless they apply for and are assigned to a
higher ranked choice).

Students may apply for any school with space available during or after Open Enrollment through
May 31.

 HC: Students eligible, but not enrolled as HCC, are not automatically assigned to their HCC
pathway school. If they apply for HCC during the on-time Open Enrollment period through May
31, they will be assigned to their HCC pathway school. Assignment to the non-pathway school
depends on space availableis subject to seat availability; tiebreakers apply during Open
Enrollment.

If a student becomes HC-eligible after the on-timeMay 31Open Enrollment period and applies for
HCC, they will be assigned to their HCC pathway school.7 This occurs when a student is newly
eligible after on-time Open Enrollment, new to the district after the testing deadline has passed,
or enrolls from another public school district, and can document comparable eligibility and
participation in that district’s similar program for gifted students. Assignment to the non-
pathway school may be requested through May 31 and depends on seats available within the
staffing capacityspace available.

 Advanced Learners: Advanced Learners (Spectrum) who apply for their attendance area school
by May 31 will be assigned to AL at that school, as long as the school offers the services the
student needs (unless they apply for and are assigned to a higher ranked choice).
Students may also apply for any school during Open Enrollment through May 31, including K-8,
attendance area, and option schools. Assignment depends on seats available within the staffing
capacityspace available; tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment.

D. Students Entering 9th Grade
Current and new students will generally be assigned to their attendance area high school, as long as the
school offers the services the student needs. Students may also apply to any school during Open
Enrollment through May 31. After May 31, assignments for new students are to their attendance area
school or to an option school with space available and without a waitlist.
 HC: Students enrolled in HCC in 8th grade will receive an initial assignment to Garfield. They may
also apply for the HCC/IBX program at Ingraham; assignment to Ingraham depends on space

6
Students enrolled as an Advanced Learner at their K-8 school will be continued without having to reapply.
7
This occurs when a student is new to the district after the testing deadline has passed, enrolls from another public
school district, and can document comparable eligibility and participation in that district’s similar program for
gifted students.
6
available and tiebreakers. If not assigned to HCC/IBX at Ingraham they retain their seat at
Garfield (unless they apply for and are assigned to a higher ranked choice). Students eligible, but
not enrolled as HCC, may also apply for the HCC/IBX program at Ingraham. Assignment depends
on space available; tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment.
If they apply for their attendance area high school during Open Enrollment through May 31, they
will be assigned to their attendance area school (unless they apply for and are assigned to a
higher ranked choice).

In 2019-2020 students enrolled in HCC in 8th grade will receive an initial assignment to the
regional pathway school for HC services. They may also apply for the IBX program at Ingraham;
assignment to Ingraham depends on space available and tiebreakers. If not assigned to IBX at
Ingraham, they retain their seat at the regional pathway school.

Students eligible, but not enrolled as HC, will receive an initial assignment to their attendance
area high school. These students may also apply during Open Enrollment to attend their
regional pathway high school and will receive placement at this site. These students may also
apply during the Open Enrollment process for the IBX program at Ingraham. Assignment
depends on space available; tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment.

 International Schools: Non-attendance area students who are eligible for continuation in a dual
language immersion pathway and who apply during Open Enrollment through May 31 will be
assigned to the relevant pathway school (unless they apply for and are assigned to a higher
ranked choice).
Students may also apply to any school with space seats available during or after Open Enrollment
through May 31. After May 31, assignments for new students are to their attendance area school or to
an option school with seats available within the staffing capacityspace available and without a waitlist.

E. Students Who Move
When students move, they may have the option of or be required to get a new school assignment,
depending on when and where they move.
In general, students must change to their new attendance area schools if they are assigned to their
attendance area school, are not grandfathered, and they move to a new attendance area. If they move
before the school year starts, they must change schools for the new school year. If they move during the
school year, they may finish the year at their current school, but they must change schools the next year.
In all cases, reassignments are subject to any special education services a student may require.
Detailed move rules are available in the Superintendent’s Procedures for Student Assignment.8

8
Available on the district website: http://www.seattleschools.org/admissions
7
SECTION III: ACCESS TO PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Seattle Public Schools offers a variety of programs and services to meet a range of student needs,
including English Language Learners (ELL), students eligible for special education services, students who
are homeless, and students eligible for advanced learning. Many students are assigned to their
attendance area school regardless of most service needs. For required special education services not
available at every attendance area school, a linked school is designated. This provides predictable
assignments for students who need these services.

Schools and services are also available for students who have various behavioral, attendance, or
academic challenges as well as for students who self-select into certain unique programs. Students are
assigned to these schools or programs individually based on specific needs and circumstances, not
through the standard assignment process.

A. Special Education

The Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) requires the district to ensure that “a continuum
of alternative placements is available to meet the needs of children with disabilities for special education
and related services.” IDEA does not require the full continuum of placement be available at each school
in the district. If a student’s IEP requires services that are not available at the student’s attendance area
school, the student may be assigned to another school that can offer the services that are included in the
IEP and necessary for the student to receive a free, appropriate public education. Per the Washington
Administrative Code (WAC), “Unless the IEP of a student with a disability requires some other
arrangement, the student shall be educated in the school that he or she would attend if nondisabled. In
the event the student needs other arrangements, placement shall be as close as possible to the student’s
home.” Special Education Services are provided in a continuum throughout the district.

Resource level special education services are available at every school and follow the general education
student assignment process. Students who receive Special Education Resource services are assigned to
their attendance area school, and may also apply for assignment to another school through School
Choice. Most students with IEPs will retain their initial attendance area school assignment based on their
IEP service needs.

Students who are eligible for other special education continuum services (Access, Focus,
Social/Emotional, SM2, Distinct) are assigned to their attendance area or linked school, and may also
apply for assignment to another school that offers those services through School Choice. Linked schools,
which include Option Schools, for Special Education services are posted online prior to Open Enrollment,
along with linked schools for other programs and services, and provide assignment predictability.9 A very
small number of students with exceptional circumstances may require individual assignments based on
their IEP. Please refer to the Special Education Change of School Procedure Guide for further
information.

Standard assignment rules and tiebreakers apply.

Students who receive centralized special education service assignments to meet their specific IEP driven
needs (DHH, Vision, Medically Fragile) are assigned individually based on student needs, and may also
apply for assignment to another school offering the same services through School Choice.

9
If warranted by student needs, intensive special education services may be added at other locations and times.
8
These assignments are in alignment with approved boundaries and feeder patterns, to the extent
possible, depending on capacity, proximity, and individual service needs. Assignments are made
individually to ensure that each student’s IEP requirements can be met and that the appropriate services
are available at the assigned school. Transportation for students with disabilities is based on individual
IEP service needs.

B. English Language Learners

Most students who need ELL services are assigned to their attendance area school. Students who need
ELL services may also apply for other schools through School Choice. Bilingual Orientation Center services
are available for newcomers.

C. Advanced Learning10

There are several services and programs to meet the needs of advanced learners. Some students may be
served at their attendance area school; others will follow pathways with their peers.

Highly Capable Cohort (HCC)

HCC assignment pathways are based on where students live, not where they attend school. (See Appendix A
for attendance areas and feeder patterns.)
 HCC students entering grades 1-8, who apply during on-time Open Enrollment period through
May 31, will be assigned consistent with the approved HCC pathways, based on where they live.
 Students entering grades 1-8 who become HC-eligible after Open Enrollment will be assigned
consistent with the HCC pathways, based on where they live.
 Students entering 6th grade will be assigned to a middle school consistent with the approved HCC
pathways, based on where they live.
 Assignment to the non-pathway school may be requested during Open Enrollment through May
31 and depends on space available.
 All 9th graders will be assigned to Garfield and may apply for the HCC/IBX program at Ingraham.
If students enrolled in HCC apply for their attendance area school during the on-time Open Enrollment
through May 31, they will be assigned to their attendance area school.

HCC/IBX Program at Ingraham High School
A second advanced learning option for high school students who are HC-eligible high school students is
offered at Ingraham. Qualified Highly Capable/IBX HC students will generally take core classes together
and then enroll in International Baccalaureate classes beginning in 10th grade – a year earlier than usual.
An accelerated curriculum leads to an early IB diploma, allowing seniors to complete internships, college
classes, and further electives.

Advanced Learning Opportunities (ALO)
HC or AL sStudents in (grades 1-8 who are AL or HC eligible and ) who enroll at their attendance area
school will be assigned as general education students, but they will receive ALO services at their
attendance area school. Eligibility for HC or AL services will be maintained as long as the student is
continuously enrolled in Seattle Public Schools.

10
See additional information in Sections II-C and II-D.
9
Advanced Learners (AL)
Advanced Learners Learning (Spectrum) is offered for elementary and middle school students identified
through district testing. For elementary grade and middle school students, AL is offered at one or more
schools in each service areaschool site. Every attendance area middle school also offers AL. Newly-
eligible elementary students must apply for AL during Open Enrollment through May 31. Assignment to
AL in grades 1-5 depends on space available; tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment.

Advanced LearnerAL eligible students in grades 6-8 are guaranteed assignment services at their to the AL
program at their attendance area middle school. Advanced Learners in 5th grade at elementary schools
will be automatically assigned to 6th grade AL at their attendance area middle school. Students newly
eligible for advanced learning who are already assigned to their attendance area middle school will be
automatically assigned to AL at that schoolAdvanced Learning students who are already assigned to their
attendance area middle school (but are not assigned to AL) who are entering 7th or 8th grade will also be
automatically assigned to AL at that school.11 Advanced Learning students who are not already assigned
to their attendance area middle school will be assigned to AL at their attendance area middle school
upon request, if they apply during Open Enrollment through May 31. Students who are AL-eligible
students may also apply for an AL program at any other school through School Choice, during Open
Enrollment through May 31; assignment depends on space available; tiebreakers apply during Open
Enrollment. After waitlists have been dissolved, program changes within the same school will be at
principal discretion.

D. Montessori
Montessori programs are offered at two attendance area elementary schools (Daniel Bagley and Graham
Hill). Students, including those who live in a school’s attendance area, must apply for Montessori.
Students who live in other attendance areas may also apply through the regular School Choice process.
Assignment depends on space available; tiebreakers apply during Open Enrollment. After waitlists have
been dissolved, program changes within the same school will be at principal discretion. Leschi offers a
blended (contemporary and Montessori) program to all students.

E. International Schools with Dual Language Immersion
There are feeder pathways for dual language immersion students at international schools. Dual language
immersion pathways are implemented as each cohort of students is ready to move to the next level.
Assignment pathways are based on where students attend school (not where they live):
John Stanford & McDonald > Hamilton > Ingraham
Beacon Hill & Dearborn Park > Mercer > Chief Sealth
Concord > Denny > Chief Sealth

Assignment is guaranteed for non-attendance area dual language immersion students who apply for
their pathway school during Open Enrollment; after through MayOpen Enrollment, 31assignment is
based on seat availability.12

F. Programs and Services
Information about locations of programs and services that could impact family choices will be available
to families prior to the Open Enrollment period. Decisions will also be reflected in the designation of
linked attendance area schools and will specify the services or program(s) for which the schools are

11
Unless the student is already assigned to a program other than General Education, such as HCC
12
One of the choices listed must be for the pathway school without designation of AL (or HCC, if applicable).
10
linked.13 Information is also provided in quarterly reports to the Board, available online. (See School
Board Policy # 2200 for additional information.)

Service schools provide specific services or unique academic programs that are not offered at attendance
area or option schools (See Appendix C).

13
Changes not connected to the Open Enrollment process are adjusted as needed. If warranted by student needs,
intensive special education services may be added at other locations and times.
11
SECTION IV: SCHOOL CHOICE
A. Open Enrollment

School Choice allows students to apply for any school(s) beginning during the Open Enrollment period
through the end of May. A student may apply for any combination of attendance area schools and/or
option schools. Students who apply for and receive a choice assignment will receive a new assignment to
that choice school (or program). Students with a choice assignment will be continued at that school
through the highest grade served, as long as the school offers the services the student needs. Open
Enrollment applications will be processed as follows:

 All first choices will be processed first, then second choices next, etc.
 If more students apply than can be assigned, the approved tiebreakers are used.
 Waitlists established during Open Enrollment processing are based on the same processing
sequence and tiebreakers used when making assignments.
 Each student may have one assignment and, if desired, be on one waitlist. Waitlists stay active
through May 31 and will be dissolved on August 31, after which there are no further waitlist
moves for the school year. 14
 If a student submits an application and gets assigned to the first choice school, the previous
assignment is dropped and the student is not on any waitlist.
 If a student submits an application and gets assigned to one of the choices other than the first
choice, the previous assignment is dropped and the student is put on the waitlist for the first
choice.
 If a student submits an application and doesn’t get assigned to any of the choices, the previous
assignment is still in place, and the student is put on the waitlist for the first choice.

After Open Enrollment through May 31, students will be assigned to available choice seats on a first-
come, first-served basis. Space available is based on both the physical space within the school and within
the staffing allocation of a school. Waitlist moves will be made if they are budget neutral. After May 31,
assignments for new students are to their attendance area school, or to an option school with space
available and without a waitlist.

B. Tiebreakers

If more students apply for a school during Open Enrollment than can be assigned based on the staffing
capacity of a school, tiebreakers determine assignment and waitlist status.

STANDARD TIEBREAKERS
for available seats after assignment of attendance area students
Attendance Area Option Schools
Attendance Area Attendance Area
Elementary / K-8 (all grades)
Middle Schools High Schools
Schools
1. Attendance Area 1. Sibling 1. Sibling 1. Sibling
(Montessori Only) 2. Feeder School 2. Lottery 2. GeoZone
12. Sibling 3. Lottery 3. Lottery
23. Lottery

14
The District anticipates making all waitlist moves by May 31. No students will be added to the waitlist after May
31, but waitlists will be maintained until August 31.
12
13
Montessori Tiebreakers
Elementary Schools
1. Attendance Area
2. Sibling
3. Lottery

AL Tiebreakers (Spectrum)
Elementary / K-8 Schools Middle Schools
1. Service Area 1. Sibling
2. Sibling 2. Feeder School
3. Lottery 3. Lottery

HCC Tiebreakers (formerly APP)
Elementary Schools Middle Schools High Schools
1. Sibling 1. Sibling 1. Sibling
2. Lottery 2. Feeder School 2. Lottery
3. Lottery

C. Waitlists

Waitlists established during Open Enrollment processing are based on the same processing sequence and
tiebreakers used when making assignments.

After Open Enrollment assignments are made and waitlists are established:

 Students may be added to the end of any waitlist through May 31, but no student may be on
more than one waitlist at a time.

 Waitlists stay active through May 31.15

 If there are multiple students added to the same school/grade/program waitlist on the same day,
those students only will be sequenced by lottery. (They will not move ahead of students already
on the waitlist from Open Enrollment or from a previous day.)

 If a school does not have a waitlist, assignments for space available are first come, first served
through May 31.

D. Siblings and School Choice

SPS provides a variety of options for families who would like to have siblings assigned to the same school.
Some options are guaranteed and some are not. A student’s designated school is their attendance area
school, or a linked school to which the student is assigned because the attendance area school does not
have the required special education or ELL services the student needs.

1. New students who are siblings in the same grade span will start out assigned together at their
designated school:

15
The District anticipates making all waitlist moves by May 31. No students will be added to the waitlist after May
31, but waitlists will be maintained until August 31.
14
 If siblings have different designated schools due to different service needs, the sibling
without required special education or ELL service needs can be assigned to the other
sibling’s school upon request until May 31 (or at the time of enrollment, if later).

2. Siblings in the same grade span who are assigned to different schools:
 All siblings receive a tiebreaker priority during Open Enrollment when applying for a school
which another sibling currently attends and will attend the following year.
 After Open Enrollment through May 31, any student will be assigned to their attendance
area school upon request. If siblings have different designated schools due to different
service needs, the sibling(s) without required special education or ELL service needs can be
assigned to the other sibling’s school upon request until May 31.

3. Siblings who are already assigned together, but who apply for reassignment together to one or
more schools for the following school year:
 If the siblings apply for the same schools in the same order during Open Enrollment, the
applications will be processed using the “keep siblings together” rule: If all siblings cannot
be assigned together to one of the schools listed, they will keep their original school
assignments and all will be waitlisted for the first choice school. (No siblings are reassigned
unless all siblings can be reassigned to the same school.)
 Siblings may apply for different programs at the same school (e.g. one of the siblings
applies for AL at a school, while the other does not apply for any special program), as long
as they apply for the same schools in the same order.

4. Twins16 who apply for assignment together to one or more schools:
 If they apply for the same schools in the same order during Open Enrollment, the resulting
school and program assignment of the student with the highest SPS student ID number will
determine the assignment of the twin, as long as that school provides all required services
for both students.
 They may apply for different programs at the same school (e.g. one of the siblings applies
for the AL program at a school while the other does not apply for any special program) as
long as they apply for the same schools in the same order. A twin who is not eligible for the
assigned program of the sibling with the highest student ID number will be assigned to the
General Education program at the same school (or the appropriate Special Education
program, if applicable).
 If the siblings are waitlisted for the same school and program during Open Enrollment, the
twin with the lower student ID number will be placed on that waitlist immediately after the
twin with the highest ID number.

16
This includes triplets and other multiples, as well as siblings in the same grade.
15
APPENDIX A
Attendance Areas and Feeder Patterns
HIGH SCHOOLS
Attendance Area High Schools: Ballard, Franklin, Garfield, Nathan Hale, Ingraham, Rainier Beach, Roosevelt,
Chief Sealth, West Seattle
Option High Schools: The Center School, Cleveland STEM

ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOLS
Attendance Area Middle Schools: Aki Kurose, Denny, Eagle Staff, Eckstein, Hamilton, Jane Addams, Madison,
Meany, McClure, Mercer, Washington, Whitman
Each middle school attendance area has a group of elementary schools that feed into the middle school.

MIDDLE ELEMENTARY FEEDER SCHOOLS OPTION SCHOOLS17 HCC PATHWAYS18
SCHOOLS (Including K-8 Attendance Area Schools)

Aki Kurose Dunlap, Emerson, Graham Hill, Martin Luther King Jr., Rainier South Shore PK-8 Thurgood Marshall
View, Wing Luke Washington
Garfield
Denny Arbor Heights, Concord, Highland Park, Roxhill, Sanislo, West STEM K-8 Thurgood Marshall
Seattle ES Madison
Garfield
Eagle Staff Broadview-Thomson (K-8), Daniel Bagley, Greenwood, Licton Springs K-8 Cascadia
Northgate, Olympic View*, Viewlands* Eagle Staff
Garfield
Eckstein Bryant, Green Lake*, Laurelhurst, Sand Point, View Ridge, Thornton Creek Decatur19
Wedgwood Jane Addams
Garfield
Hamilton B. F. Day, Green Lake*, West Woodland John Stanford Cascadia
McDonald Hamilton
Garfield
Jane John Rogers, Olympic Hills, Olympic View*, Sacajawea, Cedar Park Cascadia
Addams Hazel Wolf K-8 Jane Addams
Garfield
Madison Alki, Fairmount Park, Gatewood, Genesee Hill, Lafayette Pathfinder K-8 Thurgood Marshall
Madison
Garfield
Meany Leschi, Lowell, Madrona, McGilvra, Montlake, Stevens TOPS K-8 Thurgood Marshall
Washington
Garfield
McClure Catharine Blaine (K-8), Coe, John Hay, Lawton Queen Anne Cascadia
Hamilton
Garfield
Mercer Beacon Hill, Dearborn Park, Hawthorne, Kimball, Maple, Van Orca K-8 Thurgood Marshall
Asselt Washington
Garfield
Washington Bailey Gatzert, John Muir, Thurgood Marshall Thurgood Marshall
Washington
Garfield
Whitman Adams, , Loyal Heights, North Beach, Viewlands*, Whittier Salmon Bay K-8 Cascadia
Eagle Staff
Garfield
*Elementary schools with an asterisk feed into multiple middle schools. Assignment to attendance area middle schools is based on student address.

17
Option schools are located in proximity to attendance area schools. Living within an option school’s GeoZone is
not a guarantee of assignment.
18
Ingraham also offers the advanced HCC/IBX program, but is not an HCC pathway high school.
19
HCC students living in the Green Lake attendance area will be assigned to Cascadia for HCC.
16
HIGH SCHOOL HC PATHWAYS

Beginning in the 2019-20 school year, there will be regional HC pathways for students entering 9th grade. Students
in a high school HC pathway in 2018-19 will be grandfathered in their current pathway school. The regional
pathways are based on your attendance area high school.

HC PATHWAY SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AREA HIGH SCHOOLS

Ballard Ballard and Ingraham

Franklin Franklin and Rainer Beach

Garfield Garfield and Lincoln20

Roosevelt Roosevelt and Nathan Hale

West Seattle West Seattle and Chief Sealth

20
Lincoln High School will begin serving students in the 2019-20 school year.
17
APPENDIX B
Geographic Zones for Option School Tiebreakers

The tiebreakers for option schools are:
1. Sibling
2. Geographic Zone (GeoZone)
3. Lottery

GeoZones give tiebreaker priority for students who live near the school and serve as a tool for capacity
management. In some cases, they can also be used to improve diversity. GeoZones are not a guarantee
of assignment to the requested option school, and are likely to change periodically.

Maps of GeoZones are available on the School Directory page of the www.seattleschools.org website.

High School Option Schools
 Center School
 Cleveland STEM

K-8 Option Schools
 Hazel Wolf
 Licton Springs
 Orca
 Pathfinder
 Salmon Bay
 South Shore PK-8
 STEM K-8
 TOPS

K-5 Option Schools
 Cedar Park
 John Stanford
 McDonald
 Queen Anne
 Thornton Creek

18
APPENDIX C
Service Schools
Students are usually placed in a service school based on individual assessment. Assignments to service
schools are choice assignments except for the Secondary Bilingual Orientation Center (SBOC), which is a
designated assignment. Additional information is available in the Superintendent’s Procedures for
Student Assignment21.

Service Schools:
 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Institute School
 Head Start
 South Lake
 Education Admission Centers
 Seattle World School (including SBOC)
 Skills Center
 Special Education Consortium (Children’s Home Society, McGraw Center, Ryther Center,
Experimental Education Unit, Birth to 3 Contracts, Private School Services, and other non-SPS
services)

21
Available online at www.seattleschools.org/admissions
19
APPENDIX D
Alternative Learning Experience Schools
Alternative Learning Experience (ALE) schools offer learning experiences for public school students
developed and supervised by a student learning plan and certified teachers. ALE schools generally follow
the same enrollment timelines and procedures as service schools.

ALE Schools:
 Cascade Parent Partnership Program
 Interagency Programs
 Middle College High School
 Nova

20
Attachment A: Advanced Learning Community Engagement Summary October 2017

Community Engagement on High School Advanced Learning: There are three challenges the
district is working to resolve related to high school advanced learning: HC projected capacity at
Garfield high school, increasing advanced learning for all students, and integrating any possible
changes to HC pathways with the new high school boundaries. New high school boundaries will
be implemented in 2019-20 with the opening of Lincoln High School in Northwest Seattle. Prior
to developing possible high school advanced learning solutions it was important to ask families
about their ideas and values.

If the School Board approves any changes to high school HC pathways, those changes won’t be
implemented until 2019-20 but will be reflected in the 2018-19 SAP to ensure transparency for
families. A decision about HC pathways needs to be made prior to finalizing high school
boundaries. Anticipated board action on high school boundaries is planned for January 2018.

The Student Supports Division supported by the Communications/Engagement Dept., launched a
two-way community engagement project using the newly adopted tool, ThoughtExchange. This
is a new tool for the district, and it is different from a traditional survey. Staff used open-ended
questions (What are the most important things for us to understand as we consider changes to our
high school advanced learning services? What are some things we could put in place to increase
high school advanced learning opportunities for more students? What questions do you have
about these possible changes?) to surface ideas and then families engaged with other people’s
thoughts – scoring them on a scale of 1-5. Top thoughts were themed and are described below.
The exchange was provided in English and Spanish to K-12 families and promoted through a
new Community Engagement webpage and social media. Numerous reminders were provided
directly to families throughout the exchange period as well as direct technical assistance
provided by communications staff. The exchange lasted one week, closing on October 4.

In addition, Advanced Learning, ELL and the Engagement Department hosted four home
language meetings focused on advanced learning. Invitations were provided through email, home
language phone calls, community partners (e.g. Chinese Information Service Center), and
principal invitations. Over 100 family members participated in the focus group meetings run in
Chinese, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Somali. Families were asked the same open ended questions
used during the online ThoughtExchange. Groups of families identified priorities and the top
ideas were shared with the larger group. Staff shared back what they heard and confirmed their
understanding. 85-90% of the meetings were conducted in native language. While some results
were similar to the online engagement, there were also unique requests and they are described
below in the outcome section.

Participation Results and Demographics
ThoughtExchange Online Participation: 1,819 family members, students and staff provided
4,903 unique comments and scored others’ thoughts 169,270 times.

In addition, 100 families and students participated in home language ThoughtExchange focus
groups.

School Level/Type: Elementary (16.2%, 294), K-8 (4.1%, 75), Middle School (38.9%, 707),
High School (40.5%, 737), and Service or ALEs (.3%, 6).
Attachment A: Advanced Learning Community Engagement Summary October 2017

Race/Ethnicity (including home language focus groups): 1218 (white/Caucasian) and 530
(families of color, multi-racial) and 171 (preferred not to declare race/ethnicity). After removing
participants who chose not to share their race/ethnicity, the district continues to see over-
representation of white families (69% for ThoughtExchange participation versus 46% district-
wide) in survey/engagement activities. Working with and through community partners is one
way to engage our diverse community. While invitations for participation were sent out through
community partners in home language, we found the most successful approach was to work
directly with a community partner. During this engagement we worked with the Chinese
Information Service Center (CISC). Not only did they help us plan a meeting structure that
would work well for our shared families but graciously hosted a meeting. Their trusted
relationship with families helped us bring forward authentic perspectives and engaged in a
deeper, more meaningful conversation. With more time, we would have employed this strategy
with all of our home language focus groups and plan to do so in the future.

The advanced learning department also met with the Garfield PTSA to share the HC pathway
challenges and gather feedback.

Online ThoughtExchange Analysis methodology: The top 20 thoughts from each school were
examined and thoughts with an average of 4.0 and above were themed. The identification of
themes and analysis of priorities was completed by the ThoughtExchange research and
evaluation team.

Home Language Analysis methodology: Each home language focus group shared top priorities
verbally and in writing. These priorities and other thoughts were reviewed and themed by SPS
staff.

Engagement Limitations:
o Time – The School Board in response to staff recommendations approved engaging
families around the topic of advanced learning on Sept 9. Within three weeks, we
designed and implemented a community engagement plan. Analysis needed to be
completed by October 18 in order to provide the Advanced Learning department time to
consider the findings and begin developing possible options. While the engagement
timeline was challenging, clear themes were surfaced from stakeholders.
o Technical Challenges – The moderation component of the exchange wasn’t working
correctly when the ThoughtExchange tool launched. It was a technical issue on the side
of the vendor. The issue was resolved and a note sent directly from the CEO to our
families. In addition, the communications team followed up with direct communication.
The district extended the exchange period to accommodate for the technology challenge.
o Elementary Participation - Another limitation was the elementary cohort size. Participant
participation for middle and high school was much higher than elementary. Despite lower
5 grade family participants (294) there were clear priorities provided.
o Spanish Participation - Finally, one reason we selected ThoughtExchange was because it
can be provided in multiple languages. We had very limited Spanish speaking family
participation. We think this is due to the request for an email and the current national
context. The email was required to ensure the exchange was limited to SPS families and
in order to target reminders. Email reminders were sent to participants who didn’t
Attachment A: Advanced Learning Community Engagement Summary October 2017

respond or to encourage families to engage with others’ thoughts. In response to limited
participation, staff held a Spanish focus group at Chief Sealth International High School.
Thanks to our principals and staff, we had families and students attended on short notice
and provide rich feedback. Priority themes from home language meetings are described
below.

Online ThoughtExchange Outcomes
The ThoughtExchange evaluator analyzed thoughts/themes across all secondary schools. Below
are the three top themes for each open ended question. Equal Access was the top response to
question number one in all regions except for the central region. Quotes below the priority theme
are an example of comments families provided. For both question one and two, equal access and
availability of advanced education were top themes.

Question 1: What are the most important things for us to understand as we consider changes to
our high school advanced learning services?
o Equal Access
“AP should be available to all students, not just those in the ‘AP/HCC track.”
o Availability of Advanced Education
“HS students need access to a diversity of challenging classes, including a variety of AP
offerings. For HCC pathway students who have experienced years of acceleration, and in
order to grow they need to be challenged in HS, which requires depth of AP.”
o Support Advanced Learners
“That you continue to place a priority on meeting the educational needs of advance
learners at high school. At times, advanced learning is considered by some to be an
"extra." It is about providing an appropriate education for all students.”
Question 2: What are some things we could put in place to increase high school advanced
learning opportunities for more students?
o Equal Access
“Let all students know all students can take advantage of advanced learning if they want
to be in those classes and have a good work ethic. All students should have access to
advanced learning.”
o Availability of Advanced Education
“More AP Classes at more schools. More accessibility to classes will increase learning
opportunities.”
o Eligibility Testing
“The district should implement universal screening for advanced learning. The standard
process for identifying gifted students, based on referrals of parents & teachers, misses
many qualified students.”
Question 3: What questions do you have about these possible changes?
o Information and input
“How will we hear what concrete options are being considered? It would be very helpful
if parents were provided with concrete pathway options that are the "finalists," once
things are narrowed down.”
o Timeline and planning
“What would be the rollout plan for moving students to Lincoln? Families are clearly
concerned about the change to their student's school assignment.”
Attachment A: Advanced Learning Community Engagement Summary October 2017

o Grandfather policy
“Will current Garfield High School students be grandfathered? Changing schools well
into high school careers is a lot to ask, particularly as many advanced learning students
have been through several splits/moves.”

Additional middle and high school priority themes included: curriculum and programs,
maintaining and expanding HC pathways, recognizing the value of a cohort – critical mass of
students, funding, professional development, and teachers/staffing to support advanced learning.
To view differences between levels and type of schools see Attachment B.

Elementary Priorities: Despite a small number of 5th grade family respondents (294) priority
themes were clear. Priorities include:
o Information and Input
“Clarity on the types of advanced learning options available across the district and at each
school.”
o Support Advanced Learners
“I worry that HC kids sent to many neighborhood schools would lose the opportunity to
truly excel academically and would not be challenged A critical mass of HC students is
needed at a school to make sure that there is a full slate of advanced learning courses to
take.”
o Curriculum and Programming
“A curriculum designed to challenge gifted students. Teaching this population requires
more than just accelerated curriculum. Should be taught in greater depth and with an
emphasis on problem solving.”

Home Language Focus Groups Outcomes: Top thoughts across language groups were:
o Increase access by providing Advanced Learning opportunities in all regions and or
schools.
o Improve communication for ELL families on opportunities, making sure communication
is in home language.
o Provide student and family supports (i.e. partnership, tutoring, SAT prep, summer
support). Families shared a desire to partner with staff and teachers to identify giftedness
and asked for resources to support their student’s acceleration.
o Improve testing and identification (i.e. access, information, frequency).

The communications and engagement and ELL departments will be sharing back, in home
language, how families’ input was integrated into the final recommendations. We are committed
to continuing to build authentic relationships with our ELL families and working to ensure their
perspectives are integrated into major decisions of the district.

Conclusion: In general, families are interested in receiving advanced learning supports and
services closer to home. They are also concerned about having a “cohort” or critical mass of
students to support sequencing and advanced learning programming. Availability and diversity
of courses to support students was also a priority theme. Families want clarity on timelines,
possible grandfathering at Garfield, and how these possible changes integrate with the new high
school boundaries. While not unique to ELL families, families participating in home language
Attachment A: Advanced Learning Community Engagement Summary October 2017

focus groups want more information on advanced learning opportunities and requested advanced
learning information be provided in home language.
.
Discover: Advanced Learning
Agenda

1. Project Overview

2. Understanding Top Thoughts

3. Digging Deeper

4. Next Steps

2
Overview - Steps

3
Overview - Questions

1. What are the most important things for us to understand as
we consider changes to our high school advanced learning
services?
2. What are some things we could put in place to increase high
school advanced learning opportunities for more students?
3. What questions do you have about these possible changes?

4
Overview - Participation Numbers

1,819 4,903 169,270
PEOPLE THOUGHTS TOTAL
PARTICIPATED CONTRIBUTED RATINGS
5
Overview - Demographics

16.2% 294
Elementary 4.1% 75
K-8

38.9% 707
Middle School 40.5% 737
High School

0.3% 6
Service School

6
Demographics

Race/ethnicity Region
American Indian/Alaska
Native/Aluet/Eskimo (7) 147
218
40
Asian/Pacific Islander (147) 45
Central Region (525)
101 525
91
Black/African American (40)

100 Northeast Region (469)
Hispanic/Latino (45)

Multi-racial (91) Northwest Region (506)
171
1218
506
Other (100)
Southeast Region (101)

Prefer not to answer (171)

469 West Seattle Region (218)
White (1218)

7
Analysis Methodology

The top 20 thoughts from each school were examined, and thoughts
with an average star count of 4.0 and above were themed.

8
Q1 Participants’ Top Rated Thoughts
• Equal Access
“AP should be available to all students, not just those in the ‘AP/HCC track’.”

• Availability of Advanced Education
“HS students need access to a diversity of challenging classes, including a
variety of AP offerings. For HCC pathway students who have experienced years of
acceleration, and in order to grow they need to be challenged in HS, which requires
depth of AP”

• Support Advanced Learners
“That you continue to place a priority on meeting the educational needs of
advance learners at high school. At times, advanced learning is considered by
some to be an "extra." It is about providing an appropriate education for all students.”
9
Q2 Participants’ Top Rated Thoughts
• Equal Access
“Let all students know all students can take advantage of advanced learning if
they want to be in those classes and have a good work ethic. All students should
have access to advanced learning”

• Availability of Advanced Education
“More AP Classes at more schools More accessibility to classes will increase
learning opportunities”

• Eligibility Testing
“The district should implement universal screening for advanced learning The
standard process for identifying gifted students, based on referrals of parents &
teachers, misses many qualified students”
10
Q3 Participants’ Top Rated Thoughts
• Information and input
“How will we hear what concrete options are being considered? It would be very
helpful if parents were provided with concrete pathway options that are the "finalists,"
once things are narrowed down”

• Timeline and planning
“What would be the rollout plan for moving students to Lincoln? Families are
clearly concerned about the change to their student's school assignment”

• Grandfather policy
“Will current Garfield High School students be grandfathered? Changing
schools well into high school careers is a lot to ask, particularly as many advanced
learning students have been through several splits/moves”
11
Elementary School Priorities
• Information and Input
“Clarity on the types of advanced learning options available across the district
and at each school”

• Support Advanced Learners
“I worry that HC kids sent to many neighborhood schools would lose the
opportunity to truly excel academically and would not be challenged
A critical mass of HC students is needed at a school to make sure that there is a full
slate of advanced learning courses to take”

• Curriculum and Programming
“A curriculum designed to challenge gifted students
Teaching this population requires more than just accelerated curriculum. Should be
taught in greater depth and with an emphasis on problem solving” 12
Q1 – CONSIDERATIONS: PRIORITY THEMES
All Middle School Garfield High School Other High Schools
Participation for Context
All Middle Schools - 707 participants
Garfield High School - 227 participants
Other High Schools - 510 participants 25%

15% 15% 15%
14%
13%
11%
9% 9% 9% 9%
8%
7%
5% 5% 5% 5%
4%
3%
2%
1%

Availability of Curriculum and Equal Access Grandfather Policy Maintain/Expand Support Advanced Value of Cohort
Advanced Education Programming HC Program Learner
Q2 ACCESSIBILITY: PRIORITY THEMES
All Middle School Garfield High School Other High School
Participation for Context
All Middle Schools - 707 participants
Garfield High School - 227 participants 31%
Other High Schools - 510 participants

24%

21%
19% 20%
17%
16%
13% 13%
12% 12% 13%

9% 9%

5%
4% 4% 4%
3%

0% 0%

Availability of Equal Access Funding Eligibility Testing Information and Professional Teachers and Staff
Advanced Education Input Development
Q3 - QUESTIONS: PRIORITY THEMES
Participation for Context All Middle School Garfield High School Other High School
All Middle Schools - 707 participants
Garfield High School - 227 participants
37%
Other High Schools - 510 participants

31% 30%
30%

24%

17%

11% 10%
9%

Grandfather Policy Information and Input Timeline and Planning
Analysis Tools

Interactive Bar Charts 16
Analysis Tools

Heat Maps
17
Home Language Community Meetings:
Advanced Learning in High School(s)
Language Groups: Vietnamese, Somali, Chinese, Spanish
100 Participants, 4 meetings

Methodology:
• Native language focus groups
• Paper based version of ThoughtExchange questions
• Public report out and capture of top thoughts including ranked
priorities
Participants’ Top Thoughts (Q1-3)
Top Thoughts across language groups:
• Increase access by providing Advanced Learning
opportunities in all regions and or schools
• Improve communication for ELL families on opportunities.
• Provide student and family supports (i.e. partnership,
tutoring, SAT prep, summer support)
• Improve testing and identification (i.e. access, information,
frequency).
Questions?

20
Next Steps – Taking Action

• Will share data publically including native language
focus group feedback with families
• Will share Advanced Learning recommendations based
on community engagement
• Regional community meetings (5) to share what we
learned and recommendations

21
Question 1: What are the most important things for us to understand as we consider changes to our high
school advanced learning services?
SPANISH
We don’t have enough information to give proper answers (need more information)
We want to be engaged and included by the district
Make sure to communicate in our language so it is not a barrier.
Each region should have at least one school with the HC program. One elementary, middle and one high
school per region.
Because navigating the education system is difficult for minorities/ELL families, the district should provide
annual trainings (about important dates and how to use the systems)
District should provide interpreters all the time
To start, there has been a lack of information to the Spanish community about the existence of this program
at all
We need teachers to inform us if our students are good candidates for the advanced classes
We want budget for our school area and not only the north area schools
it is important to give the students opportunities for advanced education in our own schools
VIETNAMESE
Advanced Learning HS pathway in three regions such as North, Central, and South to keep neighborhood
students together, decrease travel time
Build an additional HC HS school
Better communication to families
Every school should offer advanced learning programs
Time spent traveling

CHINESE

More resources (trained staff, budget) at neighborhood high school to support advanced learning
Does advanced learning also support emotional intelligence?
Add more advanced learning courses in every school
Students should be in mixed class together in every school.
Each school should provide AL courses to challenge all students
More information about how parents and schools could work together to help students prepare for/learn
about AL
There are not enough seats at Garfield
Supports for parents to understand AL eligibility
More communication about AL to ELL parents

SOMALI

Begin outreach and awareness at an earlier age to Somali families and community
Ask school staff to outreach directly to families
Question 2: What are some things we could put in place to increase high school advanced learning
opportunities for more students?

SPANISH
We want more funding to schools in our areas to offer more advanced learning opportunities
We need more opportunities for testing (more than once a year) to be able to access these programs
We want advanced learning/AP programs across the district, regardless of students' language,
background, or income level
More information should be provided about the programs the district is offering
Information should be provided in home language
We need more information about how to enroll/test into advanced courses
To increase the opportunities in high school, the whole community needs to be included, starting in
elementary school
We want to be informed in a timely manner of the testing schedule, and testing should be done each
quarter
We prefer to be informed in Spanish documents since not all of us use computers
Language is a barrier to have access to services and programs
We want to belong and want our opinions considered
VIETNAMESE
Better communication: reaching out to ELL parents/newcomers
Make testing available to all students to participate
No more referral from teachers in order to apply
More high schools beside Garfield

2
CHINESE
Nourish student and provide challenging courses
More teacher involvement, more homework, more discipline
More diversity
All around knowledge about program
More communication between the school and parents
Update information about this program
All communication should be translated
Tutoring
Family support: resources for families to support students
Support at schools for students to prepare/know about advanced learning options
More and better communication from the school
Share stories of famous people who have been successful to boost students' confidence
Advanced courses in more subjects
After school tutoring options
More involvement/communication from teachers
Unfair to other schools because Garfield gets more resources
Are all students using the same curriculum at Garfield
Would a new policy make Garfield more elite?
Teachers should be more aggressive in making recommendations to parents

SOMALI
More high schools that offer these courses

3
Question 3: Other questions or comments?
SPANISH
We want you to keep us informed of the decisions that affect our children. send us messages through the
school or PTA.
Most of the people in this room do not know about the advanced programs. What efforts is the district taking
to get to the families and to include everyone regardless of language/origin
We do not have enough information to be able to provide opinions because we do not know how this
program works/have never heard of it.
VIETNAMESE
Do students spend more time at school?
Is there added pressure or challenges?
Which subjects are taught in advanced learning?
More transportation available for students
CHINESE
Concern that Garfield already has an established program
What about the budget shortfall? How will the district ensure fair distribution of resources to support
HC/AL to each school?
Can other advanced subjects be taught?
Improved communication about AL programs to families (specifically ELL)
How does an English language test support ELL students to truly show their ability?
Increase more highly qualified teachers. Every school should have an AL program. Every school needs to have
both HCC and regular students. How can schools and parents work together to prepare students for this
program, How do parents know if their child has the potential to become an HCC student? Teacher need to
refer students to the program
Teachers need to be more proactive in referring students to the AL program, in the summer, provide courses
so that the students can prepare for the tests. Free SAT prep courses for HS students
How does an English language test support ELL students to truly show their ability?
If students are in advanced classes can they skip a level, can they stay in their school?
Does AL put an extra burden or provide support to students who may already be struggling academically and
emotionally?
If students are advanced in only math or English, can they still test?
More communication to (ELL) parents about the content of the program
More communication about the AL program, eligibility testing, content and options for AL courses

SOMALI
More high schools that offer these courses

4
Attachment D: Advanced Learning Garfield PTSA FAQ
October 19, 2017

Dear Garfield High School Families,

The district is in the process of updating the 2017-18 Student Assignment Plan (SAP) and
developing new high school boundaries for implementation in 2019-20.

One area of this work under review is how we serve our high school advanced learners. Given
the opening of Lincoln High School in 2019, development of new boundaries, and the upward
trend in the number of students who are eligible for Advanced Learning services, we have been
seeking input on how to improve access to high school Advanced Learning programs and
courses across the district.

Additionally, as part of this review we have been examining the projected Highly Capable (HC)
enrollment at Garfield High School. Currently, HC seats at Garfield are reserved for any student
who has participated in the Highly Capable Cohort (HCC) in eighth grade. Within a few years,
the majority of Garfield’s student body will be students who have participated in the HCC
program, limiting neighborhood student enrollment and access. Garfield will struggle to meet
HC capacity needs while also maintaining strong neighborhood student enrollment.

Over the past month, the Student Supports Division has been actively engaging families about
possible solutions and supports needed if changes to HC pathway(s) are approved. Initial
recommendations will be introduced to the School Board on October 25. Any changes made
would not go into effect until the 2019-20 school year when the new high school boundaries
are implemented.

The Advanced Learning Department met with the Garfield PTSA on this topic. Below are
questions provided by the Garfield families and the district’s response.

If you have additional questions, please contact advlearn@seattleschools.org

Questions and Answers:

Q: How could the proposed changes in the student assignment plan influence enrichment
course offerings at Garfield?
A: Garfield will continue to offer a full range of Advanced Placement classes to meet the needs
of all students prepared to take them.
A: Courses such as band, choir, orchestra and other core academic courses will continue. The
district may look at new models for serving accelerated musicians etc. and would do so in
partnership with teachers and families.

Q: Will there be a grandfathering of students identified as Highly Capable currently attending
Garfield?
A: If changes are made, we will recommend to the Board that all HC students attending Garfield
during the 2018-19 school year be grandfathered. Incoming HC freshmen in the 2019-20 school
year will not be guaranteed a seat at Garfield unless they live in the neighborhood boundary.
Attachment D: Advanced Learning Garfield PTSA FAQ
Students not in the GHS attendance area may be assigned to other pathway schools yet to be
determined.

Q: What proposed changes in access to advanced learning courses will be provided to all
students at Garfield and other high schools?
A: Courses for advanced students (Honors, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate)
are open to all students. There is no eligibility requirement to participate in these courses and
this practice would continue.
A: Over the last few weeks, the Student Support Services Division has been engaging families.
The data analysis of family feedback is close to complete and will be presented to the School
Board on October 25. High-level themes from the community will be shared with the Board and
public. If any changes are made to the SAP regarding HC pathway(s) they won’t be
implemented until 2019-20, providing time to build an implementation plan with more
specificity.

Q: In the proposed expansion of a list of advanced learning courses at the comprehensive
high schools, what is the district doing to ensure rigor and quality courses?
A: Newly assigned AP teachers are provided the opportunity to participate in training offered by
the College Board each spring and fall.

Q: How will families comprised of limited English speakers be allowed to provide input on this
process and get updated information?
A: Information sessions have been conducted in the Chinese, Somali, Vietnamese, and Spanish
speaking communities. In addition, updated information will be posted on the Advanced
Learning and Enrollment Planning websites. The district has and will continue to provide
translation services to families who require them, and will work with our school based
Instructional Assistants and community partners to get information out to families. Invitations
to the SAP and High School Boundary meetings have also been provided in home language.

Q: What is the timeline for the proposed changes to the Student Assignment Plan?
A: If changes are made to the HC pathway(s) they will be reflected in the 2017-18 Student
Assignment plan but won’t be implemented until 2019-20.

Questions about high school boundaries may be sent to growthboundaries@seattleschools.org
Questions about the Student Assignment Plan (SAP) may be sent
to enrollmentplanning@seattleschools.org
Questions about Advanced Learning may be sent to advlearn@seattleschools.org

To learn more about Advanced Learning visit www.seattleschools.org/advlearning