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Forword.............................................................................................................................................1 Part 1: Chronology ..........................................................................................................................2 Part 2: Annual “In Production” Charts ......................................................................................47 Alphabetical Title Index ...............................................................................................................96 Part 3: Statistics...........................................................................................................................110 Films Released in the UK ................................................................................................111 The Distribution of British Films ...................................................................................118 British Cinema Statistics ................................................................................................120 British Studios..................................................................................................................129 British Feature Production..............................................................................................133 British Film Companies and Investment .....................................................................138 Films Certified by the British Board of Film Censors..................................................143 USA ....................................................................................................................................145 France ................................................................................................................................150 Germany............................................................................................................................151 World Cinema Statistics .................................................................................................152 The Bernstein Questionnaires .......................................................................................155 The Korda Questionnaires..............................................................................................161 Appendices Bibliography......................................................................................................................162 Journals .............................................................................................................................163 Availability Of British Films Produced Between 1927 And 1939* ..............................164 Thirties Features In 16mm/Video Distribution* ..........................................................165 General Research Guidelines* ........................................................................................167 Abbreviations ...................................................................................................................168

* Some of the information contained within these sections was correct at the time of original publication of this document in 1986. The information has been retained as it was originally written for historical interest. Where possible, links to relevant BFI activities in 2009 have been provided. British Films 1927 - 1939 was originally produced in 1986 by BFI Library Services. Original document by: Retype and design (2009): Cover Design: Linda Wood Ian O’Sullivan Ian O’Sullivan

© BFI National Library 2009 21 Stephen Street London W1T 1LN

British Films 1927 - 1939
FOREWORD
No attempt has been made in this booklet to cover either the early days of television or the documentary film movement; any such coverage would have been unacceptably cursory given both these areas warrant an entire dossier of their own. The perimeters of this dossier have been confined to the commercial film industry, incorporating its three separate branches, production, exhibition and distribution. The booklet covers the years 1927 to 1939. Although restricting the period to 1930-1939 would have meant a neater time span - a decade rather than the 13 years encompassed here - history, even film history, cannot be broken down into such convenient blocks. Starting in 1930 would have meant excluding most of the important developments tied to the introduction of sound films; more significantly, it would have meant leaving out the Cinematograph Films Act of 1927 (CFA). Yet this Act was crucial in terms of the development of a film industry in Britain. Before it reached the Statute Book, it is possible to argue that Britain did not possess a film industry as such; films were made, but in a spasmodic and haphazard fashion. The CFA was a response to pressure put on the Government by a combination of disparate groups with a common desire to see the establishment of a indigenous industry in Britain. Much of what happened in the succeeding years can be viewed as a response to the working framework laid down in the Act. The introduction of the quota made certain the production of films on a large scale and called for large scale investment. The Thirties saw the building up of a home production base alongside the development of two British vertically integrated combines, the working out of a balancing act between the British and American majors, a laying down of the limitations of the role independents could play in production, distribution and exhibition. Missing out the years 1927 to 1929 would have meant ignoring both the foundation stone and the important initial steps in developments which were to reach some kind of conclusion - albeit a temporary one - by the late Thirties and it is difficult to understand the events of the later years without being able to refer back to the earlier ones. The dossier takes the form of a catalogue and factbook. It is not a critical or discursive work and an effort has been made not to incorporate or provoke any specific analysis. Of course, any attempt to give an objective and impartial picture has to operate within limitations; the material included is of necessity the consequence of a selection and selection has been influenced not only by the selector's value judgements but also by BFI Information Services 1 contemporary value judgements; if something is not dealt with by trade publications or the national press at the time, it is dificult for researchers to pick it up at a later stage. Within inevitable limitations. I have tried to provide a sufficiently wide range of strictly factual information to enable those looking at this period to reach their own interpretation of what took place. A major objective of this booklet is to make it possible for a wider number of individuals to embark on topics covering British film history and culture and to the widen the scope of anyone undertaking such work. Consequently, I have tried to make available material which is not at present to be found in other publications, at least not in the form provided here, and which currently is only accessible to those able to visit centrally based specialist libraries. It is hoped that this booklet will save future researchers from duplicating groundwork already dug over several times. The dossier should certainly be of interest to those undertaking specific and large scale research projects for whom it will be a starting point upon which they can build. But it should also be helpful to those who wish use some aspect of British cinema in the Thirties as a context for the more particular areas of film debate - the notion of star, use of genre, the relationship between media and society, etc. as often those teaching film studies do not have the necessary time to collate this kind of background material for themselves. Whereas Sections 1, 2, and 3 carry out the task of providing factual information, the Appendices indicate useful sources of supplementary material. As the dossier is largely aimed at those who are interested in pursuing some aspect of British cinema but do not have access to central research facilities, the Appendices examine what resources should be available locally: hence, the bibliography is not exhaustive but is made up of references which should be obtainable through local libraries and the inter-library loan system; the guide to research concentrates on locally based projects; there is a listing of British features available for hire or purchase on 16mm/vldeo.

Linda Wood

even within Britain. One such film was THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII (1933). production over here was stepped up. Partly in response to the British exhibitors’ need for more films. though always offset by bread and butter films. one obvious step was to build up a chain of outlets in order to ensure a screening for the films they made. the Wall Street Crash had hit badly nearly all the American majors who had been forced to trim back production schedules. This put an end to a potential European filmmaking block. The American distribution subsidiaries in Britain accepted quota only after a fight. possesed few trained personnel and had no filmmaking tradition when there were plenty of American films to meet the needs of British cinemas.mainly made available by insurance companies . but early advances were set back temporarily by the advent of sound. American strategy in dealing with quota had undergone a change. Initially the major British producers did embark on some more ambitious projects. Film production expanded to an articificially high level. They saw themselves as being forced to make films in a country which lacked adequate technical facilities. Film production had more or less died out and the country was unprepared for the demands of large scale production which followed the introduction of quota legislation. Even at home. at least for those in a position to do so. Gaumont and Wardour. The success of this film was misinterpreted. But some American companies. modernising. The situation was exacerbated by the second Cinematograph Films Act (1938) which both reduced the quota requirement and. it became a matter of selfprotection for other cinema groups. in response to American pressure. During the mid-Thirties many producers utilised budgets which could not be recovered from distribution at home but soon found their films were locked out of the American market which was essential to their financial viability. Although lacking the resources and polish of the best Hollywood films. given Britain had the facilities and expertise to produce quality films. As the films were judged to have little appeal. The early Thirties was a difficult time for British producers. little consideration was given to whether a large number of British films would be given free access to the American market. rapidly emerged as the dominant British forces. Around this time there was a shortage of American films. largely financed by UA. extending and equipping of studios to provide the type of facilities necessary if the demands of quota were to be met. several of the large public companies launched in the wake of quota were unable to BFI Information Services 2 weather the storm and went bankrupt.Part 1: Chronology A Brief Survey of the Thirties In 1927 film distribution in Britain was dominated by the UK branches of the American majors. Over the next couple of years City money . The American film trade which had soon got back on its feet was not prepared to let British films cream off any of the profits felt to be rightfully its own. notably United Artists. it was assumed that the film’s box office bonanza was attributable to the lavish nature of the film and that any film made on a similar scale would do equally well.flowed into the film industry and was sunk into production. to follow their lead: groups able to offer multiple bookings would get first option on the best American films and the control of a number of venues provided a bargaining position in the face of increasing rental demands from the American distributors. Rather than establish British production branches. made it possible for a film to qualify for two or three times its actual footage. studio building and the development of new cinemas. Cinemas were largely independently owned with many groups of 3-4 cinemas organised around a given locality. Yet despite the severe restraints under which British filmmakers had to operate. they began to make fewer but more expensive films which could be marketed internationally. As the number of films made in Britain fell dramatically so did the demand for studio space and further losses were . But this boom was to have disasterous long term consequences. Once it became clear that two major British forces were embarking on a policy of building up circuits. they relied on British independents to produce material for them. two companies which had major British distribution interests and which were to form the basis of Rank and EMI respectively. which went on to be a huge box office hit in the USA and throughout the world. by 1932 there had occurred a tremendous improvement in the standard of films coming out of British studios. Both sought means of protecting the substantial sums of money poured into production. 1928 to 1931 were years of intense activity with the building. introduced a new set of technical demands for British filmmakers to master and required a further heavy financial outlay to convert studios to sound. resources put at the disposal of British producers were meagre. the glut of films meant many independent producers had difficulties in obtaining bookings for their films. Although a number of new companies were launched. some impressively wellmade British films were being turned out. looked to Britain for some films for the USA. A successful British release depended on access to the circuits and the circuits gave priority to their own and American films.

The Act failed to specify what kind of films should be produced. However. In other industries. the decade was a time of consolidating their power base. A major motivation behind the Film Act had been the desire to set up an indigenous production sector turning out films with a uniquely British character but the formulators of the legislation saw no connection between an indigenous production sector and the existence of a strong independent sector. Quota made it possible to produce films in Britain on a profitable basis. This depression only came to an end with a new set of circumstances brought about by the outbreak of World War II. testing their boundaries and learning where their strength lay and what limitations they were subject to. To an extent. The question of whether the films turned out were well or badly made was irrelevant: the American market was closed to British films for strategic reasons which took no account of the merits of individual films. For Gaumont-British and BIP.made on the huge sums spent in developing studio capacity which by the end of the decade far outpaced demand. It would seem as if an opportunity to establish a strong independent sector had been frittered away with blame at the time being placed on extravagant producers and greedy cinema speculators. Although there were some instances of fraud and even more of inept management. But it was not just in the area of production that independents took a battering. these factors did not really account for the collapse of the independent sector in 1937. In the quest for the super profits of the international market. they developed a sense of their own identity and their . usually independently owned cinemas. Moreover. At that time. any expectations that the Government might incorporate a separate quota for the independent sector would have been unrealistic. pennywatching John Maxwell. But the element of profitability was tied to the producer's ability to get his films shown for which he needed control over a large number of cinemas. not without cost: production was severely cut back for a number of years and GB's weakened state made it possible for J. Gaumont’s wider base of operation enabled it to survive the crisis. British independents found themselves in a far weaker position than before the boom: producers could no longer use control over limited studio space to extract contracts for the production of quota films. as explained above fewer films were needed. Although the structure of the two majors mirrored each other fairly closely. even negative. the policies they followed very much reflected the personalities of their respective Managing Directors. the attendant rationalisation these demanded had invariably resulted in large conglomerates swallowing up smaller units. Arthur Rank to take over the company. the City institutions which suffered losses of several millions developed a distrust of the film industry (which continues today) and from this time on independent producers had to look to American sources for finance. intervention had been kept to a minimum. The Cinematograph Film Act (1927) by guaranteeing continuity of production was instrumental in bringing about major changes in the framework of the British film industry. with the latter then going out of business. The financing of a production programme and the acquisition of cinemas required the support of City institutions. the large amounts of money made available to the independent producers during the boom years initially hid the fact that their base of operation was being eroded. they fell harder and with greater ease than otherwise might have been the case. quite often new cinemas were built in areas where there was a cinema already. But as the circuits grew in size. Gaumont-British under Isidore Ostrer followed a much more flamboyant and expansionist policy than BIP (ABPC) guided by the more cautious. The history of the film industry in the Thirties charts this process. BFI Information Services 3 it left the American subsidiaries in a position to control the companies making films on their behalf and this control was usually used in a restraining. The mid-Thirties had also witnessed a cinema boom. The structuring of the film industry in Britain in a way which would eventually entail severe limitations on the role the independents could play had already been set into motion well before the boom got underway. fashion. The need to interest “big business” in the film industry necessitated the acceptance of general business practices. British producers undermined their own position by taking on huge debts which in the end they had no chance of repaying. Initially the majors had built up their circuits as a means of protecting their investment in production. Consequently when the crisis came. The newer ones tended to take business from the older. finally. most of whom went bankrupt. some American majors had set up their own production units in Britain and were no longer commissioning outside companies. it could not have been fully realised that the Act would result in the setting up of two vertically integrated combines whose interests would become so pervasive in such a short space of time. Although undeniably providing a major step forward. the size of investment entailed in building up a chain of cinemas demanded in turn a commitment to production on a large scale. Already out of line with the Government's protectionist policies. nevertheless the legislation had avoided addressing a number of problems which were to bode ill for the independent sector. Gaumont was one of the leaders of the assault on the American market but unlike the independent production outfits.

The exhibitors’ capitulation effectively put an end to the possibility of an independent exhibition sector with any kind of economic strength.The implications of a very powerful American presence with a strong vested interest to protect. . some lessons could be learnt from its failure.The development of industrial relations and unionisation of the different sectors of the film industry.The interdependence of production. The failure of both attempts was directly attributable to intervention by the American distributors who were afraid that strong booking groups would be able to negotiate better terms. Other issues which appear to have little importance in retrospect are covered because they assumed such importance at the time e. It is hoped that the cumulative effect will be to create an overall impression of the concerns and issues of the period as a whole. items have been included which scarcely warranted a mention at the time but which later turned out to have important consequences such as J. . . the controversy over Sunday Opening. . profits tended to be small and uncertain. It demonstrated that the forces mitigating against the setting up of an indigenous production industry were stronger and more complex than had been previously allowed for. in 1927 and 1931. Although the second Film Act (1938) was much less successful than its predecessor. contemporary observations and details of legislation. its need to adapt to a specific national situation within a global policy. But changes and developments are not always the consequence of a single decision. They made two attempts to organise themselves into booking combines. Very large profits were being earned from the booking of American films.Censorship and the three way relationship between the film trade. Doubts as to whether the company's primary focus of activity should be production were compounded by the Gaumont experience which had illustrated the difficulties connected with the production of “quality” British films. In as much as the Cinematograph Film Act (1927) provided the impetus for the appearance of British majors. pressures. these demanded budgets which could not be recouped from the home box office but were difficult to market abroad. Attempts to set up a network of international outlets turned out to be cripplingly expensive and ineffective. the weight of opinion within the combines themselves seemed to favour concentrating on exhibition while cutting back on production. In general. By the end of the decade.The growth of two British vertically integrated combines. the British Board of Film Censors and the local authorities. Independent cinemas were fully aware of the dangers presented by the growth of the circuits and realised they needed to join forces in order to protect their interests. . Occasionally. . Rank's first film or the beginning of the Odeon circuit. . The American hold was too tightly established for any rival to make inroads. .Government involvement in the film industry and the kind of criteria which gave rise to intervention. Those who sought to protect the film industry in Britain needed to follow suit. The decade seemed to end on a low note but the depression which followed the 1937 collapse perhaps obscured the substantial gains which had been made during the previous ten years.The debate on the relationship between cost and quality and how this was tied to the struggle between independent and major.g. it heralded the end of a strong independent exhibition sector. By 1939 Britain possessed both the necessary facilities and personnel with the relevant expertise to produce the kind of quality films which could not have been made in this country ten years previously and on a sustained basis. The first Cinematograph Film Act (1927) succeeded in its objective of setting up a professionally based production industry. It was clear that in normal circumstances the level of intervention so far had proved inadequate to cope with the forces which it was attempting to control and future legislation would have to incorporate a greater degree of Government involvement. Rather they are the consequences of ongoing processes.The interaction between the British and American majors. distribution and exhibition. For many filmmakers. among them events. .The growth of the circuits and the impact of these on independent cinemas. . for instance. The entries for each year include a variety of items.own interests which did not necessarily include servicing the production division of the parent company. Even with films produced on a more modest basis for the home market.A. Any cinemas participating in the schemes were blacked and few independents had the financial reserves to withstand an embargo. the Thirties provided the apprenticeship which made possible the flowering of British production in the Forties. did not take a single rigid line in coping with the legal BFI Information Services 4 obligations placed upon them but showed themselves adept at adjusting to changing circumstances. etc and listed below are some points of reference which can be used when looking at the period. The Americans.

Nation. the article by Mr. however. “Whatever may have been the motives of the Government in preparing the (Cinematograph) Bill. The wisdom of establishing a film producing industry in this country should hardly. The capital invested in the exhibiting business in this country alone already exceeds £7. Apart from employing actors and other workers of the higher grades. Maxwell planned to extend the studio and produce twenty pictures a year: “The policy of BIP is to make quality pictures. February 7th: The foundation stone for the new GaumontBritish Studios at Shepherd's Bush was laid. even if it was only a vague hankering after anything that savoured of Protection.000 while picture theatre employees number 80. which had been making films since 1919.000. 10th February. If it were.000.it does far less than the Government have already done under the Trade Facilities Act otherwise to assist the infant Beet-Sugar industry.000. also had interests in a small number of Scottish . British Incorporated Pictures. (see June) 24th: Gaumont-British Picture Corporation was registered as a public company with a nominal capital of £2.opened by the dozen overnight.1927 January The acquisition of two Birmingham cinemas by Paramount provoked a storm of protest from exhibitors throughout the country who feared this was the first step in the formation of a series of American renter-owned theatres. Keynes on the same page provides the answer. British International Pictures (registered in December 1926 as a private company) which included an increase of capital to £100. it intended both to attract talent from the stage and also develop unknown talent. the recently opened Elstree Studios. 23rd: A new “Empire-wide” organisation. 26th February. its declared policy was to produce "films which will compete in technique with the best foreign productions". The Bill does no more than clear the ring for such a film production business to get going with a chance of paying its way and so continuing its existence . There are no physical difficulties in making good films in this country.000 issue followed in November. and the ‘quota’ which the proposed Bill is assumed to provide would give the industry a chance of getting itself established. be open to question. Representatives of the American companies denied any such intention but continuing fear on the part of independent cinema owners was one of the factors in the setting up of the CEA Trading Scheme (see 26th October). 28th: British Instructional Films (Proprietors) Ltd (see March) was registered as a public company with a capital of £100. such a measure should be welcomed as an inevitable first step.000 was over-subscribed within two hours. Bundy. along with its principal asset.albeit they were only converted shops . while the present turgid flood of American films continues. enough money will be spent to do any subject chosen justice. and while there will be no foolish expenditure. I think.500. “Not only in London but in all other parts of the country new cinemas are springing rapidly into existence while old cinemas are changing hands at enhanced prices. A subsequent share issue of £57.000. I consider the establishing of a substantial volume of British film BFI Information Services 5 production would be just such an industry.” John Maxwell. April John Maxwell revealed details of his new company.” A £300. The Bill largely followed the recommendations of the Ormiston Report of 1925.E. British Instructional Films. This formed the foundations of what was heralded in the press as Britain's first vertically integrated film industry combine. 27th: John Maxwell. Formed to take over the studio and plant of British National Pictures at Elstree. it would provide such employment for many classes of manual workers. Bioscope. joined the Board and effectively took control of British National Pictures. who controlled Wardour Films and British International. if a substantial industry of film production is to be established in Britain at all. It looks as though 1927 will be a boom year comparable with the early days of the industry when picture theatres . March The Cinematograph Films Bill (1927) was introduced in the House of Commons by Sir Philip Cunliffe-Lister.” Editorial. was acquired by A. was registered as a private company with a capital of £1 million. as John Maxwell. an entirely new building adjoining existing studios was to triple the previous floor space. President of the Board of Trade. Gaumont-British Picture Corporation completed negotiations through which it secured control of W & F Film Service and Ideal Films (distributors) and the Bicolor circuit of 21 cinemas. Chairman of Wardour Films (a leading British distribution company).000. at that time Britain's largest film studio. He urges the view that assuming a considerable proportion of our pre-war export trade is lost we must seek to replace it and find work for our million unemployed inter alia by creating new home industries.

just managed to keep their heads above water. while others cost little more than £2. and the owners ..250.000 pictures because higher expenditure was considered unsound. What I mean is that I cannot find it written in the cards that all the British pictures which are to be made for the world-market. taking £12. “the largest concrete structure in the world”. say 25%. as cinemas were booked up about eighteen months ahead which meant that the financier had to wait a very long time for a problematical profit on his investment.000. but.000. 5th May. 12th August. 20th: County Cinemas. To this should be added the cost of preliminary exploitation expenses. a fair estimate.000. will reach the world-market. Victor Saville's THE ARCADIANS was the first film to go into production. this claim was open to dispute. by some miracle.000 to provide money for the construction and purchase of cinemas. to a film studio..don't let us abuse the opportunity which is presented to us to-day.000. a harking back to the bad old days when exhibitors were expected to take programmes of £3. But the industry was not increasing. While improving our standards of production. they did not prosper. was oversubscribed more than thirty times.. 18th June.000 share issue. we can make a profit within the home market. A.. and would be better made.cinemas. August “The number of British films now awaiting trade show in course of production and contemplated is 62.000. June British Incorporated Pictures (see April) acquired the British Empire Exhibition site of 35 acres at Wembley with the intention of converting the Palace of Engineering. without necessarily BFI Information Services 6 increasing our budgets. Bioscope. Better an assured small profit on a steady flow of pictures than the gambling risk upon a few costly high-fliers.” Editorial. For the last few years. Don't let us get too obsessed with the idea of catering for the world market. It is what I consider to be sound business sense.” Michael Balcon. is close on £750. So I would say . They are always secure of two-thirds of the world-market.000 to £1 million through a £500. and many of these conditions operate against our building up a recognisably British genre of picture production. Associated Provincial Picture Houses. Bioscope. Shareholders of another circuit. and an allowance should be made for the production of short length films. Many companies fell by the wayside and others. I certainly do not advocate that. Full-length features at a cost of £20. Bundy's new renting subsidiary for BIF.. “My credo is film-costing based upon the home market. as the average per film.000 to £40. for a variety of reasons. May The shareholders of Provincial Cinematograph Theatres (Britain's largest cinema circuit) approved the increase of the company's capital by £1.000.. formed that month with a capital of £60. The home market did not offer much scope. British production has been spasmodic. This is no counsel of niggardly economy. at costs based upon the hone-market.E. September A share issue made by Pro Patria Ltd. world markets demand world conditions. British pictures fit for the world-market are being made. The importance of the forthcoming cinema legislation can be seen from the almost simultaneous setting up of two combines in a 30 year old industry which had remained largely unorganised up to then.” Daily Express. Gaumont opened its new studios at Shepherd's Bush. One or two big companies were formed for production. To talk now of not biting off more than we can chew suggests a distrusting mind. it was languishing.000 production programme. It will entail more than money. In these years all kinds of productions were attempted. We may safely say the Compulsory Films Bill has given birth to a £1. The total cost of this producing programme. October “There are at present exactly six studios in Great Britain in which films can be made. “In 1919 there were few pictures being made in this country. The serious critical journal Close Up started publication. was registered as a private company with a nominal capital of £50. and supposedly based upon world-market costing. These plans were never realised and in May 1928 Wembley's lease was sold to Victor Sheridan. marking the inauguration of the EMB Film Unit.000. First National (later subsumed into Warner Bros) marked its entry into British production by starting CONFETTI AT NICE. July John Grierson began filming Drifters for the Empire Marketing Board (EMB). also approved the increase of their company's capital from £500. which was to become a major circuit by the mid-thirties. One thing is certain .we can never have the latitude for expenditure which the Americans have.000 to £1.000 were produced.

Producing companies are falling over one another to get into the magic circle of six. the film's release gave rise to serious controversy. A £200.000 flotation by Whitehall Films. foreign companies could always be setting a higher standard than any British company could emulate and the tendency of their intervention would be always to compel the British competitors to occupy a position of inferiority in this market. the rent is augmented by a fixed percentage of the amount spent on producing the film. usually resulting in the banning of films rather than the other way round. was oversubscribed twice by midday on the day lists were opened. announced it had acquired Beaconsfield Studios which was to be extensively improved. Various local authorities who considered the film to be irreligious banned its screening. The most striking fact at the moment is that some of the large groups of cinemas are able to book films generally about 30% lower than individual exhibitors. The Home Secretary announced in the House of Commons that a number of recent serious fires in premises where film was either manufactured or stored had led him to redraft the Celluloid Regulations. along with companies which combine film exhibition with film production. 2) To enable them to secure films at economic prices. A memorandum giving details of a trading scheme devised by the Committee of the Cinematograph Exhibitors' Association was issued: “the objects of the scheme are to secure for participating exhibitors: 1) The preservation of the capital they have already invested in their cinemas. British Lion. distribution and exhibiting under one control.” November “War has been declared within the British film industry. Initially the Films Bill required quota films to be made by British controlled companies. The issue of £350. 29th: The Kinematograph Renters’ Society (KRS) issued the following statement in response to the CEA Trading Scheme (see October): “The settled policy of the Society representing renters controlling 90% of the films exhibited is to refuse to . formed with Edgar Wallace as its chairman. which is certainly an incentive to economy. but is hardly the way to help this country to turn out the sort of film which will not look shoddy on exhibition . the question arises for discussion at once whether production and renting. 2nd October.of all of them can get almost any price they like for letting them. and thousands of pounds have been paid for a few weeks lease of a studio. representing probably 3. A situation which has to be faced is that the progress of the film industry has brought into it 'big money’.” Lloyd's Weekly News.” 26th: Independent exhibitors attempted to establish their own booking combine to protect themselves against the increasing strength of the circuits and renters. The methods used by ‘big money’ are just as ruthless as those of the producer-renter. was heavily over-subscribed on the day of issue. The company planned to build new studios at Elstree and to both distribute and produce films. this was changed to British registered companies. and a group made up of companies controlling circuits of theatres. Clearly the solution for unorganised and independent exhibitors lies in the direction of organising themselves into a national circuit with headquarters in London. Simon Rowson of Ideal Films. During the committee stage. British International Pictures became a public company making a £1. registed as a public company on 2nd November. 3) To enable them to participate in the normal development of the industry.000 share issue.the only type of film on which we shall build up a worldwide demand for our wares. De Mille's KING OF KINGS was given a BBFC certificate. Moreover.000) were also successfully floated. that 90% by attention to organisation shall preserve their investments either by ultimately interesting themselves in production or alternatively being sufficiently powerful to deal with the other sections and to negotiate business on terms which are economically satisfactory to BFI Information Services 7 both parties. sent a memorandum to Members of Parliament in which he argued: “There can be no stability in an industry which is controlled by foreigners. The two 'armies’ now facing each other are the independent exhibitors.000) and British Lion (registered on 27th November with a nominal capital of £210. Two further companies.000 cinema theatres. Although Cecil B. British Filmcraft Productions Ltd (registered on 22nd November with a nominal capital of £150. With the resources at their disposal. 8th November.125.” Daily Chronicle. This was a particularly well publicised instance of local authorities arbitrarily disregarding the BBFC classification but during this period it was fairly common for the local watch committees to follow their own judgements. If economic forces are to place production. 1921 and introduce more stringent precautions. which represent about one-tenth of the capital invested in the business are to dominate the remaining 90%. or whether.000 worth of shares by British International Pictures. in the case of most of the studios. representing a minority group of British producers.

was registered on 24th with a nominal capital of £1. the Board of Trade started a register of films theatrically exhibited in the UK. Allied Artists . February 13th: Herbert Wilcox's new company. Schlesinger. is greater than in the ease of ordinary commercial undertakings. European .do business with combinations believing that both from the point of view of public service and general business interest. and the investor in such enterprises is doubtless fully aware that. Quota requirements did not apply to newsreels. British and Dominions (B&D). in order to meet the heavy demand from outside producers for floor space. or educational films. 4th: In order to comply with the requirements of Cinematograph Films Act (1927).000 .none. Oxford became the first educational authority to sanction the attendance of school children at a local cinema in school hours for the viewing of educational films. arrangements with German and other European companies. Warners . “There has been considerable speculation in the trade regarding the possible source from which American renting houses would secure their quota of British films laid down by the Cinematograph Films Act. a major German production company.none.” Bioscope. these show no signs of materialising. Although the company was principally concerned with distribution.none. as well as the chance of big profits. The Films Bill received the Royal Assent on 27th December. the financial editor of the Bioscope warned investors: “Film production is necessarily a speculative business. Both distributors and exhibitors were required to show a proportion of British films starting at 7.First National Pathe. 16th February). and Gaumont-British. the record company. 23rd: At an extraordinary general meeting.a share issue was made shortly after to fund the purchase of nine London cinemas (The UPT circuit was acquired by Gaumont in April 1930). announced BFI Information Services 8 .000 in order to enlarge Elstree Studios (see January) and set up foreign distribution organisations. advertisements. arrangements for the acquisition of British film is as follows: First National Pathe . there is more to be gained by free development and open competition. A £200.” The Scheme had no chance of surviving such intransigent hostility on the part of the distributors who had the power to cut off the supply of films to participating cinemas. After pointing out that the company owned few capital assets which might be used as security against any investment made in B&D. The definition of British was extended to include the subjects and lands in the British Empire. studio sequences had to be shot in a British studio and 75% of salaries and payments for wages had to be made to British subjects. In order to qualify as British a film had to be produced by a British person or British registered company.5% and 5% respectively in 1928 rising to 20% in 1936. During the next 12 months most of the major British production companies made similar.own British productions. as a public company with a nominal capital of £300.. synchronised system of photographic musical effects at a price considerably lower than any other system. The merger was announced of the distribution interests of the American major First National and the British Pathe company.Welsh-Pearson and British Filmcraft. British Brunswick. Fox . it was interested in establishing a sound film service and would float a new company to be called British Phototone (see June). Jury-MetroGoldwyn . having passed its third reading in the House of Commons on 16th November. Many reports of big production plans have been circulated. however wisely plans are laid.” (Bioscope. formed in June 1927. In fact B&D’s record turned out to be far sounder than many other production ventures floated around this time.British Instructional.000. The new organisation.” 12th: United Picture Theatres was registered by I.000 to £750. this would “supply the trade with a complete mechanical.no site had as yet been found. 16th February. So far as the purely American houses are concerned.000. but with the exception of First National. the element of risk. few of which survived the early Thirties. mutually beneficial. A committee was set up to advise the Board of Trade on the administration of the Act. four additional stages adjoining their present studios at Elstree were to be built. any film theatrically released had to be registered with the Board of Trade. First National Pathe Co. was registered as a public company with an authorised capital of £500. The Act made blind and advanced booking illegal. the agreement included arrangements for film production. a South African film magnate. Paramount .000 share issue followed to finance the production of films and the building of a new studio .W. British International shareholders approved a motion to raise the company's capital by £225. December A reciprocal agreement was entered into between UFA. As part 1928 January British International announced that.

A.C. the first film to be made there was a version of the Edgar Wallace bestseller.” Sheridan sold his lease to British Talking Pictures a few months later.000 to acquire British Screen Classics (founded in 1925) and the Worton Hall. The BSP £125. 27th: Welsh-Pearson-Elder. Gaumont's close ties with Denman were indicated by its guaranteeing the sale and by the presence of its Managing Director. another recently formed company. The abandonment of the Trading Scheme (see October/November 1927) was formally announced at a meeting of the General Council of the CEA. Britain's largest circuit. The company faced continual financial difficulties. May Gaumont-British Picture Corporation took control of the recently formed General Theatres Corporation (see March) becoming by far the largest circuit in Britain with nearly 200 halls. The controversy considerably boosted the film's box office and by May it had taken £48. 27th: Gainsborough Pictures. THE RINGER (Edgar Wallace was British Lion's chairman). The company was not planning to produce films itself. was registered as a public company.000 from Ralph J.00.000 in the UK alone.000 ordinary shares were subscribed in advance by F.000. A £262.AF went into liquidation in August 1932.000 public issue was made by the General Theatre Corporation (registered on llth February) for the purpose of acquiring 56 cinemas valued at £4. On 30th May a special shareholder's meeting approved an increase of capital and a £250.400. 28th: British inaugurated. formed in 1924 by Michael Balcon.M. A.of John Maxwell's plan to build up European outlets for BIP films.000 share issue to fund this and the Denman deal (see April). it also set up a subsidiary to distribute films in Canada.000 share issue in order to acquire 96 cinemas. March The Board of Trade issued an official reminder informing distributors that the requirements of the Cinematograph Films Act (1927) in regard to licensing. a quota of British films and the keeping of a record book were to come into force on 1st April. the company had just acquired the German distribution company Sudfilm. The failure was attributed to a recent surfeit of share issues involving film/cinema operations and led to serious disagreements within the company which together with its weak financial position left it open to a takeover (see May). Representatives of leading European production . The directors of British Screen Productions (BSP).429 share issue to pay for theatres recently acquired and to acquire and build additional theatres. Actors' Equity Association writers had to pick up about 85% of the issue as a whole. announced it was to be floated with a capital of £250. a new public company. a move to put it into liquidation was halted when it became part of Audible Filmcraft but this was a temporary reprieve . Victor Sheridan announced that with the backing of a financial group he had acquired the lease of buildings and 35 acres at Wembley for £147. Woolf became its Chairman.500 share issue followed in May with a controlling number of shares being reserved for Gaumont-British.500.000) made a £2. this forerunner of the Association of Cinematograph Technicians collapsed when its treasurer absconded with the Association's funds. £750. Pugh and that £500. The first general meeting of the Association of Cinematographers and Associated Technicians took place. A £3.000 to finance the production of films and an unrealised plan to build a new studio (the company went into voluntary liquidation in 1932). the share issue was not a success and underwriters had to pick up 40% of it. Bromhead. PCT. registered on 20th February. Denman Picture Houses (registered as a public company on 31st March with a nominal capital of £1. on the Denman board. made a share issue of £178. April DAWN. but was intending “to let the new studios for the making of American and other quota pictures. made a £853. Herbert Wilcox's screen biography of Edith Cavell.000 share issue followed in late March. Gaumont's C. Despite the Gaumont connection. Michael Balcon was to continue running the company and became Managing Director of the new Gainsborough. it was fully subscribed on the day of issue. Studios.000. Isleworth. became a cause celebre when the British Board of Film Censors initially refused it a certificate.000 was to be spent on developing the biggest and best equipped studio centre in Europe. Szarvasy's British Foreign and Colonial Corporation but underBFI Information Services 9 19th: British Lion's new studios at Beaconsfleld were officially opened. The Film Artistes Guild (a forerunner of the Film Artistes Association) was formed to act as a casting agency and to negotiate improved conditions for extras.

These rumours should be utterly disregarded. Activities were to be limited to the manufacture of apparatus and the leasing of rights under the De Forest patents held by the company. Warners had to pay £16. August The Shops (Hours of Closing) Bill received the Royal Assent.000) .000. A 20% quota of British films is an unrealisable dream.000.000.000 of new money has been found for eighteen different companies. (see entry for John Maxwell. hold between them about £7. The authorised capital of these companies is now £16. concerned in the production of British films. National Screen Services was registered to provide trailers. Unfortunately rumours spread quickly at the moment because of the obvious lack of understanding of film problems in the City. Some of this money has been found a good home and some of it has not. Cinema.000. was acquired by the newly formed British Talking Pictures (with a nominal capital of £500.C. the total capital invested in public companies for the production and exhibition of British films is nominally about £23.000.000 share issue to fund the building of new studios at Elstree. Many British production companies had already established links with German and French companies. The picture theatre section of the industry has a nominal capital of over £16. the market value of which is in the neighbourhood of £28. there are rumours already of one or two companies being in trouble. Even before the screening of the first sound feature film in Britain. it is a lamentable feature of the film world that Wardour Street is really Scandal Street. to British International Pictures. this was soon followed by a £190. First National-Pathe.000. 1st July. which will be shattered by the hard fact that entertainment values alone are what concern the public. June 14th: British Phototone. was formed in September to undertake film production.000. reports of the phenomenal success of “talkies” in the USA lead to a eagerness on the part of investors to share in what was seen as a potential bonanza. before ever it reaches the limit of its schedule in 1936 will have proved unworkable. However the possible development of a European production block was pre-empted by the arrival of talkies.0000. 4th July. P. July “Since legislation on behalf of British pictures was assured. With regard to the latter. . it was decided to form a British Screen Writers' Association. British Sound Film Productions.000.000 of nominal capital. formed to develop a British sound system and registered on 1st June with a capital of £250. demonstrated their equipment using 12” discs.” George Smith (who was to become a leading producer of “quota quickies”). which has appreciated in market valuation to over £18. Despite a not totally successful demonstration. and will have been amended. a £100. was fined £10 and 25 guineas costs for booking TWO LITTLE DRUMMER BOYS to Birmingham cinemas before they had been registered with the Department of Trade.a share issue followed shortly after. which was formed in 1923 and had developed a sound system on film. An action brought by Warner Bros.T. A £200. “Fifteen public companies.houses met in Paris to establish a combined European front to oppose American monopoly. sold its controlling interest of 51% in the distribution company. 18th: Union Cinemas (to become one of Britain's largest circuits in the mid-thirties) was registered as a public company with a nominal value of £300..000. January 1929) 18th: The Ludwig Blattner Picture Corporation was registered with a capital of £250. 12th July. Therefore. 24th: The first prosecution under the Films Act for advance booking took place when Famous Players (Midlands) Ltd. “I foresee that the Quota Act.000. This gave the cinema industry permission to sell sweets and tobacco to patrons inside a cinema during the whole period the hall remained open.” Referee.000 share issue made in the following month was oversubscribed 27 times.084. De Forest Phono-Films.000. £12. 9th: At a meeting of interested parties.940. BTP took over the lease of Wembley Studios and a subsidiary. Britain’s largest cinema circuit.000. which has a market value of about £10.” Kine Weekly.000 and legal costs.000.000 share issue was made four days later to cover the purchase of seven cinemas. On the whole investment turned out to be speculative and ill-advised. against Gaumont-British alleging GB had infringed Warner's sound system was settled in favour of the British defendant.000. Underwriters were left with 84% of the issue (the company went into liquidation March 1933). There is every reason in the world to anticipate for every film company conducted by men of experience an BFI Information Services 10 era of very great prosperity.

British Phototone. 1929 January Gaumont's offer to acquire Provincial Cinematograph Theatres was accepted by the required majority of PCT shareholders in preference to one by John Maxwell. which controlled 116 cinemas. However. which had developed a sound system using discs.000. announced the company had entered an agreement with Siemens Halske and Allgemeine Elektricitats Gesellschaft (i. With silent films. even with a largely British cast. Finally. 26th: Associated British Cinemas Ltd. November British Instructional's new studio at Welwyn was officially opened. the first talking feature film to be shown in Britain. frequently scripts had to be extensively rewritten as literal translations proved ineffective and wooden.000. were officially opened. for instance. it became necessary to film a different version for each country in which the film was going to be released. was made public (see January 1929). chiefly the pooling of costs and guaranteed access to foreign markets.500. among others. Twickenham from Neo Art Productions. 27th: THE JAZZ SINGER.e. During the silent era making films in coproduction seemed to offer many advantages. Later in the month the Ostrers announced the ordinary share capital of GaumontBritish was to be increased by £1.000. a £250. co-productions filmed in a foreign studio. The cartoonist was Mr Jose Noble who introduced a new film character in 'Orace. 30th: Whitehall Studios. Tobis) for the purpose of placing on the market a comparatively cheap electrical reproducer. with films being allocated the kind of budgets which could be recouped from a British release. BFI Information Services 11 . An important part of his strategy was to establish links with European production outfits. who founded the Odeon Circuit.000 with the object of acquiring a chain of 40 cinemas. The decision was officially ratified by a PCT general meeting in February. The first meeting of the British Association of Cinematographers took place. Elstree. John Maxwell reasserted British International’s commitment to making films whose "standard was at the level of the world’s best quality". Before long the practice was abandoned and production in Britain over the next few years was aimed predominantly at the home market. December 18th: Filmophone was registered as a public company with a nominal capital of £225. Moreover.000 in order to acquire Alliance Studios.markets. was registered with a capital of £1. Gaumont's offer to purchase Provincial Cinematograph Theatres. a subsidiary of British International Pictures. Its objectives were to acquire a combined gramophone and kinematograph apparatus known as Filmophone and also the renting business of Inter-Cine which was to function as the company's distribution outlet. 29th: Twickenham Film Studios was registered by Julius Hagen as a private company with a nominal capital of £15.000 to £2. In a speech. British Acoustic.000. did not qualify for quota. opened at the Piccadilly Theatre. the Picture House. opened his first purpose-built cinema. the different versions usually had to utilise different stars because of the difficulties in coping with a foreign language. the production of release prints for different countries had merely required the insertion of appropriate inter-titles in the required language at given points. had pursued with some success. This was tied to his determination to break into foreign .000. the advent of sound radically altered the situation. a sound system developed by Gaumont-British was given its first demonstration at the Capitol.000 share issue followed and was immediately oversubscribed.September 14th: The opening scenes of the first talking film cartoon ever produced in Britain were shot by British Sound Film Productions at Wembley Studios. giving GB control of 300 (nearly all prime position) halls with an aggregate capital of £14. the making of multi-language versions turned out to be far more cumbersome and expensive than first envisioned. October 1st: Oscar Deutsch. Staffs. and it was a policy which BIP. Brierley Hill. the 'Armonious ‘Ound.and more specifically European .000.

in addition to ATP. the trade journal Kine Weekly for 4th July reported that the Ostrer Brothers had purchased 1. The phenomenal success of the film in London and Glasgow has led to a rush for installations of the Western Electric System and within a few weeks there will be at least fifty installations in operation. May Associated Talking Pictures (ATP) was formed with a capital of £125. Some local authorities were licensing cinemas for Sunday opening. albeit as a very minor partner. they must bow to public demand. Great resentment was felt by those cinemas whose local authorities were banning Sunday opening and it was decided to launch a test appeal to see if it was in a local authority's jurisdiction to refuse permission for Sunday screenings. BIP Elstree (RCA). The Raycol system was never properly developed and in the end investment in the company had to be written off. Herbert Wilcox expressed the view that in the States patrons have accepted 'talkies' as the only form of entertainment. In an item headed ‘Gaumont Deal: British Control Assured’.000. At the end of the decade the situation regarding Sunday opening was extremely confused.000. This. Also.316. Stephen Courtauld. All of these. the deal seemed to be connected with the decision announced in June to install Western Electric sound apparatus in the 300 cinemas controlled by the company and there were strong financial links between Western Electric and the Fox Film Company. but there had previously been rumours about a bid for control by American interests and it was generally believed that the Ostrers were acting on behalf of a third party.000 share issue to allow the company to increase its holdings from 60 to 150 cinemas. BFI Information Services 12 Raycol British Corporation.000 combine which included Tobis and AEG Klangfilm. registered on 23rd May as a private company with a nominal capital of £300. 21st February. Gaumont-British announced that its circuits were being installed with Western Electric apparatus pending the appearance of its own sound system. was set up to develop a British colour system. During May. 15th: Associated British Cinemas made a new £1. was launched. by the Board of Trade. moreover. financial instability was a fairly typical feature of companies floated during the sound boom. June Gainsborough (RCA). This was done with the case of . Sound Industries. may be regarded as an ex parte statement. The prestigious critical journal Close-Up organised a petition aimed at stopping the BBFC from making extensive detrimental cuts to foreign films. 1929 saw a rush of activity connected with the phenomenon of sound pictures which reached a peak in the middle of the year. but its truth is born out by the experiences of British exhibitors who have played THE SINGING FOOL. 21st: BLACKMAIL.000 to produce talking films. International Talking Screen Productions. Isleworth and Twickenham (RCA) were all in the process of being converted to sound. British Filmograph. British Talkie Films Ads.” Kinematograph Theatre.it was decided to use the American Western Electric equipment. On his return last week from America. it was announced that a new ‘talkie’ studio was to be built at Ealing. ATP made a substantial investment in the company and Basil Dean's subsequent involvement in Raycol brought him into contact with another of the company’s directors. July British Movietone News. which was still in the course of development. “The one outstanding feature in the present ‘talkie’ situation is that exhibitors have come to the conclusion that if they are to keep up their end in the existing state of competition. others were prosecuting cinemas which attempted to open.February ABC started fitting its circuit with sound equipment . with the exception of ATP. had a short life span and failed to reach the mid-Thirties.6512.107. of course. Talking Films. Shepherd's Bush. No official statements were issued. was trade shown.000. the first British talkie. during this month. In an attempt to improve its position when competing with the giant American corporations.799.571 Gaumont shares at £1. Work started on converting BIP's Elstree Studios in preparation for sound production. British Phonotone joined a £20. Basil Dean was to be both Chairman and Managing Director.500 were all registered: Allied Talking Pictures. a British subsidiary of the American Newsreel Company. who was to provide financial backing for ATP throughout most of the 30s. Powers Cinephone Equipment. the following companies with a combined capital of £1. March The first prosecution for advance booking by an exhibitor (banned by the Cinematograph Film Act) was brought against the Southsea Picture Playhouse Co.

Kine Weekly. “At the moment the renter is in the fortunate position of being able to hold the pistol at the head of the exhibitor because. Isidore Ostrer became the new Chairman and C. and the vast sums of money invested in talking pictures both in England and abroad. the following was issued by the Board of Trade: “The selection of apparatus in either the theatre or the studio is a question in either case for the judgement of the prospective owners.see July.” Eric Hakim. the ability to play films made using one sound system back on a different one). and who have no motive whatever for installing apparatus of any kind that will not give satisfaction to the public. is forced to show talking films. Fox. 31st July. it has never been a satisfactory method to fix arbitrary hiring terms when the prospects and value of a picture could only be vaguely determined. The two following quotations from Kine Weekly outline the arguments put forward by the distributors and make clear why the exhibitors eventually gave way: “The production of talkies involved much heavier overhead costs than the production of silent pictures. The summer saw an intensification of the campaign on the part of distributors to introduce booking terms based on getting a percentage of takings as opposed to the flat rate fee which had previously operated.” A narrow understanding of what restraint meant and Government's unwillingness for further involvement in the film industry meant that developers of British sound systems were afforded little protection and equipment subsequently installed in British studios and theatres was predominantly American. not only is there a shortage of silent films. However. Kine Weekly. We have no desire to dictate to any exhibitor the form of reproducing equipment or device he should use but we wish to take every precaution that our sound pictures are only projected over equipments which give suitable results. August In response to approaches made by anxious British sound equipment manufacturers.” Arthur Dent. The Ostrers forced the resignation of A.C. of Gaumont-British. Obstruction and delaying tactics had allowed the Americans to establish their predominance and this was maintained by the quality of their product and the range of the back up service they were able to provide.C.the following letter was sent to The Bioscope by FamousLasky. who may be presumed to be disposed to carry on their own business efficiently. Rumours attributed the change to the influence of a third party who was believed to have acquired substantial interests in (and possibly control of) the company . Once other sound systems were successully demonstrated and it became obvious that though reluctant to intervene the British Government would do so if blatant restraint of trade occured. Jury-Metro-Goldwyn. and R. Chairman (and founder of the British branch of the Gaumont Company in 1898).the Plaza (Portsmouth) which was heard on the 20th July.Moreover. and with this object in view we have arranged for the examination by independent experts of every device for the reproduction of sound which is put on the market. having spent large sums of money in talking equipment. following this case Sunday Observance groups were beginning to question whether in fact local authorities had the right to grant permission for Sunday openings (see December 1930). BFI Information Services 13 . we are willing to book our pictures for reproduction by such equipments.M. Despite the American distributors' protestations. Woolf. which leaves the renter in the position of being able to dictate terms. Managing Director. The small British companies had little chance of mounting a successful challenge without some form of Government protection which was not forthcoming (see following item). 22nd.” Bioscope. 15th. and provided that the reproduction reaches the standard which we have set..e. Bromhead. but also the exhibitor.. The rejection of the appeal clarified the situation for those areas where the local authorities refused to allow Sunday opening. Wardour Films. we feel it incumbent to make clear our position in this matter. Bromhead. United Artists. Managing Director. August. It is our desire that every one of the various systems of sound reproduction equipment should be given a fair chance to exhibit films distributed by our respective companies. Universal and Warners: “So much having been written and said on the subject of interchangeability (i. The appeal was turned down. I am convinced that sharing terms provided the only equitable arrangements between renter and exhibitor. For those reasons. Following widespread accusations that American distributors were refusing to book their films to those cinemas using British sound equipment in order to pressurise them into buying American equipment . the Managing Director. Our sole object is to protect the interests of the trade generally.close ties existed between the US majors and sound equipment manufacturers . the Americans reduced their charges. August. undoubtedly they had used every means at their disposal to maintain the US sound equipment monopoly for as long as possible. The committee are of the opinion that any attempts on the part of either manufacturers of apparatus or distributors of films to impose preferential conditions in restraint are directly opposed to the intentions of British production.

was formed. a leading American trade paper. Paisley. 27th November. November A £1. Quigley. “British films have been deficient in story values. Also. founder of the Odeon circuit. Britain's first purpose-built sound studios was officially opened. 17th: Columbia Pictures Corporation was registered as a private company with a nominal capital of £100. ASFI was formed by BTP and International Tobis Co. the company was put into compulsory liquidation on llth November. Herbert Wilcox's B&D took over the lease of two studio floors from BIP. the Home Office sent out a memorandum to all licensing authorities pointing out that “a child or young person under 16 should not be allowed to see an ‘A’ film unless the parent or guardian accepts the responsibility of taking the child with him. its three sound stages were equipped with the company's own sound system. whereby the two concerns would produce jointly in British studios.000 was to be made. 20th: A major fire broke out in the new Wembley Studios. Sixty nine children lost their lives and one hundred and fifty were admitted to hospital. reports estimated the amount of damage at around £100. ASFI took over certain BTP assets. editor of The Exhibitors Herald World. O'Connor. T.Sound Pictures was formed by British ThomasHouston. For once. Martin J. with Oscar Deutsch. 19th: The first prosecution for failing to comply with renters’ quota was brought against FBO. the British subsidiary of General Electric of America.000 but the figure may have been deliberately underestimated to avoid panic on the part of investors and through fear that an important financial deal in the offing might be adversely affected (see November). Western Electric and RCA announced a reduction in charges for sound installations following the appearance on the market of several lower priced but generally efficient systems.P. Edward Shortt. Gaumont-British announced that a new issue of £500. Bioscope. 31st: the most disastrous cinema fire ever to occur in Great Britain took place at a children's matinee at the Glen Cinema. The crisis affecting the Fox operation in the USA led to the issue of a formal statement which referred to the purchase of stock in Gaumont Theatres in 1929 (see July 1929 and February 1930). a bill to amend the law relating to the right of public performance of copyright music introduced in the House of Commons. a former Home Secretary. (based in Amsterdam) who held a 45% and 55% interest respectively. September Wembley Studios.” The memorandum also recommended that details of a film's certification should be clearly displayed in a prominent position at the entrance of cinemas and on the screen at the beginning of a film to avoid any confusion. The Musical Copyright Bill. The agreement broke down when it became apparent that RKO was not prepared to make available the kind of BFI Information Services 14 . By September 1931. as chairman. following the death of his predecessor. a sound equipment company was able to fulfil its brief and the resulting system proved very popular with British exhibitors. 1930 January 18th: A serious fire badly gutted Islington Studios which had to be closed down for a short period. those films produced under the agreement were to be made under the name of Association Radio Pictures (ARP). was appointed President of the British Board of Film Censors. Associated Sound Film Industries (ASFI). Elstree.000.000 company. Basil Dean announced that the company had reached an agreement with RKO. the company had the right to utilise both BTP’s De Forrest and the TobisKlangfilm sound patents. have presented inferior technical standards and have not offered personalities who have appealed to the American public”. exactly what was never publicly listed and negotiations between the Dutch and British companies continued well after the formation of ASFI but Wembley Studios was among the assets included in the deal. owned by British Talking Pictures. October 15th: A receiver was appointed to Whitehall Films. Its objective was to develop a cheap but reliable sound apparatus. At an extraordinary general meeting of Associated Talking Pictures. December In response to concern over unsuitable films being shown to unaccompanied children. 500 cinemas had installed BT-H equipment and after RCA and Western Electric it was the most used system in Britain.

Birmingham. Maurice Ostrer. Parrott and Lord Lee. Fidelity Films.000) and Argosy Films (£30. International Talking Screen Productions (£850.000 cash and 9.000) .000 ‘talkie’ houses.000 per film.000 shares in Gaumont-British in 1929. was put up for sale (see July). In exchange he received £375. rumours of the deal had been circulating for several months. However. British cinemas had opted to buy the American equipment. When asked at the CEA annual conference whether he thought the Film Act had been successful.000). Elstree. F. The voting shares are held: 4. The recommendation was that "a quality test be instituted. exclusive of the copyright costs of the story.010.finance necessary for producing the ‘quality’ films Dean wanted to make (see March 1933).H. The advent of ‘talkie’ films. Most of them had been set up on the wave of City and public enthusiasm following the introduction of the quota.000 in its first month. the financial reorganisation merely provided a stay of execution.750 by the Fox Film Corporation. February An affidavit by William Fox to New York courts gave details of the purchase by his company of 20. music and recording". with 100 each by Messrs R. MacDonald. Whitehall Studios.000. which used different and noncompatible techniques. During the winding up of British Phototone. together with the Musical Copyright Act (1930) made it necessary for the Cinematograph Exhibitors Association (representing cinemas) to renegotiate their agreement with the Performing Rights Society who used the opportunity to raise fees substantially.. A receiver was appointed to British Filmcraft. It controlled two studios . a number of ailing companies . necessary to play the hugely popular American films. had a capital of £350. June In an attempted salvage operation. From this point on. April The Sunday Express carried a story which showed that Fox had substantial shareholdings in and potential control of Gaumont-British: “Mr Isidore Ostrer transferred 368. Shareholders of the first three agreed to winding up proceedings being temporarily adjourned.B. a film extra. Mark Ostrer. March own sound system using 12” discs. the company went into liquidation in August 1932. John Maxwell.and that the law be amended so as to insist upon a minimum outlay of £10. 29th: British and Dominions purchased the freehold of its Elstree Studios which it had been leasing from John Maxwell since late 1929.” Gaumont's bid for United Picture Theatres was accepted in preference to one from John Maxwell's ABC Theatre Group.000.736 shares in Gaumont-British to a company called the Metropolis and Bradford Trust.893 ‘A' shares which have voting control of the trust which has a capital of £1. 570 had Western Electric equipment. The new company. . The Maxwell interest did strengthen the bargaining position of UPT shareholders who were able to hold out for better terms.agreed to amalgamate. ruled that this was one of a class of cases in which the contract was “for service and not of service” i. The judge. British Screen Productions (£250.principally British Filmcraft (£150. Audible Filmcraft. In order to provide Audible Filmcraft with a base for its productions Whitehall Studios (see February) was purchased and Whitehall Films became part of Audible Filmcraft.e. applied for compensation for a knee injury obtained during the filming of a panic sequence in the BIP film ATLANTIC. of the 1. May 1st: The FBI Film Group adopted a recommendation put forward by a special sub-committee. Consequently.750 by Mr isidore Ostrer and 4. The company discovered it was unable to market its BFI Information Services 15 23rd: Marie Mischel. On the whole.000. 24th: The Waldorf Cinema.000). Sparbrook. replied . launched in June 1928 to develop a British sound system. not an employee and consequently compensation could not be claimed under The Compensation Act. the company lost all the money which had been sunk into the production of a disc based apparatus and films using this system. whose decision set a legal precedent. appointed to consider the question of improving the standard of British films and securing amendments to the Cinematograph Films Act. the stealthy building up operation undertaken by the two circuits was transformed into a competitive scramble.Walthamstow which was being used for the production of educational films and BSP's Worton Hall Studios which had been leased to another film company. head of BIP. Discussions continued into July when the Gaumont bid was approved at an extraordinary UFT general meeting. it was revealed that the company had run up losses of £66. became the 1000th cinema in the British Isles to be equipped with sound reproducing apparatus.

Crow. and there is no intention of surrendering this control to any foreign interest. Subsequently Whitehall Films was listed as one of the companies involved in AF although it had gone into liquidation in November 1929. were of a quality which marked them as good to very good.000 Ordinary shares of the Gaumont-British Corporation. The renaissance of the British picture is the result of the Act. It was revealed that the new owner of Whitehall Studios. At the International Exhibitors Conference in Brussels. September Nettlefold Studios. no fewer than 118 British films were presented to the trade in London.G.219. Herbert Wilcox's production company. November The Government promised to carry out an investigation into the hours of employment of attendants and operators in cinemas. There is no truth in this statement which is sufficiently disproved by the fact that the Metropolis and Bradford Trust Company.V. Of the rest. and thus owns control by a substantial voting majority. and my appointment as its chairman. the Americans taking 75% and Klang Tobis 25%.000 out of the 5. December British and Dominions. 4th: After much confusion as to whether local authorities could license cinemas for Sunday Opening. Britain was to be shared. R. A critical analysis reveals that of these. . 35 were of average appeal.” Bioscope. Canada. Moreover. Australia and New Zealand were to be exclusive to RCA and Western Electric. while the somewhat alarming number of 37 were definitely bad. outlined the problems facing British cinema owners: chiefly the high cost of wiring. It had previously been assumed that the local authority did have the right to permit Sunday opening and this was usually tied to certain conditions.000 per film was unsuccessfully introduced in the House of Commons under the Ten Minute Rule Bill procedure. “During the year ended September 30th. owns in its own right over 3. The LCC lodged an appeal heard on the 27th January 1931. Norman revealed details of a scheme to rebuild and re-equip Weir House Studios.” Lord Lee issued a statement strongly denying that Fox had acquired control of Gaumont-British: “My attention has been drawn to various statements to which considerable publicity has been given to the effect that the control of the Gaumont-British Picture Corporation has passed into the hands of the Fox Film Corporation of America. 23 judged by generally accepted standards of entertainment value. a test case was heard in the High Courts. Walton-on-Thames. Teddington for sound production. 1931 January Henry Edwards and E. The Court decided that the Sunday Observance Act 1780 prohibited entertainments on Sunday where the public paid for admission and that the LCC had been granting permission for something they had no power to do and something expressly forbidden by the Sunday Observance Act. one of which was that some of the profits should go to charities. 6th June.000. Ltd of which I am the permanent chairman. which had been closed for reconstruction and installation of (RCA) sound facilities reopened. the shortage of films and above all the high guarantees and high rental percentages which the American companies were charging for sound films: “The important and burning question which affects us today is the amount that is left to us of the receipts after paying the renters for film hire and meeting the additional expenses incidental to the new order of things.” Quoted in Bioscope. they planned to make pictures on their own account and let studio space to independent producers.” The statement made no reference to who controlled the M&B Trust (see April). 23 were so far below the desired standards as to rank as 'poor’.“Undoubtedly it had. The action followed an objection by the Entertainments' Protection Association to the giving of a Sunday license by the London County Council to the Streatham Astoria. July 22nd: A Private Member's Bill to amend the Film Act so as to raise the British quota gradually to 50% by 1934 and to lay down a minimum production cost of £12. The rest of the world was left as open territory.000. the constitution of the Metropolis and Bradford Trust Company. annouced a loss of £127.000 plus a number of BFI Information Services 16 AF shares. ranking as fairly good. Elstree. It has created conditions essential to a large and substantial British film industry and has attracted the attention of financiers to this business. 5th November. An important conference took place in Paris between the 3 major manufacturers of sound equipment at which an agreement was reached as to their respective territories: USA. were specifically designed to ensure and preserve British control. was Audible Filmcraft and that the purchase price had been £15. Vice President of the CEA.

with whom they had contracts to make quota films. no evidence was ever produced. The infrastructure necessary for filmmaking had required the building of new BFI Information Services 17 studios and the purchase of expensive technical equipment. February 27th: Radio-Keith-Orpheum (RKO) was registered as a private company with a capital of £10. The difference between the individual theatreowner and the producer renter-exhbitor combine equals the difference between being an . it still enjoys a power which only complete monopoly could strengthen. If films are great they associate their country and the works of their country with greatness.” BIP acquired control of British instructional Films (including the company's Welwyn Studios) and Pro Patria Films (BIP’s distribution outlet) by offering the shareholders of these two companies an exchange of shares. RCA and Western Electric. The allegation was vigorously denied by both the American renters. There is the greater gain which comes through that form of independence in bargaining which it is the main purpose of combination to achieve. the objectives of the breakaway group were to be “the dissemination of knowledge and the elucidation of technical problems.“America's command of the film markets has done a great deal to improve her position in the commercial markets. In this era of centralisation and unification the lesson is born home by sheer weight of fact.” 22nd: G. Sunday Opening was to become a major issue throughout 1931 and for much of 1932. But the consequent reduction of overheads represents only an infinitesimal factor in the advantages of the combine. By an association of ideas the plumbing of America is desirable because the Hollywood stars who are associated (so often) with it proclaim so ably their own desirability. made the following observations on the significance of the £506. It has not been done by propaganda films. Kine Weekly. 27th: The Appeal Court upheld the decision of the High Court and reiterated that in granting the Streatham Astoria a license to open on Sundays. Let a youthful Hollywood blonde push them. March The trade journal. A subsequent proposal. recommending the amendment of the Cinematograph Films Act (1927) so that a proportion of British equipment had to be used in the making of British films was rejected by the President of the Board of Trade. kitchen appliances. Bioscope. with sounds that accentuate the situation and nauseate the listener. and the parlour sofa. use them. and the world is stunned into an illusion of their superior virtue. and its products as the last word in fashion. Isaacs introduced a private members bill. as no British producer was prepared to risk being boycotted by his primary source of work. made by the British equipment lobby. Expenditure far outweighed income and this led to either companies going bankrupt or being taken over. This was another instance of companies floated in the wake of quota being unable to recoup the initially heavy financial outlay. In consequence.810 profits made by PCT (Britain's largest circuit): “Relatively few independent exhibitors can show returns on their own theatre investments such as are revealed by the latest PCT report.are effected by the co-ordination of scattered units. 19th: The draft constitution of British Kinematograph Sound Society (now BKSTS) was approved. Edward Shortt. And so on to carpet sweepers.” John Grierson. new President of the British Board of Film Censors sent a circular letter to all film companies: “Of late it has been noticed with regret that films are being produced in which the development of the theme necessitates a continuous succession of grossly brutal and sordid themes accompanied. that if they used British sound equipment their contracts would not be renewed. in the case of auditory films. The Sunday Observance Act (1780) Amendment Bill in the House of Comnons. no film will receive the Board's certificate in which the theme depends upon the intense brutality of unrelieved sordidness of the scenes depicted. the LCC had been acting outside its jurisdiction. but by the propaganda which goes with films. A major controversy resulted from a story carried in the trade press claiming that certain independent production companies had been informed by the American renters. or kick her pretty heels on them. it received no support from the Government which was waiting for the outcome of the LCC appeal (see 27th January) before committing itself to any action.tremendous in their significance . So it goes. PCT is often in the position of negotiating terms with its own producer-renter affiliates: when circumstances are different. Economies .A. No modification can render such films fit for public exhibition. And the reason is fairly clear. in future. the Board takes this opportunity of notifying the Trade that. 8th January.000. That is why it is silly to argue that PCT owe their success largely to the fact that they have refused to pay more than 25% on sharing terms while independent showmen have risen to 40% and even 50%. This organisation had initally been a branch of the American Society of Motion Picture Engineers. If they are merry and modern and youthful in spirit they establish their country as a country of the future.

000 on 28th August. 25th March.000 was to be spent on the first schedule of 10-12 films.. Elstree. which is therefore in control of the Company. £200. negotiated the lease of Teddington Studios for a period of two years with an option to renew. etc. to be called Associated Radio Studios. in some cases the Board definitely advised against the production.‘independent’ and enjoying real independence. not only since the passing of the Films Act. June “Before the sound revolution broke. August Warners. these were to be used for producing all quota films for RKO. a paper presented by Simon Rowson to the CBA Annual Conference. 6th: Basil Dean.” May “Today. John Maxwell announced an issue of 1. were to be built at Ealing. ‘Exhibitors Problems and Anglo American Relations’. July The re-equipped Teddington Studios opened. Kine Weekly.” April 2nd: The Home Secretary introduced The Sunday Performances Regulation Bill “to enable licenses to be granted permitting the opening and use of places on Sunday for certain entertainments and for debates.this was an interim measure to allow cinemas to open legally on Sunday until .105. BFI Information Services 18 Ltd. Chairman of Associated Talking Pictures. it was immediately oversubscribed. September 31st: The Sunday Performances (Temporary) Regulations Bill was read for the first time in the House of Commons ..000 5 shilling Ordinary Shares. it became common practice for film producers to submit scripts to the British Board of Film Censors for vetting prior to filming. and 300 by three other individuals. there are twenty feature pictures in the making in our studios simultaneously. This is a record.” Editorial. 3. but in the entire history of British production. Opened on the 31st August. Warner Brothers-First National Productions was registered as a private company with a nominal capital of £1. subsequent deletions were found necessary. During the 1930s. when the United Artists picture THE BAT WHISPERS was displayed on a screen 31ft wide and 16ft high. Ltd. 21st May.750 by the United American investing Corporation. The following response was made by the President of the Board of Trade following questions in the House of Commons on the ownership of GaumontBritish: “Of the 5 million ordinary shares of the Gaumont-British Picture Corporation Ltd.. No fees are charged for perusing and reporting on a synopsis..000). The sharp reduction or complete extinction of the foreign market is represented by a figure of probably not more than 5% of the entire producers' revenue. dated November 5th 1930. which had announced in July it was to set up an all-British production unit which would turn out at least 15 films in its first year. subsequently (25th June) Paramount British Productions was registered as a private company and a production unit established at British and Dominions Studios. In other cases suggested modifications of dialogue or incident were made with the result that very few. The annual return of the Metropolis and Bradford Trust Co. Marble Arch." Bioscope. At the annual general meeting of British International Pictures. (The tie-up with RKO had been announced in January and ARP Studios was registed on 30th March with a capital of £5. announced that new studios. if any. shows that of the ten thousand ‘A’ shares which alone carry voting rights. Production began in September with Murder in Monte Carlo. 4.” Determined opposition to the Bill from the Lord's Day Observance Lobby resulted in it making very slow progress through the Commons and in September the Bill was withdrawn to enable the Government (prior to its resignation following a political crisis) to introduce a temporary measure. there has been an attempt to try and force the English market to make good the deficiencies in other markets”.000 are held by the Metropolis and Bradford Trust Co.950 are held by three persons of British nationality named Ostrer. The following quote from the Annual Report for 1930 published during March indicates how the practice was established: “In the last report mention was made that some British producers had discussed proposed productions with the Board prior to commencing work in the studio. An indication of the company's confidence in itself and in its reputation can be gathered from the fact that it was not felt necessary to underwrite the issue.and other foreign countries from 15% to 20%. Paramount produced its first film in Britain for ten years. 4. the English market was estimated to provide froi 20% to 25% of the entire revenue of American producers .This custom is on the increase and it would appear that in several cases considerable sums of money have been saved by the producers in adopting this procedure. 31st: The first wide screen presentation in Britain was given at the Regal.000. In face of this. scenario.

” Film Correspondent. Editorial. exhibitors and public authorities would know exactly where they stood in every case. Like the CEA Trading Scheme (see 26th October 1927) it was confronted by unified and unremitting opposition on the part of the KRS which ensured FICOS would be a failure. starring Leslie Howard and commissioned by Paramount. Gainsborough Studios .500. These figures are based on product already trade shown and are arrived at as follows: BIP Studios . Liverpool and Newcastle. 14th January. when for a time not a single films was being made in this country. On 15th October. Daily Herald.000 ft. the policy will probably be to aim at making a slightly smaller number than in 1931 and to make the subjects bigger and better.” Kine Weekly. Twickenham Studios 237. that from 1st February 1932 only sound-on-film copies would be made available by the company marked the end of sound-on-disc. October Alexander Korda started work on his first British film.000 ft. the length of sound negative recorded by RCA in this country to date is 1. Producers.000 ft. Nor was arbitrary action limited to the smaller and rural authorities. managing director of Warners in Britain.13. 6th January.an acceptable permanent solution could be worked out. February 1932 January “More than 200 talking films will be made this year in British studios.000. 6th January. Teddington Studios . SERVICE FOR LADIES. with a nominal capital of £100.000 ft. It was felt a strong argument for state censorship was that a final classification would be made which would apply all over the country. As we are organised at present.689. it subsequently moved into the Warners offices though nominally remaining a separate company. had been refusing to allow children to see "A" films. The following editorial reflected the film trade's widespread disatisfaction with the functioning of censorship arrangements: “The whole of the trade must look with anxiety at the present position of our censorship arrangements. November The Film Industries Co-operative Society (FICOS) was launched with the aim of establishing a big combine which would be able to book films for its members on a more economic basis than could be arranged independently. 14th January. maintenance. A WEDDING REHEARSAL starring Merle Oberon and Roland Young was to be Alexander Korda's first film under the London banner. renters.” Bioscope. watch committee or chief constable can re-classify any film. BIP's Managing Director. which have proved since the growth of talkies a veritable happy hunting ground for every crank who has ever seen a picture. l3th: London Film Productions was registered as a private company. Arthur Dent.000 ft. A first step was for First National to end its joint distribution arrangements with Pathe. After the split Pathe Pictures operated as a wholly owned subsidiary of the John Maxwell group. the distribution operation of the two companies in Britain was brought closer together. First National Film Distributors was registered as a private company. It was similar to the abortive CEA Trading Scheme of 1927.” Kine Weekly.000 ft. . and as a result some incongruous decisions have been recorded. 17th: The Council of the KRS issued a statement reaffirming its opposition to doing business with exhibitors organised into booking combines. The announcement by Max Milder. Gaumont-British acquired a controlling interest in Baird Television. At this time a large proportion of British production units were using the RCA recording system (the only important studio not listed above is Shepherd's Bush then closed for rebuilding) and these figures provide a good indicator of the volume of sound films being made in British studios. While being interviewed about the temporary closure of Elstree Studios for repairs and BFI Information Services 19 Following heavy losses. 1932 is to be a year of startling progress in the industry.000 ft. Compared with 1924.178. stated: “When production is resumed. That means four new pictures a week and an outlay of £2. Nettlefold Studios . even if accompanied by a guardian. December 28th: Ealing Studios was officially opened. Following the merger of Warner Brothers and First National in the USA. any licensing bench. It received the Royal Assent on 10th October. Gainsborough reduced its capital by half and made a new share issue.270. “Exclusive of newsreels. FICOS had been prompted largely by the high booking fees charged by the renters to independent exhibitors for sound pictures. for instance.83. Beaconsfield Studios -70.

24th: The Sunday Opening Bill (the third attempt to legislate for Sunday opening) was introduced in the House of Comnons by Oliver Stanley.. The new Shepherd' s Bush Studios. Sound City..” The sum involved amounted to approximately £4 million. During a visit to London. Now with the quota at 15%.000. Shepperton. issued a writ “for the purpose of recovering monies which the Fox Film Corporation contributed towards financing and investing in the shares of the Gaumont Picture Corporation. March “In the summer. announced it had purchased Littleton Park. In the widest economic sense. which had been formed two years previously and had been successfully making ‘book-movies’ dealing with sport and other subjects.This should be prevented by the introduction of an amendment to the Act by which films which are not 'recommended' and have not a vestige of entertainment should not be eligible for quota. and have sought to fulfil their quota by the purchase of films which normally would be held unfit for exhibition.. The first issue of Sight and Sound .registering shelving dodge has become too expensive. in several cases. “The film is the most powerful factor for national publicity and has a direct reaction on industrial and commercial relationships between nations.A Quarterly Review of Modern Aids to Learning was published by the British Institute of Adult Journals.The Flicker Production Co.” “Several renters of foreign films have publicly expressed their anger at the terms of quota regulations. opened (see February). music and recording. this buying . the cumulative effect of such films has been to give filmgoers an entirely false idea of genuinely British film effort. American companies would have been able to exploit the shortage to the tune of another 20% added to the excessive amounts already paid for film rentals. Even when the story in itself is not prohibitive. When the quota was smaller. announced it was intending to make forty films a year at a cost of £750. Gaumont-British. Under Secretary to the Home Office. 1st April. such renters.” CEA Annual Report published that month and covering the previous year. Although containing some general critical material. “There has been a tendency of late for films to become more and more daring.. exclusive of the copyright costs of the story. the journal was largely orientated towards film as a teaching medium. the necessity for a flourishing film industry is obvious.” Seaton Margrave. Had the famine conditions of the USA been reproduced in this country. rebuilt at a cost of £250.. Paramount announced that although it would continue to have a say in the stories and casting.. there appears to be a desire to stress the unpleasant aspect which is best described as ‘sex appeal’ with a wealth of detail which is altogether prohibitive for public exhibition. Sex films and others containing various phases of immorality and incidents which tend to bring the institution of marriage into contempt show a marked increase in numbers. Secondly.. purchased films merely for registration with the Board of Trade and set down their cost as a loss. its owner. Gaumont-British signed an agreement with UFA to co-operate on "the production of a number of films specifically designed for the English speaking world".000: the first film to go into production was Walter Forde's ROME EXPRESS. in this country we were saved from a similar experience through the large quantities of British films that had been produced steadily throughout the year. The Fox Film Corporation and the United American Investing Corp.” British Board of Film Censors Annual Report for 1931. their films would be produced for them by Herbert Wilcox's British and Dominion. the provision that BFI Information Services 20 each film produced for such purposes must cost at least £150 for each 100 ft produced with a maximum requirement of £10.” April A conference of British film societies held by invitation of the London Film Society decided that a Federation of British Film Societies should be established. May Following the success of Congress Dances. in my opinion. was opened. the one stage ready was to .000. but even so these recalcitrant renters are determined to acquire their quota films as cheaply as possible. a new studio complex at Shepperton.” (Joint Memorandum from Federation of British Industries and Trade Union Congress General Council presented to President of the Board of Trade on 4th April). The principal recommendations were: “the elimination of worthless films made especially in this country for quota purposes. Jack Warner announced “We have decided on an immediate plan of expansion and as soon as work can be started we shall begin on two big new stages. a 60-acre estate which was to become the site of a new studio to be known as Sound City (see May). the cinemas of the USA were faced with a serious shortage of product. Daily Mail.

In consequence it is proposed to place The Bioscope Publishing Co. Cinemas were given permission to open on Sunday under certain conditions: there had to be a working week of not more than 6 days for cinema employees. October 1st: The provisions of the Sunday Entertainment Act 1932 came into force. Advertising. This ended the company's long standing agreement with the Gaumont subsidiary. The last issue of the trade journal Bioscope published on 4th May carried the following statement: “It will have been observed that since September last. certain film advertising has been withheld from this journal. councils had to hold public meetings and if more than 100 electors or one twentieth of the electorate objected then a poll of the electorate had to be held. Its main recommendation was the constitution of a National Film Institute under a Royal Charter. cinemas had to make a contribution to charity and a contribution to the Kinematography Fund (for the financing of a British Film Institute) Fox started using Wembley Studios as its British production base. the local licensing authority could give permission not only for that cinema but any other within their area to open without any further formalities. Herbert Wilcox announced that from January 1933 onwards all British & Dominions productions would be distributed in Britain and elsewhere by United Artists who guaranteed the US release of selected subjects. Another reason is that the majority of British talkies are devoid of entertainment. which traditionally had always been organised by the distributors. and the Cockney with his ‘Gor blime . However. was settled out of court. Regent Street. British Screen Productions. was issued. John Buchan introduced an amendment to the Sunday Opening Bill proposing that 5% of proceeds taken by cinemas on Sunday should go towards the maintenance of the Institute. The first issue appeared on June 15th. Ltd. July British Lion announced a big expansion in its renting activities. the amendment was eventually accepted. November Gaumont-British Theatres. The fop with his Oxford accent and the inevitable eyeglasses.000 claim taken out by the Fox Film Corporation against Isidore Ostrer. If a cinema within a given area had been allowed to open in the twelve months prior to 6th October 1931. 1887.be used by the company for its own productions and was available for hire to independents. An organisation called the British Association of Amateur Cinematographers was launched. Before an application to Parliament could be made. Among its objectives were the interchange of personnel and ideas. acquired control of Moss “Film producers and renters in London are all racking their brains to discover why it is that 90% of British pictures flop in Scotland. President of Gaumont-British Pictures Corporation and the Metropolis and Bradford Trust. Funereal conversations are boring. Registered in June 1930 with an authorised capital of £350. into voluntary liquidation. The Film in National Life. in those areas where cinemas had been previously refused permission for Sunday opening. The first course covering cinema technique to be introduced in a British academic institution was established at the Regent Polytechnic (now the Polytechnic of Central London). Beautiful scenery is not amusement. Ostrer agreed to two Fox representatives joining the board of Gaumont-British and to the GB circuit showing more Fox films. Subsequently.000. 4th May. 26th: Fox British Pictures was registered as a private company. W&F. The reasons should be obvious to anyone with a grain of intelligence: the filthy language is one. with a nominal capital of £100. it had been an amalgamation of a number of ailing British BFI Information Services 21 companies. a monthly priced at 1d. was withdrawn subsequent to Bioscope's support for a co-operative booking scheme for independent cinemas (see FICOS. Argosy Film Company and Whitehall Films. It had started publication as The Optical Magic Lantern Journal and Photographic Enlarger: a Magazine of Popular Science for the Lecture-room and the Domestic Circle. the issue of technical bulletins and the creation of a technical advice service.” Bioscope. November 1931). September The £4. further authorisation had to be gained from Parliament. 10th: The report of the Commission on Education and Cultural Films. June Kinematograph Weekly had its 25th birthday. A second stage was opened in January 1933. principally International Talking Screen Productions.000. Despite vehement opposition from the film trade lobby. August 3rd: Audible Filmcraft went into voluntary liquidation.

an influential Birmingham cinema owner. BFI Information Services 22 . Glasgow. Hollywood film industries executives met on Monday last and a statement was cabled to this country that a stoppage of all work is contemplated. “The new policy is to produce a number of pictures specifically for world release.” H. Despite the larger number of British films being made and distributed. distributors. a subsidiary of BIP. workshops. exhibition and distribution of films (including educational and cultural films) at home and abroad. 3rd November. and exhibitors) and cultural and educational interests. f) To maintain a national repository of films of permanent value. Improved facilities became available at Sound City. b) To influence public opinion to appreciate the value of films as entertainment and instruction. devised a scheme whereby he would build up a national circuit based on a number of separate and locally based companies each of which would finance the building of a cinema in their area through private subscription. distribution. with the opening of a large new floor. It would be impossible to detail here the suggestive jokes I have seen and heard in talkies passed by the censor lately.me’ sense of humour get the bird on every occasion. Colour has virtually collapsed and there is no hope of its becoming a commercial proposition again. 1933 January “There is practically no colour in use in America now. types of films and apparatus. and during the summer and autumn season there will be a real dearth of good pictures even upon the present schedule. The film trade is incensed by the apparent inconsistency of the decisions. c) To advise educational institutions and other organisations and persons as to sources and conditions of supply.000 issue of 4. Four features a year were to be produced. e) To promote and undertake research into the various uses of the film and of allied visual and auditory apparatus.” Arthur Dent. 9th March.” Kine Weekly. the total feature films on offer is less than for some time. 21st January. The absence of quotations of dollars against pounds has put a temporary stop to financial transactions between this country and America and until the moratorium declared in America is at an end there can be no remission money either way. The first three such companies registered were the Odeon (Canterbury). Managing Director of BIP. the Park Cinema. etc. 18th November. 7th January. Allegations have been made that the censors are afraid of the powerful American organisations whose productions they are paid to censor and who have a majority on the trade committee which deals with censorship matters. was to run its own production unit based at Welwyn which during recent years had only been used for shorts. Teddington Studios was also being extended and improved. Marsh. If such action takes place it is bound to affect adversely the position of the exhibitor in this country. Oscar Deutsch.000.” Letter to Kine Weekly from Richard Williamson. This means that money due to producing companies in America is held up and this coupled with the lack of ready money in the hands of the American public means no money can flow into Hollywood to pay the necessary outgoings of production. Today's Cinema.25% debenture stock made by Gaumont-British proved a failure and underwriters had to take up 65% of the issue. Shepperton. The Joint Committee of the Commission on Educational and Cultural Films and bodies representing the film trade reached agreement on a scheme for the setting up of a British Film Institute. British producers claim that their films are much more harshly treated. March “America's financial crisis and the means taken to handle an admittedly serious situation are not without their repercussions upon the film industry in this country. d) To act as a means of liaison between the trade (producers. embracing British and American talent. February A refunding operation involving a £5.” New Era. Today's Cinema. Under Section 2 of the Sunday Entertainments Act a fund was to be established for the purpose of encouraging the use and development of the kinematograph as a means of entertainment and instruction. and exhibition.T. and the conditions of production. John Maxwell announced Pathe Pictures. Managing Director of British and Dominions. “The British film censors are too old and innocent to understand the meaning of many of the lines they pass. the Odeon (Worcester Park) and the Odeon (Worthing). Its specific objectives included: a) To act as a clearing house for information on all matters affecting the production.

000. a report by the Department of Overseas Trade. April Alexander Korda announced he had completed arrangements to raise the capital of London Film Productions from £20. h) To act. especially in the depressed North. 12th May. The average admission price was set at 8d and weekly box office receipts estimated at £800. Because our pictures were made on the basis of Anglo-American co-operation.” (Paper given to the Royal Empire Society by Simon Rowson . this is twice as much as the quota requirement.000.000. That sum included about £7. with an eye mainly to the British Empire market.000. Alfred Hitchcock has been assigned to the latter film.000 beyond the registered capital of £3. and always have been.500. Associated British Film Distributors (ABFD). 12th: The first official meeting took place between technicians at Gaumont Studios interested in forming a film technicians union and Captain Cope who had been suggested as a potential organiser. Our business will in future be built upon entirely British lines.000. The foreign market for their films declined by nearly two-thirds. the name of Basil Dean's Associated Radio Pictures Studios at Ealing was changed to Associated Talking Pictures (ATP) Studios (see March). May 1st: Following the break with RKO-Radio. According to his figures the weekly attendance varied between 20.000 depending on the quality of the programme and the state of the weather. that of public companies making large share issues.000. one of the major independent production companies to be floated as a consequence of the introduction of a quota requirement (see May 1928) went into liquidation.note the discrepancy between the average weekly attendance figure given here and that in the Kennedy figures in the preceding entry). i) To undertake the certification of films as educational.000 for Entertainment Tax. “Since the beginning of this year British film studios have been working at increased pressure. nearly half of the present figure for the US. US Trade Commissioner in London.000 to £100.” (Statistics compiled by M. 13th April.000 a week. It has therefore been decided to reorientate our policy.000 and 28.principally insurance companies -covering expenditure on production programnes and studio development schemes. an entirely British project financed entirely by British capital. The average price paid for admission was about ninepence which represented about 960. chairman of both Ealing and ABFD stated: “It cannot be too often pointed out that the ARP Studios (shortly to be renamed Associated Talking Pictures Studios) are. Kine Weekly 9th March).000 weekly. The world economic crisis has told against the chances of the successful working out of this AngloAmerican scheme. This has never been the case. They are Wings over the Jungle (never realised) and Henry the Eighth. Kennedy.000. and the highest known per capita attendance of any country in the world at present. Gaumont-British Picture Corporation increased its nominal capital by the addition of £2.” Daily Herald. As a result very great care is being given to the production of films for the foreign markets.” Kine Weekly. Today there is not a single idle studio and a record number of films are being produced. in order to embark on an expanded film programme: “two films will be started immediately after the Easter holidays. “The year 1932 was a very trying one for the (US) film producing corporations.000. Following the increasing widespread popularity of twopenny (2d) matinees. was formed to handle films produced at ARP Studios. BFI Information Services 23 “Last year the amount paid by the public into all the cinemas of Great Britain was about £43. The restriction in the foreign markets is due in most European countries to the quota system employed in those countries in favour of local production.” 'Economic Trade Conditions in the USA'. and the home market has also been very much affected by the depressed economic conditions.g) To compile and maintain a descriptive and critical catalogue of films of educational and cultural value. The Blattner bankruptcy marked the end of the kind of finance which had been funding production in the immediate post quota years i. A new renting company. Ealing. Film production finance in the mid-Thirties was largely obtained on the strength of guarantees made by finance companies .000 admissions a year or 18. as an advisory body to the Goverment Departments concerned with the use and control of films. with a population only about a third as high as the US has a current movie attendance averaging 24.000.750. if required. “England.500. we have sometimas been considered as an off-shoot of the RKO company.N.000. cultural. or scientific.e. .” The Blattner Corporation. Basil Dean. the Manchester CEA attempted to introduce minimum admission charge of 3d in cinemas throughout the country. About 25% of screen space in England during 1932 was occupied by British product. The company had been facing serious financial problems for some time and had never paid a dividend.

The outcome of this meeting was the formation of the Association of Cine-Technicians (ACT). “American accents are to be grafted on to British actors' voices in talkies to make them acceptable to the Middle West. So while American accents are good enough for Britain, British accents are not good enough for the US.” Daily Herald, 13th May. “Among the causes of neurosis in city children, food intoxication may be mentioned, lack of hygene and last, but not least, frequenting cinemas. During my career as an inspector of establishments for abnormal children, I have often had occasion to note the pernicious and sometimes irremediable effect of cinema scenes on predisposed imaginations. They are sometimes sufficient to deviate a person from the normal path for the whole of his life.” (Dr. Victor Kuettte, International Review of Educational Cinematography (League of Nations), reported in Today's Cinema, 15th May). 18th: Murray Silverstone, managing director of United Artists and I. Toeplitz de Grand Ry and Alexander Korda, joint directors of London Film Productions, signed an agreement under which UA was to distribute London Films, both in Britain and the US. The contract covered the making of fivesix films a year, and it was agreed to spend at least £500,000 over a two year period. The first film to be delivered was THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII. It was planned to spend a minimum of £40,000 on each picture. This agreement together with the one signed at the end of 1932 with British and Dominions represented a more serious interest in British films on the part of a major American company than had been demonstrated previously. “Although the Cinematograph Films Act has greatly benefited the British exhibitor by placing restrictions on ‘blind’ booking, there is reason to believe that in some quarters the law is being evaded. The Act makes illegal any booking contract for a period of more than six months in advance. But this provision is being defeated by 'gentlemen's agreements' to take so many films at such-andsuch a price. The terms are pencilled in, and the agreement is retained until the proper time comes around, and then forwarded to the renters' head office for filing.” Daily Telegraph, 19th May. “Cinemas in many parts of the country yesterday were packed with cheerful people largely of the hard-working class, whose only chance of recreation is their Sunday. A year ago most of these people were spending the hours aimlessly walking the streets or uncomfortably overcrowding such parks as were within their reach. Before the Sunday Entertainments Act became law in July 1932 fewer than 80 local authorities permitted Sunday opening of cinemas. Under the new Act which provides local option, it is estimated that the BFI Information Services 24

number has been more than doubled. The fight for Sunday cinemas is prolonged and furious. Advocates of brighter Sundays are bombarding the authorities with arguments denouncing Grundyism and upholding freedom, reinforced with cries voicing the necessity of providing clean entertainment for the 'loafing' youth of today.” Daily Express, 22nd May. “The influence of the film upon the young and adolescent is unknown in its magnitude. it is, in fact, probably the greatest power for good or evil that we know in our country at present. I know nothing to which the loyal citizens should devote more wholehearted attention than to the proper regulation of children. The real future of this country, the future of its people, of their children and grandchildren, depends on the way we regulate the cinema today.” Edward Shortt, President of BBFC, Manchester Guardian, 30th May. June Gainsborough replaced its RCA sound equipment with Gaumont's own British Acoustic system. “Two outstanding weaknesses of British films today are the lack of good stories and the predominance of comedy. The first weakness is not peculiar to Britain, however, and producers everywhere are trying to remedy it. America on average finds good stories. Britain seems to be picking for herself types of stories bounded on one side by broad farce and on the other by light comedy drama. Only two years ago the cry went up that British film comedy was dying. Producers had a ready answer. During 1931, they made 67 comedies and romances as against 62 films under the broad heading of drama. Last year they brought out 76 comedies and romances and 62 of all kinds of dramas. It would be unfair to condemn British comedies altogether. There is always room in this world of not enough laughter for a good supply of comedies. But there is a desperate need for balance in British production. It needs body just as much as a fish needs bones. We and our Colonial cousins want to see the average man and woman on the screen - ordinary people whose lives would be like ours but for the complications of character and circumstances. We get them from America in film versions of Fanny Hurst and Edna Ferber novels. There must be stories in the average Briton if there are stories in the average American. Surely Britain has her own angle on the problems created by the shortcomings and gallantries of human nature. Some directors have attempted to get down to this everyday type of film but concentration on comedy seems to have grooved their minds.” Leeds Mercury, 26th June. July The L.C.C., setting the precedent for other local

authorities, announced that from January 1st. 1934, licensees would be obliged in cases where a film was classified by the BBFC as “Horrific”, i.e. one likely to frighten or horrify children, to exhibit a notice "This film is unsuitable for children". However, at this stage it was still left to the guardian's discretion as to whether their child could see an "H" certificated film. Columbia terminated the agreement under which its films were distributed in Britain through United Artists. Columbia British (registed on 3rd July with a nominal capital of £25,000) was formed to operate as an independent renting and producing concern. The first film scheduled was THE LADY IS WILLING starring Leslie Howard. 21st: Following the steady success of Sound City Ltd, Shepperton, a new company was registered as Sound City Films Ltd, with a capital of £175,000. A third sound stage was to be built to cope with the company's expanded production programme. Reginald Smith, managing director of PDC Distributors, announced the formation of a British production company. Triumph Film Co., and the acquisition of premises at Hammersmith to be converted into a sound film studio. PDC was to distribute the films made by Triumph but at this stage there were no formal links between the two companies (Triumph went into voluntary liquidation in late 1934). August

weak and puny infant the British film industry has grown into a strong and sturdy David that is ready and able to carry the battle into the Hollywood Goliath's camp.” Daily Dispatch, 8th August. In fact, the foothold the Americans had already established, the genuine popularity of American films and the financial links between circuits in the Dominions/Empire and American distributors meant that British films were unable to make any serious dent on the Empire markets. September Details of a £3,000,000 merger being planned between British International Pictures and Associated British Cinemas Ltd were given in the annual reports of the two companies; the new company was to be known as Associated British Picture Corporation (ABC was a subsidiary of BIP). Details of a scheme for the reorganisation of the renting interests of Gaumont-British were released; Gaumont-Ideal was to merge with W&F and the combined unit to operate under the title of Gaumont-British Distributors. 30th: The British Film Institute was registered as a company (see March). 30th: The Empire Marketing Board and its film unit disbanded - Stephen Tallents was invited to join the staff of the Post Office and took the film unit and film library with him. October

Under the terms of a contract signed with ATP, Gracie Fields became the top earning British star, receiving between £22,000-£25,000 per picture. Both Gaumont-British and London Films announced a £1,000,000 production programme for the following year. “Britain and America are at War! The battlegrounds are many and spread over our Dominions and Colonies - Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India and the smaller lands of the Empire on which the sun still resolutely refuses to set. The fight is keen, and on America's side intensely bitter, for the fruits of victory are plums indeed - our Empire film markets which Hollywood has gathered in for so long. Slowly but surely British films are coming into their own in Britain's lands across the sea. Slowly but with ever increasing strength they are blazing the trail for British studios throughout those profitable regions where American films have enjoyed the monopoly practically ever since Hollywood began. Hollywood is fighting now for the money of our Empire filmgoing public as it has never fought before. It is fighting hard because it needs that money badly, because the dollar is not quite the almighty thing it once was, and because it realises that from a BFI Information Services 25

12th: The premiere of THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII took place at the Radio City Music Hall, New York; the film broke box office records, taking over £7,000 in its first week. The film continued to do well throughout the USA and became the top earning British film to date taking over £500,000 on its first world run. 19th: At an extraordinary meeting of British International Pictures, shareholders approved a proposal to change the name of the company to Associated British Picture Corporation. The different parts of the Maxwell organisation such as BIP and Wardour Distributors did not start trading under the ABPC name until 31st March 1937. An independent Filmmakers Association was organised to co-ordinate the efforts of those filmmakers seriously engaged in the production of experimental, documentary and educational films. November The annual general meeting of British and Dominions approved a capital reorganisation of the company, involving a 75% reduction of capital and a total writing off of £224,340.

Gaumont formed a subsidiary, G-B Instructional, Ltd (registered on 6th November) for the production and distribution of "educational and industrial propaganda films". 6th: Consolidated Film Studios was registered by J .V. Bryson (former head of Paramount British) and Laurence Evans as a private company with a nominal capital of £55,000. This new company took over the lease to Whitehall Studios, Elstree, which had belonged to the bankrupt Audible Filmcraft/Whitehall Films. “For the first half of this year British film positives into the US have increased by 8%. The total footage is over 13,500,000 feet against just over 7,000,000 in the corresponding period a year ago... At the same time, American importations into this country have declined from 12,000,000 feet of positives to nearly 7,500,000 feet. This is the greatest indication of how British films have conquered their own home market.” Morning Post, llth November. “£4 million will be spent on the production of nearly 200 British films during the next 12 months. This figure is easily the highest in the record of the industry. Two companies alone account for more than £2 million between them, while two others budget to spend £500,000 each on film production. The remainder will be divided between the independent studios who operate outside the big producer-distributor-exhibitor circuit.” Sunday Dispatch, 12th November. December “During the period under review there has been a tendency for production costs to increase. This does not mean that the company is spending wastefully or extravagantly; on the contrary the films are being produced more efficiently and economically than ever before. Any increase in production cost is due to a decision by the directors that in the long run the production of ‘Quality Films’ is more economical and more profitable than making cheap and hasty products; for only with films of world standard in technique and entertainment can the company hold its own in the world market.” C.M. Woolf, Annual General Meeting of Gainsborough Pictures.

1930, 14.7%; in 1931, 16.7%; in 1932, 22%." The Cinema, 3rd January. “The new year promises to be a record one for kinema openings. Already four companies have plans for opening at least forty-two kinemas. Oscar Deutsch, chairman of the Odeon Circuit, has scheduled another twenty-five kinemas for 1934, making his circuit up to fifty, and C.J. Donadas, of County Cinemas, starts a programme of six more houses." Kine Weekly, llth January. “In my opinion, the first great need of a picture which is intended for the markets of the world is an international star... I believe that stories of English national life, set among familiar scenes, should be made and, indeed I intend to make some of these, but I shall not expect them to have the world market. National customs are interesting to foreigners much as travelogues of strange countries interest us, but the British film industry must become more cosmopolitan in outlook before British films can capture the entertainment markets of the world.” Julius Hagen, Managing Director, Twickenham Film Studios, Kine Weekly, llth January. Whether Britain should be making films for the world market was not an assumption at that time open to dispute and given the large number of American names appearing in British films in the mid-Thirties, the Hagen formula for success was one commonly subscribed to. “The weak spot of the British challenge to Hollywood lies primarily in the scenario department. Our authors have utterly failed to grasp the cinema technique. Perhaps they lack the camera mind. Perhaps the tradition of the stage and the novel still holds them in their grip. Whatever the reason, the established English author has contributed nothing to the development of the British film except, indirectly, as in THE GOOD COMPANIONS or THE CONSTANT NYMPH, by writing filmable novels.” The Times, 22nd January. An agreement covering music in cinemas was signed by the Performing Rights Society and the Cinematograph Exhibitors' Association. February

1934
January The Board of Trade figures for the year 1933 show that British films registered during the year have still continued to show an increase in percentage compared with all films registered. This increase has been maintained with only one set back since 1928. Board of Trade figures show that in 1928 the British percentage was 13.6%; in 1929, 11.5%; in BFI Information Services 26

“Whereas Gaumont-British, BIP, Gainsborough and the larger studios have agreements with the trade unions concerned governing normal hours and rates of pay for emergency overtime, a number of minor studios are alleged to be exploiting their workers to the extent of working 40 hours at a stretch without adequate remuneration. In some cases work has gone on for five days at a time, day and night.” Reynolds News, 18th February.

dressing rooms and cutting rooms.000 for 1934 from the Cinematograph Fund. C. He commented “under existing circumstances. Isleworth.” Kine Weekly. The time will come when the present tendency to desecrate moral standards will be suppressed.” Film correspondent. They are little short of a ramp for the promoters. Facilities at Worton Hall Studios. The British Film Institute was awarded a grant of £5. Elstree were in the process of being improved and extended. At least 100 halls have appeared since 1931 which are not sponsored by experienced members of the trade. Up to then. the CEA made arrangements for National Screen Services to supply non-copyright records. If British films are to be sold in America.M. improvements included a new sound studio. asked the President of the Board of Trade if he could reconsider the quota in terms of quality rather than quantity. Fox had depended upon outside sources for its supply of quota pictures.000 and . marked J. made at a cost of £2. March Following the failure to reach an agreement with the gramophone companies as to the level of fees which should be paid for the playing of records in cinemas. letter to Kine Weekly. then we must go to the United States and do the job for ourselves. Daily Herald. went over to feature production.700. but the independent exhibitors do not get them. 28th: Associated British Film Distributors took over PDC's operation. built wastefully by those who get fat fees. British National Films was formed as a private company with a nominal capital of £6. executive offices. were improved and extended. Consolidated Studios (previously Whitehall). Woolf. by the subjects on which the alleged ‘plots’ are based and by the extreme intimacy of the details depicted. re-opened. nor will coarseness be glorified.Triumph Studios. “I am no prude. MASTERSHIP received its first screening. a directly controlled production unit with its own studios at Wembley. “Mr. April Warner Brothers purchased Teddington Studios which they had been leasing since 1931. actor. of these 220 had average takings of not more than £10 per three days.” Miles Mander. 19th April. August Arrangements were completed for the establishment of Fox British Pictures Ltd. The agreement was short lived with PDC re-entering the distribution field in March 1935. B&D. Yet I frequently find myself embarrassed when at the cinema. The 1934 KRS annual report revealed that 1. previously used for instructional films. I do not deny that at times. Sir Reginald Mitchell Banks. Sir Adrian Baillie. lest they should be degraded. outlined a scheme for the direct distribution of GB productions in the USA. but they are few and far between. there emerges out of the muck of mediocre British films a super picture that will compare favourably with anything produced in Hollywood. In the House of Commons. was published. The first issue of the BFI journal. Hammersmith. A maximum programme of 3 hours was agreed upon by the major circuits. MP. will it be possible for boys and girls to visit the cinema without fear. Charles Laughton became the first actor to win an Academy Award for a performance in a British film with his role in THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII. this 20 minute short. 2nd August. Park Cinema. and financed by unlucky investors who little know the conditions of the business. 6th April. Sidney Bernstein. our drawings go down 100%. When that day comes. Gaumont. scriptwriter) News Chronicle. a leading member of the film trade. Joint Managing Director of GaumontBritish. and not till then. Dennistown.200 exhibitors had average daily takings of between £1 and £8. including the difficulty of getting good films. Genuine emotion will no longer be subordinated to cheap sensation. July The first Annual General Meeting of the Association of Cine-Technicians was held at the Poland Street Rehearsal Room under the chairmanship of its President. Monthly Film Bulletin. 20th March. Work on building new studio floors at Twickenham and Ealing began. Almost every time we show a British film. Merton Park. told me last night that in the last two years over £4 million had been invested in certain BFI Information Services 27 new cinema buildings and will certainly be lost. Arthur Rank's first venture into film production. “90% of the British films I have trade reviewed lately are unfit to be shown in any kinema. BIP and London Films have put out some masterly paybox films. we cannot expect American companies to sell our films on the same basis as their own.” Richard Williamson. (well-known director. I have never lived in the suburbs.

Arthur Rank. 1935 January “The past year has broken all records for kinema building. September 17th: At the official opening of the new Twickenham Sound stage. “Renewed speculation as to the future of colour films is certain to be aroused by the forthcoming presentation of LA CUCARACHA. while giving a clean bill of health to typical American pictures of the very class that gave rise to the ‘cleaning-up’ movement. Korda’s London Films took over the lease of Worton Hall Studios. At the annual general meeting of Associated British Picture Corporation. Behind it. or a weekly average of 18. Ealing. which was shown privately in London yesterday.000 share issue. Its prosperity has become a matter of national prestige. there is very Big Business. immoral and unfit for public exhibition’ certain outstanding English pictures to which no exception can be taken on moral grounds.000 production schedule. and will shortly be distributed throughout the country.000. but it illustrates the possibilities of propaganda directed against the British film by those interested in keeping it out of the United States. a new two-reel feature made in the recently perfected Technicolor process.000. announced a £200. Lady Yule and J. a move advocated by the County Councils Association. George Elvin became General Secretary of the ACT. the Mussolini Cup. the company's managing director. In a paper to the British Association at Aberdeen. Two new sound stages at Associated Talking Pictures Studios. John Maxwell outlined major plans concerning the future of the company including a £4.25 million. Herbert Wilcox's British “super” production NELL GWYNN was banned by the US censors. Leslie Fuller Productions acquired Blattner Studios. the number of kinema openings fell only a few short of the 150 mark. He also calculated that in 1933 remittances for US films earnings in Britain stood at £5. Isleworth.000 capital re-organisation and a £2. acquired the Fishery. Work on building a new sound floor at Welwyn commenced. Bucks.500. .” Kine Weekly. October Fox British Productions took over the lease of Wembley Park Studios. Alexander Korda's London Film Productions Ltd. RCA lost an action brought against Gaumont for alleged infringements of recording patents. April Anglo Amalgamated Renters (with a registered capital of £175. February Gaumont-British acquired substantial (though not controlling) interests in the Union Cinema Company which controlled sixty cinemas.000) was formed to distribute British films in the United States. Deputy Chairman of Grand National and C. 12th September. And it is perhaps significant that the latest development in the American ‘Clean Film’ campaign has been to label as ‘indecent. The contrast may be accidental. whereas receipts from British films shown in the USA were only £100. on which a large film studio was to be built. at the 2nd Venice Film Festival. Arthur Rank. a mansion in extensive grounds at Denham.” Morning Post.M. 2nd: J. MAN OF ARAN won the first prize.000. “The American film industry is remarkably wellorganised. The intention was to produce "British films with British themes for world distribution". announced that in future Gaumont-British would distribute Grand National's output. December The Films Advisory Committee advised the Board BFI Information Services 28 of Trade on the need to amend the Cinematograph Films Act (1927) with respect to the quality of quota films. 24th December. In spite of the keen war waged against overseating. Elstree.power to borrow up to £75. Julius Hagen. were officially opened.3 million. as represented both by the electrical engineering industry and by Wall Street. Its directors were Stephen Courtauld. 3rd January. among others. Woolf of Gaumont-British.. November The Home Office declined to bring newsreels under censorship.” Financial News. Simon Rowson estimated there were approximately 958 million admissions a year in Great Britain.

kidnapping. The studios BFI Information Services 29 are to be built on the 180 acre estate known as Iver Hall. 27th: General Film Distributors was registered as a private company with a nominal capital of £270.000 issue of £1 preference shares to finance the acquisition of cinemas both in London and the provinces. or shock the just susceptibilities of any reasonablyminded section of the community. must be allowed the same freedom as is accorded to other forms of dramatic art. the directors of which are Charles Boot and J. I cannot believe that such films are wholesome. a major independent producer. and thus to facilitate the distribution of their pictures in the American market. Many of the popular British films are made by studios allied to chains of cinemas. 3rd May. owing to differences of opinion as to the moral character of the pictures. PDC took over Triumph Studios. While this is so. President of BBFC in an address to CEA at Cardiff.000 by C.” Morning Post. July 2nd: The British premiere of BECKY SHARP the first three-tone Technicolor film.May C. Woolf. arson is just as prominently portrayed as of yore. Regent Street. Today he owns 53.000. 9th: The British Film Institute formally announced its intention of forming a National Film Library which would "preserve in a repository for posterity films of a national and historical value". but in future these will go to Odeons. the Code has been rigorously enforced and the reception of certain British films has been affected. took place at the New Gallery Cinema. Naturally they supply their own cinemas first. By May 1936. Other areas quickly followed London's lead. From October. Hammersmith (see July 1933) and announced its intention of making a programme of eight high grade first features. set up his own distribution subsidiary. It is estimated that the complete studios will cost in the region of £300. “There appears to be a tendency towards an increase in the number of films which come within the 'Horror' classification. ABPC made a 600. Fox Films merged with 20th Century. Rank is a director with British National Films and this producing company will occupy the first studio erected at Iver. 6th June. within certain limits. June “A private company has been formed entitled Pinewood Studios Ltd. murder. robbery with violence. Warners announced a £500. an agreement as regards the rates of wages and hours of employment was signed by the London and Home Counties Joint Conciliation Board of the Kinematograph industry representing the CEA. “Four years ago Oscar Deutsch opened his first cinema. pandering as they do to the love of the morbid and horrible. 12th June.M. he will control 200 . extenuate crime or vice. We are here to attend a conference with your producers. 27th June. observed: “In July last year. differences devised so that exhibitors may have a choice and might avoid showing the worst. Woolf (who had recently resigned as Managing Director of GB). visiting London as a representative of the American film industry with a specific brief to clarify the standards of morality adopted by US censors for the benefit of British producers. Previously independent cinemas have been able to compete for films by Korda.” Daily Mail.” Edward Shortt. Mr. The agreement was to come into operation on 2nd October. NATKE and the Musician’s Union. as the result of a nationwide purity campaign. deputy chairman and joint managing director of Gaumont-British Picture Corporation resigned.” Julius Hagen. which I think is unfortunate and undesirable. Twickenham Film Distributors.M. “Thousands of cinema owners are in revolt against the section of the Cinematograph Films Act which compels exhibitors to show an increasing percentage of quota of British films. to familiarise them with the requirements of the Code. the quotas for both exhibitors and renters will be 20%. I cannot believe that any single film can have any lasting effect on the public but the result of the same thing repeated over and over again might be undesirable. Arthur Rank. In recent productions the hero is not the criminal but the policeman but the whole gamut of gangster crime. for the purpose of erecting studios. Closely allied to the horror film is the new type of gangster film. regardless of the quantity or quality available. due to “ill-health. Martin Quigley.” Kine Weekly. Until now film renters have had to acquire a higher percentage of British films than has been compulsory in cinemas. I have always held the opinion that the film.000 film scheme involving the extension of Teddington Studios and the production of some quality films alongside the low-budget quota films on which the company had previously concentrated. 38 more are under construction and plans are well advanced for a further 40. always bearing in mind that it should be of a character which will not demoralise the public. 15th: After three years of negotiation. Work is to begin at once and the first stage is to be available for use in nine months.

I asked him where he got the idea that £60.000 should be spent on the average British picture with the chance of getting the money back and he replied cheerfully enough: “I have seen the figures of HENRY VIII'. 5th September. with the result costs are being forced up all round.. There are nearly a score of lesser firms at work. Eight major producing companies are hard at work.. this was the first serious case of investors losing large sums through investment in an independent production aimed at the world market . head of Paramount.4% can be traced as having made pictures or are in the process of making a picture. quoted in The Edinburgh Evening Dispatch. some making five films at once.000 will be spent on British films this year. Kalmus (originator of the Technicolor process) over the setting up of a Technicolor laboratory at Denham. Although.000.000 scheme to develop Milheath Studios at Bushey was announced. August A £200. But thousands of pounds are waiting to be spent on films that cannot begin because of a shortage of one thing or another.” Statement by John Maxwell. Chairman at the Associated British Picture Corporation Annual General Meeting. or 22. Entertainment tax relief on cheaper cinema seats was introduced. Arthur Rank was the power behind GFD. who made DON QUIXOTE at a cost of £100. “I did not of course intend my reference to apply to established concerns. General Film Distributors was rapidly becoming a major force in the film industry and was obviously being backed by somebody with money. who had recently established the renting unit.000 to £100. It is estimated that £2.000 each. financial difficulties had forced the company to sell the studios and it went into liquidation in January 1936. “The British film business is growing so fast that it is finding itself short of nearly everything it requires . “British film production seems to be looked upon as a sort of new Klondyke . Union Cinemas completed a £1. head of the newly merged Twentieth Century-Fox. 28th July. plunge into picture-making and leave a large loss behind them.000 are being spent on these films. but he was also to operate an independent production company. An agreement was reached between Alexander Korda and Dr.” Kine Weekly. September Alexander Korda joined the board of United Artists. In all some 200 pictures will be made this year .000 from confiding City gentlemen.000 production programme. I was referring to what I may call inexperienced promoters who with no particular or intimate inside knowledge of the business.a land flowing with easy money for all and sundry. 20th July. Independent Producers Studios acquired Whitehall Studios.except money! There are not enough studios. stars. Herbert Wilcox BFI Information Services 30 Productions.. I know of large sums of money advanced on pictures having been lost. General Film Distributors. raise £50. it became known around this time that J. Sidney Kent.many more were to follow.equalling nearly half of Hollywood's output.000 or £60.500.” Jesse Lasky. writers or cameramen. 5th August British Lion secured the UK distribution of Republic Pictures. Woolf was getting finance from insurance companies.000 deal which added another 32 properties to the circuit.000 was spent on it.. “An analysis of film producing promotions registered during 1934 reveals the fact that of the 67 companies registered. In line with its aggressive programme of expansion.cinemas. During the last year or so. technicians of all sorts. extended his activities to production by becoming Managing Director of British and Dominions.000 went into bankruptcy. and I would deplore a return to the conditions which existed in 1928-29 when money amounting to two millions was lost in the liquidation and reconstruction of film production companies. Herbert Wilcox's contract as director of productions was renewed. of which Woolf was to be Chairman and £750. Sums varying from £6. C.” Evening News. directors.000 was to be spent on the first year' s programmes.” Sunday Chronicle. 27th: Max Schach's Capitol Films announced a £600. “I foresee no serious threat to the film industry through the practical application of television. the company's output was to be distributed by General Film Distributors. Woolf. The Klondyke fever is due in part to the outstanding success of THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII. Elstree. By November. arrived in London to launch the company's plans for making ten pictures a year at an average cost of £100. The financial backer of a film recently made cheerfully told me that in going into the proposition he knew it was not worth while making a British picture unless at least £60. Nelson Films. like everyone else. Yet another promoter who had financed a picture costing .M. Large sums of money are being spent extravagantly and wastefully. only 15.

000 grosses which means £65. Hutchinson. clarifying the remarks he made at the ABPC Annual General Meeting in Kine Weekly.£70. and that as against this there are at the moment 30 to 40 pictures pending. Star values are more important than story values. but few inquiries concerning colour.000 from £210. etc. The Association of Cine-Technicians issued a statement expressing “grave alarm at the continued employment of foreign technicians whose skill is not superior to that of British technicians. it was also believed that the departure of Michael Balcon. British Lion Film Corporation increased its capital by £540. Of these prizes.” Daily Herald. six or more are carried off by our American competitors. October Gaumont-British and the National Association of Theatrical Employees reached a wages agreement. carpenters. where. five or six for British companies. was imminent. props. painters and other craft workers. leaving five millions available for division amongst all the feature pictures put out in this country in one year.W. each of which it is claimed to have cost £60. furthermore. “So many ‘bucket shop’ film concerns have sprung up and disappeared within the past year that warnings are being issued to actors. This was the beginning of planning for the conduct of propaganda in the eventuality of any forthcoming hostilities. The Committee of Imperial Defence set up a special sub-committee to put forward recommendations as to the detailed organisation of the Ministry of Information. meal breaks and night shifts for plasterers. MGM announced it was setting up a production unit in Britain: “The production and star value of the films to be made here were to equal those of the best American films”. 5th September.000 or so net to the producer available for British pictures in the year. 29th: the main studio at Twickenham Film Studios was completely destroyed by fire with damage estimated at £100.were being released from their contracts and would soon be leaving the company. 21st September. “To advertise a British programme is good business. manager of the Ambassador. Chairman ABPC. Consider the matter in the light of economics.is as high as the Hollywood average.000. Julius Hagen purchased Consolidated Studios.000 was good enough to discuss this hazardous enterprise. many of whom are without regular employment. In general the cost of the average production which stood at about £70.000 before the depression and dropped in 1931 to £40.000 which had only brought back £30. Morning Post. has now climbed back to at least the former level”. in an address to the British BFI Information Services 31 Kinematograph Society on 14th October.at the moment approximately £30. Gaumont-British revealed that several of its leading directors . the production of programme pictures has been systemised so thoroughly that even the major companies make many films for £20. it is easy to calculate the average gross per picture. this covered the regulation of rates and conditions of employment.000.000 .000 in this country. A good organist is a distinct asset to a kinema”. “The greatest film production 'push' since the depression in 1931 is now taking place in Hollywood. November “The average cost of a British picture . a former British ambassador in Paris. 3rd November. head of production.000 to £70. I have made inquiries which satisfy me that not more than ten pictures a year gross £100.000. Alfred Hitchcock was the only remaining top flight director to remain.000. and when I asked him what was the basis of his estimate answered in precisely the same words. succeeded Edward Shortt as President of the British Board of Film Censors. as yet. As the number of feature pictures released in a year is about 500. etc. electricians.” 25th: Lord Tyrell of Avon. including overtime and Sunday working. From this £7 millions must be deducted roughly one-third as the cost of print distribution. and it will be seen that the danger of heavy losses to which I have drawn attention is in no way exaggerated. 29th October (see following item).000”. Maurice Elvey and Tom Walls . Cartoons are no longer the preponderating draw they formerly were. The total amount of film hire available for feature pictures from the kinemas may be placed at £7 millions after making allowance for the amount of available film hire in newsreels and shorts. Patrons have made. This misconception as to what can be spent on a picture with any legitimate chance of getting the money back is one that calls for the red light warning I deemed it advisable to utter. despite the high cost of super films. investors. publicity etc. Sunday Dispatch. is a major attraction. Assuming there are only three or four £100. Hendon. Conclusions drawn by J. Elstree.including Walter Forde. leaving four. and particularly hot news.000 to £750. Following rumours that Gaumont- . Berthold Viertel. News.” John Maxwell. It does not appear to be realised by these financial wizards that such an amazingly successful picture as HENRY VIII happens once in a lifetime.

announced the company had acquired control of another 47 cinemas. industrial action was very costly for producers. It was hoped the studio would be operational by the following July.000 share issue made by ABPC was oversubscribed within an hour and five minutes of its opening. 7th: C. 9th: Criterion Films. The Union Circuit announced the acquisition of a further 23 cinemas. Accommodation would eventually include eight studios. during part of the year. Bernhard. Two studio floors belonging to BIP and all three belonging to B&D were charred.548.F. costing £100.263 share issue.000 extension plan. 16th: The laying of foundation plates for two new studio blocks at Sound City. workers were localised in one work unit. In addition. provision also had to be made in respect of certain productions which did not possess the all-important ingredient of popular appeal to a sufficient degree.600. Ben Goetz arrived from Hollywood to make arrangements for the setting up of an MGM British production unit.000 damage caused by fire at BIP and B&D Elstree Studios. This was immediately followed by a £291. Sound City. A strike by electricians belonging to the ETU held up work for four days at BIP's Elstree and Welwyn Studios. B&D attributed this to: "revenues from some of our productions. where. But over the past couple of years. BFI Information Services 32 . which had been previously used by London Films while their new Denham Studios were being built. was to be completed by June. Equity Law Life Assurance Society had agreed to advance £100." “42% of cinema admissions are for seats for which the charge last year did not exceed 7d and another 36% of cinemagoers did not pay more than this”. 9th January. Shepperton. the work. up to then industrial action in British studios was virtually unknown. “Beyond doubt the year 1936 will be a boom year in new kinema schemes. Managing Director of Union Cinemas. 18th December. Work. This falling off was especially marked in the United States. a company formed by Paul Czinner and Douglas Fairbanks Jnr. Secondly. This guaranteed their product a national circuit release. December 10th: Amalgamated Studios Ltd announced a scheme for building a large new British studio at Elstree.000. United Artists bought a substantial interest in the Odeon Circuit.000 of the increased capital and work was to begin immediately. particularly from abroad.000. bringing the total in the group to over 200 cinemas. Approximately 150 new theatres are planned giving an approximate additional seating capacity of a quarter of a million. the studios were not working to capacity. The situation of film studio workers contrasted sharply with that of cinema employees. 1936 January The building of the new studios for Warner Brothers-First National at Teddington got underway. February A £1. Simon Rowson.000.000 and the construction of 5 new stages. The company also ventured into distribution by taking over Associated Producing Distribution Co. acquired Worton Hall Studios. two review and recording studios. announced extension plans involving the increase of capital to £350. formally inaugurated a £200. among other things. £500. at least £4. Fox completed negotiations to purchase their Wembley studio. The amount of capital investment involved is.000.” Kine Weekly. (APD) which had specialised in distributing British films. Evening Standard. including the Sidney Bacon Houses. sixteen editing rooms and administration offices. efforts to unionise the studios received enthusiastic support from film workers and the situation was favourable to the successful establishment of an effective union: film work was highly specialised and there was a big demand for film technicians with more films being made in the mid-Thirties than there were trained personnel to work on them. B&D had the choice of rebuilding or finding new premises (see May). expected to cost over £500. at a conservative estimate. It guaranteed the Odeons a supply of and first option on quality American and British films. Isleworth. Shepperton. proved smaller than anticipated.British had no money to continue with their production programmes. had already started. alterations demanded by the American censor authorities destroyed the effectiveness of certain of our films. the price of its shares dropped. British and Dominions’ annual report revealed a debit of £25.

due to a shortage of funds.” Evening Standard. March J. 23rd: GCF Corporation was registered as a private company with a nominal capital of £1. The purchase of Carl Laemmle's interest in Universal Pictures Corporation became effective when the Standard Capital Corporation deposited a cheque for one and a half million dollars. Rogers of America. very small or due to special circumstances and only fourteen prosecutions had been made. a large proportion of these had been for part of a year only.000. the purchasers are an Anglo-American group. GB's interim dividend was postponed. having in mind the approaching expiry of the Cinematograph Films Act. with such large sums involved. “The activities of a group of mystery financiers who are providing hundreds of thousands of pounds of capital for kinematograph productions in this country are creating considerable speculation among film circles in the City of London. renting and exhibition of such films. Mr Woolf has bought outright Universal's distributing business in this country. So far the issued capital amounts to only £98 although the group is believed to have advanced sums up to a total of more than £1. John Stafford Productions.” Kine Weekly. measures were required in the public interest to promote the production. 1st April.225. Franco-London Films. backed by the Standard Capital Corporation and C. However. The price paid by Woolf and his English associates is said to be more than £500. “We wanted to establish a British production industry.000.A. a County Cinema flotation was withdrawn. but so far they have succeeded in maintaining complete anonymity. under the Chairmanship of Lord Moyne. Its objects were to acquire not less than 90% of the issued share capital of General Film Distributors. Cecil Films. Various conjectures have been made about the leading spirits behind the operations that have succeeded in taking place. 30th April. that was its main function. 1927. Among the production companies who have secured advances are London Screens Ltd. exhibitors and producers of kinematograph films. Toeplitz Productions. Iles announced that Rock Studios were to be built at Elstree on the site of the old Blattner Studios at a cost of £500. “to carry on the business of an investment and trust company and that of distributors. Soskin Productions. Woolf.” Kine Weekly editorial reviewing the effectiveness of the Quota Act.” Morning Post.000.M.When asked about the level of failure in meeting the quota. Technicolor Ltd acquired a site on the Great West Road in order to build a £250.” The creation of this private holding company followed the deal by which GFD acquired substantial interests in Universal. 24th April. Details concerning mortgages and charges amounting to more than £1. Obviously. to inquire into the position of British films with the following terms of reference: BFI Information Services 33 “to consider the position of British films. the backers of Aldgate Trustees Ltd represent a powerful and wealthy group. 9th April. in addition to a share in the Universal Corporation of America. announced his decision to appoint a departmental committee. City Film Corporation. the President of the Board of Trade said that 448 exhibitors had failed to meet their obligations in the previous three years. and if so what. with a nominal capital of £1. All the prosecutions had been successful.” Daily Telegraph.000.500.” April “A difficult situation has arisen in London for many film companies owing to the the existence of more films demanding a ‘pre-release’ run in the West End than there are cinemas to accommodate them. 17th: A serious fire took place at Korda’s new Denham Studios. Julius Hagen of Twickenham Films acquired the assets of PDC which included Triumph Studios.H. Capitol Film Corporation. .000 colour film laboratory.500. on all counts it has been successful. Hammersmith and offices on Wardour Street. Welsh Productions.000. 26th: Arthur Runciman. Seventeen renters had failed to meet their quota obligations during the same period but after consultation with the Cinematograph Advisory Committee only one prosecution was undertaken. “Carl Laemmle to sell Universal. The group in question is working through a company known as Aldgate Trustees Ltd. head of General Film Distributors. President of the Board of Trade. 41 were mediocre and the remaining 60 so poor that they would ruin the exhibitor who consistently showed them. This company was registered on 24th July 1935. headed by Charles R. The Eastman Kodak Group is also involved. The Receiver was appointed to City Films. Trafalgar Films.000 have been published within the past month. “Yesterday I was permitted to see the judgement of the Cinematograph Exhibitors' Association on the 173 British pictures submitted last year: 72 were regarded as being up to a good Hollywood standard. 17th March. T. and to advise whether any. Hammer Productions.

While the ordinary picture costs from £50.000 or more it is frequently lucky if it makes a profit of 40 per cent. but which reap relatively enormous profits in the industrial parts of England. living on directors' fees drawn from the investment of other people's money and having no real knowledge of the economics of the business. as far as they are able.000 investment in Pinewood Studios Ltd. up-to-date theatres which even today are not out-moded were being built by the Davis family. Kine Weekly.the odd 2 per cent -realise that there is a regular supply of films which are never shown in the West End. What happened when talkies came? Vicious percentage systems of film hire set in and the margin of profit of cinema owners became not only slender but uncertain. and their minds on. “More than 98 per cent of the film-going public lives outside London. was increased to £300. and this was general all over the country. June New studios at Bushey and four new sound stages at Sound City Shepperton were opened. This has strengthened the new circuits which have become a menace to the major circuits as well as to the independents. of course. President of the British Board of Film Censors. cinemas in the populous areas were being built or rebuilt out of the profits made by working exhibitors who had their money in. some of which are never shown in the South of England at all. 18th May. mainly for quota purposes.May Denham Studios was officially opened. Under its provisions. while foreign technicians hold most of the major posts on the better pictures. Procuration fees seems to be the ironically correct term to apply to the money received by these go-betweens who helped speculators to prostitute a legitimate business. of whom there are over 100 employed in the British industry. “The making of ‘quickies’ and inferior pictures. produced as a rule by men who have been in the business for years. The Quota Act has generally resulted in British technicians working on the lowest class of British pictures. sometimes of inferior technical quality. done with impunity in those countries where the cinema is under the control of the State. An agreement was signed between British Actors' Equity Association and the Screen Actors Guild to enforce standard acting conditions in the studios of both countries. but it would be dangerous to make such an attempt in this country. Financiers with no knowledge of the business but a peculiar complex that it was a ‘get rich quick’ affair became interested.000. These other pictures cost £12. Architects. Existing share capital of £150.” Morning Post. members of Equity automatically became members of the Guild during residence in the USA and vice versa. The incoming speculators. “The Board has noticed tendencies of late which I think it is wise to bring to your notice . Islington were opened. Rank and Charles Boot.. It is. 4th June. the Bernsteins and others. 24th June. followed an era with cheap money when speculation became rife. stated: "The policy is not to make any outstandingly expensive pictures. Reserves for new building could not be accumulated because these reserves were now swelling the bank rolls of distributors. they often prove much more lucrative than the costly and widely-advertised ‘super’ pictures. Renters played on the amateurs’ ignorance and swung away from the independent exhibitor . so ensuring the speedy realisation of the proposed plan to build large new studios at Pinewood. but often excellently acted. film hire has soared for the major combines as well as for the independents.who had always strenuously opposed uneconomic film hire . large. intent on having the best films. marketable product with selling angles".000. New studios at Highbury. Made for insignificant sums of money. as well as by the major circuits. “Before the advent of talkies. The greater part of it lives outside the Home Counties. It is to the credit of the major combines that they have rarely been accused of deliberate over-building.” Evidence by the Association of CineTechnicians to the Moyne Committee.” Lord Tyrell.. Wisely they refuse. Oliver Bell was appointed general manager of the British Film Institute. soon realised that the film and booking strength were the things and not the theatre as such. the Hyams. estate agents. after the slump. In London. Pinewood was to become B&D's production base instead of rebuilding its former studios at Elstree destroyed by fire. are never asked to work on this kind of picture. but to concentrate on steady. The first is the creeping of politics into films. is reflecting detrimentally on the British technician. 26th: British and Dominion shareholders approved a £150.000 or less and often make a profit of several hundred per cent. and this is continuing today more than ever. who. In announcing a new programme of pictures to be BFI Information Services 34 made at Gainsborough. The films to be made included Will Hay and Will Fyffe vehicles.A. all set up a search for sites. addressing the CEA Annual Conference. Foreign technicians. for instance. surveyors.000 to £100.to the newcomers. its Director of Administration. Few of the London film audience . Maurice Ostrer. the business and were far-seeking enough to progress with the increasing public demand. to be made milk cows for the . controlled by J. paid and are still paying ridiculously disproportionate prices. Then. the chains of beautiful.

Rank announced plans for the building up of a new cinema circuit which would eventually comprise 100 cinemas. first scenes were shot on 14th September .000.000. NATKE’s activities became increasingly concerned with the cinema exhibition sector of the industry. Since 1933 the studios had rapidly been going through a process of unionisation. Criterion . but both grow with the elimination of the independent exhibitors.two films for £250. presented to the Cinematograph Trade Benevolent Fund by Sir William Jury.distributors and their great booking strength has meant that they could resist the renters more effectively than could the independents.” Daily Mail.two films for £150. the holding company which controlled Gaumont-British.A. September J.000 to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer . It was not until some time later that it became evident that the finance for these films was not being provided by United Artists but by British insurance companies.The dispute concerned two non-union painters.000 workers at the Denham Studios was settled last night.000. llth July.two films for £80. was appointed as Director-General Designate. but the larger independents. “The strike of more than 1. who are either being squeezed out by the over-builders or if lucky are acquired by the major circuits. the convalescent home of the cinema industry.000.. To achieve this end it is not only necessary to provide for the preparation and issue of National Propaganda but also for the issue of ‘news’ and for such control of information issued to the public as may be demanded by the needs of security. union officials persuaded the men to return to work on the understanding that the cases of the two painters would be referred to an arbitrator appointed by the Ministry of Labour. probably because the ACT leadership was prepared to take a stronger line than the more conciliatory NATKE.000 took place. The management refused to dismiss them.the deal folded in September. Erich Pommer two films for £300.” K.e. 30th: The official opening ceremony of Pinewood Studios. Garrett Klement . The function of the Ministry would be “to present the national case to the public at home and abroad in time of war.000: British Cine Alliance .000. Chairman of Twentieth CenturyFox announced Isidore Ostrer was in Hollywood for negotiations which would probably result in either Twentieth Century-Fox or Gaumont-British buying the 49% interest the other held in the Metropolis and Bradford Trust i. paper read to CEA Annual Conference. embracing an expenditure of no less than £2.000” was announced by Murray Silverstone.A.500. Korda’s capitulation to union demands demonstrated the unions had grown in strength as well as numbers. Managing Director of UA: “Our organisation means to have some of the greatest British Talkies for universal marketing and to this end will spare neither time nor money. 9th: Glebelands. The subcommittee of the Committee of Imperial Defence set up to prepare guidelines for a Ministry of Information presented its report. The two painters will remain at work and if necessary will join a union. August ABPC reported a record year's trading with £926. B&D .previously they had been thought exempt. Trafalgar .six films for £1. and union workers struck in defiance of the agreement betweeen the studios and National Union of Theatrical Employees.200. Alexander Korda said he was anxious to conform to trade union conditions of employment so long as the trade union leaders BFI Information Services 35 could control their members. A representative of the studios said last night that the interruptions caused by men acting without the authority of their leaders had become so serious that it had been considered whether it would be advisable to end the agreement with NATKE.000.” The report was accepted in full and Sir Stephen Tallents.000. then in charge of public relations at the BBC.two films for £160. completed at a cost of over £1.000. of America under which ABFD would handle about thirty American films and ATP product was guaranteed a release in the US. July Joseph Schenck. “The most ambitious programme yet lined up in the history of United Artists. the ACT had replaced NATKE as the principal representative of studio workers. Nyman..three films for £200. By the end of the decade.042 gross earnings.000.” The contracts given out included: British London Films . was officially opened. Two days later a different deal was made public. are forced to hand over their magnificent theatres to the major circuits and we are passing through the period when the two major circuits must grow still larger and the new minor circuits are rapidly becoming larger.one film for £80. Mr. under which Isidore Ostrer was to sell a 25% interest of his Metropolis and Bradford Trust holdings for £2. A test case in high court established that newsreels were as liable to contempt of court proceedings as newspapers . Yesterday. Victor Saville . realising the inevitable. Associated British Film Distributors signed a reciprocal agreement with Grand National Films Inc.

000: The Great Ziegfeld £350.100 “A” shares of Metropolis and Bradford. . John Maxwell acquired the Ostrers’ class “B” (nonvoting) shares in the Metropolis and Bradford Trust for £620.” In fact. which holds the controlling block of shares in the Gaumont-British Picture Corporation. 27th: The Moyne Report was published. Failing this.000. Dixey outlined a scheme which was to provide independent exhibitors with a supply of quality films: the independents were to join together to form an Independent Exhibitors Distributing Co. At the subsequent GaumontBritish Corporation's annual general meeting.. Ostrer Bros. The ACT compiled a draft agreement for the working conditions of all technicians.000. However. Metropolitan Film Studios at Southall was destroyed by fire. in addition to the existing quota for long films. the announcement of the MGM deal breakdown was accompanied by rumours that a new.when Herbert Wilcox filmed a scene from LONDON MELODY with Anna Neagle. the financing of production through a Government organisation. and more financially lucrative. The following joint statement was issued by the Associated British Picture Corporation and the Ostrer Brothers on the 12th October: “The agreement which has been signed between Messrs. Mark Ostrer told those present: “It is impossible to recover from the home market alone the full cost of quality films and the company can only get its money back by producing these for the world market. GB shareholders were notified that the company's overdraft had risen by £500. Ostrer and Associated British Pictures provides for the acquisition of the holdings of Messrs. a strict watch on the transfer of interests to foreign hands.000 and £120. Ostrer in the Metropolis and Bradford Trust. evidence to the Moyne Committee. The BFI proposed a central distribution unit for films intended exclusively for children. October “I have been told on very good authority that Ben Hur cost £500. the first of which. A Tale of Two Cities £250. Mutiny on the Bounty cost £400. the acquisition of the 250.initially about 15 a year . will be dealt with as soon as practicable. The main recommendations were: a British quota rising to 50% in ten years. has now been completed. this would finance the production of films . (see April 1937) The MGM deal to purchase half of the Ostrers' shares in the Metropolis and Bradford Trust fell through . A. 21st: The ACT submitted proposals covering wages and conditions of work for laboratory workers to the employers . Under Two Flags £250.000 in the previous twelve months.C..000.an agreement was not reached until February 1939. Maxwell never got the all important class “A” shares which would have given him control of Gaumont. strong protests were voiced over the presentation of accounts involving large losses and shareholders forced an adjournment so that directors could prepare a consolidated balance sheet. November The London.” Simon Rowson. The second stage of the agreement in regard to the acquisition of the 5. the courses are the abandonment of quality films for cheaper films for the home market only.” During a visit to New York. David Copperfield £300.which would then become available to independent cinemas.N. It is true these are the sums expended on ‘specials’ but even the normal expenditure on the great majority of the ordinary (US) pictures ranges between £60. This agreement falls to be operated in two stages. Middlesex and Surrey County Councils announced that as from 1st January 1937 children would not be admitted to cinemas in their area when a film with a “Horrific” certificate (i. Up to then it had been left to the guardian's discretion as to whether a child could see an “H” film.e. deal with John Maxwell had reached an advanced stage. a quality test for fitness to rank as quota. or the abandonment of production altogether.000 “B” shares of the Metropolis and Bradford by Associated British.the official reason given was that British interests had refused to let control of Gaumont pass into American hands. held by Messrs.000. Isidore Ostrer stated that he and his brothers had no intention of selling their class “A” (voting) shares in the Metropolis and Bradford Trust (see October). a separate quota for short films.000.000. he also acquired an option to buy the Ostrers’ class “A” (voting) shares under the impression that the immediate transferal of these was being delayed due to the need to complete a few legal formalities. one likely to frighten or horrify children under the age of 16) was being shown. the shares transferred and the appropriate part of the purchase consideration paid over. Whether this was because the sale was vetoed by Fox with whom the BFI Information Services 36 Ostrers had to clear any sale of their “A” shares or whether the Ostrers never intended selling these shares and had simply used them as a bait to get Maxwell to buy the useless but expensive “B” shares was never made clear.000.

450.500. Rank disposed of his interests in British National. football . up to then Hagen had been operating one of Britain's largest independent production outfits.000. was registered as a public company with a nominal capital of £6. A large flotation planned by the Odeon Group was postponed. 8th January.” Daily Telegraph.000. Other major contributors were theatres and music halls . 17th December.£417. This company was formed by the amalgamation of three cinema groups .802. 15th: The Chancellor of the Exchequer told the House of Commons that of the £8.000. Smith. But America didn't buy.338. having spent £5.” Kine Weekly. J.000. Following huge losses made by his company and in a subsequent attempt to cut back on expenditure. Alexander Korda announced that technicians employed by London Films were to have their salaries reduced. John Logie Baird demonstrated large screen television at the Dominion. 1937 January 20th Century-Fox stopped acting as GB's US distributor. 28th: Union Cinemas Ltd. An agreement was signed between the Association of Cine-Technicians and Gaumont-British Picture Corporation in respect of salary rates and working conditions for ACT members employed at the Corporation's Studios at Shepherd's Bush.908. Denham Film Productions was formed by S. Provincial Cinemas and Oxford and Berkshire Cinemas . British studios occupied the twelve month in a mad scramble to turn out bigger and better epics aimed at the American market. John Maxwell registered a new £3. cinema contributions amounted to £5.000. Julius Hagen and John Maxwell announced in a joint statement that Twickenham Film Distributors would be closed down and in future Wardour would handle the output from Hagen's three studios.December London Films revealed losses of £330. 12th January.000£700. In well informed circles these developments are regarded as signs that in the future the City will insist on reasonable safeguards against waste. was to make sixteen films costing between £600. Receivers were appointed to Julius Hagen's Twickenham Film Distributors.048.000 in 1936.967. there is a bank overdraft of £1.842. to be based at Denham Studios.000 Entertainment Tax receipts.431 and creditors amounting to £1. The position of the larger concerns is secure but there are others whose methods are considered unsound and their failure is only a matter of time. BFI Information Services 37 .A.£1.” Daily Express.577. are faced with a £2.000. On the other hand. This new company.S. while films and productions in progress are put at £1.W. which had engaged in an aggressive policy of expansion. Productions. Kine Weekly’s City Editor commented: “The cash position is not good. Michael Balcon resigned as Head of Production at Gaumont-British and joined MGM's new British unit. Assessing the financial statements made available to shareholders at the resumed GB annual general meeting.758.038.000.000 and racing £435. This agreement was the first ever to be negotiated between a British film company and its technicians.000 contract with Columbia for the production of eight pictures. This was due to the generally poor financial state of the British film industry and a series of company reports announcing large losses.000. So 1937 will see a pretty fierce economy wave. GB announced its American organisation would become the nucleus of a new distribution unit handling selected films but in reality the company's attempt to capture the American market had been abandoned. Twickenham Film Studios and J.000. “Reports that receivership has been applied for respecting an independent British film producer and that two of the Big Five Banks will advance no more capital for film production caused some anxiety among some of the smaller film companies yesterday. Managing Director of British Lion. Tottenham Court Road.000 loss. Paul Soskin returned from the US and announced that he had signed a £500.Union Cinemas Co.000 company called Associated British Properties to take over 54 cinemas from Associated Cinema Properties.. “British producers. With few exceptions. cash debtors and investments together amount to only £816. Technicolor Laboratories opened.378.which previously had a combined capital of £1.H.

A careful computation suggests that the exhibitors’ payments for running costs. continue to take from 7 to 10 million pounds yearly from this country for your pictures . and so on. Due to large losses.but you must buy from us genuine British pictures to a value of. 14th January. probably over £1. the amount of money invested in independent film production during the first ten months of last year was .” Kine Weekly. It was owing to the fact that films take a long time to produce and to realise that this business reached the proportions it did before its weaknesses were exposed.including salaries.400. 25% of that amount’. February MGM established a production office in London. 18th: Two Cities Films was registered. This brings the total earnings of British films to nearly £3 millions”. “British studios have taken fright at the recent publicity to their goings on. unless they have a world market. Approximately £6. The Receivership of the Twickenham companies raises the total losses incurred during the past year up to £2. and is made possible mainly because certain insurance companies facing a big loss of marine insurance business endeavoured to replace this by financing the film trade. They must realise by now that pictures made for the English speaking world cannot pay either cultural or cash dividends. which are probably in the region of £1 million.How is the renters' £13 millions disposed of? Probably some £2. rents. The tax collector has.. The system is interesting.000 to £50. Hammersmith reopened.000. A meeting of Gaumont-British shareholders was called to discuss the possibility of ceasing production at Shepherd's Bush and merging GB's distribution interests with GFD. £30. Of the remaining £35 millions. About £1. Entertainment tax is now payable on all admissions over 6d.. In view of the proposed revision of the Cinematograph Films Act. 22nd January..000 in order to finance a picture. but as soon as the losses began to accrue the banks acted with commendable promptitude and although further losses are to be expected from films still to be completed it now believed that both the banks and the insurance companies have the situation well in hand.5 millions are required annually to defray the running costs of their highly elaborate organisation .. “We know that the public pays over £40 millions a year for admission to the kinema. i. the return comes out at nearly 10%.e.“As a result of exhaustive inquiries. advertising. On this basis allowing for charges. I am quite definite in saying that Gaumont-British will not continue in production unless by this or some similar means a way is found to overcome the resistance not of the American public but of powerful interests in the American industry”. According to a financial analysis.000. as always. This can be secured by saying to the Americans: ‘By all means. I am able to announce that thanks to action taken last week to deal with mushroom film producing companies. Whereas last summer the value of films in the making was never less than £2. are in the neighbourhood of £10 millions. During recent months almost any would-be film producer has been able to form a small company with a capital of £200 and immediately raise. it is estimated that nearly £22 millions is retained by the exhibitors and £13 millions paid to the renters. for outgoings other than films. Isidore Ostrer made the following observations on its inadequacies so far as the Gaumont-British operation was concerned: “Producers over a period of time could not avoid loss on production. unless substantial revenue was received from all the important English speaking (and more specifically American) markets”. The aggregate capital value of all British kinemas may be estimated at nearly £80 millions. Consequently he advocated the introduction of a reciprocity scheme: “I have a concrete proposal to make to the Government. 16th February.. How is this huge sum divided among different interests?. Six months ago there were no fewer than forty pictures on the floors in any one week. and brings in over £5 millions annually for the Treasury.000. Today's Cinema. In making the announcement the directors stated that there BFI Information Services 38 had been substantial losses in a wholly-owned subsidiary and losses to the end of December amounted to more than £600.” Daily Express.25 millions is required to pay for the cost of the positive prints used in the kinemas and another £1 million is spent on the newsreels..000 in any week.5 millions are remitted to America for films. Hardly a single major firm has more than one production in hand. the first claim upon it. say. Today it could not be placed above £800. Yesterday I could check up on only sixteen. say. three weeks ago there were twentythree. Holders of ordinary shares made an unsuccessful attempt to take out a motion to restrain GB from paying out the dividend. Economist Riverside Studios. GB announced it would only be paying dividends on preference shares.75 million to £2 millions remains for payments to producers of British films to which we may add net receipts from sales of British films abroad. in November it was announced that the company would be making a number of Anglo-British co-productions which would be distributed by Sound City. the worst of the financial trouble as regards the City itself has now been overcome. Depreciation accounts for approximately another £2 millions and leaves about £10 millions for fixed charges and profits. Of the balance of £4 millions.000.

This was undoubtedly a solicited prompt and marked the beginning of manoeuvres to introduce the "H" certificate ruling throughout the country (see June 1937).000 each. Tentative plans for technical reprocity between Pinewood. which would have given it a controlling interest in Gaumont-British.000 were independently owned and managed. These have no link with a producing organisation and the directors are confident that a membership of at least 800 of these cinemas can be anticipated”. its objective was “the creation of a Federation of British Kinema Owners to develop the cinema industry on an economic basis primarily in the interests of the independent exhibitor in the UK”.000. May A £15. Wardour Films and B. At the Gainsborough Annual General Meeting.000 cinemas in Britain. but to the fact that we are not accorded playing time in the most important situations. Consolidated Film Studios. The FBI Film Group had been badly split over recommendations to be put forward for the new Films Bill with independents advocating radically different measures from those favoured by the British majors and American subsidiaries. (Export).000 which we are spending is for acquiring and making the studios equal to the best in Hollywood…The main underlying idea is similar to the object of the Film Bank in Germany which finances independent producers up to two-thirds of the production cost against the security of the negative”. The group was more important than the numbers would suggest since there was little duplication of sites and it contained a high proportion of recently constructed super cinemas. The LCC notified the British Board of Film Censors it considered that children should not be admitted to films with an "H" certificate. take over trading carried on by its three subsidiaries. 6th: A public statement by Isidore Ostrer revealed that in 1931 the Government had turned down the opportunity to acquire shares in the Metropolis and Bradford Trust.823. Shepherds Bush Studios were to be closed down. First mooted in BFI Information Services 39 September 1936. and carry on these businesses under its own name”. a sum at least half as large was expended by the three leading British producers. up to then children could gain admittance to "H" films if accompanied by a guardian. On the basis of this estimate. Elstree. J. Mark Ostrer attributed the company's £97.I.000. he stated: “The sum of over £100. 22nd April. In addition.930 loss to their films failing to get proper access to the American market: “This is not due to any lack of merit. on and after March 31st 1937.000. Expectations turned out to be wildly optimistic and the scheme never got off the ground. Kine Weekly. The new organisation was made up of two separate but closely associated bodies. 3. the Associated British Picture Corporation will. The new organisation officially came into being on 1st July. the Federation of Film Producers and the Association of Film Producers. resulted in an important new circuit of 250 cinemas. March Joe Bamberger announced that his company. four of which were to be made at Pinewood and four at Islington. Denham and Amalgamated Studios. most independent cinema owners lacked the necessary capital. The ruling had already been introduced in the LCC area. It was pointed out that “of 4. Studio strike in Hollywood.” Today's Cinema. the average expenditure for British films amounts to £18. bringing the total up to about £4.000. these being almost wholly controlled by American producing interests”. Bamberger went on to say his company would be producing films for quota requirements at up to 40% of the current costs of British pictures. 20th: Odeon Theatres. April A public issue was made by British Independent Exhibitors (Distribution) Co. Arthur Rank became Chairman of General Film Distributors. many were struggling just to stay in business and by this time City sources were no longer prepared to support film production.P. had bought the former JH Studios. . 26th: Details of the Gaumont-British/General Film Distributors agreement was made public: GB films were to be distributed by GFD. GB and GFD were to co-fund the production of eight films at a total cost of £420.000.£2.200. 19th: A draft Form of Agreement and Articles of Association for a new producers organisation to replace the Film Group of the FBI were submitted to a representative meeting of interests concerned. the company was registered in February with a share capital of £200.000. Ltd was registered as a public company with a nominal capital of £6. The following statement was issued by Associated British Picture Corporation: “In order to secure the benefit of concentrating its trading departments and operating them under a common name.000.000 share issue on 7th July.000. 19th February. The merger was followed by a £4.000 tie up between County Cinemas Ltd and Odeon Theatres Ltd. British International Pictures.

of Union Cinemas.” Kine Weekly.” City Editor. died. that worthwhile films produced cheaply would be penalised by the proposed legislation. The Government promised an enquiry into the working conditions of the latter group. “During the past twelve years. August “The City is still busy sorting out the mess brought about by last year’s indiscriminate lending to mushroom film production companies.000. and an American director. Fewer than 3% are in production at the present time. He was appointed chief of Radio's British production activities following VICTORIA THE GREAT's success in America and was given a ten-year contract to make three films a year for RKO. June Alexander Korda released details of the terms of a £1. September MGM launched its new MGM British production unit: the first film to be made was A YANK AT OXFORD. in the production of the film. A Kine Weekly survey revealed that in the first half of 1937 cinema openings were up 60% on the same period in 1936. Its liabilities are £37. were made public.000.200. told shareholders that an action for damages was being taken against Gaumont-British based on the claim that ABPC purchased a substantial interest as a result of misrepresentation (see July 1938). that the introduction of a cost clause would encourage extravagance and inefficiency.000 deal whereby he and Sam Goldwyn acquired an option to take over the whole of the ordinary shares of UA . with an American star. of which only £2 has been paid up in cash. Subsidiary companies of the Odeon Group were voluntarily wound up prior to a big new flotation. They receive no protection by a fair wages clause which is essential to the equitable working of the labour costs proposals and to the reorganisation of the industry in a rational basis”. Banks and underwriters are demanding the fulfilment of such difficult requirements that it is now almost impossible for all but the very best projects to obtain money. The company has a nominal capital of £1. the Film Industry Employees Council. the Bill made it illegal for any person to exhibit a film for public exhibition. the general license terms for which are that the film may not be shown in any circumstances to children whether acompanied by an adult or not". A joint organisation.000 deal with Radio Pictures. and probably at least 85% will never make another film. The figure of roughly £38. “A striking instance of the kind of film finance which was indulged in last year comes to light this week in the liquidation notification of Incorporated Talking Films Ltd. John Maxwell. the subsequent investigation into the company's financial affairs revealed major irregularities. 'Kine Weekly.the scheme broke down in December. Following questions in the Commons. BFI Information Services 40 Herbert Wilcox announced a £6. David Bernhard. The Film Cruelty Bill was passed by Parliament. July The Government white paper detailing proposals for film legislation was published. if. was formed as the result of an inter-union agreement between the Association of Cine . Joe Schenk announced the production of four £100. 12th August.016 loss. Arthur Wood.000 British pictures by 20th Century-Fox. The British Board of Film Censors announced the introduction of the “H” certificate: “H” is the certificate letter for “Horrific” films. Subsequently a wages clause was introduced into the Bill. The first film to be given the new “H” certificate was MGM’s THE THIRTEENTH CHAIR: the first British film was THE DARK EYES OF LONDON. 19th August.Elstree. it is now one of the most difficult things in the world to raise a loan. share issue (see January). any event or scene was organised in such a way as to involve the causing of pain to any animal. The CEA published a pamphlet called “Quality not cost is the test of a good British film” in which it argued that cost was not synonymous with quality. 640 production companies have been registered. Whereas at that time it was possible to obtain fresh film finance quite readily. 7th: Odeon made a successful.000. Robert Taylor. the ACT issued a statement criticising the inclusion of a double quota provision and the absence of a fair wages clause: “The ACT deplores the fact that there is no more recognition of British technicians in the White Paper proposals than in the previous Act. British Lion reported a £14.” Memorandum issued by the ACT.000 set down as assets represents the costs of the films produced. head of ABPC. In response to the Film Bill White Paper. the scope of the Factory Bill then going through Parliament was widened to include film studio technical but not on-screen personnel.

largely in response to the need for a concerted union lobby on the proposed new film legislation. slick directors and radiant stars. The situation is further complicated by the fight for the control of the industry between British and American interests. A test case was brought by the Board of Trade to decide the legality of morning matinees of British films. December A report by William Crocker. The Court found in favour of the Board of Trade. the Electrical Trades' Union and the Film Artists’ Association joined the Council soon afterwards. But the occasional spectacular profits were more than offset by gigantic losses. stars and famous producers imported from abroad and quantitatively there has been a substantial increase in British film output. making it the second largest in the world. revealed that £5. Millions of pounds were indiscriminately poured into it by the banks. Adding the 168 theatres in the Union Group to ABPC's 325 produced a chain of over 500 cinemas. subsection 2a of the Cinematograph Films Act (1927)”. Employees lost their jobs. As a result of the passage of the 1927 Bill. probably rightly. presented the new Cinematograph Films Bill to the House of Commons. The quality of films produced in no way enhanced our reputation abroad. with circuits and independents acting together.Technicians and the National Association of Theatrical and Kine Employees. In 10 years 640 new producing companies were registered of which only 19 are in operation today. The protection afforded the industry whetted the appetite of Big Finance. It became the happy scavenging ground for every City vulture. have arrived at an understanding whereby the national officers of the Cinematograph Exhibitors Association have agreed to recognise the National Association of Kine Employees as the trade union for the purposes of the negotiations of wages and working conditions of the employees of cinema exhibitors”.000 had been loaned to and lost by the film industry. Artistic and technical merit had little chance to establish themselves amidst this orgy of speculation. it was announced that no quarterly dividend would be paid and work on an annual balance sheet was in progress. Thousands of small shareholders lost their savings. 8th: The Boulting Brothers registered Charter Film Productions as a private company with a nominal capital of £100. Soon after John Maxwell joined the Union Board. Nevertheless the 1927 Act fell far short of achieving the results expected by its sponsors. The Kinematograph Renters' Society announced that it was introducing a grading system and in future features would be classified into 'A' and 'B' films and 'A' films would only be available on a percentage booking basis. as a manoeuvre by the distributors to increase their share of the box office. a permanent struggle between the renters to keep as much as they can of the £35 million box office receipts. 27th: The following joint statement was issued by the CEA and NATKE: “The Cinematograph Exhibitors Association and the National Association of Theatrical and Kine Employees. 19th November. after two years of negotiation. Mr Oliver Stanley. Behind the glamour of BFI Information Services 41 the studio looms the Board Room. The dispute dragged on well into 1938 but eventually the KRS had to retreat and the scheme was dropped.000. These were shown before ordinary programmes began for the purpose of fulfilling quota. It is a complex and rather sordid industry. For once. prior to taking action. And film finance today is in such disrepute that it is difficult for the best production groups to raise the capital necessary for their work. Some of these never made a single film. Behind the Board Room are ranged a number of financial interests scrambling for profits. The Board of Trade had. In short the recent history of the film industry affords a striking example of the havoc which unfettered private enterprise can play with our social and national interests.” The Tribune. notified the company that “no registered films exhibited by you at the Commodore before noon can be regarded as having been shown during normal hours in the ordinary programme within the meaning of Section 19. the exhibitors' unity was solid. British production received an immense fillip. an insurance solicitor acting on the behalf of underwriters. Hammersmith. The bosses of the industry became far more interested in the manipulation of its financial resources than in the production of great films. Only the Fox West Coast Chain of America which controlled over 800 cinemas exceeded it. This was seen by the exhibitors. insurance companies and the public. October Associated British Picture Corporation acquired a controlling interest in the Union Cinema Company. Max Schach lost control of the Capitol Group of companies as a consequence of pressure exerted by financial groups which had invested in his . Associated British Cinemas had been summoned for failing to comply with exhibitors' quota in respect of the Commodore. The British Association of Film Directors. President of the Board of Trade. November “Film production is not just a matter of lavish sets. New and up-to-date studios were built.

A long and acrimonious dispute followed between the LCC and the CEA. the London CEA threatened to take the matter to court but eventually backed down in the face the LCC's unshakeable determination to introduce the new rules. Elstree.H.000 films to be made on a co-operative basis. Gaumont-British which had ceased film production announced its 80 acre estate at Northolt which had served as an outside lot was being sold off. the establishment of a quota film cost qualification which fixed a minimum labour cost of £7. After considerable delay.the first occurred on 25th October 1925. The main features of the new Act were: a new quota schedule for long films starting at 15% for renters and 12. This was taken as a precedent by the provincial licensing bodies. This week was typical and formed part of a steady trend.are suffering acute unemployment and distress. 25th January. 21-28th: Receivers were appointed to five film production companies: Beaumont Films. A committee of Gaumont-British shareholders asked the Department of Trade to investigate the running of the company. At the first Union annual general meeting.” Daily Telegraph. with provision for a viewing test given special circumstances.500. Harry Day asked the President of the Board of Trade to give particulars of estimates supplied to his Department in respect of films made abroad and exhibited in this country.5% for exhibitors. technicians and cameramen . it was disclosed that despite only an 8% increase (from 18. Of the eighty stages available in this country. file . A Government inquiry into wages and conditions of employment in cinemas was completed. only five are in use. carpenters. the formation of a Cinematograph Films Council with wide advisory powers. cinema building in the London area increased by 50%. March The Film Bill received its third reading and was subsequently given the Royal Assent on 30th March. nationwide 1938 January Following complaints that patrons had been kept waiting or forced to buy more expensive seats when cheaper ones were still unsold. the LCC introduced regulations to cover the adjustment of seat prices and management rules. Only four of Britain's main studios are working at present: thirteen stand empty. extras.5% for exhibitors.000 share issue by Associated British Picture Corporation was heavily oversubscribed.including small-part players. certain films acquired for foreign distribution could be offset against British quota. The reply stated it was not possible to furnish precise information but it was estimated that the amount of the payments made abroad in 1936 was in the neighbourhood of £6 million while the receipts from British films shown abroad as probably less than £1 million. Iles's Joe Rock Studios. London Screen Plays and Oxford Films. Pinebrook was formed with plans for £20. “With the British film industry plunged into the worst slump it has known since 1926. the building increase throughout the country was 15-17%. studio wages and labour conditions were safeguarded. whose losses totalled around £250. In the House of Commons.500.000) in weekly British film attendances on the previous year.000. February A £1. the institution of a shorts quota starting at 15% for renters and 12. those working on Pinebrook films often received lower salaries than their norm in return for a percentage of the profits. the exhibitors’ representative. the introduction of a renter's double and treble quota provision. the Board of Trade did start on an investigation but this was slowed down by the Gaumont management's lack of co-operation and was then overtaken by the outbreak of war. the rank and BFI Information Services 42 .companies and lost approximately £3 million in his companies.500. company directors were accused of mismanagement and improperly using company funds. London and Continental Pictures. A Receiver was appointed to J. April An eventually unsuccessful projectionist strike began.000 to 19. In July. 20th: The one hundredth performance of the Film Society took place . An amendment to the Film Bill which sought to replace the cost requirement with a quality test was rejected by House of Commons Committee. May At the annual meeting of London and District Cinemas. Citadel Films.000.

July After severing links with MGM British in June. This was registered as a £100. Michael Balcon concluded arrangements to embark on a series of pictures in association with Reginald Baker. chairman of Sound City (i. Tom O'Brien of the National Association of Theatrical and Kine Employees outlined “the National Charter of the Kinema Employer”. October 1st: The new quota of 12. and the Cinematheque Française.. Elstree (5). Shepherds Bush (5). Shepperton Studios) revealed in the company's annual report that income in the previous trading year had dropped by almost £100.June Twenty-seven floors at six studios were vacant. but difficulties have arisen. A receiver was appointed for British Independent Exhibitors (Distributors) Co. representing Ealing. It advocated a 48 hour week for men and 45 hours for women. the founder members were the National Film Library of the British Film Institute. managing director of Associated Talking Pictures. The depression in British production was attributed to the withdrawal of insurance finance. The Ministry mobilised. After 18 years of picture production Stoll's Cricklewood Studios was sold to the aviation company.000 company formed in February 1937 to enable independent exhibitors to obtain a supply of worthwhile product. September Basil Dean resigned from the position of chairman and joint managing director of Associated Talking Pictures and Associated British Film Distributors. The Electrical Trades Union and the Association of Cine Technicians signed an agreement which provided for mutual recognition of each others' problems and collaboration in areas of mutual interest. managing director of BIED commented “Strenuous efforts had been made since the formation of the company to maintain the organisation and obtain the necessary films. educational and artistic film. John Maxwell resigned from the board of GaumontBritish. 4th: An action brought by Associated British Picture Corporation against Isidore and Mark Ostrer alleging misrepresentation of profits was heard in the King's Bench. Berlin. Isleworth (3). The agreement also provided for the formation of a Joint Consultative Committee of the two organisations. The lawsuit was withdrawn on 18th October. studios and laboratories was formulated. Elstree. the Museum of Modem Art Film Library. of Information was partially British Talking Pictures (formed in 1928) was taken over by British Acoustics. MP Studios. Shepperton (6). a Gaumont subsidiary. Wembley (2).A. Paris. Norman Loudon. Ealing joined Pinebrook in founding the CoOperative Association of Producers and Distributors (CAPAD). BFI Information Services 43 . November The draft constitution of the Film Production Employees' Federation representing British and American production interests. the delay in passing the Films Act and the re-issue of old films. plus two weeks holiday a year with full pay.25% which applied to both features and shorts came into operation. Later in the month the company changed its name to Ealing Studios. the reduction of renter's quota. The new group superceded the Film Group of the FBI. owing to the lack of anticipated insurance and other finance available for film production and the general difficulty in obtaining product. Twickenham (2) and Amalgamated. Elstree (4). Rock. representing Pinewood. a £200. and moved to Ealing Studios.” The International Federation of Film Archives was formed to facilitate the exchange of historical. Hawker-Siddeley.e. the Reichsfilmarchiv. August Jack Buchanan announced that Hammersmith Studios was to be used as the base for Jack Buchanan Productions. were acquired by the AngloAmerican Film Corporation.000. Zatouroff. MGM reached an agreement with Gaumont under which it was to distribute a number of GBGainsborough productions. A.000 company by Richard Norton and Anthony Havelock Allen. and Michael Balcon and Stephen Courtauld. registration agents. showed a big slump in the number of new companies registered during the first six months of 1938. Figures produced by Jordan and Son. New York.

February When answering questions on the failure of the Films Act (1938) to produce British films. December At the annual general meeting of London Films. however. 12th January.to use the premises for filmmaking. 2) The incapacity of those directors who were in control of the various film companies. was acquired by Rank. Mark Ostrer stated “there appeared to be little or no improvement in the revenues earned in overseas territories.in the immediate future at least . Elstree. The new company formed to amalgamate and operate the two studios was to be registered under the name of D & P Studios. A committee was formed representing the various insurance companies. and for which indeed the insurance companies guaranteed the banks were never in fact produced at all”. in particular.000 was placed on the insurance market and so far as the insurance companies are aware. details were given of the merger of Denham Studios with Pinewood. “During the years 1934.000. Today's Cinema.At the Gainsborough annual general meeting. Amalgamated Studios. when for the first time information was given that difficulties had arisen. 2. These guarantees were provided by insurance companies…During 1934. whereby film producers could obtain a proportion (usually 80% or 90% of the estimated production costs) for the making of one or several pictures from a bank provided they were able to furnish the Bank with suitable guarantees. At a subsequent meeting the insurance companies concerned were furnished with a report by a firm of accountants who had investigated the position of the Capitol companies and the report made it clear that they must he prepared to face a very substantial loss.1) Pictures when produced were not exploited to the best advantage owing to the distributors being more interested in American products than they were in British products. . but it was considered that they would make very suitable storage in connection with air raid arrangements. Oliver Stanley. From the short particulars which were given it was clear that the matter was very serious and required thorough investigation and prompt action to limit the loss which was becoming appreciably worse. 4) This in turn caused BFI Information Services 44 money to be misused as. this was an important step in the unionisation of the film industry and represented the first collective agreement covering an entire sector of the industry. The net result of this method was that a number of the pictures intended to be produced. the territory in America. The average per technician is 8 weeks out of a possible 39”. having shown no appreciable signs of increased interest in films produced and financed by British capital. Grand National announced plans to produce eight quota films annually for its own distribution.1. Managing Director of Warner-First National Studios at Teddington left for America to discuss production plans with Jack Warner. 15th: Jerome K Jackson. 1935 and 1936 business to the extent of something like £4. 8th: The former Fox-British Studios at Wembley started functioning as a service studio for independent producers under the name of Wembley Film Studios. his departure from the company was announced on 13th March. 3) The prodigal waste of money in production which resulted in the cost of many of the pictures produced being much higher than originally budgeted for. 1935 and 1936 substantial efforts were made to create in this country a film industry. Report to the Board of the Commercial Union prior to writs being issued against the company by the Westminster Bank (see May 1939). 16th: An agreement which was to come into operation on 6th March was signed between the Film Production Employers’ Federation and the Association of Cine-Technicians to regulate the wages and working conditions of laboratory workers engaged in film printing and processing. President of the Board of Trade. but the requisite finance was not obtainable through the usual proper channels. Worton Hall Studios reopened. A new method of financing the making of films was inaugurated. matters proceeded smoothly enough until 31st March 1937. For that reason. they utilised part of the money intended to be used for Picture No. 1939 January “ACT has obtained figures of the number of weeks worked by leading technicians between April and December 1938. it was not intended . the producer must continue to look at the exhibitors of this country for the business necessary to enable him to recover his costs”. As a result of a very thorough and careful investigation the Committee ascribed the cause of the debacle as follows:. if the producers had not sufficient money to make Picture No. announced “the consideration of the future quota position under the Films Act by the Films Commission is regarded by the Government as a matter of urgency”.

Hoare replied he was unable to accept the view the BBFC exercised political censorship. London Films.000 lawsuit brought by the Westminster Bank against insurance companies was announced. 8th: An out-of-court settlement of the £1. formed on 29th April with a nominal capital was planning to produce films for Columbia and other American renters.000 loan from the Prudential insurance Co. . We must make this ‘high quality’ factor so universally recognised that audiences abroad will have no desire to see inferior films that owe their existence simply to some government legislation or subsidy”. “It is unwise for us to try to export mediocre films. President of the Board of Trade. Lord Strabolgi observed that while he did not favour subsidies.000.. proposed in December 1938. He argued that the censorship had been exercised on political grounds contrary to views held by the Opposition and favourable to views held by the Government. Sir Samuel Hoare.000 production programme. Plainly. was registered. producers in foreign markets discloses that those films listed among the best pictures shown here in the United States have also been the biggest revenue-remitters. over the past few years. of our best revenue BFI Information Services 45 Government issued a provisional listing of occupations relating to film production and cinemas which would be reserved if war broke out. Oliver Stanley. Denham and Pinewood Ltd. as well as films such as inside Nazi Germany.. The question was again taken up on 9th March when Geoffrey Mander asked the Home Secretary whether he would consider promoting legislation to prevent the political censorship of films being exercised by the BBFC in refusing permission for or insisting on cuts of certain MARCH OF TIME films such as ARMS AND THE LEAGUE. Irving Asher Productions (run by the ex-head of Warners British) announced a £250. Spanish Earth and Britain and Peace. April The Government announced it had definitely decided against any alterations in the quota figures laid down in the Cinematograph Films Act (1938). The company. Alexander Korda Productions.000. involving the leasing of Twickenham Film Studios for three years and the production of “supers” beginning with THE STARS LOOK DOWN. May 1st: Hearings started of a series of actions related to the financing of British films brought by the Westminster Bank against a number of insurance companies. June 18th: Korda's new company. was registered with a capital of £750. gave the information that the average cost per foot of films registered had been £3. Foreign audiences in numerous countries get an abundance of that kind of picture from their own studios. The annual report of the ACT revealed that over 80% of British film studio workers were unemployed. and that something in the nature of a financial corporation might be formed. he did urge that the Government should take a hand in the providing of finance.5s.000 British production programme. MP. Persistently and adroitly we must make the foreign moviegoer acutely conscious that the American picture is a product of decidedly superior quality. it had a share capital of £200. Twickenham Films and Sound City Productions and Rock Films. March In a debate in the House of Lords on the crisis in the film industry. An examination. before all else. as striking. If the choice is between our 'B' type of films and a picture from a native studio. the Home Secretary stated that the BBFC was entirely independent of the Home Office and was not subject to any Government control either directly or indirectly. Details of the settlement were not made public. The insurance companies counterclaimed that a major factor in the size of the losses was a failure on the part of the Bank to exert proper supervision over the loans and this negligence made the Bank equally liable for the resulting losses. we must emphasize the contrast between our good American pictures and the typical product of local producing industries abroad. The Bank's claims arose out of guaranteed policies upon which they contended the insurance companies were liable to pay (see December 1938).. Asher promised that “the story value of each of the subjects being planned is of the highest and their production treatment will entitle them to frontrank consideration as a contributory factor to the revival of British production”. as impressive as it can be possibly made. the latter is almost invariably preferred..g. Most of the claims in this case related to Max Schach's Capitol group but insurance companies had made similar losses with several other independent production companies e. Annual Survey of Trade Conditions Abroad issued by US Department of Commerce.000 and a £330. We must make that contrast as vivid. Grand National announced a £500.28th: In response to a Parliamentary question from Geoffrey Mander. In reply to questions on the working of the Quota Act during its first year.

Mr. 31st: Sound City. At the annual general meeting of Union Cinemas. The Executive Council of the ACT passed a resolution that owing to past practice and constitution the BBFC was entirely unsuitable for the work which in any case should not be entrusted to a private firm but should remain the direct responsibility of the Ministry of Information. but it would function under the control of the Ministry of information and films were to be submitted for a ‘security’ censorship. for.165. In addition there was no production at Southall. the President of the Board of Trade announced in the House of Commons “the Film Act is still in force and will not be modified without further consultation with interested parties”. Rock. November The President of the Board of Trade announced that Renters’ Quota was to remain at its current level of 22% for long films until March 1940. voiced in the House of Commons severe criticism of the Government over the nonissue of films for propaganda purposes. Although nominally a separate company still. In response to apprehension among British production interests that the Goverment might yield to pressure from American sources and abolish quota or considerably reduce it. They soon re-opened following a concerted lobby by the film trade. This was an important step in the fight to establish minimum standards of salaries and working conditions for documentary filmmaking. It was pointed out that cinemas were liable to prosecution if they showed any films containing information which might be directly or indirectly useful to the enemy and they could avoid this risk if they showed only films which had been submitted to a security censorship. it would be impossible to take action against an exhibitor for not screening the requisite proportion of British films”.000 while assets amounted to £300. Permission was granted to remit to America 50% of the average annual remittances during the previous 3 years.000. and Associated British. Deputy Leader of the Opposition. December The ACT signed an agreement with the Realist Film Unit regulating minimum salaries to be paid to technical employees and provisions for holidays. September Following the outbreak of war. Elstree. It was decided that all exported films would be subject to compulsory censorship to be undertaken by the British Board of Film Censors. The amount remaining in the country was to be controlled by an organisation representing the Board of Trade and companies concerned. was requisitioned by the Government.Alexander Korda remained chairman of London Films and retained a controlling interest in Denham Laboratories and United Artists but he lost his majority shareholding in London Film Productions Trust and control of Denham Studios. The wording of the BBFC's certificate was altered to: “Film passed for…exhibition and complies with the requirement of the Ministry of information”. John Maxwell revealed that the company's poor financial state necessitated a major reorganisation. C. Elstree had been dismantled and leased to the Government which had also acquired space at Sound City. Newsreels (which had previously been exempt) would become subject to censorship. but Exhibitors’ Quota was being suspended temporarily: “the most obvious case was for the Exhibitors Quota. After that period some alternative arrangements would be introduced which would oblige American renters to spend on British production an amount equivalent to what they would have spent under the quota. First National had been part of Warners since 1931. Elstree. By the end of the year Amalgamated Studios. October 23rd: First National was absorbed by Warner Bros.M. Liabilities stood at £2. The Government announced that the voluntary basis of censorship of films showing in Great Britain and Northern Ireland would continue to operate during the war. provided that any current operators should have preference in employment and promotion and that BFI Information Services 46 The Government announced that the Renters’ Quota provisions of the Film Act were to be retained. Shepperton. August any arrangements made in respect to the employment of women should end immediately at the termination of war”. and overtime. Woolf reached an agreement with Gainsborough Pictures under which Shepherds Bush Studios was to be re-opened to make a series of pictures for distribution by General Film Distributors. Shepperton. Bushey and Hammersmith. NATKE accepted in principle “the CEA proposal that women should be employed as projectionists. caused by Air Raid Warnings. sick pay. the Government issued an edict closing down cinemas. due to local restrictions imposed. Arthur Greenwood. .

by whom and who was handling them. because the Cinematograph Films Act specified that all films released had to be trade shown and registered with the Board of Trade. For instance. and also gather useful background information. great pains to ensure that any film made in his studio . with their initially very restricting technical requirements arrived. Although there is an alphabetical title index. even from the print itself. whereas. These represent only a small precentage of films made in the period and on the whole they were the low budget “quota quickies” made in a couple of weeks and released very shortly after.got a mention. technical equipment improved and film technicians became more confidant in their handling of sound equipment. unfortunately. a large number of British companies were making films in association with European colleagues. the entries in the production charts generally reflected the studio's attitude to publicity. Production Companies During the late Twenties.e. Information Provided Production Date Studio Production Company Distributor Director Whether a Film's Running Time is 70 Minutes or over Working Title Any working title which may have been used appears in brackets after the release title. During the period up to 1930 when there was a chronic shortage of studios. Unfortunately. BFI Information Services 47 Information on where a film was made has been restricted to which studio was used and the absence of any reference to locations should not be taken as an indication that during these years films were being made completely in studios. production and release would generally occur in the same calendar year. it was not practical for film correspondents to make weekly visits to each of them. As has previously been noted. British films became very studio bound and given the continuing shortage of studio space working around the clock became a common practice. it was rare to include details of any such partners on the British release print.such as a director's indexes. Unless made at the end of a year. the titles have not been incorporated into the main annual sequences. not all studios had efficient publicity agents and given that there were over 20 studios in operation by the mid-thirties. Although most films appearing in the appendices are “quota quickies” . day or week) as the trade press was not as systematic in its coverage of new productions as might have been wished. by consulting these journals around the time a film was being made. But MAN OF ARAN and DEADWOOD are probably the only two instances of British sound features being shot entirely on location before 1940. It has not been possible to give a more precise date than month (i. But as it is not possible to provide evidence supporting this this supposition. the general trend was for film companies to incorporate into their scenarios as many location sequences as they could. shortage of space has lead to the exclusion of any other . However. Bioscope and The Cinema . Anyone interested in finding out what locations were used for a particular film should be able to do so by checking the weekly trade press production reports. The three trade papers . However. nevertheless. similarly. directors started making greater use of locations.irrespective of the size of its budget .Part 2: Annual “In Production” Charts It was decided to use the format of annual production charts as the principal unit within which to present any information on the films listed in the catalogue as these provide an instantly viewable indication of production trends . As the decade progressed. cross-checking in German Appendices to the Annual Production Charts The appendices are made up of films which were released but did not appear in trade press production reports and these titles have been listed under year of release. Where a Film is Made . it is possible to assemble a more comprehensive set of credits than would otherwise be available.Kine Weekly. it was felt that the date of production provides a truer dating than the release date. it should not be assumed that the appendices provide a complete listing of such films or that just because a film appears in the main sequence it must be a “quality film”. once talkies. though they were frequently gossipy.all carried “in production” sections. Date Used The date given in the charts is that for the starting of principal photography. given there can often be a substantial waiting period between a film being made and its release.it is possible to how many films were made in a given year. The major disadvantage of using a production rather than release date is that it is not always possible to find the former. But also a production date can be a valuable resource for for those looking for material on specific films. it is fairly simple to compile a listing of every feature theatrically released with the appropriate date.

In general. BFI Information Services 48 .or French reference books for films which may have had British backing . Asterisked Titles Films with a running time of 70 minutes and over have been asterisked.usually provided no mention of any British involvement. Running Time Any film included in the charts will have a running time of 40 minutes or over.indicated by the presence of a British stars . Consequently it has not been possible to always give full information on which production companies were involved in a particular film. in the late Twenties and early Thirties there was a far higher degree of inter-European cooperation than the charts would indicate. a first feature would be over and a supporting programme would be less than this length. certainly.

Wheeler Dryden Marcel L'Herbier Graham-Wilcox Fred Paul Paramount Herbert Wllcox Walter West Frank Miller Louis Mercanton George Dewhurst GB Samuelson EA Dupont Herbert Wilcox T Hayes Hunter Manning Haynes Arthur Maude Geoffrey Barkas. THE Coronal and the Falkland Battles. THE * ROBINSON CRUSOE * ROSES OF PICARDY * SAILORS DON'T CARE * SHOOTING STARS May New Era Jul Oct Jan Jul Jan Oct Jun Apr Aug Sep Oct Apr Jul Jan Jul Dec Jan Oct Jun Jul Jan Jan Nov Sep Worton Hall BIP. Elstree Nice Cricklewood British National. THE Dec Oct Jan Apr Jun Oct Jun Oct Aug Apr Mar Jul Oct Oct Jun Sep May Oct Aug BIF/Pritish Projects W&F Britannia Films HR Sokai Film FN-Pathe Gainsborough Saumont W&F FN-Pathe W&F (Germany) BIP. THE * GLAD EYE. THE * HELLCAT. Michael Barringer Graham Cutts Maurice Elvey Bert Wynne Alfred Hitchcock MA Wetherell Maurice Elvey WP Kellino AV Bramble (2) (Nice) QTS Ideal British Screen Fox Classics International Cine Intercine . CORONEL AND THE FALKLAND ISLANDS. Elstree Worton Hall (Berlin) Shepherd's Bush Twickenham BIP. THE King's Mate see The White Sheik * LAND OF HOPE AND GLORY * LITTLE BIT OF FLUFF. THE * HIS HOUSE IN ORDER * HUNTINGTOWER In Pawn see Women in Pawn JOKER.Cine Societe de Cineromans Intercine Intercine Reciprosity Wardour W&F W&F FN-Pathe Wardour New Era W&F Gaumont Reciprocity Films BIP Herbert Wllcox Gainsborough Film Manufacturing Co BIP New Era GainsboroughPiccadilly-UFA Gaumont Worton Hall BIP. THE *GUNS OF LOOS. THE Date Studio Aug Shepherd's Bush Cricklewood 1927 Production Co (s) Gaumont Distributor Gaumont Director(s) Victor Saville Walter Summers Dinah Shurey Graham Cutts Graham Cutts Adrian Brunel (1) *BATTLES OF THE. Denmark) Cricklewood Neo-Art Prods Gainsborough Gaumont Stoll Archibald Nettlefold QTS Welsh-PearsonElder WP-Nordisk Seven Seas Stoll KINGDOM OF TWILIGHT. A * LITTLE DEVIL MAY CARE * LUCK OF THE NAVY. Elstree Islington Cricklewood Islington Islington Twickenham BIP. THE * QUINNEYS * REMEMBRANCE * RING. Elstree Twickenham Islington (Nice) BIP. THE IDOL CONFETTI * CONSTANT NYMPH. THE * FLIGHT COMMANDER. NOBODY * MONKEYNUTS MOTORING * MOTHERLAND * MOULIN ROUGE * MUMSIE * ONE OF THE BEST * PASSION ISLAND * POPPIES OF FLANDERS * Q-SHIPS * QUEEN WAS IN THE PARLOUR. THE * FARMER'S WIFE. Elstree Cricklewood/ Shepherd's Bush Cricklewood Shepherd's Bush Cricklewood British UK Independent Prods BIP Epic Films Gaumont Gaumont BIF Wardour Gaumont Gaumont Gaumont New Era BFI Information Services 49 . Apr THE (THE CORONEL AND FALKLAND BATTLES) * CARRY ON * CHANCE. Elstree Shepherd's Bush B&D Gainsborough Piccadilly Pictures Neo-Art Prods BIP Gaumont GB Samuelson W&F W&F W&F WP Wardour Gaumont Victoria Films WP w&f Gaumont New Era Butcher’s Ideal Famous-Lasky Herbert Wilcox Alfred Hitchcock Alfred Hitchcock Georg Jacoby Alfred Hitchcock Maurice Elvey GB Samuelson WP Kellino Geza von Bolvary Maurice Elvey Sinclair Hill Harry Hughes Randle Ayrton George Pearson George Jacoby Alexander Macdonald Sinclair Hill Twickenham (Berlin) Twickenham Walton-onThames Teddlngton Cricklewood (Nordisk. Elstree Islington Gloria Films BIP Cinegraphic Graham-Wllcox British National British Lion Wardour Gaumont Harley Knoles Jess Robbins. THE * FOR VALOUR * FURTHER ADVENTURES OF THE FLAG LIEUTENANT. THE * MADAME POMPADOUR * MARIA MARTEN MR.Films in Production Title * ARCADIANS. THE * GHOST TRAIN. The see The Battles of the Coronel and Falkland Islands * DAWN * DOWNHILL * EASY VIRTUE * FAKE. THE Jul * KING'S HIGHWAY.

Films in Production
Title * SILVER LINING, THE * SISTER TO ASSIST 'ER, A * SOMEHOW GOOD * SOMME, THE * SORREL AND SON Summer Lightning see Troublesome Wives This Marriage Business see This Woman Business THIS WOMAN BUSINESS (THIS MARRIAGE BUSINESS) TONI TROUBLESOME WIVES (SUMMER LIGHTNING) UNDER ARABIAN SKIES * VICTORY * VIRGINIA'S HUSBANDS * VORTEX, THE WAIT AND SEE * WARE CASE, THE Date Studio Apr BIP, Elstree May Jun Mar Shepherd's Bush Twickenham Worton Hall (UK Iocs)

1927
Production Co (s) BIP Gaumont Distributor Wardour Gaumont Director(s) Thomas Bentley George Dewhurst Jack Raymond Geoffrey Barkas, MA Wetherell Herbert Brenon

Film Manufacturing FN-Pathe Co New Era New Era Feature Prods UA

Sep Nov Jun Mar Oct Feb Jun Aug Oct BIP, Elstree

FBO BIP Walton-on-Thanes Archibald Nettlefold Algeria Graham-Wilcox Worton Hall Walton-onThames Islington Walton-onThames Twickenham BIP, Elstree Twickenham Shepherd's Bush Cricklewood W&F Archibald Nettlefold Gainsborough Archibald Nettlefold Film Manufacturing Co BIP Sidney Morgan Gaumont Stoll

FBO Wardour Butcher's

Leslie Hiscott Arthur Maude Harry Hughes Fred Leroy Granville MA Wetherell Harry Hughes Adrian Brunel Walter Forde Manning Haynes Harley Knoles Sidney Morgan Edwin Greenwood Sinclair Hill

W&F Butcher's W&F Butcher's FN-Pathe Wardour W&F Gaumont New Era

* WHITE SHEIK,THE (THE Mar KING'S MATE) * WINDOW IN PICCADILLY , A Aug * WOMAN IN PAWN (IN PAWN) WOMAN REDEEMED, A (1) Basil Dean uncredited codierctor (2) Anthony Asquith uncredited co-director Sep Mar

BFI Information Services

50

Films in Production
Title * ADAM'S APPLE * AFTER THE VERDICT * AFTERWARDS Alias see The Man Who Changed His Name * ALLEY CAT, THE * AULD LANG SYNE * BALACLAVA * BLUE PETER, THE * BOLIBAR (A PRINCE OF BOLIBAR) * BONDMAN, THE * BROKEN MELODY, THE Date Mar Jul Aug Studio BIP, Elstree BIP, Elstree Bushey

1928
Production Co (s) BIP Tschekowa Films Bushey Distributor Wardour BIFD APD Director(s) Tim Whelan Henrik Galeen W Lawson Butt

Sep Jul Sep May Jan Jun Sep Cricklewood Shepherd's Bush Walthamstow Cricklewood Cricklewood Cricklewood Walthamstow

B&F Welsh-PearsonElder Gainsborough British Filmcraft BIF B&D Welsh-PearsonElder British Filmcraft

B&F Paramount: W&F W&F Pro Patria W&F Paramount W&F

Hans Steinhoff George Pearson Maurice Elvey Arthur Rooke Walter Summers Herbert Wilcox Fred Paul George J Banfield

* BURGOMASTER OF STILEMONDE, Apr THE Cassilis Engagement, the see Not Quite a Lady * CELESTIAL CITY, THE Oct * CHAMPAGNE * CHICK CITY OF YOUTH, THE * CLUE OF THE NEW PIN, THE COCKTAILS Common People see The First Born * CO-OPTIMISTS, THE * CROOKED BILLET, THE * CUPID IN CLOVER DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT * DEVIL'S MAZE, THE DOWN CHANNEL * EILEEN OF THE TREES * EMERALD OF THE EAST Father see Master and Man * FEATHER, THE FIRST BORN, THE (COMMON PEOPLE) * FLYING SQUAD, THE * FORGER, THE Fortune Hunter, The see The Gallant Hussar * GALLANT HUSSAR, THE (THE FORTUNE HUNTER) Girl of To-day, A see Love's Option * GOD'S CLAY Jan Oct May Oct May Sep Oct Aug Aug Nov Dec Mar check Feb Feb Feb Dec Aug

Welwyn BIP, Elstree Islington (Oxford) Beaconsfield BIP, Elstree

BIF BIP British Lion

JMG Wardour Ideal

Anthony Asquith Alfred Hitchcock AV Bramble CC Calvert Arthur Maude Monty Banks

British Universities British Univ Films Films British Lion BIP PDC Wardour

Twickenham Islington Worton Hall (Germany) Shepherd'a Bush Cricklewood BIP, Elstree BIP, Elstree BIP, Elstree BIP, Elscree Beaconsfleld Southall

New Era Gainsborough British Screen Prods Hom Film-BIP Gaumont New Era FN British Pacific-BIP Strand Gainsborough British Lion British Lion

New Era W&F British Screen Prods Wardour Gaumont New Era FN-Pathe Wardour UA W&F WB Ideal

Edwin Greenwood Adrian Brunel Frank Miller Hans Behrendt V Gareth Gundrey Michael Barringer Grahan Cutts Jean de Kuharski Henry Edwards Miles Mander Arthur Maude GB Samuelson

Apr

Islington

GainsboroughW&F Fellner and Somlo

Gaza von Bolvary

BIP, Elstree BIP, Elstree Worton Hall Twickenham

FN BIP British Screen Prods New Era

FN-Pathe FN-Pathe British Screen Prods New Era WB

Graham Cutts Denison Clift Frank Miller Geoffrey Barkas, Michael Barringer Adelqui Mlllar, John Stafford

* HIGH SEAS (THE SILVER ROSARY) Oct * HOUP-LA! Apr

* INFAMOUS LADY, THE (MAYFAIR) Aug * INSEPARABLES, THE Introspection see The Warning Juan Jose see Life * KITTY * KNIGHT IN LONDON, A LADY OF THE LAKE, THE * LAST POST, THE * LIFE (JUAN JOSE) Aug May Sep Jul Mar Sep

Whitehall, Elstree Whitehall Films

BIP, Elstree BIP, Elscree Islington Cricklewood (Menchis, Paris)

Burlington Blattner Films Gainsborough Britannia Films Whitehall

Wardour WB Select Gaumont New Era

Victor Saville Lupu Pick James A Fitzpatrick Dinah Shurey Adelqui Millar

BFI Information Services

51

Films in Production
Title * LIGHT WOMAN, A * LILY OF KILLARNEY * LITTLE MISS LONDON * LOST PATROL, THE Date Ap Sep Jul Sep Studio Islington BIP, Elstree Bushey Welwyn Cricklewood

1928
Production Co (s) Gainsborough BIP BIF BIF Welsh-PearsonElder Distributor Ideal Wardour Fox Fox Paramount Director(s) Adrian Brunel George Ridwell Harry Hughes Walter Summers George Pearson

LOVE'S OPTION (A GIRL OF TODAY) May Mademoiselle From Armen-tieres O.B.E. see Mademoiselle Parley Voo * MADEMOISELLE PARLEY VOO (MADEMOISELLE FROM ARMENTIERES O.B.E.) MAN IN THE SADDLE * MAN WHO CHANGED HIS NAME THB (ALIAS) *MANXMAM, THE * MASTER AND MAN (FATHER) Mayfair see The Infamous Lady My Wife's Husband see Weekend Wives NIGHT PATROL * NOT QUITE A LADY (THE CASSILIS ENGAGEMENT) * NUMBER SEVENTEEN Pace see Smashing Through * PALAIS DE DANSE * PARADISE * PASSING OF MR, QUIN, THE * PEEP BEHIND THE SCENES, A * PHYSICIAN, THE * PICCADILLY * PLAYTHING, THE * POWER OVER MEN * PRICE OF DIVORCE, THE Prince of Bolivar see Bolibar Princess Priscilla's Fortnight, the see The Runaway Princess RETURN OF THE RAT, THE * RINGER, THE * RINGING THE CHANGES * RISING GENERATION, THE Rough Seas see You Know What Sailors Are * RUNAWAY PRINCESS, THE (PRINCESS PRISCILLA'S FORTNIGHT) SECOND MATE, THE * SILENT HOUSE, THE * SILVER KING, THE Silver Rosary, The see High Seas * SIR OR MADAM * SMASHING THROUGH (PACE) * S.O.S. * SOUTH SEA BUBBLE, A * SPANGLES Stowaways, The see Cocktails STREETS OF LONDON, THE * SWEENEY TODD * TESHA * THIRD EYE, THE THOROUGHBRED, THE Sep Apr Mar Oct Jun Jul Jun Aug Feb Aug May May May Sep Feb Aug Oct Dec May Mar Sep Aug Aug Jun

Shepherd's Bush

Gaumont

Gaumont

Maurice Elvey Widgey R Newman AV Bramble Alfred Hitchcock George A Cooper

Cinema Exclusives PDC Beaconsfleld BIP, Elstree Worton Hall British Lion BIP British Screen Prods British Lion Wardour British Screen Prods

Worton Hall Feb Jan BIF, Elstree (Berlin) Shepherd's Bush BIP, Elstree Twickenham Cricklewood Shepherd's Bush BIP, Elstee BIP, Elstree Walthamstow Cricklewood

HB Parkinson BIP Fellner & Somlo Gaumont BIP Strand B&D Gaumont BIP BIP British Filmcraft Syndicate

JMG Wardour W&F Gaumont Wardour Argosy W&F Gaumont Wardour Wardour Paramount Stoll

Norman Lee Thomas Bentley Geza von Bolvary Maurice Elvey Denison Clift Leslie Hiscott Jack Raymond Georg Jacoby EA Dupont Castleton Knight George Banfield Sinclair Hill

Oct Apr Nov Feb

Islington Beaconsfield Twickenham Twickenham

Gainsborough British Lion Strand Westminster

W&F Ideal Argosy WP

Graham Cutts Arthur Maude Leslie Hiscott Harley Knoles, George Dewhurst

Sep Oct Jul Dec

Welwyn(Laender) BIF Worton Hall Walton-onThames Cricklewood/Shep herd's Bush BIP, Elstree Shepherd's Bush Shepherd's Bush Islington Walthamstow Worton Hall Islington BIP Elstree Walton-onThames Twickenham HB Parkinson Archibald Nettlefold Welsh-PearsonElder Foremost Prods Gaumont Strand Gainsborough British Filmcraft HB Parkinson QTS Burlington Graham-Wilcox London Screen Plays

JMG Pioneer Butcher's Paramount WB Gaumont Allied Artists W&F Paramount HB Parkinson QTS Burlington

Anthony Asquith J Stevens Edwards Walter Forde T Hayes Hunter Carl Boese WP Kellino Leslie Hiscott T Hayes Hunter George Banfield HB Parkinson Walter West Victor Saville

Graham-Wilcox P Maclean Rogers Gaumont Sidney Morgan

BFI Information Services

52

VISION D'HISTORIQUE * WARNED OFF * WARNING. THE * VALLEY OF THE GHOSTS. THE * YELLOW STOCKINGS Date Aug Jul May Jan May May Mar May Jul Jan Oct Oct May Apr Mar Aug Aug Mar Dec Jul Jun Studio 1928 Production Co (s) British & Foreign British Screen Worton Hall Prods (Rex Ingram.Films in Production Title * THREE KINGS. Nice) St George Prods BIP. THE * VERDUN. Elstree (New Guinea) Southall Shepherd's Bush Cricklewood Welwyn BIP. THE (INTROSPECTION) * WEEKEND WIVES (MY WIFE'S HUSBAND) * WHAT MONEY CAN BUY * WHAT NEXT? * WHEN KNIGHTS WERE BOLD * WIDECOMBE FAIR * WOMAN IN WHITE. THE * TOMMY ATKINS * TRIUMPH OF THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL. THE * TWO LITTLE DRUMMER BOYS * UNDERGROUND * UNSLEEPING EYE. THE THREE MEN IN A CART * THREE PASSIONS. Elstree Shepherd's Bush Walton-onThames Cricklewood BIP. Elstree Cricklewood BIP B&D GB Samuelson BIF Seven Sea Screen Prods British Lion Gaumont-Alliance B&D British Projects BIP Gaumont Archibald Nettlefold B&D BIP JMG Pro Patria Wardour Gaumont Butcher's W&F Wardour W&F Butcher's W&F Paramount Gaumont Regal Pictures FN-Pathe Distributor British & Foreign Universal Allied Artists Wardour W&F GB Samuelson Pro Patria British Screen Prods JMG Director(s) Hans Steinhoff Arthur Phillips Rex Ingrams Norman Walker T Hayes Hunter GB Samuelson Anthony Asquith Alexander Macdonald GB Samuelson Leon Poirier Walter West Reginald Fogwell Harry Lachman Edwin Greenwood Walter Forde Tim Whelan Norman Walker Herbert Wilcox Walter Forde Geza von Bolvary Theodore Komisarjevsky Maurice Elvey E Oswald Brook Jack Raymond * YOU KNOW WHAT SAILORS ARE Jun (ROUGH SEAS) * YOUNG TOODLEY Sep * ZERO Jan B&D Archibald Walton-on-Thanes Nettlefold GainsboroughIslington Fellner & Somlo Welsh-PearsonCricklewood Elder Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Cricklewood Cricklewood Regal Pictures Film Manufacturing Co Appendix * Adventurous Youth Pall Mall WB Edward Godal BFI Information Services 53 . Elatree Cricklewood Southall BIP. THE WOULD YOU BELIEVE IT? * WRECKER.

MARY'S. Elstree (Tiffany St. THE FLAME OF LOVE. Donald Stuart Herbert Wilcox Norman Lee * COMPULSORY HUSBAND. THE * INFORMER. Elstree BIP. Elstree Blattner. THE DOWNSTREAM Encore see Life's a Stage * FEATHER. Elstree BIP. Elstree B&D/Blattner Elstree Welwyn Shepherd's Bush Islington BIP. Elstree Beaconsfield Walton-on-Thames Kingsway General FBO BIP British Lion Archibald Nettlefold BIP B&D BIF FA Thompson Sageen BIP B&D FN British Lion Butcher's Albert Arch Walter Summers Edgar Wallace Walter Forde Road to Dishonour. THE * CITY OF PLAY Date Nov Jul Jun Jun Oct Sep Jan Feb Mar Jan Jul Feb Feb Studio Shepherd's Bush BIP. THE * JOURNEY'S END * JUNO AND THE PAYCOCK * JUST FOR A SONG (VARIETY) * KNOWING MEN LADY FROM THE SEA. Elstree BIP Elstree Twickenham Preston (Brighton) Morton Hall BIP. THE (THE PARSON) * BLACKMAIL * BLACK WATERS * BRIGHT EYES * BROKEN ROMANCE. Elstree BIP. A DARK RED ROSES DIZZY LIMIT. Elstree/B&D. THE (THE PELICAN) Dec SISTER TO ASSIST 'ER. Elstree Worton Hall 1929 Production Co (s) Distributor Gaumont BIP BIP BIP Twickenham G&S GP Prods BIP B&D-Sono Art World Wide BIP-Sascha HB Parkinson BIF Gainsborough BIP BIT-Swedish Biograph BSFP Carlton Films Strand BIP BIP BIP BIP Gaumont GainsboroughFellner & Somlo BIP GainsboroughTiffany-StahlWelsh-Pearson BIP Gainsborough Talkicolor BIP Fellner & Somlo. The see The Flame of Love ROMANCE OF SEVILLE. THE (GOODWIN SANDS) * LAND WITHOUT LADIES LIFE'S A STAGE (ENCORE) LONDON MELODY Feb Jul Nov May Mar Nov Feb Nov Aug Apr Apr Feb Dec Oct Oct Oct Apr Apr Jan Nov Edward G Whiting PDC * LOVES OF ROBERT BURNS. Ger) BIP. THE * ATLANTIC * AT THE VILLA ROSE AUNTIE'S ANTICS BELLS OF ST. The see The Sacrifice * PICCADILLY NIGHTS * RAISE THE ROOF * RED ACES * RED PEARLS Oct Nov Feb Apr Preston Shepherd's Bush G&S Films Gaumont G&S Films Ideal Wilfred Cannon Sewell Collins Southall BIP. Elstree Wardour W&F Fox Gaumont Paramount FN-Pathe W&F Norman Walker Tom Walls Victor Peers George Dewhurst Seymour Hicks Harry Lachman Jack Raymond * SACRIFICE. THE (THE ROAD TO DISHONOUR) FLYING SCOTSMAN. A Jan *ROOKERY NOOK Sep BIP. Elstree BIP. Vienna) Worton Hall Welwyn Islington BIP. Elstree Islington BIP. Elstree (Hollywood) (Saacha. THE Sep Parson. Elstree (Germany) Worton Hall Worton Hall B&D. THE * HIGH TREASON * HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES. The see The Bells of St. Mary's Pelican. Elstree BIP. Walter Summers Castleton Knight Thomas Bentley Norman Walker Maurice Elvey Richard Oswald Arthur Robison James Whale Alfred Hitchcock V Gareth Gundrey Elinor Glyn Castleton Knight Carmine Gallone Argosy British Screen Prods W&F Fox Arthur Phlllips Geoffrey Mallns. THE Feb * COTTAGE ON DARMOOR. Elstree Shepherd's Bush (Staaken St. THE Goodwin Sands see The Lady from the Sea HARMONY HEAVEN * HATE SHIP. Gainsborough Encore Films British Screen Prods B&D HB Parkinson Gaumont Wardour Wardour Wardour WB G&S JMG Wardour W&F Wardour Fox PDC W&F Wardour Pro Patria BIFD WB United Artists Wardour WB Wardour FN Gaumont Wardour W&F Wardour W&F United Artists Paramount Director(s) WP Kellino WP Kellino Thomas Bentley EA Dupont Leslie Hiscott Wilfred Cannon Redd Davis Alfred Hitchcock Marshall Neilan Geza von Bolvary J Steven Edwards Walter Summers Denison Clift Harry Lachman Anthony Asquith Sinclair Hill Edward Dryhurst Guarino G Glavany Leslie Hiscott Richard Eichberg. THE CHAMBERS OF HORRORS. A * SLEEPING PARTNERS * SONG OF SOHO * SPLINTERS Oct Nov Oct Sep BFI Information Services 54 . Sep THE * LURE OF THE ATLANTIC Luxury see Bright Eyes Mary Was Love see Those Who Love NICK'S NICKERS Aug NIGHT PORTER. USA) BIP.Films in Production Title * ALF'S BUTTON * ALF'S CARPET * AMERICAN PRISONER. Elstree Welwyn Wembley Worton Hall Worton Hall Twickenham BIP.

USA) 1929 Production Co (s) Distributor Gainsborough BIP W&F FN-Pathe Director(s) Denieon Clift. Arthur W Barnes Albert de Courvllle Paul Czinner Victor Saville Walter Forde Pathe-Nathan Strand Tiffany Film AB MinervaBIP BIP Wardour Cinema Exclusives BIP Neo-Art Prods B&D Charles Whittaker Prods GainsboroughBurlingtonTiffany-Stahl Archibald Nettlefold Fox Wardour WP W&F WB J&F Butcher's Walton-on-Thames HB Parkinson Fox J Steven Edwards BFI Information Services 55 . Elstree Blattner. Elstree BIP. Elstree (Tiffany. THE Variety see Just For a Song * WHITE CARGO WOLVES * WOMAN HE SCORNED. Elstree Twickenham Twickenham Lapland) BIP. The Date Mar Jan Aug Jul Feb Jul Feb Mar Jan Aug Jun Aug Jul Studio Islington BIP. THE * WOMAN TO WOMAN YOU'D BE SURPRISED Appendix * Pride of Donegal. Elstree Esher BIP. Alexandre Esway Manning Haynes Andre Hugon Edwin Greenwood Gustaf Molander Harry Lachman AE Colby Geza von Bolvary JB Williams.Films in Production Title * TAXI FOR TWO * THOSE WHO LOVE (MARY WAS LOVE) * THREE MASKS. THE * TO WHAT RED HELL * TRIUMPH OF THE HEART * UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREE UNTO EACH OTHER VAGABOND QUEEN. Elstree Twickenham/ Whitehall.

Elstree B&D. Elstree BIP. Elstree Beaconsfleld Ealing Twickenham BIP. THE * CITY OF SONG COMETS * COMPROMISING DAPHNE Conflict see The Woman Between CONTRABAND LOVE CROSS ROADS DANGEROUS SEAS * DOWN RIVER Dying to Live see Never Trouble Trouble ELSTREE CALLING Enter Sir John see Murder ENTER THE QUEEN ESCAPE * ETERNAL FEMININE. THE * GREEK STREET GUILT Happy Husband.Films in Production Title All of a Tremble see Never Trouble Trouble All Right on the Western Front see Not so Quiet on the Western Front * ALMOST A HONEYMOON BED AND BREAKFAST * BEYOND THE CITIES (REPARATION) * BIG BUSINESS * BIRDS OF PREY (THE FOURTH WALL) BLACK HAND GANG. THE * FLYING FOOL. Elstree Twickenham Twickenham BIP. Elstree Oscar M Sheridan Fox ATP BIP Gaumont Twickenham Twickenham B&D BIP Harry Rowson BIP Neo-Art ASFI Alpha BIP British Screenplays British Projects Gaumont BIP Starcraft ATP Starcraft BIP D&H Prods Gaumont Gaumont Reginald Fogwel] Twickenham Starcraft Patrick K Heale Butcher's BIP Archibald Nettlefold George King BIP Twickenham BIP Reginald Pogwell BIP BIP George King Radio Wardour Gaumont WB WB W&F Wardour United Artists FN-Pathe WP Sterling JMG Wardour Aug Feb May Oct B&D. Elstree Wembley Twickenham BIP. Elstree Walton-onThames BIP. Elstree Shepherd's Bush Shepherd's Bush Worton Hall Twickenham Twickenham Worton Hall Walton-onThames BIP. Elstree Shepherd's Bush BIP Gaumont Piccadllly Wardour Gaumont Paramount Monty Banks Walter Forde Carlyle Blackwell Oscar M Sheridan Basil Dean Monty Banks Sewell Collins Leslie Hiscott Leslie Hiscott Tom Walls EA Dupont Campbell Gullan Alexandre Esway JB Williams. Elstree Worton Hall BIP. NIGHT BIRDS (WEST END) * NIPPER. The see Birds of Prey * FRENCH LEAVE * GREAT GAME. THE (THE BRAT) May Apr BIP Lupino Lane BIP Betty Balfour Wardour PDC Wardour United Artists Lupino Lane Richard Eichberg Louis Mercanton BFI Information Services 56 . Elstree Paramount Paramount Gaumont Wardour Fox Radio Paramount Wardour Sterling Gaumont Gaumont Paramount WB Fox Paramount: Butcher's Wardour Butcher's Fox Wardour WB Wardour W&F Wardour Wardour Fox Sidney Morgan Reginald Fogwell Edward Dryhurst Peter Godfrey Adrian Brunel (1) Arthur VarneySerrao Basil Dean Arthur VarneySerrao Walter Summers Jack Raymond Jack Raymond Sinclair Hill Reginald Fogwell Leslie Hiscott Arthur VarneySerrao Fred Paul Castleton Knight Monty Banks Walter Forde George King Norman Walker Walter Forde Harry Lachman Reginald Fogwell Walter Summers Norman Walker George King Alfred Hitchcock Edward G Whiting Fllmophone * LORD RICHARD IN THE PANTRY Apr Moorland Terror see The Road to Fortune * MURDER (ENTER SIR JOHN) Mar * NEVER TROUBLE TROUBLE-(ALL Nov OF A TREMBLE/DYING TO LIVE. THE MIDNIGHT Mar Jul Dec Jul Apr Feb Jul Jan Dec Aug Sep May Feb Sep Feb Sep Sep Aug Aug Nov Date Studio 1930 Production Co (s) Distributor Director(s) Jul May May Aug Aug Sep Jul Sep Jun Jul Aug Aug Jun Aug Apr Jan Jul BIP. Arthur Barnes Carmine Gallone Sasha Geneen Thomas Bentley Twickenham Beaconsfield BIP. The see The Nipper * BROWN SUGAR CALL OF THE SEA. THE Fourth Wall. Elstree Welwyn Shepherd's Bush BIP. Elstree BIP. Elstree B&D. Elstree Shepherds Bush Twickenham Twickenham B&D. THE * MADAME GUILLOTINE * MAN FROM CHICAGO. THE * CANARIES SOMETIMES SING * CAPE FORLORN * CASTE * CHILDREN OF CHANCE * CHINESE BUNGALOW. The see Uneasy Virtue * HOUSE OF THE ARROW IMMEDIATE POSSESSION IN A LOTUS GARDEN * KISSING CUP'S RACE KISS ME SERGEANT ' * LAST HOUR. THE (SPEED) * MIDDLE WATCH. THE BRACELETS Brat. Elstree Walton-onThames BIP. Elstree Twickenham BIP. Elstree BIP. THE LEAVE IT TO ME * LOOSE ENDS * LOVE HABIT. Elstree Cricklewood BIP.

THE *SUCH IS THE LAW * SUSPENSE * SYMPHONY IN TWO FLATS * TELL ENGLAND * TEMPORARY WIDOW. THE REALITIES Separation see Beyond the Cities ROAD TO FORTUNE. Elstree Welwyn Islington B&D. JOSSER (THE POLICE FORCE) * PLUNDER * POTIPHAR'S WIFE * PRICE OF THINGS. Elstree BIP. Elstree B&D. Elstree BIP. Elstree Beaconsfield BIP. Elstree BIP. Geoffrey Barkas Gustav Ucicky Walter Forde Tom Walls Manning Haynes EA Dupont Norman Walker Victor Savllle Monty Banks John Orton Welwyn BIP. THE * SPANISH EYES * SPECKLED BAND. THE *YELLOW MASK. THE Stop Press see Press Gang *STRONGER SEX. Elstree BIP. Elstree B&D. Elstree BIP. Elscree BIP. The Savanna JMG Lawrence Huntington Charles Barnett Geoffrey Benstead Guarino G Glavany Charles Barnett Norman Lee Erle O Smith Ralph Smart.Elstree Worton Hall BIP. Elstree BIP. THE * THIRD TIME LUCKY * TONS OF MONEY * TO OBLIGE A LADY * TWO WORLDS * UNEASY VIRTUE (THE UNHAPPY HUSBAND) Wanted see What a Night * WARM CORNER. THE * SQUEAKER. Elstree Welwyn (Germany) Islington B&D. THE * YOUNG WOODLEY May Oct May May Dec Jul Nov Dec Mar Dec Oct Feb Jun Sep Feb Jan Jun May Sep Sep Nov Feb Nov Jul Nov Jun Oct Feb Mar Apr Twickenham Worton Hall BIP. THE * SLEEPING CARDINAL. THE * 77 PARK LANE SHOULD A DOCTOR TELL? Show a Leg see Old Soldiers Never Die * SKIN GAME. Elstree Islington/BIP. THE * WOMAN BETWEEN. THE (MOORLAND TERROR) ROMANY LOVE * SAILORS AHOY * SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL. THE * W FLAN. Elstree B&D. FR Lucas Argyle Art Pictures EB Geoffrey Benstead Geoffrey Benstead Carlton WB Bernard Smith Fox HB Parkinson JMG Erle O Smith Universal Pro Patria Pro Patria BFI Information Services 57 . Elstree Beaconsfield Islington Cricklewood BIP. Elstree Production Co (s) WB Gaumont BIP BIP Distributor WB Gaumont Wardour Wardour Director(s) Charles Saunders Lupino Lane Monty Banks Monty Banks Tom Walls Walter Creighton Milton Rosmer Tom Walls Maurice Elvey Elinor Clyn Bernard Mainwaring Arthur VarneySerrao Fred Paul Monty Banks Maurice Elvey Albert de Courville Manning Haynes Alfred Hitchcock Leslie Hiscott GB Samuelson Jack Raymond Victor Saville Edgar Wallace V Gareth Gundrey Sinclair Hill Walter Summers V Gareth Gundrey Anthony Asquith. THE Speed see The Man From Chicago *SPORT OF KINGS.C.Films in Production Title NO EXIT * NO LADY NOT SO QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT (ALL RIGHT ON THE WESTERN FRONT) OLD SOLDIERS NEVER DIE (SHOW A LEG) * ON APPROVAL * ONE FAMILY * P. Elstree Twickenham Twickenham B&D. Elstree BIP. Elstree Date Feb Aug Apr Dec Jun Jan Aug Aug Nov May Sep 1930 Studio Welwyn Shepherd's Bush BIP. Elstree BIP Twickenham Julian WylieUlargui B&D Gainsborough British Lion Gainsborough Stoll BIF Gainsborough BIF UFA Gainsborough B&D British Lion BIP BIP Gainsborough BIP Edward C Whiting JMG Burlington BIP BIP Wardour Wardour Wardour (1) Interconnecting sequences directed by Alfred Hitchcock Appendix *After Many Years Flames of Fear Naughty Husbands Obvious Situation. An Painted Pictures Scrags Terrors Woodpigeon Patrol. A West End see Night Birds WHAT A NIGHT! (WANTED) When East Meets West see The Woman From China WINDJAMMER. Elstree Pro Patria BIP BIF Wardour Miles Mander Edward Dryhurst Victor Saville Harry Lachman Thomas Bentley B&D W&P Empire Marketing Pro Patria Board Gainsborough W&F B&D BIP Elinor Glyn BIP W&F FN-Pathe United Artists Wardour Starcraft Paramount MGM Wardour Paramount United Artists British Lion Wardour WB MGM W&F Ideal British Lion Ideal Butcher's Wardour Gaumont Wardour Wardour W&F W&F British Lion Wardour Wardour Ideal FN-Pathé Patrick K Heale BIP Albion Walton-on Thames Famous Players Guild Beaconsfield British Lion BIP. THE (CONFLICT) * WOMAN FROM CHINA.

Elstree B&D. the see The Frightened Lady * CHANCE OF A NIGHT TIME.C. Elstree Beaconsfieid Beaconsfleld B&D. Elstree Real Art Twickenham UFA BIP BIF George King BIP BIP Welsh-Pearson Paramount MGM W&F Gaumont Wardour Wardour Butcher's Pathe Wardour Gaumont Paramount Guy Newall Walter Forde Erik Charell John Orton Anthony Asqulth George King Norman Lee FW Kraemer.Films in Production Title ABOVE RUBIES * ALIBI ALMOST A DIVORCE * AREN'T WE ALL? * ARIANE BACHELOR'S BABY BAD COMPANIONS. Elstree BIP. Elstree (Germany) BIP. Elstree B&D W&F Herbert Wilcox. THE * CAPTIVATION Carmen see Gipsy Blood *CARNIVAL Carnival see Dance Pretty Lady Dec Jun Apr Blattner. A see Man of Mayfair CHIN CHIN CHINAMAN * CONDEMNED TO DEATH * CONGRESS DANCES * CREEPING SHADOWS DANCE PRETTY LADY (CARNIVAL) * DEADLOCK *DR. Harcourt Templeman Reginald Fogwell John Orton Harry J Revier Walton-on-Thames Twickenham B&D. Bill the Conqueror * BLACK COFFEE Black Diamonds see Paradise Alley BLACK DIAMONDS * BLUE DANUBE. Milton Rosmer George Pearson Arthur Rosson Apr BIP. THE (THE CASE OF THE FRIGHTENED LADY) GAME OF CHANCE. (HOUSE FULL) * DREYFUS * EAST LYNNE ON THE WESTERN FRONT * EBB TIDE England Through the Ages see Stepping Stones FASCINATION Footsteps in the Night see A Honeymoon Adventure Four Winds see The Strangler * FRAIL WOMEN * FRIGHTENED LADY. A (HIS PROMISE) Jul Sep Jun Mar Jul Apr Jul Jan Jan Nov B&D. THE Sep Nov Aug Nov Apr Date Nov Jan Apr Jan Studio 1931 Production Co (s) Ralph J Pugh Twickenham B&D B&D Nerofilm-Pathe Natan BIP BIP-BIF Rex Ingram Amalgamated Films BSFP Distributor W&F W&F Paramount Universal Path_ Path_ Ideal British Lion PDC Director(s) Leslie Hiscott Arthur VarneySerrao Harry Lachman Paul Czinner Harry Hughes John Orton Rex Ingram John Harvel. the see Let's Love and Laugh *BROTHER ALFRED CALENDAR. Elstree Regina Wardour Miles Mander Nov Nov May Twickenham Beaconsfield Twickenham British LionGainsborough Radio Ideal Maurice Elvey T Hayes Hunter Reel Arms (Tamworth) Equity British Equity British John F Argyle BFI Information Services 58 . THE * BAROUD BEGGAR STUDENT. THE Bombs on Monte Carlo see Monte Carlo Madness Bridegroom's Widow. Elstree Shepherd's Bush B&D. Elstree BIP British LionGainsborough John Harvel B&D Wardour W&F W&F W&F Henry Edwards T Hayes Hunter John Harvel Herbert Wilcox Case of the Frightened Lady. Ralph Lynn Twickenham Twickenham (Neubabelsberg) Welwyn Welwyn Walton-on-Thames BIP. Jan THE Child in their Midst. Elstree Twickenham Fogwell Films BIP Twickenham Universal Wardour Ideal May Twickenham Twickenham W&F Leslie Hiscott Jun Aug Goldthorpe(Yorks) Hammer B&D Wardour W&F Charles Hanmer Herbert Wilcox Nov Jul Jan Apr BIP. THE * BELLS. Victor Hanbury Oscar M Werndorff. Elstree Beaconsfleld Wembley United Artists Frank Richardson BETRAYAL BILL AND COO BILL'S LEGACY Bill's War Debt see Poor Old Bill Bill Takes a Holiday see Tonight's the Night Bill the Conqueror see Mr. JOSSER K. Elstree BIP. Elstree Welwyn B&D.

Films in Production Title * GENTLEMAN OF PARIS. The see The Innocents of Chicago MISCHIEF * MISSING REMBRANDT. THE * MAN OF MAYFAIR (A CHILD IN THEIR MIDST) * MAN THEY COULDN'T ARREST. Elstree (Berlin) Twickenham Teddington Gainsborough BIP BIP National Talkies Twickenham BIP Paramount Gainsborough Associated Metropolltan BIP Gainsborough B&D Twickenham BIP BIP UFA Twickenham WB-FN Ideal Wardour Pathe PDC W&F Wardour Paramount WSF Pathe Wardour Ideal W&F PDC Pathe Pathe Pathe W&F FN Walter Forde Lupino Lane Lupino Lane AV Bramble Arthur Maude Harry Hughes Louis Mercanton T Hayes Hunter Milton Rosmer Walter Summers Victor Saville Jack Raymond Leslie Hiscott Norman Walker Monty Banks Hanns Schwarz Leslie Hiscott William McGann BFI Information Services 59 . Elstree Twickenham BIP. Elstree Blattner. THE INDISCRETIONS OF EVE (NEW YEAR'S EVE) INNOCENTS OF CHICAGO.THE * MANY WATERS MEN LIKE THESE * MICHAEL AND MARY Milky Way. THE (THE KNIGHT ERRANT) * GLAMOUR * GOODNIGHT VIENNA * GREAT GAY ROAD. Elstree BIP. Josser KC HOUSE OF UNREST. Elstree BIP. The see Creeping Shadows Little Tommy Tucker see Out of the Blue LORD BABS * LOVE LIES Lovelorn Lady. THE(THE MILKY WAY) * INQUEST Jack o' Lantern see Condemned to Death JEALOUSY Josser Goes to Sea see Josser Joins the Navy JOSSER JOINS THE NAVY (JOSSER GOES TO SEA) * KEEPERS OF YOUTH Knight Errant. A * GHOST TRAIN. Elstree Cricklewood Shepherd's Bush 1931 Production Co (s) Gaumont Gainsborough BIP Henry Edwards BIP B&D Stoll Gaumont Distributor Gaumont W&F Wardour Wardour Wardour W&F Butcher Gaumont Director(s) Sinclair Hill Walter Forde Cecil Lewis Henry Edwards Seymour Hicks Herbert Wilcox Sinclair Hill Millard Webb Oct Apr Apr Jun Jun Jan Feb Apr Dec Oct Sep Apr Teddington BSD. Elstree BIP. Elstree B&D. Elstree BIP. THE HOUSE OPPOSITE. Elstree Shepherd's Bush BIP. Elstree Islington B&D. Elstree BIP BIP Wardour Wardour Norman Lee Thomas Bentley Mar BIP. The see Service For Ladies Healer of Souls see Castle Sinister * HELP YOURSELF (SINNERS ALL) HER REPUTATION (PASSING BROMPTON ROAD) HINDLE WAKES His Promise see A Game of Chance HOBSON'S CHOICE HONEYMOON ADVENTURE. THE * GIPSY BLOOD (CARMEN) GIRL IN THE NIGHT. Elstree BIP Wardour Richard Eichberg Oct Apr Aug Dec Jan May Aug Mar Aug Aug Aug Sep Nov Sep Aug May Jul Sep Islington BIP. A * LYONS MAIL. A (FOOTSTEPS IN THE NIGHT) * HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES. THE * MAN AT SIX. Elstree Beaconsfield Islington Cricklewood BIP. THE LUCKY SWEEP. Elstree BIP. Elstree Islington BIP. The see The Perfect Lady * LOVE RACE. THE * MR. THE House Full see Dr. Elstree BIP. THE * HAPPY ENDING. Elstree BIP. Elstree Twickenham BIP. BILL THE CONQUEROR (BILL THE CONQUEROR) * MONEY FOR NOTHING MONTE CARLO MADNESS (BOMBS ON MONTE CARLO) MURDER IN COVENT GARDEN MURDER ON THE SECOND FLOOR Date May May Jun Apr Jan Nov Jul Feb Studio Cricklewood/ Shepherd's Bush Islington BIP. THE Head Waiter. Elstree BIP. The see The Girl in the Night * LET'S LOVE AND LAUGH (THE BRIDEGROOM'S WIDOW) Limping Man. Elstree Worton Hall Worton Hall WB-FN London Screenplays Gainsborough BIP ATP Gainsborough Associated Picture Prods BIP BIP BIP Majestic-New Era Majestic-New Era WB Paramount Gaumont Wardour Radio Gaumont PDC Pathe Wardour Wardour FN WB John Daumery Sidney Morgan Victor Saville Thomas Bentley Maurice Elvey V Gareth Gundrey Leslie Howard Gordon Walter Summers Cecil Lewis Lupino Lane GB Samuelson GB Samuelson Oct Feb BIP. Elstree B&D.

Elstree Cricklewood Paramount Film Engineering Geoffrey Benstead Teddington BIP-BIF BIF Gaumont Fogwell Films Paramount Welsh-Pearson Paramount Fox Geoffrey Benstead WB Pathé Pathé Ideal MGM Paramount Gaumont Dimitri Buchowetzki Michael Powell Geoffrey Benstead Henry Edwards Norman Lee Jacquellne Logan. Elstree GS Enterprises BIP BIP Frank Richardson Milton Rosmer. THE (SOOKEY) Dec SERVICE FOR LADIES (THE HEAD Oct WAITER) * SHADOW BETWEEN. THE OTHER PEOPLE'S SINS * OUT OF THE BLUE * OUTSIDER. Elstree Production Co (s) Film Engineering BIP Gainsborough B&D ATP George King BIP Harry Rowson British Lion Associated Picture Prods BIP Cinema House Distributor Fox Wardour Gaumont W&P Radio Radio Wardour Paramount British Lion PDC Pathé MGM Argyle Art Pictures Fox Wardour Wardour Director(s) Michael Powell Monty Banks Leslie Hiscott Tom Walls Basil Dean George King Alfred Hitchcock Manning Haynes Manning Haynes Sinclair Hill Gene Gerrard Harry Lachman John Argyle Argyle-Art (Tamworth) Argyle Art Pictures Feb Apr Jan Twickenham BIP. THE RODNEY STEPS IN * ROSARY. Eletree BIP. Elstree BIP. Elstree Walton-on-Thames Walton-on-Thames ASFI. THE Apr SHADOWS (PRESS GANG) Jan Sinners All see Help Yourself Sookey see The Self Made Man Special Assignment see The Star Reporter * SPLINTERS IN THE NAVY Jul Spring Cleaning see Women Who Play * STAMBOUL Jul STAR REPORTER. Elstree Beaconsfleld Twickenham Twickenham Walton-on-Thames Walton-on-Thames Beaconsfield Walton-on-Thames B&D. THE (THE LOVELORN LADY) POOR OLD BILL (BILL'S WAR DEBT) Press Gang see Shadows Pyjama Nights In Paris see Pyjamas Preferred PYJAMAS PREFERRED (PYJAMA NIGHTS IN PARIS/RED DOG) PROFESSIONAL GUEST. THE * OLD MAN. THE PARADISE ALLEY (BLACK DIAMONDS) Passing Brompton Road see Her Reputation PEACE AND QUIET * PERFECT LADY. Wembley Argyle Pictures Sterling BIP BIP Film Engineering Nettlefold Cinema House Equity British Charles Barnett Sterling Pathé Wardour Fox MGM Jack Raymond FW Kraener Monty Banks Michael Powell Fred Niblo Unlted Artists George King BFI Information Services 60 . THE (SPECIAL ASSIGNMENT) STEPPING STONES (ENGLAND THROUGH THE AGES) STRANGLEHOLD Oct Jan Aug United Artists George King Paramount Wardour Wardour Alexander Korda Norman Walker Alexandre Esway Twickenham Twickenham W&F Walter Forde BIP. Elstree Twickenham B&D. Elstree BIP. A * NIGHT LIKE THIS. Mary Field Victor Saville Graham Cutts Louis Mercanton George Pearson STRANGLER. Elstree BIP. Elstree Walton-on-Thames Worton Hall Teddington Welwyn Welwyn Islington Worton Hall B&D. THE RYNOX SAFE AFFAIR. Frederick Jackson Monty Banks Aug May Sep Jun Feb May Apr Jun Jul Mar Welwyn Walton-on-Thames Walton-on-Thames BIP. THE Those Charming People see These Charming People THOROUGHBRED * TILLY OF BLOOMSBURY TIN GODS * TONIGHT'S THE NIGHT (BILL TAKES A HOLIDAY) TWO CROWDED HOURS TWO WAY STREET * TWO WHITE ARMS Oct Jul Aug Apr Sep May Sep Oct Nov Jun Oct Dec Argyle B&D. THE (FOUR WINDS) Aug STRICTLY BUSINESS * SUNSHINE SUSIE TEMPERANCE FETE. THE Red Dog. A * NINE TILL SIX NUMBER PLEASE NUMBER SEVENTEEN * OFFICERS' MESS. THE * THESE CHARMING PEOPLE THIRD STRING. Elstree Walton-on-Thames Beaconsfield Cricklewood BIP. Elstree BIP. Elstree Ealing Walton-on-Thames BIP. Elstree BIP. A * SALLY IN OUR ALLEY Date Aug Mar Mar Jul Dec Ap Nov Mar Oct Jan Jul Jan 1931 Studio Walton-on-Thames BIP.Films in Production Title * MY FRIEND THE KING MY WIFE'S FAMILY New Year's Eve see Indiscretions of Eve * NIGHT IN MONTMARTRE. THE RASP. Elstree BIP-BIF George King Film Engineering BIP Gainsborough-British Lion Real Art Twickenham Film Engineering Langham ATP George King Paramount BIP BIP Pathé Fox Fox Wardour Ideal Fox WP Ideal MGM Radio Val Valentine George King Michael Powell Alfred Hitchcock Walter Forde Guy Newall Guy Newall Michael Powell Bert Wynne Maurice Elvey SELF MADE MAN. the see Pyjamas Preferred * RICH AND STRANGE * RINGER.

Elstree Beaconsfield Twickenham B&D. Elstree B&D.Films in Production Title * UP FOR THE CUP VERDICT OF THE SEA * WATER GIPSIES. The Other Woman. The Date May Aug Aug Jan Nov Mar Studio B&D. Sydney Northcote Maurice Elvey Frank Richardson Arthur Rosson Reginald Fogwell Macnamara Argyle Arc Pictures Majestic Films Samuelson G&L EB Ben R Hart John Argyle United Artists GB Samuelson United Artists GB Samuelson BFI Information Services 61 . THE WE DINE AT SEVEN * WOMEN WHO PLAY (SPRING CLEANING) * WRITTEN LAW. THE Appendix Birds of a Feather Last Tide. Elstree BIP. The Wickham Mystery. Elstree 1931 Production Co (s) B&D Regina Films ATP GS Enterprises Paramount Reginald Fogwell Distributor W&F Pathé Radio Fox Paramount Ideal Director(s) Jack Raymond Frank Miller.

THE (BLACK DIAMONDS) * FIRES OF FATE * FIRST MRS. Robert Stevenson United Artists GW Pabst United Artists Alexander Korda WB-FN WB Gaumont-Welsh. THE CALLED BACK Case of Lady Camber.Gaumont Pearson Gainsborough-UFA W&F BFI Information Services 62 . Jack Harris Delta Filmophone Widgey R Newman Jan Feb Dec Feb Twickenham Blattner. THE Black Diamonds see The Final Reckoning * BLARNEY STONE. The see Lord Cambers Ladies CASTLE SINISTER (HEALER OF SOULS) Chauffeur Antoinette see The Love Contract Chinese Nights see The Television Follies * CHINESE PUZZLE. Elstree (Neubabelsberg) Twickenham Islington Argyle (Tamworth) BIP. Elstree B&D. Elstree Shepherd's Bush BIP Gaumont BIP.P. Maurice Elvey Henry Edwards Frank Richardson Leslie Hiscott Harry Lachman Ludwig Berger Leslie Hiscott Victor Saville John F Argyle Norman Walker Sinclair Hill Henry Edwards Frank Richardson FW Kraemer Norman Walker Monty Banks Karl Hartl John Rawlings Victor Saville Paul Martin. Elstree (Nice) Teddington Twickenham B&D. Elstree Wembley B&D. Die see Waltz Time * FLYING SQUAD. THE Jun Sep Oct Mar Date Studio Jan Sep Feb Jul 1932 Production Co (s) PDC Distributor PDC Fox Wardour Gaumont Director(s) Leslie Howard Gordon Albert Parker Thomas Bentley Milton Rosmer Cricklewood Walton-on-Thames Fox BIP. THE Dance of the Witches see Strange Evidence * DAUGHTERS OF TODAY DIAMOND CUT DIAMOND * DISCORD DON QUIXOTE DON'T BE A DUMMY DOUBLE DEALING Double Trouble see His Wife's Mother * DOWN OUR STREET Driven see One Precious Year * EARLY TO BED (THE WIDOW'S BED) Easy Money see Forging Ahead * FACE AT THE WINDOW. THE * HAPPY EVER AFTER Mar Aug Sep Jan Sep Feb Feb Jun Mar Mar Dec Sep Aug Dec Aug Jul May Sep Dec Cricklewood Twickenham Samuelson Real Art United Artists GB Samuelson Radio Reginald Denham. THE COME INTO MY PARLOUR * COUNSEL'S OPINION * CROOKED LADY. Paramount B&D WB-FN Westminster Wardour Paramount W&F WB MGM Cecil Lewis Henry Edwards Tom Walls John Daumery Michael Powell * BORN LUCKY (MOPS) Oct Bright Lights of London see That Night In London Bring 'em Back Half Dead see Send 'em Back Half Dead Butler's Millions.1 * GIRL FROM MAXIM'S. THE FLAT NO. THE GOING STRAIGHT *GOOD COMPANIONS. Elstree B&D. Paramount Nelson & Vandas Films WB-FN Real Art Paramount Gaumont-UFA Real Art Gainsborough Equity British BIP Sterling B&D VE Deuchar British Lion Harry Cohen BIP UFA/Gaumont London United Artists FW Kraemer MGM Paramount FN Fox Paramount W&F Radio Ideal Equity British Wardour Sterling W&F Fox British Lion Fox Wardour Gaumont Fred Niblo. THE Fifty-Fifty see Just My Luck FINAL RECKONING. Elstree Twickenham Beaconsfield Wembley BIP. Elstree B&D. Elstree (Neubabeleberg) Paris Teddington Shepherd's Bush (Neubabelsberg) FWK Prods Cinema House B&D. FRASER. The see Money Means Nothing * CALLBOX MYSTERY. Elstree B&D. Elstree Twickenham Twickenham Gem Prods London Real Art W&F MGM Paramount MGM Guy Newall John Longden Allan Dwan Leslie Hiscott Nov Feb Oct Sep Nov Mar Cricklewood B&D. THE FORGING AHEAD (EASY MONEY) * FOR THE LOVE OF MIKE *F. THE * BLIND SPOT. THE * FAITHFUL HEART.Films in Production Title ACCOUNT RENDERED AFTER DARK * AFTER OFFICE HOURS (LONDON WALL) * AFTER THE BALL Alone at Last see Her Night Out Antoinette see The Love Contract * ARMS AND THE MAN * BARTON MYSTERY. THE *FLAG LIEUTENANT. 9 (STORMY WEATHER) Fledermaus. Elstree Teddington Wembley BIP B&D.

Eistree Shepherd's Bush London Gaumont United Artists George King Paramount W&F Leontine Sagan Albert de Courville MEN OF TOMORROW (YOUNG APOLLO) Jun * MIDSHIPMAID. Elstree Islington BIP. Elstree Teddington Gaumont W&F Wardour W&F Wardour Wardour Wardour Paramount W&F FN Ace W&F FN Radio Wardour W&F Radio W&F Wardour FN Ideal Wardour Ideal Gaumont Radio Ideal W&F FN Carmine Gallone Herbert Wllcox Thomas Bentley Tom Walls Monty Banks Gene Gerrard. Elstree Beaconsfield BIP-BIF B&D Indian & British Film Prods GainsboroughBritish Lion B&D BIP B&D BIP BIP BIP Paramount B&D WB-FN Delta Twickenham WB-FN ATP BIP B&D ATP Gainsborough BIP WB-FN Gainsborough BIP Gainsborough Gainsborough Twickenham Gainsborough B&D WB-FN Wardour W&F Ideal Norman Lee Jack Raymond John Hunt Oct May May Mar Dec Jun Nov Beaconsfield B&D. Frank Miller John Rawlings Anthony Asquith Lupino Lane Sinclair Hill Robert Flaherty Maurice Elvey William Thiele P Maclean Rogers Leslie Hiscott * LORD CAMBER'S LADIES (THE CASE Sep OF LADY CAMBER) * LOVE CONTRACT. THE London Wall see After Office Hours LONG LIVE THE KING * LOOKING ON THE BRIGHT SIDE Feb Sep Jul Jul Jun Sep Jun Jun Sep Jul Apr May Jul Oct Dec Feb Jan Jan Apr Nov Sep Feb Jun Date Studio 1932 Production Co (s) Distributor Director(s) Cricklewood Teddlngton Bushey Delta Teddington BIP. Elstree PDC St•George Prods WB-FN Delta VB-FN BIP Fox Twickenham WB-FN ATP Twickenham Paramount Real Art B&D Gainsborough BIP PDC Sterling WB Butcher's FN Wardour Fox Fox FN Radio APD Paramount Radio W&F W&F Wardour Redd Davis Allan Dwan William McGann Widgey R Newman John Rawlings Harry Hughes Jack Harrison Walter West William McCann Basil Dean Maurice Elvey Harry Lachman Leslie Hiscott Jack Raymond Walter Forde Norman Lee Jan Oct Welwyn B&D. THE IT'S A KING * JACK'S THE BOY * JOSSER IN THE ARMY Josser Joins the Army see Josser in the Army * JOSSER ON THE RIVER (STOP ME AND BUY ONE) * JUST MY LUCK (FIFTY-FIFTY) KARMA Kingdom for Five and Six. THE MELODY MAKERS Men of Darkness seg Heroes of the Mine * MEN OF STEEL Apr Mar Jun Sep Mar Jul Feb Jun Feb Aug May Walton-on-Thames Langham B&D. Elstree B&D. Elstree BIP. Elstree B&D. THE * MAN OF ARAN * MARRIAGE BOND. THE * MAN FROM TORONTO. Elstree Teddinton Islington/Welwyn BIP. THE * LAST COUPON. Elstree BIP. Elstree BIP. THE * LITTLE FELLA LITTLE WAITRESS (SONG OF THE RHINE) LODGER. THE (A KINGDOM FOR FIVE AND SIX) Magenta Street see Money Talks * MAID OF THE MOUNTAINS. Elstree Islington Aranmore Twickenham Islington B&D. Elstree BIF. THE * MARRY ME MAYOR'S NEST. Elstree B&D. A see The Lucky Number KING OF THE RITZ * KING'S CUP. THE * IN A MONASTERY GARDEN * INSULT IRON STAIR. THE Sep BFI Information Services 63 . THE (CHAUFFEUR Apr ANTOINETTE) LOVE ON THE SPOT (THREE OF A KIND) May * LOVE ON WHEELS * LUCKY GIRL * LUCKY LADIES * LUCKY NUMBER. Elstree Ealing Islington BIP. Graham Cutts Benn W Levy Herbert Selpin Graham Cutts Victor Saville Gene Gerrard. Elstree Wembley Wembley Teddington Ealing Twickenham Twickenham B&D. Elstree B&D. Elstree Teddington Bushey Twickenham Teddington Ealing BIP. THE * LEAP YEAR * LEAVE IT TO ME (HELP) * LET ME EXPLAIN DEAR * LETTING IN THE SUNSHINE Light Fingered Freddy see Taking Ways * LILY CHRISTINE * LITTLE DAMOZEL. A * ILLEGAL * IMPASSIVE FOOTMAN.Films in Production Title Happy go Lucky see Where is This Lady Help see Leave It to Me HERE'S GEORGE (THE SERVICE FLAT) * HER FIRST AFFAIRE HER NIGHT OUT (ALONE AT LAST) HEROES OF THE MINE (MEN OF DARKNESS) HIGH SOCIETY His Night Out see Their Night Out HIS WIFE'S MOTHER (DOUBLE TROUBLE) HOLIDAY LOVERS HUNDRED TO ONE. Frank Miller Lupino Lane Paul L Stein Herbert Wllcox William McGann Widgey R Newman Maurice Elvey William McGann Basil Dean.

Elstree Shepperton Wembley Worton Hall (Neubabelsberg) B&D. Elstree FN John Dauniery United Artists Bernard Vorhaus Harcourt Paramount Tenpleman. Elstree Teddington Sound City WB-FN Gaumont Real Art British Lion B&D Cecil Landeau Real Art Sound City Sound City ATP WB-FN BIP Gainsborough * SAFE PROPOSITION. THE REUNION RIVER HOUSE GHOST. THE SILVER GREYHOUND. THE Night Work see A Safe Proposition OLD SPANISH CUSTOMERS (TOREADORS DON'T CARE) ONCE BITTEN * ONE PRECIOUS YEAR (DRIVEN) Perfect Service see Money Means Nothing * PERFECT UNDERSTANDING Priscilla the Rake see She Was Only a Village Maid * PUPPETS OF FATE * RADIO PARADE (RADIO REVUE) Radio Revue see Radio Parade * RETURN OF RAFFLES. Elstree Blattner. 9 * STRANGE EVIDENCE (DANCE OF THE WITCHES) TAKING WAYS (LIGHT FINGERED FREDDY) TAXI TO PARADISE. Elstree Twickenham Shepperton Shepperton Ealing Teddlngton BIP. THE (CHINESE NIGHTS) * TELL ME TONIGHT * THARK * THAT NIGHT IN LONDON (BRIGHT LIGHTS OF LONDON) * THEIR NIGHT OUT (HIS NIGHT OUT) THERE GOES THE BRIDE Third Man Lucky see Taxi to Paradise * THREADS THREE MEN IN A BOAT Three Of a Kind see Love on the Spot TIGHT CORNER. The see Here’s George SHADOW. A (THIRD MAN LUCKY) TELEVISION FOLLIES. Elstree Islington/ Beaconsfield/ Welwyn B&D. Elstree Beaconsfield London Sound City George Smith English Films CIne-Allianz B&D London BIP GainsboroughBritish Lion Samuel son ATP Real Art Paramount Universal Fox English Films W&F W&F Paramount Wardour Ideal Robert Milton John Baxter Adrian Brunel Geoffrey Benstead Anatole Litvak Tom Walls Rowland V Lee Harry Hughes Albert de Courville Cricklewood Ealing Twickenham United Artists GB Samuelson ABFD MGM Graham Cutts Leslie Hiscott BFI Information Services 64 . Elstree Real Art BIP United Artists George A Cooper Wardour WP MGM FM Gaumont Fox British Lion W&F Fox Archie de Bear. A (NIGHT WORK) May United Artists George A Cooper MGM MGM Radio WB Wardour W&F Arthur Maude Ivar Campbell Graham Cutts William McGann Thomas Bentley Maurice Elvey Feb Nov B&D-Paramount WB-FN Paramount WB Jack Raymond Leslie Hiscott Nov Dec Dec Dec Aug May Aug Nov Jun B&D. THE * SLEEPLESS NIGHTS * SOLDIERS OF 'THE KING Song of the Rhine see Little Waitress * SORRY YOU'VE BEEN TROUBLED Speed King see Money for Speed Steel see Men of Steel STOLEN NECKLACE. Herbert Wilcox Wardour WB PDC Wardour Fox Paramount Norman Lee John Daumery Bernard Mainwaring Lupino Lane Leslie Hiscott Henry Edwards Jun Ealing Gloria Swanson United Artists Cyril Gardner Nov Sep Twickenham BIP. Elstree B&D. Richard Beville Mansfield Markham John Daumery Ivar Campbell Walter Forde Leslie Hiscott T Hayes Hunter Jack Raymond Redd Davis Walton-on-Thames Markham Shepperton Teddlngton Shepherd's Bush Twickenham Beaconsfield B&D. THE * ROME EXPRESS * SALLY BISHOP SAY IT WITH MUSIC SEND ‘EM BACK HALF DEAD (BRING 'EM BACK HALF DEAD) Service Flat. THE Stop Me and Buy One see Josser on the River Stormy Weather see Flat No. Elstree Twickenham B&D. A May Aug Jul Oct Oct Jun Jul Jun Dec Dec Sep Nov Jan Jun Jul Aug Date Studio Dec Dec Jun Sep Oct Jan Mar Feb Dec Teddington Wembley 1932 Production Co (s) WB-FN Hallmark Films Paramount BIP WB-FN PDC BIP Real Art B&D-Paramount Distributor Director(s) B&D. QUINCY OF MONTE CARLO * MONEY FOR SPEED (SPEED KING) * MONEY MEANS NOTHING (THE PERFECT SERVICE/THE BUTLER'S MILLIONS) * MONEY TALKS (MAGENTA STREET) Mops see Born Lucky NAUGHTY CINDERELLA * NEW HOTEL. Elstree BIP. Elstree BIP. THE SHE WAS ONLY A VILLAGE MAIDEN (PRISCILLA THE RAKE) SIDE STREETS * SIGN OF FOUR. Elstree Teddinton Cricklewood BIP.Films in Production Title MR.

Elstree Real Art British Lion B&D Appendix C. Elstree Shepherd’s Bush Shepperton Wembley Twickenham BIP.O.Films in Production Title TIMBUCTOO Toreadors Don't Care see Old Spanish Customers TO BRIGHTON WITH GLADYS * UP FOR THE DERBY * WALTZ TIME * WATCH BEVERLY * WEDDING REHEARSAL * WHEN LONDON SLEEPS * WHERE IS THIS LADY? (HAPPY GO LUCKY) * WHITE FACE Widow's Bed. Arthur Woods George King P Maclean Rogers William Thiele Arthur Maude Alexander Korda Leslie Hiscott Ladialao Vajda. THE YES.D Westminster United Artists Michael Powell BFI Information Services 65 . Elstree Beaconsfield George King B&D Gaumont Sound City London Twickenham Amalgamated Films Association GainsboroughBritish Lion Reginald Pogwell Fox W&F W&F Butcher's Ideal APD British Lion W&F Sterling Radio Fox W&F Twickenham Beaconsfield B&D. THE FLESH AND THE DEVIL. The see Early To Rise * WONDERFUL STORY. Elstree 1932 Production Co (s) BIP Distributor Wardour Director(s) Walter Summers. BROWN Young Apollo see Men of Tomorrow Date Studio Feb BIP. THE WORLD. W Victor Hanbury T Hayes Hunter Reginald Fogwell George A Cooper Leslie Hiscott Jack Buchanan Dec Jun Dec Aug Apr Mar Sep Jan Aug Oct Dec Jul Ealing B&D. MADAM * YES MR.

THE FLAT NO. Elstree B&D. John Stafford John Baxter Bernard Mainwaring Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Shepperton Cricklewood Sound City John Stafford MGM W&F MGM Gaumont Shepperton Sound City MGM Teddington Twickenham Shepperton BIP. THE * CUCKOO IN THE NEST. see A Political Party * BITTER SWEET BLACK ABBOTT.Films in Production Title All the Winners see Eyes of Fate ANNE ONE HUNDRED AS GOOD AS NEW (GOOD AS NEW) ASK BECCLES * AUNT SALLY * AUTUMN CROCUS * BATTLE. THE * BERMONDSEY KID. Elstree Welwyn B&D-Paramount BIP Paramount Wardour P Maclean Rogers Bernard Vorhaus Bernard Mainwaring Tom Walls Ivar Campbell W Victor Hanbury. THE CRIME ON THE HILL Crime Reporter see The Warren Case CRIMSON CANDLE. the see The Glue Squadron * BLUE SQUADRON.P. A * DESIGNING WOMEN (WHAT SHALL IT PROFIT A WOMAN?) * DICK TURPIN Digging Deep see The Man I Want DOSS HOUSE Double Trouble see Double Wedding DOUBLE WEDDING (DOUBLE TROUBLE) EXCESS BAGGAGE EYES OF FATE (ALL THE WINNERS) FACING THE MUSIC (THE JEWEL SONG) * FALLING FOR YOU FEAR SHIP FIRE RAISERS. THE Aug Fleet Street Murder see The Warren Case FOLLOW THE LADY May Jan Feb May Feb Mar Jun Jul Dec Jun Jan Sep Aug Apr Mar Nov Date Mar Feb Oct Aug Nov Studio 1933 Production Co (s) B&D-Paramount WB-FN B&D-Paramount Gainsborough ATP LianofilmGaumont WB-FN WB-FN B&D Real Art Distributor Paramount WB Paramount Gaumont ABFD Gaumont FN FN United Artists Radio Director(s) Henry Edwards Graham Cutts Redd Davis Tim Whelan Basil Dean Nikolas Farkas Ralph Dawson George King Herbert Wilcox George A Cooper B&D. THE BEWARE OF WOMEN (WITH THE BEST INTENTIONS) Bill M. Elstree Teddington B&D. Jack Hulbert J Steven Edwards Michael Powell Leslie Hiscott Norman Walker Adrian Brunel BFI Information Services 66 . THE Contraband see The Luck of a Sailor * CRIME AT BLOSSOMS. Elstree Islington Wembley Beaconsfield Wembley WB-FN Real Arc Sound City BIP Gainsborough ASFI-J Stevens Edwards Gaumont British Lion Patrick K Heale George Smith WB Radio Universal Wardour W&F Paramount W&F MGM Paramount Fox Frank Richardson Redd Davis Ivar Campbell Harry Hughes Robert Stevenson. Elstree Islington Ealing (France) Teddington Teddington B&D. Eletree Twickenham Aug Oct Jan Nov Feb Sep Apr Feb Aug May Aug Teddington Albany WB-FN-Steffano P FN Haluga Blakeley's Prods Butcher's Ideal APD WB Paramount United Artists W&F British Lion MGM George King Bert Tracy Sinclair Hill Bernard Vorhaus John Daumery Zoltan Korda Paul Czinner Milton Rosmer Leslie Hiscott WP Lipscomb Edward Dryhurst Basil Dean Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Twickenham B&D. Elstree Beaconsfield Shepperton Cricklewood Twickenham WB-FN London Films London British Lion Sound City Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Granville Pictures MGM Gaumont Shepherd's Bush Gaumont B&D. 3 Sep FLAW. THE Blue Army. THE (THE BLUE ARMY) * BOOTS! BOOTS! Bosambo see Sanders of the River * BRITANNIA OF BILLINGSGATE * BROKEN MELODY. THE CALL ME MAME * CASH * CATHERINE THE GREAT * CHANNEL CROSSING * CLEANING UP * COLONEL BLOOD * COMMISSIONAIRE * CONSTANT NYMPH.

THE LAUGHTER OF FOOLS. The see The Right to Live Kongo Raid see Sanders of the River * LADY IS WILLING. Elstree WB-FN Real Art Real Art Danubia B&H-Ensign WB-FN Twickenham British Lion George Smith GS Enterprises BIP Gainsborough B&D Gaumont FN Radio Pictures Radio Danubia Butcher's WB W&P British Lion Fox MGM Wardour W&F United Artists W&F Gaumont George King George A Cooper George A Cooper Anthony Frenguelli Norman Walker George King Maurice Elvey Leslie Hiscott Adrian Brunel Adrian Brunel Allan Dwan Tim Whelan P Maclean Rogers Victor Saville Walter Forde * HOUSE OF TRENT. The see Oh. The see Facing the Music * JEW SUSS Josiah Steps Out see That's My Wife JUST SMITH (NEVER COME BACK) Mar Aug Mar May Feb Nov May Mar Nov Apr Jun Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Shepherd's Bush/ Gaumont Islington Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Beaconsfield British Lion Nov Gaumont Lothar Mendes W&F MGM Tom Walls Leslie Hiscott KEEP IT QUIET Nov 'K' Formula. Elstree Twickenham Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Teddington B&D. Elstree Ealing Islington B&D. Elstree Twickenham Columbia George Smith Twickenham George Smith Prods B&D-Paramount Twickenham Columbia Fox APD Gilbert Miller Arian Brunel Maurice Elvey Jun Jan Jan Fox Paramount APD Adrian Brunel Henry Edwards Maurice Elvey BFI Information Services 67 . Elstree Shepperton Beaconsfield Teddington BIP. THE * GOING GAY GOLDEN CAGE. Elstree BIP. THE * FRIDAY THE THIRTEENTH Gay Lord Scrathpeffer see Guest of Honour * GENERAL JOHN REGAN * GHOST CAMERA. THE Good As New see As Good As New GREAT STUFF (UNDER PROOF) GUEST OF HONOUR (GAY LORD STRATHPEFFER) * HAPPY HAWLEYS OF HIGH STREET HEAD OF THE FAMILY HEADS WE GO HER IMAGINARY LOVER Her Man of Destiny see Little Napoleon High Explosive see I'm an Explosive HIGH FINANCE HIS GRACE GIVES NOTICE * HOME SWEET HOME HOUSE OF DREAMS Apr Aug Aug Mar Oct Oct Jan Jun Mar Aug Date Jul Sep Jun Aug Jun Mar Jan Aug Feb Studio 1933 Production Co (s) Windsor ATP Gainsborough B&D-Paramount Real Arc Distributor Sterling ABFD Gaumont Paramount Radio W&F WB Sterling MGM Fox FN Wardour Wardour FN Wardour FN Director(s) Carmine Gallone Norman Walker Victor Saville Henry Edwards Bernard Vorhaus T Hayes Hunter Monty Banks Carmine Gallone Ivar Campbell Leslie Hiscott George King Friedrich Zeinik Thomas Bentley John Daumery Monty Banks George King B&D. Elstree Islington B&D. THE * GHOUL. What a Night I SPY *IT’S A BOY! * IT’S A COP * I WAS A SPY * JACK AHOY! Jewel Song. Elstree BIP. Elstree Walton-onThames Twickenham Walton-onThames BIP. THE *LILY OF KILLARNEY Lion and Lamb see The River Wolves LITTLE NAPOLEON (HER MAN OF DESTINY) *LORD OF THE MANOR *LOST CHORD. THE * GIRL IN POSSESSION. THE(SHEP Oct HERD'S WARNING/TRENT'S FOLLY) * I ADORE YOU * I LIVED WITH YOU I'LL STICK TO YOU I'M AN EXPLOSIVE (HIGH EXPLOSIVE) IMPORTANT PEOPLE Irresistable Marmaduke.Elstree Teddington BIP. Elstree Teddington WB-FN Windsor Films Sound City British Lion WB-FN BIP BIP WB-PN BIP WB-FN Teddington Twickenham Twickenham (Sacha) Ealing Teddington Twickenham Beaconsfield Walton-onThames Wembley BIP.Films in Production Title * FOR LOVE OF YOU (ONE IN A MILLION) * FORTUNATE FOOL. THE Aug Sep Jun B&D.

THE Magistrate. Elstree Bendar British Lion Real Art Real Art British Lion BIP Wyndham Films WB-FN Real Art Pathe National Talkies B&D-Paramount WF MGM Radio Radio Fox Pathe United Artists WB Radio Pathe Paramount Paramount Teddington WB-FN WB George King BIP. Elstree BIP. The see Those Were the Days * MAID HAPPY (MAID TO ORDER) Maid to Order see Maid Happy MAN I WANT. THE * LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG LOVE WAGER. Elstree Wembley BIP B&D WB-FN John Stafford Wardour United Artists Gaumont WB United Artists Lupino Lane Jack Raymond Michael Powell George King W Victor Hanbury. Elstree Cricklewood Ealing BIP. The see My Old Duchess MURDER AT THE INN (OTHER MEN'S Oct WOMEN) Murder Party see The Night of the Party MY OLD DUCHESS (THE MUMMERS) Mar Never Come Back see Just Smith *NIGHT OF THE GARTER NIGHT OF THE PARTY. Elstree B&D. DANE'S DEFENCE MIXED DOUBLES Mummers. Elstree Beaconsfield Arthur Woods Herbert Smith Mar Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Ideal Walter Forde Oct Jun Oct May Mar Apr Nov May Apr BIP. THE (DIGGING DEEP) MANNEQUIN MAN OUTSIDE. Elstree Walton-onThames Islington B&D.P. Elstree Beaconsfield Twickenham Twickenham Beaconsfield Welwyn Wembley Teddington Twickenham Welwyn Wembley B&D.) * PRINCE OF ARCADIA * PRINCESS CHARMING * PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII. THE (MURDER PARTY) NINE FORTY FIVE * NO FUNNY BUSINESS Jan May Nov Jan Nov Oct Mar Aug Jun Feb Jun Jan May Sep Aug Nov Apr Apr Jun Mar Nov May Date Studio 1933 Production Co (s) Radius-BIP BIP Argyle Talking Pictures Anglo European ATP BIP Arthur Maude Distributor Wardour Wardour Butcher's Paramount ABFD Wardour Paramount Director(s) Paul Merzbach Thomas Bentley Manning Haynes A Cyran Basil Dean Robert Milton Arthur Maude Mansfield Markham Leslie Hiscott George A Cooper George A Cooper Leslie Hiscott John Harlow George King George King Redd Davis John Daumery AV Bramble Sidney Morgan BIP. John Stafford Frank Richardson Shepherd's Bush Gaumont OH. THE (ROYAL HUSBAND/THE FOURTH WIFE OF HENRY VIII) Private Wives see That's My Wife PURSE STRINGS Nov Oct Edward G Whiting Universal Prods BIP British Lion Wardour British Lion BIP. Elstree BIP. THE PRIDE OF THE FORCE.Films in Production Title Love and Let Love see Sleeping Car * LOVE AT SECOND SIGHT LOVE NEST. WHAT A NIGHT! (THE Dec IRRESISTABLE MARMADUKE) One In a Million see For Love of You * ON SECRET SERVICE (SECRET AGENT) * ON THE AIR Orders are Orders see Orders is Orders * ORDERS IS ORDERS (ORDERS ARE ORDERS) Other Men's Women see Murder at the Inn OVER THE GARDEN WALL PARIS PLANE POINTING FINGER. Elstree B&D. A (BILL M. Elstree Teddington B&D. Elstree BIP Sound City Real Art BIP BIP Nettlefold-Fogwell Prods Gainsborough London B&D Wardour MGM Radio Pathe Wardour W&F Gaumont United Artists Paramount John Daumery John Paddy Carstairs George Pearson Norman Lee Norman Lee Hanns Schwarz Maurice Elvey Alexander Korda Henry Edwards BFI Information Services 68 . THE * POLITICAL PARTY. THE (CONTRABAND) LURE. THE *MEET MY SISTER MRS. THE Man With a Million see Smithy MAROONED MASTER AND MAN * MATINEE IDOL MAYFAIR GIRL MEDICINE MAN. Elstree Shepperton Twickenham BIP. Elstree Wembley Feb BIP. THE * LOYALTIES LUCK OF A SAILOR.

Elstree B&D United Artists Gaumont Wardour Fox Radio Radio Paramount Herbert Wilcox Michael Powell Paul L Stein Albert Parker George Pearson George A Cooper Gustave A Minzenty Zoltan Korda John Baxter Thomas Bentley Shepherd's Bush Gaumont BIP. Elstree B&D-Paramount Paramount Redd Davis Sep Nov Twickenham Teddington Real Art WB-FN Radio WB George Pearson George King Jan Jul Jun May Sep Jun Apr May Jul Feb May Jan Mar Sep Jun Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Teddington Shepperton BIP. THE Third Degree see The Scotland Yard Mystery THIS ACTING BUSINESS * THIS IS THE LIFE (THE SINGING KETTLE) This is The Wife see Too Many Wives * THIS WEEK OF GRACE * THOSE WERE THE DAYS (THE MAGISTRATE) * TIGER BAY TOO MANY WIVES (THIS IS THE WIFE) Trent's Folly see House of Trent. THE (THE 'K’ FORMULA) RIVER WOLVES.Films in Production Title Queen. A STICKPIN. Elstree Beaconsfield Teddington Teddington Beaconsfield WB-FN Sound City BIP B&D BIP British Lion WB-FN British Lion B&D B&D British Lion WB-FN WB-FN British Lion Gaumont WB MGM Wardour United Artists Wardour Fox FN British Lion United Artists United Artists British Lion WB WB British Lion Anatole Litvak George King John Baxter Paul L Stein Jack Raymond Harry Hughes Leslie Hiscott Clyde Cook Leslie Hiscott P Maclean Rogers Jack Buchanan Leslie Hiscott John Daumery John Daumery Albert de Courville Maurice Elvey Thomas Bentley J Elder Wills George King May Dec Jun Jan Ealing BIP. Elstree B&D. A SILVER SPOON. Elstree Walton-onThames B&D United Artists Gaumont P Maclean Rogers Tom Walls Joe May. Elstree Ealing Twickenham Twickenham BIP Fox Real Art Real Art Moorland Film Prods B&D. The * TROUBLE * TURKEY TIME * TWO HEARTS IN WALTZ TIME Jun Sep Oct Aug Nov Sep Jun Date Studio 1933 Production Co (s) Distributor Director(s) B&D. A Royal Husband see The Private Life of Henry VIII * SANDERS OF THE RIVER (KONGO RAID/BOSAMBO) *SAY IT WITH FLOWERS * SCOTLAND YARD MYSTERY. Carmine Gallone Adrian Brunel Redd Davis Shepherd's Bush Gainsborough Reginald Fogwell. Elstree Ealing Teddington Real Art BIP Wyndham Films WB-FN Radio Wardour ABFD WB Aug Oct Aug B&D. THE (LION AND LAMB) ROOF. Elstree Beaconsfield Teddington Beaconsfield B&D. Elstree/ Shepperton Twickenham Welwyn London Real Art BIP Nov Nov Oct United Artists Radio Wardour Dec B&D.THE (THIRD DEGREE) Secret Agent see On Secret Service SEEING IS BELIEVING Shepherd's Warning see The House of Trent She Wanted Her Man see The Song You Gave Me SHOT IN THE DARK. THE (THE QUEEN) RED ENSIGN * RED WAGON * RIGHT TO LIVE.The see The Queen's Affair * QUEEN'S AFFAIR. Elstree BIP. THE ROYAL DEMAND. The see This Is The Life * SLEEPING CAR (LOVE AND LET LOVE) SMITHY (THE MAN WITH A MILLION) SONG OF THE PLOUGH * SONG YOU GAVE ME.Gaumont Archibald Nettlefod GS Enterprises Real Art Fox Radio TWO WIVES FOR HENRY UMBRELLA. THE Singing Kettle. THE Underproof see Great Stuff May Twickenham BFI Information Services 69 . Elstree B&D. THE (SHE WANTED HER MAN) * SORRELL AND SON * SOUTHERN MAID. THE STRICTLY IN CONFIDENCE STRIKE IT RICH * SUMMER LIGHTNING * THAT'S A GOOD GIRL THAT'S MY WIFE (JOSIAH STEPS OUT/PRIVATE WIVES) THIRTEENTH CANDLE.

THE (CRIME REPORTER/FLEET STREET MURDER) What Shall It Profit a Woman see Designing Women * WHITE ENSIGN * WILD BOY * WISHBONE. Elstree Twickenham/ Shepperton Welwyn Shepherd's Bush Tom Arnold Twickenham BIP Nov Oct Jan Dec May Shepperton Shepperton Beaconsfield BIP. The Little Miss Nobody Lucky Blaze My Lucky Star On Thin Ice Out: of the Past Till the Bells Ring Veteran of Waterloo. Elstree Sound City Sound City British Lion BIP MGM Gaumont MGM Fox Wardour Shepherd's Bush Gainsborough John Hunt Albert de Courville Arthur Maude John Daumery Monty Banks B&D-Paramount H&S Film Service WB-FM International Prods Venture Films WB-FN Ace Masquerader Hall Mark WB-FN BSFD National Talkies Paramount H&S Film Service FN Paramount WB Ace W&F EB WB BSFD Paramount Sidney Morgan St John L Cloves George King Edward Nakhimoff Reginald Denham John Daumery William R Newwan Ludwig Blattner. Anthony Asquith Jack Raymond AIfred Hitchcock Maurice Elvey Walter Summers Jun Oct Jun Dec B&D. John Harlow Bernard Vorhaus Leslie Hiscott Graham Moffatt W Bramble BFI Information Services 70 . THE WITHOUT YOU With The Beat Intentions see Beware of Women * YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU Appendix Chelsea Life Dora Enemy of the Police Hiking With Mademoiselle Jewel. The Date Studio (Austria) 1933 Production Co (s) Cine AllianzGaumont B&D Distributor Gaumont United Artists Gaumont Gaumont Pathe Director(s) Willi Forst. THE * WARREN CASE.Films in Production Title * UNFINISHED SYMPHONY * UP TO THE NECK * WALTZES FROM VIENNA * WANDERING JEW.

Films in Production Title Abdul Hamid see Abdul the Damned ABDUL THE DAMNED (ABDUL HAMID) ACE OF SPADES. Elstree Hammersmith Twickenham BIP Triumph Twickenham DOCTOR'S ORDERS (THE MEDICINE MAN) Jun DOUBLE EVENT. THE * D'YE KEN JOHN PEEL? Jan Sep BFI Information Services 71 . THE *CASE OF GABRIEL PERRY. THE (STRANGE JUSTICE/WILD JUSTICE) Cat's Whiskers. Elstree Beaconsfield Sound City Gainsborough B&D-Paramount British Lion Feb Mar Jan Feb Jul Feb Apr Jul Sep Sep Oct Islington Teddington Beaconsfield Gainsborough British Lion British Lion Gaumont British Lion MGM Gaumont Wardour Paramount Butcher's ABFD ABFD Gaumont Gaunont Wardour PDC APD Shepherd's Bush Gaumont BIP. Leave the Room! * CHU-CHIN-CHOW * CHURCH MOUSE. The see Heatwave CRAZY PEOPLE (SAFETY FIRST) * CUP OF KINDNESS. Elstree Twickenham BIP Universal Wardour Bernard Vorhaus Paul L Stein BLOSSOM TIME (THE LIFE OF SCHUBERT) Apr * BLOW BUGLES BLOW Bluff see A Little Bit of Fluff * BOOMERANG BORROW A MILLION BREAKERS AHEAD (THE LADY OF PENDOWER) * BREWSTER'S MILLIONS BRIDES TO BE (SIGN PLEASE) * BROKEN ROSARY. THE Code. LEAVE THE ROOM! (THE CAT'S WHISKERS/ONE CRAZY WEEK) Antonia see Temptation ANYTHING MIGHT HAPPEN * ARE YOU A MASON? BADGER'S GREEN * BARNACLE BILL Beauty Ball see Falling In Love Behind the Mask see Four Masked Men * BELLA DONNA * BETTY IN MAYFAIR (LILIES OF THE FIELD) BIG BUSINESS BIG SPLASH. Elstree B&D. THE * CASE FOR THE CROWN. Elstree Worton Hall Arthhur Maude Fox Columbia Fox Arthur Maude Reginald Denham Tony Gilkinson Anglo-Cosmopolitan Reunion B&D-Paramount B&D-Paramount Butcher's United Artists Thornton Freeland Paramount Reginald Dennam Butcher's Gaumont Gaumont Fox Gaumont Paramount British Lion Harry Hughes Walter Forde Walter Forde Anthony Kiromins Tim Whelan George A Cooper Albert de Courville Walter Forde Monty Banks Leslie Hiscott Tom Walls William Beaudine Norman Walker Oswald Mitchell. THE * BROWN ON RESOLUTION (FOREVER ENGLAND) * BULLDOG JACK (ALIAS BULLDOG DRUMMOND) * BY-PASS TO HAPPINESS * CAMELS ARE COMING. A * DANDY DICK DANGEROUS GROUND * DANNY BOY * DEATH AT BROADCASTING HOUSE DEATH DRIVES THROUGH * DICTATOR. Challis N Sanderson Reginald Denham Edward L Cahn Victor Saville (1) Tom Walls Norman Lee Leslie Howard Gordon Henry Edwards Shepherd’s Bush Gaumont Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Shepperton Islington B&D. Elstree Cricklewood Twickenham Real Art Real Art B&D-Paramount City Film Corp Universal Radio Universal Paramount Butcher's Leslie Hiscott George A Cooper Henry Edwards Adrian Brunel Harry Hughes Twickenham B&D. Elstree Teddington Beaconsfleid Twickenham B&D-Paramount WB-FN British Lion Gaumont WB MGM Robert Milton Cyril Gardner Leslie Hiscott United Artists Norman Walker Twickenham BIP. Elstree Twickenham Merton Park/ Twickenham B&D. THE Alias Bulldog Drummond see Bulldog Jack * ANNIE. Elstree B&D. THE ADMIRAL'S SECRET. THE Bill in the Legion see Lost In the Legion * BLIND JUSTICE (RECIPE FOR MURDER) Aug May Apr Jul Sep Date Studio Oct Oct Jan 1934 Production Co (s) BIP-Capitol Real Art Real Art B&D-Paramount Distributor Wardour Radio Radio Paramount Director(s) Karl Grune George Pearson Guy Newall George King BIP. Elstree ADVENTURE LIMITED (TRUST BARCLAY) Jul Dec Mar Jun May Nov Twickenham Twickenham Twickenham B&D. Elstree Cricklewood Wembley Ealing Ealing BIP B&D-Paramount Panther Phoenix Films Clifford Taylor Toeplitz Shepherd's Bush Gaumont BIP. THE DIRTY WORK Feb Oct Jun Jul Mar Aug Aug Nov Jan Mar Jul Jan Progressive Rudolph Messel Film Institute Walton-onThames Wembley Shepperton B&D. The see Annie.

Elstree B&D. The see The Primrose Path * FORBIDDEN TERRITORY Forever England see Brown On Resolution * FOUR MASKED MEN (BEHIND THE MASK) * FREEDOM OF THE SEAS FULL CIRCLE * GAY LOVE GET YOUR MAN GIRL IN THE CROWD. Mr. Anthony Kimnins WB Randall Faye Equity British Widgey R Newman British Lion Herbert Smith Adrian Brunel Brian Desmond Hurst Victor Saville Robert Wyler Alexandre Esway J Walter Ruben T Hayes Hunter John Baxter Norman Walker Beaconsfield Worton Hall Cricklewood British Lion British & Continental MGM Clifton Hurst Prods MGM Gaumont ABFD Wardour ABFD Fox Universal Paramount Shepherd's Bush/Shepperton/ Gaumont Islington Ealing Wyndham BIP. THE (THE INTRUDER) IRISH HEARTS (NORAH O'NEALE) * IRON DUKE. Elstree Production Co (s) B&D-Paramount Tribune Allied JG & RB Wainwright B&D Distributor Paramount Columbia Pathe Gaumont Director(s) Redd Davis Peter Saunders Monty Banks Milton Rosmer United Artists Paul Czinner Gaumont Gaumont Victor Saville Victor Saville Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Walton-onThames Teddington Bushey Walton-onThames Islington Twickenham Exit Don Juan see The Private Life of Don Juan * FALLING IN LOVE (BEAUTY BALL) May FATHER AND SON FAUST * FEATHERED SERPENT. THE February 29th see Leave it to Blanche FIGHTING STOCK FLOOD TIDE Flowery Walk. A * GRAND PRIX * GREAT DEFENDER. Elstree Teddington Beaconsfield B&D. The see The Invader INVADER. THE * GREEN PACK. THE * HEAT WAVE (THE CODE) Henry IX see The Public Life of Henry IX Hide and I'll Find You see It's A Bet His Excellency. Elstree Twickenham BIP WB-PN British Lion B&D-Paramount WB-FN B&D-Paramount B&D-Paramount BIP BIP Universal Wardour WB British Lion Paramount FN Paramount George Pearson Marcel Varnel George King Leslie Hiscott George King Michael Powell Redd Davis United Artists Jack Raymond Wardour Pathe Marcel Varnel Arthur Woods * GIVE HER A RING (GIVING YOU THE Apr STARS) Giving You the Stars see Give Her a Ring GLIMPSE OF PARADISE. Cupid see How's Chances HIS MAJESTY AND COMPANY HOW'S CHANCES HYDE PARK IMMORTAL GENTLEMAN (WILL SHAKESPEARE) Intermezzo see Youthful Folly * IN TOWN TONIGHT Intruder. Elstree BIP. THE * GIRLS PLEASE! * GIRLS WILL BE BOYS (THE LAST LORD) Mar Feb Dec Oct Dec Jun Vogue Films WB-FN Pathe WB Monty Banks Monty Banks Albert Hopkins P Maclean Rogers Tom Walls John Baxter National Interest Pics Reunion George Smith Gainsborough Real Art Columbia Gaumont Radio Shepherd's Bush Progress Pictures Gaumont Phil Rosen Jan Feb Sep May Aug Apr Mar May Twickenham BIP. Elstree B&D. THE IT HAPPENED IN PARIS IT'S A BET (HIDE AND I'LL FIND YOU) * JAVA HEAD JOSSER ON THE FARM * KENTUCKY MINSTRELS KEY TO HARMONY Aug Jan Apr Jul Oct Teddington Cricklewood Welwyn Beaconsfield Islington WB-FN BIP British Lion Gainsborough FN Wardour British Lion Gaumont St JL Clowes-LS Stock Columbia Ralph Ince St John Legh Clowes Thomas Bentley T Hayes Hunter Maurice Elvey Nov Feb Aug Sep Nov Oct Jul Sep Dec Aug Apr Aug Jul Nov Wembley Shepperton Teddington Fox Sound City WB-FN Bernard Smith Fox Fox Anthony Kimmins Ivar Campbell. THE GIRL IN THE FLAT. THE (THE MILKY WAY) Aug United Artists Jack Raymond BFI Information Services 72 .Films in Production Title EASY MONEY (SLEUTHS) EIGHT CYLINDER LOVE * 18 MINUTES * EMIL AND THE DETECTIVES * ESCAPE ME NEVER EVENSONG EVERGREEN 1934 Date Studio Feb B&D. Elstree BIP. Elstree Jul Walton-onThames Jul Shepperton Aug May Jan B&D. Elstree Teddington B&D. Elstree Ealing Cricklewood Twickenham B&D. Elstree BIP ATP Fox Twickenham B&D-Paramount B&D-Paramount * KING OF PARIS.

The see Doctor's Orders * MENACE Milky Way. Elstree Shepperton Teddington Real Art Warwick Films Real Art WB-FN Grafton Sound City WB-FN Radio APD Radio FN MGM MGM WB MGM Gaumont MGM Radio ABFD Wardour AHFU Universal Fox Paramount Henry Edwards Leo Mittler Michael Powell Harold Young WP Kellino John Baxter Ralph Dawson P Maclean Rogers Berthold Viertel George King Henry Edwards Basil Dean Fred Newmeyer Maurice Elvey Bert Tracy Michael Powell Reginald Denhair LEAVE IT TO BLANCHE (FEBRUARY 29th) Apr Walton-onGS Enterprises Thames Shepherd's Bush Gaumont George King Twickenham Ealing BIP. A * LITTLE FRIEND LITTLE STRANGER * LORD EDGEWARE DIES * LORNA DOONE LOST IN THE LEGION (BILL IN THE LEGION) *LOVE. Elstree Twickenham Beaconsfield Teddington Teddington B&D Real Art British Lion WB-FN WB-FN United Artists Herbert Wilcox Universal MGM WB WB Bernard Vorhaus Herbert Smith Ralph Ince George King BFI Information Services 73 . Elstree Teddington Sound City BIP WB-FN Worton Hall Twickenham (Lake District) Teddington Twickenham Champion Real Art Jackatoon MGM Gaumont FN Radio Gaumont Gaumont Gaumont Wardour Frank Richardson Miles Mander Ralph Ince John Baxter Carmine Gallone Sinclair Hill Maurice Elvey Richard Oswald Equity British Travis Jackson * MY SONG FOR YOU (A SONG FOR YOU) May WB-FN Real Art Cine AllianzBeaconsfield Gaumont Islington Gainsborough Gaumont-Cine Shepherd's Bush Alllanz BIP. Elstree Ealing Albany Wembley B&D. THE Last Lord. Elstree Real Art ATP BIP ATP Mancunian Fox B&D-Paramount BIP Wardour Walter Summers Twickenham Real Art Universal Gaumont Gaumont Reunion Wardour FN Henry Edwards Alfred Hitchcock Victor Savllle Adrian Brunel Friedrich Zelnik Ralph Ince Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Shepperton BIP. Elstree BIP B&D. THE LAZYBONES LEND ME YOUR WIFE LEST WE FORGET Life of Schubert. THE Feb Oct Dec Oct Mar Aug Apr Jun Mar Feb Apr Mar Apr Nov Apr Jun Jan Jun Dec Sep Welwyn May Aug Apr Jan May Oct Feb Nov Mar Jun Date Studio Jun 1934 Production Co (s) Distributor Gaumont Director(s) Tom Walls Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Mar Sep Sep Jun Jan Twickenham (Billancourt St) Twickenham Teddington BIP. Hopkinson see Rolling In Money MR. LIFE AND LAUGHTER LOVE-MIRTH-MELODY (SMILE VICAR SMILE) LOVE TEST. THE * MURDER AT MONTE CARLO * MUSIC HALL (SAY IT WITH SONG) * MY HEART IS CALLING * MY OLD DUTCH MY SONG GOES ROUND THE WORLD Navvy see A Real Bloke * NELL GWYNN * NIGHT CLUB QUEEN NIGHT MAIL * NO ESCAPE Norah O'Neale see Irish Heart OFFICE WIFE. THE * ME AND MARLBOROUGH Medicine Man. The see Breaker's Ahead LASH. THE * MOUNTAIN. THE *MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH. The see Girls Will Be Boys * LAST WALTZ. WHAT'S-HIS-NAME Monday at Ten see Money Mad Money In the Air see Radio Pirates MONEY MAD (MONDAY AT TEN) * MORALS OF MARCUS. THE LUCKY LOSER Lucky Star see Once In a New Moon "Mac" see Rolling Home MCCLUSKY THE SEA ROVER Man Save The Queen see Lady In Danger *MAN WHO CHANGED HIS NAME. The see The King of Paris * MISTER CINDERS Mr.Films in Production Title LADY IN DANCER (MAN SAVE THE QUEEN/SAVE THE QUEEN) Lady of Pendower. THE Lilies of the Field see Betty In Mayfair LITTLE BIT OF BLUFF. The see Blossom Time LIFE OF THE PARTY.

THE ONCE IN A NEW MOON (LUCKY STAR) One Crazy Week see Annie. Elstree BIP. Norman Lee Henry Edwards Bernard Vorhaus Ralph Cedar George A Cooper Max Neufeld Bernard Vorhaus John Stafford. W Victor Hanbury BIP. Austin Melford Thomas Bentley Anthony Kimmins George Pearson Norman Lee John Daumery Leslie Hiscott Dallas Bower Manning Haynes Michael Powell BIP. Teacher! See Things are Looking up PRICE OF WISDOM. Elstree Shepperton Jul Feb Jan Feb Jan May May Twickenham Welvyn/BIP. Elstree B&D.Films in Production Title * OH DADDY ! * OLD CURIOSITY SHOP. THE Mar Shakespeare Murders. EIstree Pathe Gaumont Radio Gaumont Radio Gaumont British Lion Pathe BFI Information Services 74 . THE (EXIT DON JUAN) PUBLIC LIFE OF HENRY IX. THE (THE FLOWERY WALK) * PRIVATE LIFE OF DON JUAN. Eistree Cricklewood ATP Fox WB-FN Grafton Argyle Talking Pictures John Stafford Twickenham Real Art Leslie Fuller Real Art Milofllm Transatlantic-BL John Stafford ABFD Fox WB Paramount Butcher's Basil Dean Manning Haynes Michael Powell WP Kellino Harry Hughes W Victor Hanbury. THE Jun Sep Nov Date Studio Jul Sep Jul Islington 1934 Production Co (s) Gainsborough BIP Fox Distributor Gaumont Wardour Fox Director(s) Graham Cutts. THE * ROAD HOUSE * ROCKS OF VALPRE. THE * PRIMROSE PATH. A (NAVVY) Recipe for Murder see Blind Justice * RETURN OF BULLDOG DRUMMOND. THE PERFECT FLAW. Leave the Room! OPEN ALL NIGHT * OUTCAST. HOPKINSON) * ROMANCE IN RHYTHM Safety First see Crazy People Save the Queen see Lady In Danger SAY IT WITH DIAMONDS Say it with Song see Music Hall * SCARLET PIMPERNEL. THE OVER THE GARDEN WALL PASSING SHADOWS PATH OF GLORY. Elstree Ealing Redd Davis London B&D-Paramount Wyndham MGM Redd Davis United Artists Harold Young Paramount ABFD P Maclean Rogers Milton Rosmer * SECRET OF THE LOCH. Elstree Twickenham Twickenham Cricklewood Merton Park/ Twickenham (Joinville) Beaconsfield BIP. A. Elstree Beaconsfleld Hammersmith Ealing Islington Real Art BIP BIP British Lion Triumph Fox Gainsborough Radio Wardour Wardour Fox PDC Fox Gaumont Dec May Apr Nov Aug Apr Dec Mar Jul Aug May Feb Jan B&D. THE Please. Elstree B&D. Elstree B&D. THE (HENRY IX) * RADIO PARADE OF 1935 * RADIO PIRATES (MONEY IN THE AIR) * REAL BLOKE. THE ROLLING HOME ("MAC") * ROLLING IN MONEY (MR. see My Song For You * SPRING IN THE AIR * SQUIBS Strange Justice see The Case of Gabriel Perry STREET SONG STRICTLY ILLEGAL Susie in the Bath see There Goes Susie TANGLED EVIDENCE * TEMPTATION (ANTONIA) * TEN MINUTE ALIBI * THERE GOES SUSIE (SUSIE IN THE BATH) Jan Oct Sep May Sep Nov Dec Dec Dec Apr Feb May Ealing Wembley Teddington BIP. Elstree Ealing BIP. the * PHANTOM LIGHT. Elstree Shepperton Cricklewood Welwyn B&D-Paramount B&D-Paramount London Hammer Prods BIP Sound City Paramount Paramount Reginald Denham Reginald Denham Bernard Mainwaring Arthur Woods Ivar Campbell John Baxter Walter Summers Maurice Elvey Henry Edwards Ralph Ince Albert Parker Lawrence Huntington United Artists Alexander Korda MGM Wardour APD Baxter & Barter Prods MGM BIP Wardour Gaumont Radio ABD Fox MGM Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Twickenham Shepperton Ealing Cricklewood Real Art Sound City Fox Allied Film Prods Walton-onThames B&D. THE Schooldays see Things are Looking Up SCOOP. The see The Third Clue Sign Please see Brides To Be * SING AS WE GO! May Sleuths see Easy Money SMITH'S WIVES SOMETHING ALWAYS HAPPENS SOMETIMES GOOD * SONG AT EVENTIDE Song For You.

The see The Triumph of Sherlock Holmes. THE WHAT HAPPENED THEN? WHAT HAPPENED TO HARKNESS WHAT'S IN A NAME? WHISPERING TONGUES Whither Mankind see Things To Come WHO'S YOUR FATHER? * WIDOW'S MIGHT. The * Sweet Inniscarra Tell Tale Heart. THE (THE VALLEY OF FEAR) Trust Barclay see Adventure Limited UNHOLY QUEST. TEACHER!/ SCHOOLDAYS) * THINGS TO COME (WHITHER MANKIND) * THIRD CLUE. EIstree Welwyn Teddington Teddington Twickenham Walton-onThames Teddington United Artists William Cameron Menzies Fox Paramount WB Gaumont Albert Parker George King Harold Young Leslie Hiscott Equity British RW Lotinga Aug Mar Sep Jun May Jul Feb Dec Sep George Smith British Lion B&D-Paramount BIP WB-FH WB-FN Real Art Lupino Lane-St George Pictures WB-FN Fox British Lion Paramount Wardour FN FN Radio Columbia WB P Maclean Rogers T Hayes Hunter Norman Walker Walter Summers Milton Rosmer Ralph Ince George Pearson Lupino Lane Cyril Gardner (Terra St. THE Valley of Fear.Films in Production Title * THINGS ARE LOOKING UP (PLEASE. EIstree Teddington Twickenham Fox B&D-Paramount WB-FN Real Art WR Newman Walton-onThames Beaconsfield B&D. Appendix Bagged Borrowed Clothes Crucifix. The Oh No Doctor! * Poisoned Diamond.. Berlin) Terra Manning Haynes Shepperton Sound City Columbia Miles Mander (1) Alfred Santell was initially hired to direct the film but was fired and replaced by Saville. * VIRGINIA'S HUSBAND WARN LONDON WAY OF YOUTH. The Dangerous Companions Faces King of the Whales. THE (THE SHAKESPEARE MURDERS) TO BE A LADY TOO MANY MILLIONS * TRIUMPH OF SHERLOCK HOLMES. The Womanhood BIP Maude Prods New Era ANC Macklin B&D-Paramount Argonaut George King Grafton Emmett Moore Clifton-Hurst Louis London Pathe Columbia Universal Beacon Paramount MGM MGM Columbia Columbia Fox Butcher’s John Harlow Arthur Maude GB Samuelson ANC Macklin Sidney Morgan Challis N Sanderson George King WF Kellino Emmett Moore Brian Desmond Harry Hughes BFI Information Services 75 . THE Wild Justice see The Case of Gabriel Perry WILLIAM TELL Will Shakespeare see The Immortal Gentleman * YOUTHFUL FOLLY (INTERMEZZO) Apr 'Alfred Sancell was initially hired to direct the film but was fired and replaced by Savllle Date Studio Jul Sep Aug Jun Jun Nov Islington 1934 Production Co (s) Gaumont Distributor Gaumont Director(s) Albert de Courville Whitehall/Elstree / Worton London Hall/Denham Ealing B&D.

THE Nov Feb Nov Nov Dec Oct BIP. Elstree WeIwyn Teddington Welwyn Wembley Twickenham B&D. CLEMENTS. THE * DID I BETRAY? (BLACK ROSES) * DIVINE SPARK. THE Oct * AMAZING QUEST OF ERNEST BLISS. THE (CASTA DIVA) Apr Nov Feb May Jul Jul Apr May Jul Dec Jan Aug Jan Oct Jun Aug Jan Mar Mar Oct Sep Oct Nov Oct May Dec Mar Ealing Hammersmith Rock. Elstree Bushey Elstree Twickenham B&D. THE CROWN V. Elstree (Berlin) British Lion B&D-Paramount Stanley Lupino Jesba Butcher’s Gainsborough * CITY OF BEAUTIFUL NONSENSE. Elstree Ealing Southall Cricklewood Islington Beaconsfield B&D. The see Hello Sweetheart * CALLING THE TUNE * CAN YOU HEAR ME MOTHER? * CAPTAIN BILL (WATERWAYS) * CARDINAL. Elstree Welwyn Phoenix-IFP New Ideal Leslie Fuller Grosvenor ABFD PDC ABFD Pathe Gaumont British Lion Paramount ABFD NPFD Butcher's Gaumont Reginald Denham Leslie Pearce Ralph Cedar Sinclair Hill Graham Cutts. THE * AS YOU LIKE IT AWAKENING. Austin Melford Albert de Courville George Pearson Leo Mittler Leopold Jessner Adrian Brunel Maurice Elvey Challis N Sanderson. THE Butter and Egg Man. La see Mimi * BOYS WILL BE BOYS (NARKOVER) * BROKEN BLOSSOMS BROWN WALLET. THE CAR OF DREAMS Casta Diva see The Divine Spark * CHARING CROSS ROAD CHECKMATE * CHEER UP! CHILDREN OF THE FOG CLAIRVOYANT. Elstree Shepperton Teddington Wembley Islington Twickenham Teddington Criterion Garrett-Klement Pictures Inter-Allied Cosmopolitan Stafford Real Art B&D-Paramount Baxter & Barter WB-FN Fox Gainsborough Twickenham WB-FN United Artists United Artists 20th Cent-Fox Cosmopolitan Radio Radio Paramount Universal WB Fox Gaumont Twickenham FN Thornton Freeland Alfred Zeisler Paul Czinner Anthony Frenquelli W Victor Hanbury Leslie Hiscott Ivar Campbell John Baxter Ralph Ince Ralph Ince William Beaudine John Brahm Michael Powell Bill and Son see Gaolbreak BIRDS OF A FEATHER (THE RIFT IN THE Aug LOOT) BLACK MASK (GENTLEMAN IN BLACK) Jun Black Roses see Did I Betray * BLUE SMOKE Boheme. THE (EMERGENCY) Bad Blood see First Offence * BALL AT SAVOY BARGAIN BASEMENT (JOHNSON'S STORES) Bats in the Belfry see Joy Ride BELLES OF ST. Alexandre Esway Ralph Ince Adrian Brunel W Victor Hanbury Michael Powell Marcel Varnel Bernard Vorhaus Leslie Hiscott Norman Walker Henry W George Paul Martin Carmine Gallone Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Beaconsfield B&D. Elstree Whitehall/ BIP. Oswald Mitchell Jack Raymond Zoltan Korda. THE * CRIME UNLIMITED CROSS CURRENTS (NINE DAY BLUNDER) * CROUCHING BEAST. Italy) Cinematografica Italiana BFI Information Services 76 . Elstree Worton Hall Teddington B&D.Films in Production Title * ADMIRALS ALL ALL AT SEA (MR. STEVENS (THIRD TIME UNLUCKY) * DANCE BAND * DARK WORLD * DEATH ON THE SET *DEBT OF HONOUR * DEPUTY DRUMMER. THE * COCK O' THE NORTH * COME OUT OF THE PANTRY * CONQUEST OF THE AIR. Elstree Whitehall/ BIP. THE Mar Butcher's-Mitchell Butcher's B&D-Paramount London WB-FN B&D-Paramount John Stafford WB-FN BIP Fox Twickenham British National United Artists United Artists FN Paramount Radio WB Wardour Fox Universal GFD Reunion Gaumont St George's Pictures Columbia UFA Allieanza (Tirrenia St.FAINTHEART) Date Apr Jan Studio 1935 Production Co (s) John Stafford Fox Distributor Radio Fox Director(s) W Victor Hanbury Anthony Kimmins Beaconsfield Wembley Almost a Husband see Honeymoon for Three * AMATEUR GENTLEMAN.

The see Hot News * GUV'NOR. THE (THE LAYING OF THE COWRIE GHOST/ SIR TRISTRAM GOES WEST) Guest Reporter. Elstree Rock. The see That's my Uncle Island Fling see Tropical Trouble * JACK OF ALL TRADES * JIMMY BOY Jul Apr Nov Sep May Oct Mar Apr Ealing WeIwyn Cricklewood WeIwyn BIP. Jack Hulbert John Baxter BFI Information Services 77 . Elstree Islington Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Jan B&D. Walter Tennyson Leslie Hiscott Victor Saville Herbert Mason Donovan Pedelty Tom Walls Ralph Ince George King Hammersmith BIP. Elstree Gaiety Films BIP Grosvenor BIP City Film Corp Twickenham BIP ABFD Wardour Pathe Wardour GFD Universal Wardour Leo Mittler Herbert Brenon St George's Pictures Columbia WP Kellino Sinclair Hill Marcel Varnel Harry Hughes Leslie Hiscott Paul Merzbach Islington Cricklewood Gainsborough Baxter and Barter Prods Gaumont Universal Robert Stevenson.Films in Production Title * DON'T RUSH ME (WHEN WE ARE MARRIED) * DRAKE OF ENGLAND Dubarry see I Give My Heart * ELEPHANT BOY ELIZA COMES TO STAY Emergency see The Awakening * EVERYTHING IS RHYTHM * EXCUSE MY GLOVE * FAITHFUL FAME * FATHER O'FLYNN * FIRE HAS BEEN ARRANGED. Zoltan Korda Henry Edwards Alfred Goulding Redd Davis Paul L Stein Leslie Hiscott Wilfred Noy. Elstree Teddington Hammersmith Embassy Argyle British Lion BIP WB-FN Gaumont Radio APD British Lion Wardour WB Milton Rosmer Redd Davis Norman Lee P Maclean Rogers Paul L Stein Monty Banks Michael Powell * HAPPY DAYS ARE HERE AGAIN Oct (STAGE FOLK) HAPPY FAMILY. The see Black Mask * GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT Get Out of It see Stormy Weather * GHOST GOES WEST. Elstree Hammersmith Rock. Elstree BIP. Elstree Shepperton Twickenham Islington B&D. Elstree Twickenham BIP. THE (FRENCH SALAD) Oct * HEART'S DESIRE (MY HEART'S DELIGHT) HELLO SWEETHEART (THE BUTTER AND EGG MAN) * HER LAST AFFAIRE Apr Feb Aug New Ideal Pictures PDC Her Master's Voice see Two Hearts in Harmony Here Comes the Band see Sharps and Flats * HONEYMOON FOR THREE (ALMOST A May HUSBAND) HONOURS EASY May * HOT NEWS (THE GUEST REPORTER) * HYDE PARK CORNER * I GIVE MY HEART (DUBARRY) I Lost My Heart in Old Heidelberg see The Student's Romance * IMPROPER DUCHESS. THE HANDLE WITH CARE Nov Sep Teddington Walton-onThames Aug Nov Aug Oct Nov Oct Jun May Oct Feb Nov Denham Date Sep Jan Studio 1935 Production Co (s) Fred Karno BIP London Twickenham Joe Rock Alexander Film Prods WB-FN Herbert Wilcox Butcher's Twickenham Gainsborough Crusade Gainsborough WB-FN Embassy Distributor PDC Wardour United Artists Twickenham ABFD ABFD WB GFD Butcher's Twickenham Gaumont Gaumont Paramount Gaumont WB Radio Director(s) Norman Lee Arthur Woods Robert Flaherty. THE INSIDE THE ROOM * INVITATION TO THE WALTZ Iron Woman. A * FIRST A GIRL FIRST OFFENCE (BAD BLOOD) FLAME IN THE HEATHER * FOREIGN AFFAIRS French Salad see The Happy Family GAOL BREAK (BILL AND SON) GAY OLD DOG Gentleman in Black. Elstree Teddington B&D-Paramount WB-FN Paramount FN George Pearson William Beaudine * GET OFF MY FOOT (MONEY BY WIRE) Jul Jul Worton Hall London United Artists Rene Clair Jun Feb Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Walton-onThames Shepperton Beaconsfield BIP. Elstree Teddington B&D.

THE Narkover see Boys Will Be Boys Natacha see Moscow Nights Nine Day Blunder see Cross Currents * NO LIMIT * NO MONKEY BUSINESS * OFF THE DOLE Oh. Elstree Teddington Butcher's Herbert Wllcox British Lion BIP ATP B&D-Paramount B&D-Paramount B&D-Paramount WB-FN Radio Butcher's GFD British Lion Wardour ABFD Paramount Paramount Paramount FN Frederick Hayward Reginald Denham Herbert Wilcox Bernard Mainwaring Herbert Brenon Basil Dean Donovan Pedelty Reginald Denhan Ivar Campbell Monty Banks Apr Jul Jan Oct Jan Jun Jan Aug London Embassy George King Capitol British Lion ATP BIP WB. * LIMELIGHT (STREET SINGER'S SERENADE) LINE ENGAGED * LIVING DANGEROUSLY * LOOK UP AND LAUGH * LUCK OF THE IRISH.The see The Ghost Goes West Legal Murder see The Man Without a Face LEND ME YOUR HUSBAND * LIEUTENANT DARING R. Elstree B&D. Elstree Walton-onThames BIP Wardour Alexandre Esway Hammer Prods GFD Denison Clift Ealing B&D. Elstree Beaconsfield Shepperton City Film Corp B&D-Paramount British Lion City Film Corp Gaumont ABFD Paramount British Lion GFD Gaumont GFD Harry Hughes George Pearson Ralph Ince Redd Davis Walter Forde Maurice Tourneur Henry Edwards Bernard Vorhaus Albert Parker Shepherd's Bush Capitol (Joinville) Twickenham Twickenham Wembley Twickenham Twickenham Fox Universal Twickenham Fox LATE EXTRA Aug Laying of the Gourle Ghost.Films in Production Title Johnson's Stores see Bargain Basement * JOY RIDE (BATS IN THE BELFRY) JUBILEE WINDOW * JURY'S EVIDENCE KING OF THE CASTLE * KING OF THE DAMNED * KOENIGSMARK * LAD. Elstree Ealing Rock.FN United Artists Radio MGM GFD British Lion ABFD Wardour WB Lothar Mendes George King MiIton Rosmer Karl Grune P Maclean Rogers Carol Reed Paul L Stein William Beaudine Worton Hall/ Denham London-Capitol GFD Anthony Asquith BIP. THE (LEGAL MURDER) MARIA MARTEN OR THE MURDER IN THE RED BARN * MARRIAGE OF CORBAL. Elstree B&D. Elstree Teddington Worton Hall/ Denham Walton-onThames Shepperton B&D.N. Listen to the Band see She Shall Have Music OLD FAITHFUL Jun Aug Jan Jul May Jun Aug Sep Jul Dec Mar Sep Jun Jun May Embassy Cricklewood B&D. Elstree Beaconsfield BIP. THE LUCKY DAYS MAD HATTERS * MAN OF THE MOMENT (THEWATER NYMPH) Man Who Could Not Forget see Debt of Honour * MAN WHO COULD WORK MIRACLES. THE Lady Jane Grey see Tudor Rose LAST JOURNEY. COHEN TAKES A WALK Mr. THE MARRY THE GIRL * MIDSHIPMAN EASY * MIMI (LA BOHEME/VIE DE BOHEME) * MR. THE MAN WITHOUT A FACE. Elstree Beaconsfield Ealing BIP. Elstree Albany Walton-onThames ATP Radius Mancunian Film Corp GS Enterprises ABFD GFD Mancunian Monty Banks Marcel Varnel Arthur Hertz Jul Radio P Maclean Rogers BFI Information Services 78 . THE May May Apr Apr Jul May Oct Jan Date Studio 1935 Production Co (s) Distributor Director(s) Walton-onThames B&D. Faintheart see All at Sea Mitey Man. A see Where's George * MOSCOW NIGHTS (NATACHA) Money By Wire see Get Off My Foot Murder Pact see The Riverside Murder * MUSIC HATH CHARMS My Heart's Delight see Heart's Desire * MYSTERY OF THE MARIE CELESTE.

THE Date Mar May Oct Oct Oct Mar Feb Jun Feb Jul Oct Oct May Sep Studio Wembley 1935 Production Co (s) Fox B&D-Paramount BIP Joe Rock City Film Corp Distributor Fox Paramount Wardour ABFD APD Gaumont United Artist ABFD Fox Twickenham GFD ABFD Exclusive Gaumont MGM Director(s) Bernard Mainwaring George Pearson Arthur Woods Alfred Goulding Redd Davis Berthold Viertel Herbert Wilcox Harry Hughes Michael Powell Henry Edwards Marcel Varnel Monty Banks AEC Hopkins Berchold Viertel Brian Desmond Hurst P Maclean Rogers Fraser Foulsham B&D. The see Sexton Blake and the Bearded Doctor RIVERSIDE MURDER. Elstree Islington Butcher's Leslie Fuller Gainsborough Butcher’s Gaumont Gaumont BFI Information Services 79 . THE SECRET VOICE. Norman Lee. Challis N Sanderson Leslie Pearce Tom Walls Cricklewood Rock. Elstree Shepperton Shepherd's Bush Gaumont B&D. THE * STORMY WEATHER (GET OUT OF IT) Dec Jan Apr Sep Mar Jan Mar Oct Dec May Aug Independent. Elstree B&D.Films in Production Title OLD ROSES ONCE A THIEF * ONCE IN A MILLION * ONE GOOD TURN * ON TOP OF THE WORLD (SITTING ON TOP OF THE WORLD) * PASSING OF THE THIRD FLOOR BACK. Elstree Fox Concordia BIP Fox Concordia Wardour Albert Parker Friedrich Feher Thomas Bentley. THE * PEG OF OLD DRURY * PLAY UP THE BAND (SHARPS AND FLATS) PRICE OF A SONG.1 * QUEEN OF HEARTS RAILROAD RHYTHM * RHODES OF AFRICA RIDERS TO THE SEA Rift In the Loot. Elstree Twickenham B&D. Elstree Wembley Walton-onThames Twickenham Ealing International Players B&D-Paramount Twickenham B&D-Paramount Fox GS Enterprises Exclusives Paramount Twickenham Gaumont Paramount MGM Radio Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Twickenham Phoenix Films Twickenham ABFD Leslie Hiscott Reginald Denham Cricklewood Beaconsfield Teddington Teddington Baxter & Barter Prods British Lion WB-FN WB-FN Universal British Lion WB FN John Baxter Herbert Smith Michael Powell William Beaudine Oswald Mitchell. Elstree Welwyn Rock. THE Sharps and Flats see Play Up the Band * SHE SHALL HAVE MUSIC (OH. Marcel Varnel George A Cooper. the see Birds of a Feather RIGHT AGE TO MARRY. LISTEN Aug TO THE BAND) * SILENT PASSENGER. THE Feb * SOFT LIGHTS AND SWEET MUSIC SOME DAY (YOUNG NOWHERE) * SO YOU WON'T TALK! Stage Folk see Happy Days are Here Again * STARS ON PARADE STOKER. THE SEXTON BLAKE AND THE BEARDED DOCTOR (THE RIVER MYSTERY) SHADOW OF MIKE EMERALD. Elstree Ealing Wembley Twickenham Beaconsfleld Ealing Bushey B&D City Film Corp Fox Twickenham Cecil ATP Carnival Films Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Flanagan-Hurst Walt on-onThames Marylebone Mar G S Enterprises Imeson-Foulsham Radio Universal * RIVER HOUSE MYSTERY. THE Apr Sir Tristram Goes Vest see The Ghost Goes West Sitting on Top of the World see On Top of the World * SMALL MAN. THE (MURDER Jan PACT) * ROBBER SYMPHONY Aug * ROYAL CAVALCADE (ROYAL JUBILEE) Feb Wembley Shepperton BIP. THE * PUBLIC NUISANCE NO. THE River Mystery. Herbert Brenon. Will Kellino. THE * PRIVATE SECRETARY. Elstree Quality Films Columbia Royal Jubilee see Royal Cavalcade RUNAWAY LADIES (THE UNEXPECTED Sep JOURNEY) * SCHOOL FOR STARS Mar * SCROOGE * SECRET AGENT. Arnold Ridley Jean de Limur Donovan Pedelty Henry Edwards Alfred Hitchcock George Pearson George A Cooper P Maclean Rogers ROYAL EAGLE Oct BIP. Walter Summer.

Elstree Wembley Ealing BeaconsfieId Fox Fox Widgey R Newman Butcher's Capitol GFD Alex Bryce. Elstree Walt on-onThames Shepperton Wembley Walton-onThames Cricklewood Twickenham British National GS Enterprises Times Pictures Fox Aug Jan George Smith Argyle Talking Pictures Real Art Columbia Butcher's Gaumont Adrian Brunel Adrian Brunel Henry Edwards Nov Jul Wembley Bushey B&D. Stevens * 39 STEPS. the see Runaway Ladies * VANITY * VARIETY Vie de Boheme see Mimi * VINTAGE WINE Water Nymph. Elstree Walton-onThames Wembley Twickenham B&D-Paramount Conquest City Film Corp Fox Gaumont Universal Paramount ABPD GFD Fox Alfred Hitchcock Leslie Hiscott Michael Hankinson Manning Haynes Harry Hughes Albert Parker Cricklewood Nov Jul Feb Nov Jun Dec Islington St George's Pictures Columbia Gainsborough Gaumont Gaumont Gaumont Radio Wardour Fox Henry W George Robert Stevenson Maurice Elvey Norman Walker P Maclean Rogers William Beaudine Roland Glllett Shepherd's Bush Gaumont B&D. Elstree Independent. The see Man of the Moment Water Ways see Captain Bill WEDDING GROUP WHAT THE PARROT SAW Jan Jan Nov Oct Oct Oct Mar Oct Feb BIP. Elstree B&D. Elstree Date Studio 1935 Production Co (s) BIP Baxter & Barter Prods Twickenham Distributor Wardour Universal Universal Director(s) Otto Kanturek Wallace Orton George Pearson Cricklewood Twickenham Jan Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Twickenham B&D. Elstree B&D. Elstree Wainwright Prods Garrett-Klement Pictures Radio Universal United Artists George King Andrew Marton Eugene Frenke BFI Information Services 80 . A Young Nowhere see Some Day Dec Oct May Feb May B&D-Paramount United Artists Transatlantic Film United Artists Corp B&D Fox Fox ATP British Lion ABFD British Lion Embassy Shepperton B&D. Campbell Gullan Widgey R Newman Jack Raymond Jack Raymond Adrian Brunel Albert Parker Basil Dean P Maclean Rogers * WHEN KNIGHTS WERE BOLD Oct When We Are Married see Don't Rush Me WHERE'S GEORGE? (A MITEY MAN) Jan * WHILE PARENTS SLEEP WHITE LILAC * WHOM THE GODS LOVE WIFE OR TWO. THE * TURN OF THE TIDE (THREE FEVERS) * TWICE BRANDED (TROUBLE IN THE HOUSE) * TWO HEARTS IN HARMONY (HER MASTER'S VOICE) UNDER PROOF Unexpected Journey. THE SUNSHINE AHEAD THAT'S MY UNCLE (THE IRON WOMAN) Third Time Unlucky see Crown v. A Will Shakespeare see The Immortal Gentleman WINDFALL * WOLF'S CLOTHING * WOMAN ALONE.Films in Production Title Street Singer's Serenade see Limelight * STUDENT'S ROMANCE. THE Three Fevers see Turn of the Tide THREE WITNESSES TICKET OF LEAVE * TOMORROW WE LIVE * TROPICAL TROUBLE (ISLAND FLING) * TROUBLED WATERS Trouble in the House see Twice Branded * TRUST THE NAVY * TUDOR ROSE (LADY JANE GREY) * TUNNEL.

Films in Production Title Appendix Alibi Inn * Be Careful Mr. Smith * Expert's Opinion Opening Night Sexton Blake and the Mademoiselle Swinging the Lead Village Squire. Mackane & Universal Rogers B&D-Paramount Paramount BFI Information Services 81 . The Date Studio 1935 Production Co (s) Distributor Director(s) Central Union B&D-Paramount Olympic MGM Apex Paramount Columbia Walter Tennyson Max Mack Ivar Campbell Alex Brown Alex Bryce David MacKane Reginald Denham Fox Fox Weiner.

Elstree Teddington Wembley Denham Ealing Widgey R Newrnan Paul Czinner Reginald Denham BFI Information Services 82 . Elstree JH. The see Take My Tip * CRIME OVER LONDON (GANG/THE THOUSAND WINDOWS) CRIMES OF STEPHEN HAWK. Elstree Walton-onThames Wembley Wembley Wembley Beaconsfield Shepperton JH. THE DIGGING FOR GOLD * DISHONOUR BRIGHT * DODGING THE DOLE *DOMINANT SEX. THE * DON'T GET ME WRONG DOUBLE ALIBI Double Error see The Price of Folly DREAM DOCTOR * DREAMING LIPS * DREAMS COME TRUE (THE WORLD IS ALL MINE) Jul Feb Jan Nov Dec Aug Jul Rock. Elstree Denham Shepperton (Hibernia) Rock Studios London-Victor Saville Fitzpatrick Prods Thomas Cooper Ace Cecil Mancunian BIP WB-FN Fox Bernard SmithWidgey R Newman Trafalgar Films London & Continental Jun Apr Oct Sep Dec May Aug Jul Denham Southall BIP. THE CROSS MY HEART Dancing Boy see Beloved Imposter * DARBY AND JOAN *DARK JOURNEY * DAVID LIVINGSTONE * DAWN. BLANK SQUARE) * BELOVED IMPOSTER (DANCING BOY) * BELOVED VAGABOND. Elstree Shepperton Hammersmith Criterion Gainsborough GS Enterprises Mondover BIP Fitzpatrick Twickenham United Artists Gaumont Radio Butcher's ABPC MGM Wardour Walter West John Stafford Toeplitz Fortune Fox Fox Fox Randall Faye Ace Coronel Radio ABFD British Lion Fox Fox Fox Radio Ace BIED Wardour Radio ABFD Paramount Fox British Lion MGM United Artists Columbia ABPC Walter West W Victor Hanbury Curtis Bernhardt J Elder Wills Alex Bryce Alex Bryce Albert Parker Randall Faye DA Hopwood Gilbert Pratt Norman Lee P Maclean Rogers Paul L Stein Lawrence Huntington Redd Davis Herbert Smith James A Fitzpatrick Michael Hankinson Buddy Harris Albert de Courvllle Bernard Vorhaus Alfred Zeisler George King Reginald Denham Bernard Mainwaring Syd Courtenay Victor Saville James A Fitzpatrick Thomas G Cooper RA Hopwood Tom Walls John Blakeley Herbert Brenon Arthur Woods David Macdonald Beaconsfield Wembley Wembley Wembley Walton-onThames Apr Nov Aug Jul May Rock. THE * CHICK Nov Jun CHINESE CABARET Jan * CLOTHES AND THE WOMAN (SHE GOT Oct WHAT SHE WANTED) Copperhead see The Vandergilt Diamond Mystery * COTTON QUEEN Aug Count's Livery. THE * CRIMSON CIRCLE. THE * BIG FELLA. Elstree Worton Hall Rock Studios Criterion BIED United Artists MGM Universal Paramount MGM United Artists MGM International Ace GFD Mancunian ABPC FN Fox MGM United Artists Reunion Shepperton George King Shepperton/WeI Wainwright wyn Pinewood B&D-Paramount Rock. THE BLACK TULIP.Films in Production Title Abide With Me see Hearts of Humanity * ACCUSED * ALL IN (TATTENHAM CORNER} *ALL THAT GLITTERS * ANNIE LAURIE AREN'T MEN BEASTS' *AULD LANG SYNE * BEAUTY AND THE BARGE Because of Love see Everything In Life BED AND BREAKFAST (No. Elstree Leslie Fuller BIP GS Enterprises-Bow Bells Garrick Pascal Films Fox British Lion Fitzpatrick B&D Bijou Film Co JH Prods * CALLING ALL MA'S Dec Calling All Stars (Redd Davis) see Sing as you Swing CALLING ALL STARS Oct CAPTAIN'S TABLE. THE * BLIND MAN'S BLUFF BORN THAT WAY BOTTLE PARTY Bow Bells see Busman's Holiday BOYS WILL BE GIRLS (BIG-HEARTED BILL) Breakers Ahead see Strange Cargo * BULLDOG DRUMMOND AT BAY BUSMAN'S HOLIDAY (BOW BELLS) * CAFE COLETTE * CAFE MASCOT May Jan Jan Dec Jan Jun Jan Jun Southall WeIwyn Ealing Nov Jun Apr Jun May Date Studio 1936 Production Co (s) Distributor Director(s) Thornton Freeland Marcel Varnel P Maclean Rogers Walter Tennyson Graham Cutts James A Fitzpatrick Henry Edwards Worton Hall Islington Walton-onThames Cricklewood BIP. THE Big Hearted Bill see Boys Will be Girls BIG NOISE. 7. Elstree BIP.

THE Great Divide. THE * EDUCATED EVANS ELDER BROTHER. THE * GAY ADVENTURE. The see The High Command * GOOD MORNING. THE * EAST MEETS WEST (HANDS OFF) * EDGE OF THE WORLD. The see The Great Barrier * GUILTY MELODY * GYPSY * GYPSY MELODY * HAIL AND FAREWELL Hands Off see East Meets West * HEAD OFFICE * HEAD OVER HEELS * HEARTS OF HUMANITY (ABIDE WITH ME) * HEIRLOOM MYSTERY. THE Humpty Dumpty see If I Were Rich Apr Apr Jan Aug Apr Jul Jun Jun Jun Ealing Dec Date Jan May Mar Jun Mar Nov Aug Mar Jul Feb Feb Nov Nov Nov Feb Jul Jul 1936 Studio JH. THE Gay Reality see Luck of the Turf General Goes Too Far. THE * END OF THE ROAD. Elstree Ealing B&D-Paramount Phoenix Films Paramount ABFD Michael Hankinson Reginald Denham BFI Information Services 83 . THE Forever and Ever see Jump for Glory * FORGET-ME-NOT (LULLABY) * FOR VALOUR * FULL SPEED AHEAD (FULL STEAM AHEAD) FULL STEAM Full Steam Ahead see Full Speed Ahead Full Tilt see Knights For a Day Gang see Crime Over London GANG SHOW.Films in Production Title * DUSTY ERMINE EARLY BIRD. THE (THE GENERAL GOES TOO FAR) HIGHLAND FLING * HIS LORDSHIP (THE NELSON TOUCH) His Majesty's Pyjamas see Love in Exile Horse see Song of the Road * HOUSE BROKEN * HOUSE OF THE SPANIARD. THE * HIGH COMMAND. Stanley Irving Tom Walls Lawrence Huntington RA Hopwood Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Rock. Elstree Teddington Shepperton Wembley Islington Highbury Rock St WB-FN Triangle Fox Gainsborough Tudor Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Teddington Denham Walton-onThames Ealing Wembley Beaconsfield Denham (Pagewood) Worton Hall Shepperton Wembley WB-FN Pendennis-London GS Enterprises ATP Fox British Lion Pendennis-London Gaumont-National Studios London Capitol Lawrence Huntington Ace Dec Feb Pinewood Welwyn Herbert Wilcox Grosvenor GFD Pathe Alfred Goulding Sinclair Hill Oct Jul Mar Islington Shepperton Gainsborough B&D-Paramount Gaumont Paramount GB Marcel Varnel Ivar Campbell Milton Rosmer Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Franco-London WB-FN British Artistic WB-FN WB-FN ABFD WB Wardour FN WB Gaumont APD Radio ABFD Fox Gaumont Richard Poittier Roy William Neill Edmond T Greville Ralph Ince Melville Brown Sonnie Hale John Baxter P Maclean Rogers Thorold Dickinson Manning Haynes Herbert Mason Teddington BIP. THE Eunoch of Stamboul see The Secret of Staraboul * EVERYBODY DANCE * EVERYTHING IN LIFE (BECAUSE OF LOVE) EVERYTHING IS THUNDER FAIR EXCHANGE Fall of an Empire see Spy of Napoleon * FAREWELL AGAIN (TROOPSHIP) FAREWELL TO CINDERELLA * FEATHER YOUR NEST * FIND THE LADY FINE FEATHERS * FIRE OVER ENGLAND * FLYING DOCTOR. Elstree/ Walton-onThames Highbury Production Co (s) Twickenham Crusade Distributor Wardour Paramount Gaumont BIED FN Paramount Fox Gaumont Columbia Gaumont WB United Artists Radio ABFD Fox British Lion United Artists GFD United Artists GFD Paramount Ace Director(s) Bernard Vorhaus Donovan Pedelty Herbert Mason Michael Powell William Beaudine Frederick Hayward Alex Bryce Charles Reiener J Elder Wills Milton Roomer Ralph Ince Tim Whelan P Maclean Rogers William Beaudine Roland Gillett Leslie Hiscott William K Howard Miles Mander Zoltan Korda. Elstree Teddington Teddington Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Shepperton Walton-onThames Ealing Wembley UK Films GS Enterprises Fanfare Pictures Fox Nov Mar Jun Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Rock. BOYS * GRAND FINALE * GREAT BARRIER.

IT'S HIM) * IT'S LOVE AGAIN It's Not Me. Elstree JH. Elstree Islington Nov Mar Aug Oct Dec Teddington Beaconsfield Denham Shepperton Highbury Pinewood WB-FN WB Arthur Woods Wilfred Noy Walter Reisch John Baxter George Pearson Sinclair Hill Incorporated Talking Butcher's Films London United Artists UK APD Premier Sound Films Paramount Grosvenor Sound Films Herbert Wilcox Morgan Prods Pall Mall B&D-Paramount ABFD Apr Oct Aug Jun BIP. It's Him see It's in the Bag * IT'S YOU I WANT * JUGGERNAUT * JUMP FOR GLORY (FOREVER AND EVER/THIEF IN THE NIGHT) * KATHLEEN MAVOUREEN * KEEP YOUR SEATS PLEASE * KING OF HEARTS * KING SOLOMON'S MINES Kiss and Make up see She Knew What She Wanted KNIGHTS FOR A DAY (FULL TILT) * KNIGHT WITHOUT ARMOUR * LABURNUM GROVE LANDSLIDE * LAND WITHOUT MUSIC * LILAC DOMINO. THE MAN WHO CHANGED HIS MIND. Elstree/ Rock.Films in Production Title IF I WERE RICH (HUMPTY DUMPTY) INTERNATIONAL REVIEW * INTERRUPTED HONEYMOON. THE * MAN IN THE MIRROR. THE * LIMPING MAN. THE Interval for Romance see The Street Singer * IN THE SOUP * IRISH AND PROUD OF IT (NEVER GO HOME) IRISH FOR LUCK (MEET THE DUCHESS) * IT'S A GRAND OLD WORLD * IT'S IN THE BAG (IT'S NOT ME. Elstree/ Pinewood Ealing B&D. Elstree BIP. Elstree Shepperton Denham Shepperton GFD NPFD United Artists Paramount Leslie Hiscott Tim Whelan Lothar Mendes George Pearson BFI Information Services 84 . THE * LIVE AGAIN * LONDON MELODY * LONELY ROAD. Elstree Denham Worton Hall Pearl London ATP Crusade Capitol Pathe United Artists ABFD Paramount GFD Norman Lee Jacques Feyder Carol Reed Donovan Pedelty Walter Forde Friedrich Zelnik Walter Summers Arthur Maude Herbert Wilcox James Flood Adrian Brunel Rowland V Lee Alfred Werker Clifford Gulliver Randall Faye Alfred Zeisler Michael Powell Maurice Elvey Robert Stevenson Grafton-Capitol-Cecil United Artists Welwyn Morgan Prods Herbert Wllcox ATP B&D-Paramount Trafalgar Capitol British ComediesButcher's-Hope Bell Randall Faye Standard International Joe Rock JH Prods Gainsborough Pathe NPFD GFD ABFD Paramount United Artists GFD Butcher's Radio ABFD MGM Wardour Gaumont Jul Jul Cricklewood Walton-onThames Shepperton Rock. Walter Tennyson Robert Stevenson Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Beaconsfield Twickenham Worton Hall Welwyn Ealing Cricklewood British Lion JH Prods Criterion Argyle British ATF Butcher's Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Mar Oct Feb Nov Jul Dec Sep Jul Sep Mar Feb Oct Welwyn Denham Ealing Wembley Denham WeIwyn Welwyn Rock. THE Man With Your Voice see Talk of the Devil * MAYFAIR MELODY Meet the Duchess see Irish For Luck * MELODY OF MY HEART * MEN ARE NOT GODS (TRIANGLE) * MEN OF YESTERDAY MIDNIGHT AT MADAME TUSSAUDS * MIDNIGHT MENACE (MIDNIGHT SPECIAL) Midnight Special see Midnight Menace * MILLIONS * MILL ON THE FLOSS * MOONLIGHT SONATA * MURDER BY ROPE Murder Gang see Sensation Murder In the Stalls see Not Wanted on Voyage Nov Jan Jul Mar Date Apr Jul Feb Feb Sep Aug Apr Jan Jun Apr Nov Oct Apr Jan Oct 1936 Studio Walton-onThames Medway Beaconsfield Twickenham Wembley Teddington Beaconsfield Teddington Production Co (s) Randall Faye Medway British Lion Twickenham Crusade WB-FN Ton Arnold WB-FN Distributor Radio NPFD British Lion Twickenham Paramount FN British Lion WB Gaumont British Lion Wardour United Artists Wardour ABFD Butcher's GFD Director(s) Randall Faye Buddy Harris Leslie Hiscott Henry Edwards Donovan Pedelty Arthur Woods Herbert Smith William Beaudine Victor Saville Ralph Ince Henry Edwards Raoul Walsh Norman Lee Monty Banks Oswald Mitchell. THE * LOVE AT SEA * LOVE FROM A STRANGER * LOVE IN EXILE (HIS MAJESTY'S PYJAMAS) * LOVE UP THE POLE LUCK OF THE TURF (GAY REALITY Lullaby see Forget-Me-Not * MAKE UP * MAN BEHIND THE MASK.

THE * 2nd BUREAU * SECRET LIVES (NO ESCAPE) Oct Jan Oct Oct Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Pinewood Hammersmith Shepperton Ealing Shepperton BIP. Elstree B&D-Paramount New Ideal Premier-Stafford Prods PhoenixInternational Wainwright BIP * SECRET OF STAMBOUL. DAVIS Navy Eternal. * O-KAY FOR SOUND OLYMPIC HONEYMOON Open House see Playbox Adventure * OUR FIGHTING NAVY (THE NAVY ETERNAL) OURSELVES ALONE * PAGLIACCI PAL O' MINE PATRICIA GETS HER MAN PICCADILLY PLAYTIME PLAYBOX ADVENTURE (OPEN HOUSE) Playing the Game see It's a Grand Old World * PLEASE TEACHER * POT LUCK PRICE OF FOLLY.M. Elstree Bushey Teddington JH. Elstree Cricklewood Shepperton Ealing Teddington Twickenham Rialto TA Welsh Prods B&D-Paramount ATP WB-PN Twickenham Wardour Butcher's Paramount ABFD WB ABPC BFI Information Services 85 . Elstree Norman Walker Walter Summers. THE SCAT BURGLARS. THE RADIO LOVER * REASONABLE DOUBT * REMBRANDT Mar Welwyn Walton-onThames Walton-on Thames Beaconsfield Welwyn GS Enterprises-Bow Bells GS Enterprises Pathe Radio Radio Norman Lee P Maclean Rogers P Maclean Rogers Delta British Lion Emil Reinert Jul Dec May Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Islington Ealing Gainsborough Gaumont GFD Raoul Walsh Marcel Varnel Alfred Goulding London Screenplays.RKO Fanfare Herbert Wilcox BIP Trafalgar Film Sales WB-FN Ace B&D-Paramount GFD Wardour United Artists Radio FN Ace Paramount Oct Feb Aug Feb Dec Pinewood BIP.S.H. Elstree Islington WeIwyn Walton-onThames BIP. THE (EUNUCH Jun OF STAMBOUL) SENSATION (MURDER GANG) * SEVEN SINNERS (THE WRECKER) Feb She Got What She Wanted see Clothes and the Woman * SHE KNEW WHAT SHE WANTED (KISS Mar AND MAKE UP) * SHIPMATES O' MINE Mar * SHOW FLAT * SHOW GOES ON. A (WIDOW'S Oct ISLAND) * SABOTAGE Jun SCARAB MURDER CASE. The see Our Fighting Navy Nelson Touch. Paul Capon George King Alexander Korda Arthur Woods Maurice Elvey Alfred Hitchcock Michael Hankinson Leslie Rowson W Victor Hanbury Edmond T Greville Andrew Marton Brian Desmond Hurst Albert de Courville Thomas Bentley Oswald Mitchell Bernard Mainwaring Basil Dean Ralph Ince Thomas Bentley * RHYTHM IN THE AIR Apr Robert Burns see Auld Lang Syne * ROMANCE IN FLANDERS.7 Blank Square see Bed and Breakfast Odds on Love.Films in Production Title MY PARTNER MR. The see Two on a Doorstop * O. Brian Desmond Hurst Karl Grune Widgey R Newman Reginald Purdell Frank Green WP Kellino Nov Jan Jun Jan Feb Aug May BIP. Elstree Shepperton Denham Wembley Hammersmith BIP Gainsborough WeIwyn George Smith City Film Corp Pascal Film Prods London Fox Franco-London Wardour Gaumont Pathe Columbia ABFD MGM United Artists Fox British Lion Gaumont Paramount MGM Radio ABFD GFD ABPC Gaumont Stafford Dickens Tom Walls Walter Summers Adrian Brunel Austin Melford. Elstree BIP. THE SIDE STREET ANGEL * SILVER BLAZE Jul Dec Nov Oct Shepherd's Bush Gaumont BIP. THE (DOUBLE ERROR) PRISON BREAKER. The see His Lordship Never Go Home see Irish and Proud of It No Escape (Edmond T Grevllle) see Secret Lives * NO ESCAPE NOT SO DUSTY NOTHING LIKE PUBLICITY Date Studio 1936 Production Co (s) Oxford Distributor RKO Director(s) Claude AutantLara Oct Mar Jul Northing Tramp see Strangers on a Honeymoon * NOT WANTED ON VOYAGE (MURDER Aug IN THE STALLS) No.

Elstree Beaconsfield Shepperton Denham Pinewood Beaconsfield JH. A see A Star Fell From Heaven * STAR FELL FROM HEAVEN. A Triangle see Men Are Not Gods Troopship see Farewell Again TWELVE GOOD MEN * TWO ON A DOORSTEP (ODDS ON LOVE) * TWO'S COMPANY Tzigane see Gypsy * UNDERNEATH THE ARCHES * UNDER THE RED ROBE Jun Dec Incorporated Talking NPFD Films George King MGM ABFD GFD United Artists Wardour MGM Radio GFD Grosvenor Sound Ealing Films Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Pinewood BIP. Elstree Denham BSD. Elstree B&D. Elstree BIP. THE DEMON BARBER Jan OF FLEET STREET * TAKE A CHANCE Aug * TAKE MY TIP (THE COUNT'S LIVERY) Oct * TALK OF THE DEVIL (MAN WITH YOUR Oct VOICE) Tattenham Corner see All In TENTH MAN. THE WAKE UP FAMOUS * WANTED WEDNESDAY'S LUCK * WELL DONE. Elstree Independent/ B&D. Elstree BIP. THE Three on a Honeymoon see Where's Sally * THUNDER IN THE CITY TO CATCH A THIEF * TOILERS OF THE SEA TOUCH OF THE MOON. Elstree Beaconsfield Walton-onThames BIP. A Mar * STORM IN A TEACUP STRANGE CARGO (BREAKER'S AHEAD) * STRANGE EXPERIMENT * STRANGERS ON A HONEYMOON (NORTHING TRAMP) * STREET SINGER. Elstree Twickenham Denham Shepperton Cricklewood Hammersmith/ Twickenham Teddington Shepperton Shepperton B&D. lan Dalrymple Lawrence Huntington Albert Parker Albert de Courville Jean de Marguenat Randall Faye George King Sinclair Hill Herbert Mason Carol Reed Brian Desmond Hurst Herbert Smith Randall Faye Herbert Wilcox Shepherd's Bush Gaumont Pinewood Shepperton Shepperton British National * SWEENEY TODD. THE * SONG OF THE ROAD (HORSE) * SOUTHERN ROSES * SPLINTERS IN THE AIR * SPORTING LOVE Date Oct Feb Mar Sep May Sep May Studio 1936 Production Co (s) Rock St BIP Hammer UK Films Grafton Herbert Wilcox Distributor BIED Wardour British Lion Sound City GFD GFD Director(s) Redd Davis Herbert Brenon J Elder Wills John Baxter Friedrich Zelnik Alfred Goulding J Elder Wills Maurice Elvey Rock. THE THEY DIDN'T KNOW Thief In the Night see Jump for Glory) * THIS GREEN HELL * THIS'LL MAKE YOU WHISTLE Thousand Windows. The see Crime Over London * THREE MAXIMS. Elstree Wembley Morgan BIP London-Victor Saville Lawrence Huntington Fox British Lion Wardour United Artists Paramount Fox Gaumont ABPC Melville Brown Paul Merzbach Victor Saville. THE (INTERVAL FOR ROMANCE) * SUCH IS LIFE Nov Jan Oct May Nov Aug Rock. HENRY * WHERE'S SALLY? (THREE ON A HONEYMOON) WHERE THERE'S A WILL Widow's Island see A Romance In Flanders Nov Oct Oct Dec Mar Nov Jan Feb BFI Information Services 86 . Elstree Hammer-British Lion British Lion JH Prods Wardour * SPY OF NAPOLEON (FALL OF AN May EMPIRE) Standing Room Only see Busman's Holiday * STARDUST Nov Star Falls From Heaven. Elstree Cricklewood Teddington Islington B&D BIP British Lion Randall Faye Herbert Wilcox Wilcox-Cie Pathe Consortium Atlantic GS Enterprises Beaumont GS Enterprises Feb GFD Herbert Wilcox Aug May Oct United Artists Radio Columbia Radio Marion Goring P Maclean Rogers Selwyn Jepson P Maclean Rogers Feb Feb Jan Jul Dec WB-FN B&D-Paramount B&D-Soskin Twickenham New World Winwood Pictures Malcolm JH Prods WB-FN Premier-Stafford Embassy B&D-Paramount Neville ClarkeButcher's WB-FN Gainsborough WB Paramount United Artists Wardour 20th Cent-Fox Radio Butcher's ABPC FN Radio Sound City Paramount Butcher's FN Gaumont Ralph Ince Lawrence Huntington Tim Whelan Redd Davis Victor Sjöström Randall Faye Oswald Mitchell Henry Edwards Ralph Ince Gene Gerrard George King George Pearson Wilfred Noy Arthur Woods William Beaudine VANDERGILT DIAMOND MYSTERY.Films in Production Title * SING AS YOU SWING (CALLING ALL STARS) * SOMEONE AT THE DOOR * SONG OF FREEDOM. THE VULTURE. THE Nov (COPPERHEAD) * VARIETY PARADE Sep VICAR OF BRAY. Elstree Denham Walton-onThames Wembley Walton-onThames Teddington Rock.

The Murder at the Cabaret Music Maker.Films in Production Title * WINDBAG THE SAILOR * WINGS OF THE MORNING * WINGS OVER AFRICA World is All Mine. The see Seven Sinners * YOU MUST GET MARRIED Appendix Avenging Hand. The see Dreams Come True Wrecker. The Howard Case. The * Skylarks Terror on Tiptoes Unlucky Jim Voice of Ireland Date Oct May Jul Studio Islington 1936 Production Co (s) Gainsborough Distributor Gaumont Director(s) William Beaudlne Harold Schuster Ladlslao Vajda Denham Shepperton New World Pictures 20th Cent-Fox Premier-Stafford Radio Jan Walton-onThames City Film Corp GFD Leslie Pearce John Stafford Hammer Sovereign MB Prods Inspiration Reunion MB Prods Master Victor Haddick Radio Renoun Universal Paramount MGM Reunion New Realm Radio ICC W Victor Hanbury Lawrence Huntington Frank Richardson Reginald Fogwell Horace Shepherd Thornton Freeland Louis Renoir Harry Marks Victor Haddick BFI Information Services 87 . The Bank Messenger Mystery.

THE (SHAKESPEARE MURDERS) Clock The see The Fatal Hour * COMMAND PERFORMANCE COMPULSORY WIFE. THE AROUND THE TOWN (SONG WRITERS ON PARADE) * BANK HOLIDAY * BEHIND YOUR BACK BELLS OF ST.Films in Production Title ACADEMY DECIDES. THE DR. THE EAST OF LUDGATE HILL EASY RICHES (IN THE MONEY) FATAL HOUR. see Passenger to London BLARNEY (BORDER BLARNEY/ THIS IRISH QUESTION) BLONDES FOR DANGER Bone of Contention see There Was a Young Man Border Blarney see Blarney * BREAK THE NEWS * BRIEF ECSTACY * CAPTAIN'S ORDERS CARRY ON LONDON * CATCH AS CATCH CAN * CAVALIER OF THE STREETS. THE * CHANGE FOR A SOVEREIGN * CHINATOWN NIGHTS (THE RETURN OF KIN FANG) * CHIPS CLAYDON TREASURE MYSTERY. THE * CHALLENGE. The see Concerning MR. THE (THE CLOCK) FATHER STEPS OUT Aug (Ireland) Sep Wembley Sep Oct (Ireland) Beaconsfield Date Studio Mar Denham Jan Cricklewood 1937 Production Co (s) UK Films London-Saville Fox Distributor MGM United Artists Fox Director(s) John Baxter Tim Whelan Alex Bryce Nov Islington Apr Twickenham May Beaconsfield Sep Islington Mar Wembley Jun Shepperton Gainsborough St Margaret's British Lion Gainsborough Crusade Fitzpatrick GFD Ambassador British Lion GFD Paramount MGM Marcel Varnel Thomas Bentley Herbert Smith Carol Reed Donovan Pedelty James A Fitzpatrick Harry O'Donovan Jack Raymond OD Prods Wilcox ABFD British Lion Sep Apr Pinewood Ealing Jack Buchanan IFP-Phoenix Liberty Ace Fox B&D-Paramount London-Denham WB-FN Victory British Fine Art Pictures Fox Grosvenor WB-FN Fox Ace GFD ABFD Liberty Ace Fox Paramount United Artists FN Columbia British Fine Art Pictures 20th Cent-Fox GFD WB Fox Ace Rene Clair Edmond T Greville Ivar Campbell DR Frazer Roy Kellino Harold French Milton Rosmer Maurice Elvey Anthony Frenguelli Edward Godal Manning Haynes Sinclair Hill Arthur Woods Roy Kellino RA Hopwood Aug Worton Hall Ace Mar Wembley Feb Pinewood Sep Denham Apr Teddington May Nov Cricklewood Dec Jun Feb Jan Wembley Pinewood Teddington Wembley Ace Oct Sep Jun Dec Cricklewood Welwyn Teddington Glenrose Film Prods Fidelity Rialto WB-FN George Smith British National Pathe WB RKO ABPC Gerald Blake Norman Lee Arthur Woods P Maclean Rogers David Macdonald Walton-onThames Nov Welwyn Sep Twickenham Margaret's MGM David Macdonald Harold Simpson Germain Burger Lawrence Huntington Harold Schuster Tim Whelan Anthony Frenguelli Roy William Neil John Paddy Carstairs Roy William Neill Zoltan Korda Manning Haynes P Maclean Rogers George Pearson P Maclean Rogers MV Gover-Roaenfall Independent GG Burger Fox New World London-Denham Victory Gaumont Triangle WB-FN London-Denham Fox GS Enterprises B&D-Paramount George Smith Columbia 20th Cent-Fox 20th Cent-Fox United Artists MGM GFD Paramount WB United Artists 20th Cent-Fox RKO Paramount Radio Aug Denham Aug Denham Mar Hammersmith May Islington Feb Dec Sep Shepperton Teddington May Denham Wembley Sep Walton-onThames Mar Pinewood Walton-onThames BFI Information Services 88 . THE Black Trunk. Martin DANCE OF DEATH. MARY'S. SIN FANG * DR. THE DEVIL'S ROCK DIAL 999 * DINNER AT THE RITZ (FOLLOW SUN/RIVIERA) * DIVORCE OF LADY X. MARTIN (THE CROOKED GENTLEMAN) CONCERT PARTY Copper-Proof see The Perfect Crime Crooked Gentleman. SYN DOUBLE EXPOSURES * DOUBLE OR QUITS * DRUM. THE * ACTION FOR SLANDER AGAINST THE TIDE (WITH THE TIDE) Agony Column see The Villiere Diamond * ALF'S BUTTON AFLOAT * ANGELUS. THE (THE VENGENCE OF KALI) * DANGEROUS FINGERS * DARK STAIRCASE. THE CONCERNING MR. THE (FROM THE DARK STAIRCASE) * DARTS ARE TRUMPS (MATCH POINT) * DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES (NORWICH VICTIMS) Death Adda Up se MR. Smith Carries On * DEATH CROONS THE BLUES DERELICT.

THE Follow the Sun see Dinner at the Ritz * FOLLOW YOUR STAR FOOTLIGHTS Four Dark Hours see The Green Cockatoo * FRENCH LEAVE * FROG.Elstree Jan Shepperton B&D-Paramount ABPC George King Paramount ABPC MGM John Paddy Carstairs Herbert Brenon RK Neilson Baxter Josef von Sternberg John Paddy Carstairs Clayton Hutton Anthony Kimmins Denham Pinewood Highbury Ealing cancelled B&D-Paramount Tudor ATP Paramount ABFD ABFD Jun Jan Jan Jun Teddington Shepperton Teddington Wembley WB-FN George King WB-FN Fox Buckingham George King ABPC Wainwright ATP Vogue B&D-Paramount Conway Welwyn B&D-Paramount Fitzpatrick British Lion-Tom Arnold ABPC FN MGM FN 20th Cent-Fox GFD MGM ABPC GFD ABPD GFD Paramount Sound City Pathe Paramount MGM British Lion ABPC Gene Gerrard David Macdonald Ralph Ince Bernard Mainwaring Thorn ton Freeland George King Paul L Stein Reginald Denham Anthony Kimmins Walter Forde Henry Cass Roy Kellino Thomas Bentley David Macdonald James A Fitzpatrick Herbert Smith Graham Cutts Mar Pinewood Dec Oct Shepperton AB.Films in Production Title * FIFTY-SHILLING BOXER * FIRST AND THE LAST. THE FIRST NIGHT * £5 MAN. The see Young and Innocent * GLAMOROUS NIGHT Nov Pinewood Date Studio Walton-onThames May Denham Apr Wembley Feb Wembley 1937 Production Co (s) George Smith London-Denhan Crusade Fox Belgrave Ace Welwyn Herbert Wilcox Gaumont British Unity Distributor Radio Columbia Paramount Fox GFD Ace Pathe GFD GFD ABFD Director(s) P Maclean Rogers Basil Dean Donovan Pedelty Albert Parker Sinclair Hill RA Hopwood Norman Lee Jack Raymond Sonnie Hale André Berthomieu Brian Desmond Hurst Arthur Woods William Cameron Menzies Jan Jan Apr Feb Welwyn Pinewood Pinewood Ealing Feb BIP. THE LAST CHANCE. THE * LEAVE IT TO ME (IT'S A FAIR COP) * LET'S MAKE A NIGHT OF IT Lie Detector. THE Girl Was Young. THE From the Dark Stairway see The Dark Staircase * GANGWAY * GIRL IN THE TAXI. Elstree Nov Walton-onThames Aug Walton-onThames Apr Beaconsfield Jun Jan Wembley Welwyn Butcher's Mondover Tudor Fox Welwyn Butcher's Butcher's British Lion 20th Cent-Fox Paramount Oswald Mitchell Walter Tennyson Herbert Brenon Alex Bryce Walter Summers BFI Information Services 89 .) * KATE PLUS TEN * KEEP FIT * KICKING THE MOON AROUND * LANCASHIRE LUCK * LAST ADVENTURERS. THE Husbands Don't Care see Merely MR. Elstree ABPC WB-FN New World ABPC WB 20th Cent-Fox GLAMOUR GIRL (LOVE INSURANCE) Nov Teddington GREEN COCKATOO. Elstree Nov Shepperton May Ealing Nov Sep Apr Aug Jun Pinewood Pinewood Shepperton Welwyn Pinewood May Shepperton Jun Beaconsfield Mar BIP. The see Who Killed John Savage? * LILY OF LACUNA * LITTLE MISS SOMEBODY LIVE WIRE. THE (FOUR DARK Jan Denham HOURS) Have You Come for Me? See You Live and Learn He Was Her Man see We're Going to be Rich * HOLIDAY'S END Jan Pinewood * HOUSEMASTER HOUSE OF SILENCE. THE Love Insurance see Glamour Girl LUCKY JADE Sep Jan Oct Nov AB. THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER. Hawkins I CLAUDIUS INCIDENT IN SHANGHAI In the Money see Easy Riches INTIMATE RELATIONS * I SEE ICE Island Man see West of Kerry It's a Fair Cop see Leave It To Me IT'S IN THE BLOOD IT'S NEVER TOO LATE TO MEND (NEVER TOO LATE TO MEND) IT'S NOT CRICKET JENNIFER HALE * JERICHO JOHN HALIFAX GENTLEMAN * JUST LIKE A WOMAN (SUNSET RACKET. THE (THREE MEN ON A HORSE/PLUNDER IN THE AIR) LONDONDERRY AIR. THE LAST CURTAIN.

Elstree Islington Cricklewood AB. REEDER SEES IT THROUGH) MR. Elstree Denham ABPC Gainsborough ABPC GFD Marcel Varnel Butcher's-Hope-Bell Butcher's UK ABPC Denham-London Gainsborough George Smith Denham Fox CS Enterprises Mancunian WB-FN MGM ABPC United Artists GFD Columbia United Artists Fox Columbia Mancunian WB Oswald Mitchell Wallace Orton Graham Cutts William K Howard Robert Stevenson P Maclean Rogers Thornton Freeland Lawrence Huntington Manning Haynes George Black Jnr Ralph Ince Oct Aug Islington Oct Walton-onThames LondonJul Denham Mar Wembley Feb Apr Walton-onThames Highbury Teddington PERFECT CRIME. MR. Believed Married * MR. THE Match Point see Darts and Trumps * MELODY AND ROMANCE MEMBER OF THE JURY * MERELY MR. THE Playboy. HAWKINS (HUSBANDS DON'T CARE) * MERRY COMES TO TOWN * MINSTREL BOY. Reeder in Room 13 * MR. SATAN MR. THE REMEMBER WHEN RETURN OF A STRANGER Return of Sin Fan. THE MISSING. STRINGFELLOW SAYS NO * MURDER IN THE FAMILY MURDER TOMORROW MUSEUM MYSTERY (MUSEUM PEACE) Museum Peace see Museum Mystery Music and Mystery see The Singing Cop * MUTINY OF THE ELSINORE Never too Late to Mend see Its Never too Late to Mend * NIGHT RIDE * NON-STOP NEW YORK Date Studio Jul Jul Wembley Worton Hall 1937 Production Co (s) Fox Grafton-Trafalgar St Margaret's WB-FN British Lion Fox George Smith Embassy Dreadnought B&D-Paramount Distributor 20th Cent-Fox United Artists MGM FN British Lion Fox RKO Sound City Butcher's Paramount Director(s) Alex Bryce Edmond T Greville David Macdonald Ralph Ince Maurice Elvey Bernard Malnwaring P Maclean Rogers George King Sidney Morgan John Paddy Carstairs Norman Lee Nov Twickenham Mar Teddington Feb Feb Beaconsfield Wembley Nov Walton-onThames Apr Shepperton Jul MP. Elstree Jul Pinewood Oct WeIwyn British National ABPC Aug Teddington Jun Jan Oct Dec Feb Pinewood Shepperton Wembley Cricklewood Pinewood WB-FN B&D-Paramount Incorporated Talking Films Fox Crusade B&D-Paramount FN Paramount NPFD 20ch Cent-Fox Paramount Paramount Arthur Woods Lister Laurance Randall Faye Albert Parker Donovan Pedelty Clifford Gulliver Jun Welwyn Argyle British ABPC Roy Lockwood John Paddy Carstairs Robert Stevenson Albert de Courville Apr Pinewood B&D-Paramount Gaumont Paramount GFD Norwich Victims see Dead Men Tell No Tales * OH BOY! (OLD BOY) Jun * OH.Films in Production Title MACUSHLA * MADEMOISELLE DOCTEUR * MAKE IT THREE * MAN WHO MADE DIAMONDS. Reeder Sees It Through see MR. SMITH CARRIES ON (DEATH ADDS UP) * MR. PORTER! Jun Old Boy see Oh Boy! * OLD MOTHER RILEY OVERCOAT SAM * OVER SHE GOES * OVER THE MOON * OWD BOB PAID IN ERROR * PARADISE FOR TWO (THE PLAYBOY) PASSENGER TO LONDON (THE BLACK TRUNK) PEARLS BRING TEARS * PENNY POOL. BELIEVED MARRIED (MISSING FROM HOME) Missing From Home see Missing. The see Chinatown Nights Jun Jun Mar Shepherd's Bush AB. The see Paradise for Two Plunder in the Air see The Live Wire Press Button B see Twin Faces QUIET PLEASE RACING ROMANCE Radio Revue of 1937 see Let's Make a Night of It * RAT. REEDER IN ROOM 13 (MR. THE (COPPER-PROOF) Feb Aug Teddington Walton-onThames Jul Jul Denham Shepperton WB-FN GS Enterprises FN Radio Roy William Neill P Maclean Rogers Imperator Embassy Premier-Stafford Radio British Lion Radio Jack Raymond David Macdonald W Victor Hanbury Mar Shepperton BFI Information Services 90 .

Elstree Apr Denham/ Pinewood Walton-onThames Nov Pinewood Feb Jul Pinewood Pinewood United Artists ABPC United Artists Radio GFD GFD GFD Sound City British Screen Service Ambassador Victor Seville Herbert Brenon William K Howard P Maclean Rogers Herbert Mason Norman Walker René Guissart John Baxter Ward Wing Robert Edmunds May Shepperton Aug (Sri Lanka) Jun Oct Sep AB. THE (MUSIC AMD MYSTERY * SKY'S THE LIMIT. Jack Buchanan Tim Whelan RA Hopwood Henry Edwards May Pinewood SONG IN SOHO * SONG OF THE FORGE Mar Cricklewood Song Writers on Parade see Around the Town * SOUTH RIDING Jun Denham SPRING HANDICAP * SQUEAKER. THE REVERSE BE MY LOT. Elstree Rock. SMITH. THE * THANK EVANS THERE WAS A YOUNG MAN (BONE OF CONTENTION) This Irish Question see Blarney * THISTLEDOWN Three Men on a Horse see The Live Wire * TICKET OF LEAVE MAN * TRANSATLANTIC TROUBLE TWIN FACES (PRESS BUTTON B) UNDER A CLOUD UPTOWN REVUE VARIETY HOUR (VARIETY STARS OF 1937) Variety Stars of 1937 see Variety Hour Vengeance of Kali. A.Films in Production Title * RETURN OF THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL. THE * RHYTHM RACKETEER Riviera see Dinner at the Ritz * ROSE OF TRALEE SAID O'REILLY TO MCNAB * SAILING ALONG * SAM SMALL LEAVES TOWN * SATURDAY NIGHT REVIEW * SCHOONER GANG. The see The Dance of Death Mar AB. Elstree Pinewood WB-FN Viking Triangle WB-FN WB-FN Jack Buchanan Jack Buchanan Ace Butcher's London-Victor Saville ABPC Denham-London George Smith Gainsborough Herbert Wilcox Jack Buchanan UK Chesterfield Alexander Films WB Viking Paramount WB WB GFD GFD Ace Butcher's Leslie Hiscott Eric Humphries George King Roy William Neill Arthur Woods Lee Garmes. THE * SMASH AND GRAB Date Studio Jun Feb Jan Denham Rock. THE SCRUFFY * SECOND BEST BED Secretary in Trouble see Who's Your Lady Friend? Sexton Blake and the Master Criminal see Sexton Blake and the Hooded Terror * SEXTON BLAKE AND THE HOODED TERROR (SEXTON BLAKE AND THE MASTER CRIMINAL) Shakespeare Murders see The Claydon Mystery Shilling for Candles. Elstree 1937 Production Co (s) London Rock Prods Rock Prods Butcher's Gainsborough Gaumont British Screen Service Welwyn New Garrick Vulcan Pictures Capitol Distributor United Artists Columbia BIED Butcher's GFD GFD British Screen Service Pathe Butcher's BIEF GFD Director(s) Hanns Schwarz Raymond Stress James Seymour Oswald Mitchell William Beaudine Sonnie Hale Alfred Goulding Norman Lee WD Hackney Randall Faye Tom Walls Feb Cricklewood Mar Islington Aug Pinewood Jul Jul Aug Sep Oct Highbury Welwyn Cricklewood Cricklewood Shepperton Nov Shepperton George King MGM George King Feb Apr Dec Nov Jun Jul Teddington Cricklewood Shepperton Teddington Teddington/ Rock. Elstree Teddington ABPC WB-FN Fox WB-FN George King WB-PN Premier Sound Films Triangle Ace Fox ABPC FN 20th Cent-Fox WB MGM FN Paramount Paramount Ace Fox Richard Bird Roy William Neill Albert Parker Arthur Woods George King William Beaudine Lawrence Huntington George King RA Hopwood Redd Davis May Wembley Oct Teddington Aug Shepperton May Teddington Jun Jun Jan Highbury Shepperton Wembley BFI Information Services 91 . THE * STRANGE BOARDERS * SUNSET IN VIENNA (VIENNA SUNSET) * SWEET DEVIL Sweet Racket see Just Like a Woman * TALKING FEET TEA LEAVES IN THE WIND TELEVISION TALENT (TELEVISION TROUBLE) Television Trouble see Television Talent * TERROR. see Young and Innocent SHIP'S CONCERT SHOOTING STARS SILVER TOP * SIMPLY TERRIFIC * SINGING COP. THE * STRANGE ADVENTURES OF MR.

Elstree Denham 1937 Production Co (s) Mayflower Pictures Imperator Fox WB-FN 20th Century Ace Irish National Film Corp IFP-Phoenix George Smith George King WB-FN Dorian GS Enterprises Premier-Stafford Prods WB-FN Ace Fox MGM WB-FN Gaumont Distributor ABPC Radio 20th Cent-Fox FN 20th Cent-Fox Ace Butcher's British Lion Radio MGM WB ABFD Radio Radio FN Ace Fox MGM WB GFD Director(s) Erich Pommer Herbert Wilcox Bernard Mainwaring Roy William Neill Monty Banks RA Hopwood Patrick K Heale Edmond T Greville P Maclean Rogers David Macdonald Maurice Elvey Carol Reed P Maclean Rogers Ladislao Vajda Arthur Woods RA Hopwood Harry Langdon Jack Conway Arthur Woods Alfred Hitchcock Nov Wembley Oct Oct Teddington Denham Ace May Bushey Sep Feb Jul Jun Beaconsfield Walton-onThames Shepperton Ealing Walton-onThames Shepperton Teddington Ace Wembley Denham Mar Teddington Jan Jan Apr Sep Mar Teddington Pinewood YOUNG AND INNOCENT (A SHILLING Jun FOR CANDLES/ THE GIRL WAS YOUNG) Appendix False Evidence School for Husbands Crusade Wainwright Paramount GFD Donovan Pedelty Andre Marton BFI Information Services 92 . A * YOU LIVE AND LEARN (HAVE YOU COME FOR ME?) Date Studio Sep Apr AB. THE * WE'RE GOING TO BE RICH (HE WAS HER MAN) WEST END FROLICS WEST OF KERRY (ISLAND MAN) * WHAT A MAN! WHEN THE DEVIL WAS WELL WHEN THE POPPIES BLOOM AGAIN WHO KILLED JOHN SAVAGE? (THE LIE DETECTOR) * WHO'S YOUR LADY FRIEND? (SECRETARY IN TROUBLE) WHY PICK ON ME? * WIFE OF GENERAL LING. THE (AGONY COLUMN) * VIPER. THE WINDMILL REVELS WISE GUYS With the Tide see Against the Tide *YANK AT OXFORD.Films in Production Title * VESSEL OF WRATH VICTORIA THE GREAT Vienna Sunset see Sunset in Vienna VILLIERS DIAMOND. THE WINDMILL.

see Meet Mr. Elstree Pinewood Islington Pinewood Welwyn Wembley Ealing Pinewood Walton-onThames Gainsborough George Smith George Smith ABPC British Lion GS Enterprises GFD RKO RKO ABPC British Lion Columbia Marcel Varnel P Maclean Rogers P Maclean Rogers Thornton Freeland Herbert Smith P Maclean Rogers Mar Oct Jun May Dec Gamma 20th Century ATP-Eltham British Lion Mayflower Pictures ABPC 20th Century Gainsborough CAPAD British National Fox ATP Pinebrook Grand National 20th Cent-Fox ABFD British Lion ABPC ABPC 20th Cent-Fox MGM MGM ABPC 20th Cent-Fox ABFD GFD Roy Kellino Eugene Forde Anthony Kimmins Herbert Smith Alfred Hitchcock Paul L Stein Monty Banks Alfred Hitchcock Albert de Courville John Paddy Carstairs Alex Bryce Walter Forde Maurice Elvey * JANE STEPS OUT (LOVER'S KNOT) Jan Job 1159 see Full Speed Ahead * KEEP SMILING (PICCADILLY CIRCUS) * LADY VANISHES. Elstree AB. Bush * I MET A MURDERER (DEADWATER ) * INSPECTOR HORNLEIGH * IT'S IN THE AIR * I'VE GOT A HORSE * JAMAICA INN Jun Aug Feb Jan May Sep Jun Feb May Jul Jan Dec Aug Sep Nov Dec Nov 1938 Production Co (s) Distributor Director(s) Butcher's WeIwyn Rembrandt Gainsborough Butcher's Pathe Butcher's MGM Oswald Mitchell Norman Lee Redd Davis Marcel Varnel Radius Admiral Radius Grand National Lawrence Huntington Donovan Pedelty AB.A! (STICK 'EM UP) * HIS LORDSHIP GOES TO PRESS * HIS LORDSHIP REGRETS (BEES AND HONEY) * HOLD MY HAND * HOME FROM HOME * IF I WERE BOSS If You Had a Million see The Second Mr. Penny * ALMOST A GENTLEMAN Apr Walton-onThames * ALMOST A HONEYMOON Jan WeIwyn * ANYTHING TO DECLARE? Sep Walton-onThames * ASK A POLICEMAN Dec Islington/ Shepperton Asking for Trouble see Me and My Pal BAD BOY Feb Cricklewood * BEDTIME STORY Feb Cricklewood Bees and Honey see His Lordship Regrets BEYOND OUR HORIZON * BLACK EYES Nov * BLACK LIMELIGHT Apr * CALLING ALL CROOKS (SWINGING May THE LEAD) Chez Louis see Romance a la Carte * CITADEL. A * GOODBYE MR. THE * FOUR FEATHERS. THE * GAUNT STRANGER.S. Elstree Cricklewood GHW Prods ABPC ABPC Mancunian Unity ABPC ABPC Mancunian Norman Walker Herbert Brenon Paul L Stein George Black Denham Pinewood Islington Pinewood Teddington WeIwyn Teddington Wembley WeIwyn Denham Crtcklewood Welwyn/AB. Elstree AB. THE FULL SPEED AHEAD (JOB 1159) * GANG'S ALL HERE. THE (LOST LADY/THE WHEEL TURNS) * LAMBETH WALK * LASSIE FROM LANCASHIRE LAST BARRICADE. A * GIRL MUST LIVE. THE * CLIMBING HIGH * COMING OF AGE * CONVICT 99 * CRACKERJACK * DANGEROUS MEDICINE DEAD MEN ARE DANGEROUS Deadwater see I Met a Murderer * EVERYTHING HAPPENS TO ME FATHER O'NINE * FLYING FIFTY FIVE. THE * LET'S BE FAMOUS * LIGHTNING CONDUCTOR Lights Out Please see Save a Little Sunshine * LITTLE DOLLY DAYDREAM Lost Lady see The Lady Vanishes May Mar Oct Apr Jan Nov May Jan Argyle Butcher‘s Oswald Mitchell BFI Information Services 93 . Elstree Beaconsfield Walton-onThames (shot entirely on location) Pinewood Ealing Beaconsfield AB. THE Happy Fugitive see You're the Doctor * HEY! HEY! U. THE * GENTLEMAN'S GENTLEMAN. CHIPS * GOOD OLD DAYS.Films in Production Title Date Studio Adventures of Mr. Penny. Elstree Ealing Teddington Islington Denham Teddington MGM Gaumont GS Enterprises Gainsborough Gainsborough WB-FN WeIwyn WB-FN Fox Admiral London Educational & General Services ABPC CAPAD WB-FN Gainsborough MGM WB-FN MGM MGM Columbia GFD GFD FN Pathe WB 20th Cent-Fox RKO United Artists GFD ABPC ABFD WB 20th Cent-Fox MGM FN Victor Saville Carol Reed Manning Haynes Marcel Varnel Albert de Courvllle Arthur Woods Harold French Roy William Neill Roy Kellino Reginald Denham Zoltan Korda John Hunt Thornton Freeland Walter Forde Roy William Neill Carol Reed Sam Wood Roy William Neill May Aug May May Nov Jan Islington Walton-onThames Walt on-onThames AB.

The see The Return of Carol Deane * RETURN OF THE FROG. ATKINS * MARIGOLD * ME AND MY PAL (ASKING FOR TROUBLE) * MEET MR. A * ST.Films in Production Title Lover's Knot see Jane Steps Out * LUCK OF THE NAVY MANY TANKS. Elstree Ealing 1938 Production Co (s) ABPC WB-FN ABPC Welwyn British National Smith-Newman G&S Films Jack Raymond RembrandtButcher's ABPC Argyle Welwyn British National Herbert Wilcox WB-FM Distributor ABPC FN ABPC Pathe ABPC Equity British GFD Grand National Butcher's ABPC ABPC Pathe Butcher's British Lion WB Director(s) Norman Lee Roy William Neill Thomas Bentley Thomas Bentley David Macdonald Widgey R Newrnan Victor Schertzinger Jack Raymond Harry Hughes Norman Lee Alex Bryce Thomas Bentley Oswald Mitchell Jack Raymond Arthur Woods * NO PARKING Jan * NURSEMAID WHO DISAPPEARED. A * SIXTY GLORIOUS YEARS (VICTORIA AND ALBERT) * SO THIS IS LONDON SPECIAL EDITION * SPIES OF THE AIR (OFFICIAL SECRET) *SPOT OF BOTHER. THE STAR OF THE CIRCUS * STEPPING TOES Stick 'em up see Hey! Hey! U. PENNY (ADVENTURES OF MR. Elstree Denham Pinewood Worton Hall Walton-onThames Pinewood Denham AB. Elstree Shepperton Pinewood Cricklewood Teddington Pinewood Worton Hall Ealing Imperator GS Enterprises Imperator Mayflower Picture Corp Welwyn British National Fox Assoc Independent Prods Imperator 20th Century Redd Davis British National Pinebrook Harefield ABPC UK-Two Cities Orion Prods Viking Films WB-FN Two Cities-Pisorno Pinebrook Liberty Films ATP British Lion RKO Paramount ABPC Pathe Maurice Elvey P Maclean Rogers Jack Raymond Tim Whelan Norman Lee * SAVE A LITTLE SUNSHINE (LIGHTS Mar OUT PLEASE) * SECOND MR. Widgey R Newman Herbert Wilcox Thornton Freeland Redd Davis David Macdonald David Macdonald Michael Powell Albert de Courville John Baxter Paul Czinner Eric Humphries Arthur Woods Marlo Zampi David Macdonald Ivar Campbell Anthony Kimmins BFI Information Services 94 .! * STOLEN LIFE Swinging the Lead see Calling All Crooks * TAKE OFF THAT HAT * THEY DRIVE BY NIGHT 13 MEN AND A GUN * THIS MAN IS NEWS TOO MANY HUSBANDS * TROUBLE BREWING Jun Mar Oct Feb Apr Mar Nov Feb Jun Oct Jan Dec Feb Oct Jan Feb Anglo-American John Paddy Carstairs 20th Cent-Fox Columbia RKO 20th Cent-Fox Paramount ABPC GFD Columbia ABPC BIED Paramount Viking Films FN BIED Paramount Liberty Films ABFD Albert Parker George Dewhurst. Elstree Welwyn Welwyn Wembley MP. Leslie Howard Tim Whelan Harold Schuster Arthur Woods Aug Feb Jun Feb Beaconsfield Walton-onThames Denham AB. Elstree Teddington ABPC London Harefield ABPC WB-FN ABPC United Artists Columbia ABPC WB Gabriel Pascal Prods GFD Walter Summers Brian Desmond Hurst Anthony Asquith. THE * PENNY PARADISE (PENNY WISE) Penny Wise see Penny Paradise Piccadilly Circus see Keep Smiling * PREMIERE * PRISON WITHOUT BARS * PYGMALION * Q PLANES QUEER CARGO * RETURN OF CAROL DEANE. A * SPY IN BLACK.2 Jun Jun Mar Sep Apr Apr Jul Apr Jun Sep May Gainsborough TW Prods Butcher's ABPC ATP GFD British Lion Butcher's ABPC ABFD Marcel Varnel Tom Walls Oswald Mitchell Paul L Stein Carol Reed AB. BUSH. THE (THE RETURN OF CAROL SAWYER) Return of Carol Sawyer. PENNY) MEN WITHOUT HONOUR * MIKADO. MR.A.S. READER. THE * MOUNTAINS O' MOURNE * MURDER IN SOHO MY IRISH MOLLY * NIGHT ALONE * NIGHT JOURNEY Date Studio Aug Jul Jun Oct Jan Nov Jul Jan Mar Sep Sep Mar Nov AB.C. Elstree Welwyn Welwyn Walton-onThames Beaconsfield Teddington Islington/ Shepperton Shepperton Walton-onThames AB. THE * MIND OF MR. THE * ROMANCE A LA CARTE (CHEZ LOUIS) * ROYAL DIVORCE. Elstree Teddington AB. Elstree WeIwyn WeIwyn Bushey Pinewood Highbury Walton-onThames AB. Elstree Denham Pinewood Denham AB. Aug THE Official Secret see Spies of the Air * OLD BONES OF THE RIVER * OLD IRON * OLD MOTHER RILEY IN PARIS * OUTSIDER. MARTIN'S LANE W. THE (IF YOU Jun HAD A MILLION) SECOND THOUGHTS Feb * SISTER TO ASSIST 'ER.

Elstree AB. Elstree Worton Hall Canterbury ABFD RKO Robert Stevenson P Maclean Rogers Jan Apr Jun Aug Fox ABPC ABPC 20th Cent-Fox ABPC ABPC Maurice Elvey Herbert Brenon Norman Lee Roy Lockwood New Georgian Prods BIED WeIwyn AIP Sovereign Cantaphone Hibernia Film MGM Columbia FN Exclusive Hibernia Film Harry Hughes Widgey R Newman Fraser Foulsham John R Phipps Thomas G Cooper BFI Information Services 95 . The see The Lady Vanishes * WHO GOES NEXT YELLOW SANDS * YES. MADAM? * YOU'RE THE DOCTOR (HAPPY FUGITIVE) Appendix Gables Mystery. The Smugglers' Harvest Uncle Nick Date Studio 1938 Production Co (s) Distributor Director(s) Sep Jul Ealing/ Pinewood CAPAD-Assoc Star Walton-onThames Wembley AB. THE * WEDDINGS ARE WONDERFUL Wheel Spins.Films in Production Title Victoria and Albert see Sixty Glorious Years * WARE CASE. The * On Velvet Sky Raiders.

The see Dead Man's Shoes * DARK EYES OF LONDON David Goliath see The Proud Valley * DEAD MAN'S SHOES (THE CROSS ROADS) DISCOVERIES * DR. Elstree Ealing Shepperton Islington United Artists British Lion ABPC ABPC Paramount GFD Albert de Courville George King Herbert Brenon Walter Forde Anthony Asquith Marcel Varnel Jul Walton-on-Thames Daniel BirtButcher's AB. Elstree Highbury Teddington Highbury ABPC Grand National WB-PN British Screen Service Aldwych Prods Pennant ABPC CAPAD Two Cities Gainsborough ABPC Thomas Bentley Grand National Redd Davis WB BSS Herbert Mason George A Cooper May Feb May Feb May Jun Denham Beaconsfield AB. GEORGE! * CONFIDENTIAL LADY *CONTRABAND (BLACKOUT) * CONVOY CRIMES AT THE DARK HOUSE (WOMAN IN WHITE) Cross Roads. Elstree ABPC WB-FN WB-FN ABPC Butcher's Adrian Brunel Jun Jun Jun Jul ABPC FN WB ABPC Harold Huth Roy William Neill Roy William Neill Harold French Feb Highbury Grafton Grand National Friedrich Zelnik Jul May Highbury Islington Charter 20th Century Grand National Roy Boulting 20th Cent-Fox Walter Forde Oct Mar Walton-on-Thames Butcher's WeIwyn ABPC Butcher's ABPC Oswald Mitchell Graham Cutts BFI Information Services 96 . Elstree Teddington Teddington AB. O'DOWD DOWN OUR ALLEY Dressed to Kill see His Brother's Keeper * ENGLISHMAN'S HOME. TH Gestapo see Night Train to Munich * GIRL WHO FORGOT. THE Goodness How Sad see Return to Yesterday * HELL'S CARGO (ON GUARD IN THE MEDITERRANEAN) *HIS BROTHER'S KEEPER (DRESSED TO KILL) * HOOTS MON HOUSE OF THE ARROW.Films in Production Title Alias the Bulldog see Bulldog Sees It Through *ALL AT SEA Archer Plus Twenty see. AN FACE AT THE WINDOW. THE (THE MURDER ACTION) BRIGGS FAMILY. Elstree MGM Gainsborough ATP Pennant ATP MB-FN ATP Pennant MGM GFD ABFD British Lion ABFD FN AngloAmerican ABPD British Lion Arthur Woods Walter Forde Walter Forde George King Anthony Kimmins Arthur Woods Michael Powell Pen Tennyson George King Walton-on-Thames British National Apr WeIwyn Argyle Pathe Walter Summers Mar Jun Aug May AB. THE * FOUR JUST MEN. THE Husband in Law see Law and Disorder * I KILLED THE COUNT I'm Not Rich see Mistaken Identity INQUEST * INSPECTOR HORNLEIGH ON HOLIDAY It's No Use Crying see Miracles do Happen * JAILBIRDS * JUST WILLIAM Date May Studio Beaconsfield 1939 Production Co (s) British Lion Distributor British Lion Director(s) Herbert Smith May Mar Aug Aug May Dec Nov Denham/Highbury AB. THE * FRENCH WITHOUT TEARS * FROZEN LIMITS. THE * COME ON. THE Farewell to Yesterday see Return to Yesterday FLYING SQUAD. Meet Maxwell Archer * ARSENAL STADIUM MYSTERY. THE *AT THE VILLA ROSE *BAND WAGGON Blackout see Contraband * BLIND FOLLY (MONEY FOR NOTHING) * BODY VANISHES. Elstree Islington/ Sheps Bush G&S Films ABPC Gainsborough GFD ABPC GFD RKO New Realm WB ABPC Thorold Dickinson Walter Summers Marcel Varnel Reginald Denham Walter Tennyson Herbert Mason Harold Huth Walton-on-Thames George Smith Worton Hall Teddington WeIwyn Venture Films WB-FN ABPC Nov Oct May Jun May May Dec Nov Nov Denham Shepherd's Bush Ealing Beaconsfield/ Shepperton Ealing Teddington Ealing MP. THE * BULLDOG SEES IT THROUGH (ALIAS THE BULLDOG) Busman's Holiday see Busman's Honeymoon * BUSMAN'S HONEYMOON (BUSMAN'S HOLIDAY) * CHARLEY'S (BIG-HEARTED) AUNT * CHEER BOYS CHEER * CHINESE BUNGALOW.

THE Live and Let Live see Spy for a Day LUCKY TO ME (YOU'RE LUCKY TO ME) Man From M. The see The Body Vanishes MURDER WILL OUT Apr * MUSIC HALL PARADE Night of the Fire. Elstree ABPC CAPAD CAPAD RKO ABPC ABFD ABFD RKO AngloAmerican RKO ABPC 20th Cent-Fox Paramount Paul L Stein Pen Tennyson Robert Stevenson John Paddy Carstairs Mar Jun May Apr Feb Jul Apr Jul Jun Jan Jun Jan Jul MP. Elstree Worton Hall AB.P. Elstree Wembley British National Savoy Film Prods ABPC 20th Century Pinebrook British Consolidated Admiral Films John Baxter P Maclean Rogers Graham Cutts Monty Banks Herbert Mason Grand National Maurice Elvey GFD Paramount Maurice Elvey Mario Zampi Shepperton Two Cities Shepperton/ Grafton Twickenham Walton-on-Thames Butcher's Denham Ealing Islington Grand National Carol Reed Butcher's Maurice Elvey Tim Whelan Pen Tennyson Harry Lachnan Irving Asher Prods Columbia CAPAD 20th Century ABFD 20th Cent-Fox BFI Information Services 97 . Adrian Brunel Thomas Bentley * LAUGH IT OFF Nov *LAW AND DISORDER (HUSBAND Oct IN LAW) * LET GEORGE DO IT! Nov * LION HAS WINGS. Elstree 20th Century British National Walton-on-Thames Butcher *s MGM AngloAmerican Butcher's Carol Reed P Maclean Rogers Oswald Mitchell May Denham G&S Films GFD Brian Desmond Hurst Mar Aug Jul Mar AB. THE Midnight Mall see The Spirit MIRACLES DO HAPPEN (IT'S NO USE CRYING) * MISSING PEOPLE. Elstree Islington Denham Rock. Elstree ABPC ABPC Jun Jul Oct Jan Mar Rock.5 see Secret Journey * MEET MAXWELL ARCHER (ARCHER PLUS TWENTY) MIDAS TOUCH. PYM OF SCOTLAND YARD Sep Walton-on-Thames British National British Highbury Consolidated Ealing ATP Denham London-Korda Jun AB. THE (DAVID GOLIATH) RETURN TO YESTERDAY (FAREWELL TO YESTERDAY/ GOODNESS HOW SAD) * SAINT IN LONDON. Elstree Ealing Ealing AB. THE * SWORD OF HONOUR * TEN DAYS IN PARIS * THERE AIN'T NO JUSTICE * THEY CAME BY NIGHT Apr Teddington WB-FN WB Butcher's Roy William Neill Oswald Mitchell Walton-on-Thames Butcher's Dec Aug Jun Shepherd's Bush MP. THE (MR. THE Sally Goes to Town see Shipyard Sally * SECRET JOURNEY (MAN FROM M. THE (PEACE IN OUR TIME) * SONS OF THE SEA * SPIDER. THE * MIDDLE WATCH. Brian Desmond Hurst. Elstree Teddington Welwyn Worton Hall Highbury Worton Hall RKO WB-PM ABPC GSEnterprises Jack Raymond Venture Films RKO FN ABPC New Realm John Paddy Carstairs David Macdonald Thomas Bentley P Maclean Rogers Grand National Jack Raymond New Realm Walter Tennyson Jul Highbury Hurley Prods Grand National Fred Elles Money for Nothing see Blind Folly Murder Action.Films in Production Title Date Studio 1939 Production Co (s) Distributor AngloAmerican RKO ABFD United Artists Director(s) John Baxter David Macdonald Marcel Varnel Michael Powell.I. The see On the Night of the Fire * NIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH (GESTAPO) * OLD MOTHER RILEY JOINS UP *OLD MOTHER RILEY M.5) SHADOWED EYES * SHE COULDN'T SAY NO * SHIPYARD SALLY (SALLY GOES TO TOWN) * SILENT BATTLE.I. On Guard in the Mediterranean see Hell's Cargo * ON THE NIGHT OF THE FIRE (NIGHT OF THE FIRE) Peace in our Time see The Silent Battle * POISON PEN * PROUD VALLEY. THE (MIDNIGHT MAIL) * SPY FOR A DAY (LIVE AND LET LIVE) * STARS LOOK DOWN.REEDER COMES BACK) MISTAKEN IDENTITY (I'M NOT RICH) Mr. Reeder Conies Back see Missing People Mr. Walker Wants to Know see What Would You Do Chums? MRS.

WALKER WANTS TO KNOW) * WHERE'S THAT FIRE? WINDOW IN LONDON. Tim Whelan David Macdonald Anthony Hankey. Leslie Norman Walter Summers Walter Tennyson Roy Boulting Walter Tennyson John Baxter Marcel Varnel Herbert Mason Robert Stevenson London-Alexander United Artists Korda Prods Pinebrook WB-FN Rialto Venture Films Charter Venture Grand National 20ch Century G&S Films CAPAD Paramount FN Pathe AngloAmerican AngloAmerican AngloAmerican AngloAmerican 20th Cent-Fox GFD ABFD Omnia GB Instructional GB Instructional United Artists Exclusive Exclusive Adrian Brunel Donald Taylor Donald Taylor BFI Information Services 98 . Elstree Islington Denham Ealing 1939 Production Co (s) Distributor Director(s) Michael Powell. Elstree Worton Hall MP.Films in Production Title * THIEF OF BAGHDAD. The Two Minutes What Men Live By Date Jun Mar Jan Aug Feb Feb Mar Jun Feb Apr Feb Studio Denham Denham Teddington Welwyn Worton Hall MP. Ludwig Berger. A Woman in White see Crimes at the Dark House * YOUNG MAN'S FANCY You're Lucky to Me see Lucky to Me Appendix * Rebel Son. THE * THIS MAN IN PARIS * TOO DANGEROUS TO LIVE * TRAITOR SPY * TROUBLE FOR TWO TRUNK CRIME TWO DAYS TO LIVE * WHAT WOULD YOU DO CHUMS?(MR.

. .1928 BALL AT SAVOY . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 BITTER SWEET . .1931 BONDMAN THE . .1938 ADVENTURE LIMITED . . . . . .1935 BELLS THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 ADMIRALS ALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Blackout see Contraband .1928 AFTERWARDS . . . . . . . . .1928 Alias Bulldog Drummond see Bulldog Jack . . . . . . . . . . .1931 BIRDS OF A FEATHER . . . . . .1939 Black Roses see Did I Betray? . . . . .1933 AS YOU LIKE IT .1934 ABDUL THE DAMNED . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 AVENGING HAND THE . . . . . . . . . . .1930 BLACK LIMELIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 BACHELOR’S BABY . . . .1937 BELOVED IMPOSTER . . . . . . . . . . .1937 ARSENAL STADIUM MYSTERYTHE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 ARE YOU A MASON? .1938 ARCADIANS THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 ACCOUNT RENDERED . . . .1934 ADVENTUROUS YOUTH . . . . . . . .1935 ADMIRAL’S SECRET THE . . . . . . . . . . .1939 ASK A POLICEMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 ANYTHING MIGHT HAPPEN .1928 Bombs on Monte Carlo see Monte Carlo Madness . . . . . .1933 BLACK ABBOTT THE .1936 AREN’T WE ALL? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 AROUND THE TOWN . .1933 Border Blarney see Blarney . . . . . . . . . .1934 Adventures of Mr Penny see Meet Mr Penny . .1936 All the Winners see Eyes of Fate . . . .1928 ALL AT SEA .1934 Antoinette see The Love Contract . . . . . . . . . .1936 BERMONDSEY KID THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 BIG BUSINESS . . . . .1933 Asking for Trouble see Me and My Pal . . . . . .1931 Bad Blood see First Offence . .1936 AWAKENING THE .1937 Agony Column see The Villiers Diamond . . . . . . .1934 ARIANE . . . . . . . . . . .1936 BOYS WILL BE BOYS . . . . . . . . .1931 BIRDS OF A FEATHER . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 ARMS AND THE MAN . .1932 AMATEUR GENTLEMAN THE . . . . . . .1931 ALMOST A GENTLEMAN . . . . . . . . .1931 BETTY IN MAYFAIR . .1934 BOOTS! BOOTS! . . . . . . . . .1937 ALF’S CARPET . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 BLIND MAN’S BUFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Alias the Bulldog see Bulldog Sees it Through . . . . . . . . . .1935 Bill in the Legion see Lost in the Legion . . . . . . . .1932 AFTER THE BALL . . . . . . . . .1931 BADGER’S GREEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 BED AND BREAKFAST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Bosambo see Sanders of the River . . .1934 BEHIND YOUR BACK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Bill and Son see Gaolbreak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 BEAUTY AND THE BARGE . .1932 BLIND FOLLY . . . . .1934 BE CAREFUL MR SMITH . . . . .1936 ABOVE RUBIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 BOOMERANG . . . . . . . . . .1939 AREN’T MEN BEASTS! . . . . .1934 ANYTHING TO DECLARE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 AMERICAN PRISONER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 ANNIE LAURIE . . . . . . . . .1936 BIG SPLASH THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 ANNIE LEAVE THE ROOM! . .1937 AIR RAID PRECAUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 ALMOST A DIVORCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 BORN LUCKY . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Beauty Ball see Falling In Love . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 BLACK EYES . . . . .1932 Bats in the Belfry see Joy Ride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 ALMOST A HONEYMOON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 AUNTIE’S ANTICS . . .1933 BATTLES OF THE CORONEL AND THE FALKLAND ISLANDS THE .1939 BOLIBAR . . . . . . . . .1938 ALF’S BUTTON . .1934 BALACLAVA . . . . . . .1937 ADAM’S APPLE . . . . . .931 BARTON MYSTERY THE . . . . . . .1934 BFI Information Services 96 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Bow Bella see Busman’s Holiday . . . . . . .1938 BLACKMAIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 ACADEMY DECIDES THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 BODY VANISHES THE . . . . . . . . . .1936 BORROW A MILLION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 AUTUMN CROCUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 BLARNEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 BLONDES FOR DANGER .1935 Alone at Last see Her Night Out . . . . . . . . . . .1939 BANK HOLIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 AGAINST THE TIDE . . . . . . . .1931 BLACK DIAMONDS .1938 AS GOOD AS NEW . . . . . .1932 AFTER MANY YEARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Bill’s War Debt see Poor Old Bill .1933 BETRAYAL .1930 BIG BUSINESS . . . .1937 BANK MESSENGER MYSTERY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 BREAK THE NEWS . . . . . .1938 BED AND BREAKFAST . . . . . . . . . .1928 BLUE SMOKE . . . . . . .1934 BORROWED CLOTHES . . . . . .1935 BAD BOY . . . . . . . . . . .Alphabetical Title Index Abdul Hamid see Abdul the Damned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 ALMOST A HONEYMOON . . . . . . . . . .1930 All Right on the Western Front see Not So Quiet on the Western Front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 ALLEY CAT THE . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 ACCUSED . . . . . . . . .1938 BAD COMPANIONS THE . . . . . . . .1935 Because of Love see Everything in Life . . . . . . . . . .1930 ALL THAT GLITTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 ALF’S BUTTON AFLOAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 AULD LANG SYNE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 AT THE VILLA ROSE . . . . . . .1937 BELLA DONNA . . . . . .1931 Black Diamonds see Paradise Alley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 ALL AT SEA . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 BEYOND THE CITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 AMAZING QUEST OF MR ERNEST BLISS THE . . .1931 Black Diamonds see The Final Reckoning . . . . . . . . . . .1929 BLACK MASK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 BELLES OF ST CLEMENTS THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 BIG NOISE THE . . . . . . .1936 BLACK WATERS . . . . . . . . .1931 BLUE PETER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 ANNE ONE HUNDRED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 ANGELUS THE . . .1935 BATTLE THE . . . . . . . .1933 BEYOND OUR HORIZON . . . . .1931 ALIBI INN . . . .1928 Bone of Contention see There Was a Young Man . . . . . . . . . . .1935 BILL AND COO . . . . . . . .1928 AFTER DARK . . . . . . .1930 BREAKERS AHEAD . .1930 AFTER OFFICE HOURS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 BLOSSOM TIME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 BLUE DANUBE THE . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 BLIND JUSTICE . . . . .1931 Bill the Conqueror see Mr Bill the Conqueror . . . . . . . . . .1938 BEGGAR STUDENT THE . . . . . . . . . . .1935 ATLANTIC . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 ACTION FOR SLANDER . . . .1936 All of a Tremble see Never Trouble Trouble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Behind the Mask see Four Masked Men . . .1935 Black Trunk see Passenger to London . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 BLARNEY STONE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 ALIBI . . . . . . . . . . .1927 Archer Plus Twenty see Meet Maxwell Archer .1936 Big Hearted Bill see Boys Will be Girls . . .1938 ASK BECCLES . .1934 Bill MP see A Political Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 AUNT SALLY . . .1931 Bill Takes a Holiday see Tonight’s the Night . . . . .1933 BLACK COFFEE .1929 Alias see The Man Who Changed His Name . .1936 BELOVED VAGABOND . . . . . . . . . . .1929 AT THE VILLA ROSE . . . . . . . .1934 BLOW BUGLE BLOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 BILL’S LEGACY . . .1937 BLACK TULIP THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 BORN THAT WAY . . . . . . . . . . .1939 ALL IN . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 BIG FELLA THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 BEDTIME STORY . . . . . . . . . 1934 Abide With Me see Hearts of Humanity . . . . . . . . . . .1935 BOYS WILL BE GIRLS .1939 AULD LANG SYNE . . . .1936 BRACELETS . . . . . . .1929 BELLS OF ST MARY’S THE .1934 Blue Army The see The Blue Squadron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 BELLS OF ST MARY’S THE . . . . . . . .1930 Brat The see The Nipper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 BOTTLE PARTY . . . . . .1935 BIRDS OF PREY . . . . .1936 BLIND SPOT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Breakers Ahead see Strange Cargo . . . . . . .1936 Bees and Honey see His Lordship Regrets .1938 BLACK HAND GANG THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 BAND WAGGON . . . . . . .1936 ACE OF SPADES THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Antonia see Temptation . .1935 BARNACLE BILL . . . . . . . . .1934 BEWARE OF WOMEN . . . . .1933 Bluff see A Little Bit of Fluff . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 BARGAIN BASEMENT . . . . . . . .1932 AFTER THE VERDICT . . .1935 BLUE SQUADRON THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 BAROUD . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 Almost a Husband see Honeymoon for Three .

. . . . . . . . .1936 DARK EYES OF LONDON . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 DANDY DICK . . .1938 CONVOY . . . . . . . . . . .1930 CAPTAIN BILL . . . .1930 BRIDES TO BE . .1933 CRIME OVER LONDON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 CASE FOR THE CROWN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 CRIME ON THE HILL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 CARRY ON LONDON .1936 CRACKERJACK . . .1928 CHANCE OF A NIGHT TIME THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 CASTE . see Annie Leave the Root! . . . . . . . . . .1927 CHANGE FOR A SOVEREIGN . . . . . .1927 CONSTANT NYMPH THE . . . .1928 CHICK . . . . . . .1936 CROOKED BILLET THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 CALL ME MAME . . .1930 CHILDREN Of THE FOG .1936 CROSS ROADS THE . . . . . . . . .1936 Chinese Nights see The Television Follies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 DANGEROUS MEDICINE .1935 CRIMSON CANDLE THE . .1933 BROKEN ROMANCE THE . . . . . . . .1936 CITADEL THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 CITY OF YOUTH THE . . . . . . . . .1935 CRUCIFIX THE . . . .1928 CLAIRVOYANT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 COMMISSIONAIRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 DARBY AND JOAN . . . . .1930 COMING OF AGE . . . . . . . .1936 CAFE MASCOT . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 BFI Information Services 99 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 CHEER UP! .1934 Circus see Star of the Circus . .1928 COMPROMISING DAPHNE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 CONVICT 99 . . . . .1932 Count’s Livery The see Take My Tip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 COMMAND PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Bring ‘em Back Half Dead see Send ‘em Back Half Dead . . . . .1937 CHIN CHIN CHINAMAN . .1931 CONQUEST OF THE AIR THE . . . . .1929 COMPULSORY WIFE THE . . . . . . . . . . .1937 CAPTAIN’S TABLE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Child in their Midst see Man of Mayfair .1932 DANCE PRETTY LADY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 CHILDREN OF CHANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Busman’s Holiday see Busman’s Honeymoon . .1930 BROWN WALLET THE . . . .1937 CONCERT PARTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 COLONEL BLOOD . . . .1938 CRAZY PEOPLE . . . . .1937 CHAMBERS OF HORRORS THE . . . .1934 COLLISION . . . . . . .1927 CONFIDENTIAL LADY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 CONGRESS DANCES THE . . . . . . .1928 CHALLENGE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 CARNIVAL . . . . . .1934 CAVALIER OF THE STREETS THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 CALLING ALL STARS (Herbert Smith) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 DANNY BOY . .1937 CHU-CHIN-CHOW . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 CONFETTI . . . .1936 CALENDAR THE . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Common People see The First Born . .1934 CREEPING SHADOWS . . . . . . . . . .1931 BROWN ON RESOLUTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Bridegroom’s Widow The see Let’s Love and Laugh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 CLOTHES AND THE WOMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 CHINATOWN NIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 CONDEMNED TO DEATH . . . .1937 Dance of the Witches see Strange Evidence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Carnival (Anthony Asqulth) see Dance Pretty Lady . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Cat’s Whiskers The .1935 COMETS . . . . . . . . .1934 CAFE COLETTE . . . . . . . . . . .1937 BRIGGS FAMILY THE . . . . . .1934 DANGEROUS FINGERS . . . .1930 CHINESE BUNGALOW THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 CASE OF GABRIEL PERRY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 CALLING THE TUNE . . . . . . . . . .1929 CITY OF SONG .1933 COME INTO MY PARLOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 CANARIES SOMETIMES SING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 CATHERINE THE GREAT . . . . .1933 Cassilis Engagement The see Not Quite a Lady . . . . . . . .1939 CHINESE CABARET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 CROSS CURRENTS . . . . .1932 Case of the Frightened Lady The see The Frightened Lady . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 BROKEN MELODY THE . .1928 Caeca Diva DANCE BAND .1927 COTTAGE ON DARMOOR A . . .1939 CRIMES OF STEPHEN HAWK THE 1936 CRIME UNLIMITED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 CASTLE SINISTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Carmen see Gipsy Blood . . . .1938 CITY OF BEAUTIFUL NONSENSE THE 1935 CITY OF PLAY . . . . .1934 DANGEROUS COMPANIONS .1932 CATCH AS CATCH CAN . . . . . . . .1937 CAR OF DREAMS . . . . . .1936 Copper-Proof see The Perfect Crime .1928 COCK O’ THE NORTH . . . . . . .1937 CROOKED LADY THE . . . . . .1932 BRITANNIA OF BILLINGSGATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 BROKEN MELODY THE . . . . . . . . . .1938 CALLING ALL MA’S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 CUCKOO IN THE NEST A . . . . . . .1930 COMPULSORY HUSBAND THE . . . . . . . .1933 CHARING CROSS ROAD . . . . .1930 Cross Roads The see Dead Man’s Shoes . . . . . .1934 see The Divine Spark . . . . . . . . . . .1938 Clock The see The Fatal Hour . . . . . . .1929 BROKEN ROSARY THE . . . .1936 BULLDOG JACK . . . . . . . . .1939 Copperhead see The Vandergllt Diamond Mystery . . . . . .1936 COUNCIL’S OPINION . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Coronel and the Falkland Battles The see The Battles of the Coronel and Falkland Islands . .1934 BROTHER ALFRED . . .1937 CLEANING UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Calling All Scare (Redd Davis) see Sing as You Swing . .1932 CALLING ALL CROOKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 CONSTANT NYMPH THE . . . . . . . .1931 CARDINAL THE . . . . . . .1935 BY-PASS TO HAPPINESS . . . . . . .1932 CHIPS . .1937 DANGEROUS GROUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 Butler’s Millions The see Money Means Nothing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 CAPTAIN’S ORDERS . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Crime Reporter see The Warren Case . . .1935 CHELSEA LIFE . . . . . .1937 CONCERNING MR MARTIN . . .1928 CUP OF KINDNESS A . . . . .1931 CRIME AT BLOSSOMS THE . . . . . . .1939 BUSMAN’S HONEYMOON . .1932 COME ON GEORGE! . . . . .1929 CHAMPAGNE . . . . . .1937 CHANNEL CROSSING . . . . .1931 Dancing Boy see Beloved Impostor . . .1939 Conflict see The Woman Between .1928 COD . . . . .1932 Code The see Heatwave . . . .1938 DANGEROUS SEAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 CHURCH MOUSE THE . . . . . . . .1932 CALLED BACK . . . . . . . .1933 CALL OF THE SEA THE . . . . . . . .1939 CROUCHING BEAST THE . . . . .1934 BRIEF ECSTACY . .1936 CLUE OF THE NEW PIN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 COCKTAILS . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 CAPE FORLORN . . . . . . . . . . .1934 BROWN SUGAR . . .1935 CONSIDER YOUR VERDICT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 CHINESE PUZZLE THE . . . . . .1933 Contraband see The Luck of a Sailor CONTRABAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Case of Lady Camber The see Lord Camber’s Ladies . . . . . . . . . .1931 CALLBOX MYSTERY THE . . . .Alphabetical Title Index BREWSTER’S MILLIONS . . . . . . .1929 Bright Lights of London see That Night in London . . . . . . . .1928 Crooked Gentleman The see Concerning Mr Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 CAMELS ARE COMING THE . . . . . .1932 Butter and Egg Man The see Hello Sweetheart . . . . . .1932 CHECKMATE . . . . .1931 CHINESE BUNGALOW THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 CRIMES AT THE DARK HOUSE .1933 CHELSEA NIGHTS . . . .1935 CLAYDONTREASURE MYSTERYTHE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 CASH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 BROKEN BLOSSOMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 COME OUT OF THE PANTRY .1929 COTTON QUEEN . . . . . . .1935 CHARLEY’S (BIG-HEARTED) AUNT 1939 Chauffeur Antoinette see The Love Contract . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 CUPID IN CLOVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 CARRY ON . . . .1933 CLIMBING HIGH . .1935 DANCE OF DEATH THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 BRIGHT EYES . . . . . . .1936 CAPTIVATION . . . . . . . .1935 CHEER BOYS CHEER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 CROSS MY HEART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 CROWN V STEVENS . . . . . . . . . .1938 CHICK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 CHANCE THE IDOL . .1939 CONTRABAND LOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 Chez Louis see Romance A La Carte . .1930 CAN YOU HEAR ME MOTHER? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 CELESTIAL CITY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 BULLDOG DRUMMOND AT BAY . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 CRIMSON CIRCLE THE . . .1934 BURGOMASTER OF STILEMONDE THE 1928 BUSMAN’S HOLIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 DON QUIXOTE . . . . .1936 DAWN . . . . . . . . . .1936 DON’T BE A DUMMY .1936 EVERYTHING HAPPENS TO ME . . . . . . . .1930 ENTER THE QUEEN . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 David Goliath see The Proud Valley . . . .1937 FAUST .1935 ELIZA COMES TO STAY .1934 DID I BETRAY? . . . .1932 FLAT NO 3 . . . . .1928 DEVIL’S ROCK . . . .1936 DOUBLE EVENT THE . . . . . . . .1934 DEATH CROONS THE BLUES . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 EARLY BIRD THE . . . .Alphabetical Title Index DARK JOURNEY . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 DIVORCE OF LADY X THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 EMIL AND THE DETECTIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 ENGLISHMAN’S HOME AN . . . . . . . . . . .1927 DAWN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 FEAR SHIP . . . . . . . . . .1939 FACING THE MUSIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 FIRST OFFENCE . . . . . . . .1934 DEATH ON THE SET . . . . . . . . .1934 EASY RICHES . . . . . . . . . . .1931 EAST MEETS WEST . .1939 DR SIN FANG . . . . .1932 DOWN RIVER . . . . . . . . . . .1935 DEBT OF HONOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 FALSE EVIDENCE . . . .1936 EIGHT CYLINDER LOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 DOSS HOUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 FIRST BORN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 DAUGHTERS OF TODAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 EMERALD OF THE EAST .1932 BFI Information Services 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 DEPUTY DRUMMER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 DEATH AT BROADCASTING HOUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 DIVINE SPARK THE . . . . . . .1935 DERELICT THE . .1933 DICTATOR THE . . .1936 DREAMING LIPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 DOUBLE OR QUITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 DEVIL’S MAZE THE . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 FATHER O’NINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 DON’T GET ME WRONG . . . . . . . .1936 EARLY TO BED . . . .1935 ELSTREE CALLING . . . . . . . . . . .1929 DARK STAIRCASE THE . . . .1932 DRUM THE .1937 DARK WORLD . . . . . .1937 Double Trouble see Double Wedding . . . . .1929 END OF THE ROAD THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 EVERYTHING IN LIFE .1932 DICK TURPIN . . .1935 DUSTY ERMINE . .1927 FLOOD TIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 DOMINANT SEX THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Dubarry see I Give My Heart . .1930 DOWNSTREAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 DIGGING FOR GOLD . .1928 DOWNHILL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 DOUBLE WEDDING . . . . .1936 EXCESS BAGGAGE .1934 FAIR EXCHANGE . . . . . . . . .1928 FATHER AND SON . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 FIRST NIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Encore see Life’s a Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 DR O’DOWD . . . . . .1935 FAITHFUL HEART THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 DARK RED ROSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 DREYFUS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 Emergency see The Awakening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 FINE FEATHERS . .1936 DINNER AT THE RITZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 FAREWELL AGAIN . . . . . . . . .1934 EXPERT’S OPINION . . . . . . . . . .1936 FAITHFULL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 FLAW THE . . .1932 Fleet Street Murder see The Warren Case . . . . .1932 FIFTY SHILLING BOXER . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 FALLING IN LOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 FOLLOW THE LADY . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 EBB TIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 DODGING THE DOLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Farewell to Yesterday see Return to Yesterday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 Eunuch of Stamboul see The Secret of Stamboul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 EVERGREEN . . . . . . . .1934 ETERNAL FEMININE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 FLYING SQUAD THE . . . . . .1935 £5 POUND MAN . .1933 EXCUSE MY GLOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 FLAMES OF FEAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 FLAT NO 9 . . . . . .1934 Flowery Walk The see The Primrose Path . .1933 FLIGHT COMMANDER THE . .1930 FLYING SCOTSMAN THE . . . . . .1932 EASY MONEY . . . .1934 18 MINUTES . . . . . . . .1931 Driven see One Precious Year . . . .1937 DR SYN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 FALLING FOR YOU . . . . . . . . . . .1932 FACE AT THE WINDOW THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 FOLLOW YOUR STAR . . . . . . . . . . .1938 FLYING FOOL THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 DISHONOUR BRIGHT .1936 February 29th see Leave it to Blanche . . . . . . .1932 FIRE HAS BEEN ARRANGED A . . .1938 FATHER STEPS OUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 FLAG LIEUTENANT THE . . . . . . . .1936 Dressed to Kill see His Brother’s Keeper . .1934 EILEEN OF THE TREES . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 DEAD MEN ARE DANGEROUS . . . . . . . . .1937 FOOTLIGHTS . . . . . . .1937 DESIGNING WOMEN . . . . . .1935 FIRE OVER ENGLAND . . . . .1936 Dying to Live see Never Trouble Trouble . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 FIRST MRS ERASER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 EVERYTHING IS RHYTHM . . . . . . . . .1936 ENEMY OF THE POLICE . . . . . .1934 DISCORD . . . . . . . .1933 FIRST A GIRL . . . .1938 DEAD MAN’S SHOES . . . . . . . . . . .1928 ELDER BROTHER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 ESCAPE . . . . . . . . . . .1935 DARTS ARE TRUMPS . . . . . . . .1937 DEATH DRIVES THROUGH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 FIND THE LADY . . . . . .1934 FEATHER YOUR NEST . . . .1936 ELEPHANT BOY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 FARMER’S WIFE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 EDGE OF THE WORLD THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 EDUCATED EVANS . . . .1934 Fall of An Empire see Spy of Napoleon . . . . . .1939 Enter Sir John see Murder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 ESCAPE ME NEVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 FLYING SQUAD THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 FEATHER THE . . . . . .1933 England Through the Ages see Stepping Stones . . . . . . . .1934 EVERYBODY DANCE . . . . .1934 DOUBLE EXPOSURES . . . . . . . . . .1936 EAST OF LUDGATE HILL . . . . . . . .1937 DIRTY WORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 DISCOVERIES . .1936 DOUBLE DEALING . . . . . . .1936 DON’T RUSH ME . . .1934 Fifty-Fifty see Just My Luck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Father see Master and Man .1935 EVERYTHING IS THUNDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Digging Deep see The Man I Want . . . .1935 FLAKE OF LOVE THE . . . . .1930 D’YE KEN JOHN PEEL? . . . . .1935 Forever and Ever FACE AT THE WINDOW THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 FLYING DOCTOR THE . . . . .1933 DOUBLE ALIBI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Deadwater see I Met a Murderer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 FIRE RAISERS THE .1935 DREAM DOCTOR . . . . . . . . . .1927 FASCINATION . . . . . . . . . .1933 DOWN CHANNEL . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 FIRST AND THE LAST THE . .1935 DORA . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 FLYING FIFTY-FIVE THE . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 FLYING SQUAD THE . .1931 FORBIDDEN TERRITORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 DEADLOCK . . . . . . . .1937 FIGHTING STOCK . . . . .1934 FINAL RECKONING THE . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Follow the Sun see Dinner at the Ritz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 FIRES OF FATE . . . . . . .1939 DAVID LIVINGSTONE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 FAREWELL TO CINDERELLA . . . . . . . . . .1937 DIZZY LIMIT THE . . . . . . . .1937 DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT . . . . . .1932 EAST LYMNE ON THE WESTERN FRONT . . . . . .1935 Exit Don Juan see The Private Life of Don Juan . .1937 Death Adds Up see Mr Smith Carries On . . . . . . . . . . .1937 EASY VIRTUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 DOWN OUR ALLEY . . . . .1931 FATAL HOUR THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Footsteps in the Night see A Honeymoon Adventure . . . . . .1934 FOREIGN AFFAIRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Easy Money see Forging Ahead . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 FAKE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Double Trouble see His Wife’s Mother . .1936 DREAMS COME TURE . . . .1933 Fledemaus see Waltz Time .1937 DOCTOR’S ORDERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 FAME . .1934 FATHER O’FLYNN . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 DR JOSSER KC . . . . . . .1936 EVENSONG . . . .1937 DIAL 999 . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 FLAME IN THE HEATHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 FEATHERED SERPENT THE . . .1929 DRAKE OF ENGLAND . .1937 DIAMOND CUT DIAMOND . . .1932 Double Error see The Price of Folly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 DOWN OUR STREET . . . . . . .1933 FACES . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .1936 GUNS OF LOGS THE 1927 GUV’NOR THE . . .1930 Four Dark Hours see The Green Cockatoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 GHOST TRAIN THE . . . . . . . . .1936 GRAND PRIX . . . . . . . .1931 GENTLEMAN’S AGREEMENT . . . . . .1931 GREAT STUFF . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Henry IX see The Public Life of Henry IX . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 HEIRLOOM MYSTERY THE .1934 FULL SPEED AHEAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 HER LAST AFFAIRE . . . . . . . . . .1932 FOR LOVE OF YOU .1927 GABLES MYSTERY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 HIS LORDSHIP GOES TO PRESS . . . . . . . . .1933 Guest Reporter The see Hot News .1932 GOOD MORNING BOYS! . . . . . . . .1928 GENTLEMAN OF PARIS A . . . . . . . .1935 HERE’S GEORGE . . . . . . . . .1934 GIRL IN THE FLAT THE . . . . . . . . . .1931 FPI . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 HIS GRACE GIVES NOTICE .1936 Forever England see Brown On Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 FUNNY FACE .1937 HAWLEYS OF HIGH STREET . . . . . . . . . . .1939 Help see Leave It to Me . . . .1928 FOR VALOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 GHOUL . .1933 Gentleman in Black The see Black Mask . . . . . . . . .1929 HIKING WITH MADEMMOISELLE 1933 HINDLE WAKES . . .1937 GAOL BREAK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 GHOST GOES WEST THE . . . . . . . . . . .1934 GIRL WHO FORGOT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 GIRL MUST LIVE A . . . . . . . . . . .1927 FOR VALOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 FRENCH WITHOUT TEARS .1938 FULL STEAM . . . . . .1936 GREAT DEFENDER THE . .1933 GREAT BARRIER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 GANGWAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 GOING STRAIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Great Divide see The Great Barrier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 GUILT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 GAY ADVENTURE THE . . . . . .1936 Goodness How Sad see Return to Yesterday . . .1932 BFI Information Services 101 . . .Alphabetical Title Index see Jump for Glory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 GHOSTS OF YESTERDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 High Explosive see I’m an Explosive . . . . . . . .1935 HELL’S CARGO . . . . . . . . . .1936 HAIL AND FAREWELL . . . . . . . .1937 GREEN PACK THE . . . . . . . . . .1933 Head Waiter The see Service For Ladies . . . . .1935 GYPSY . .1934 Here Comes the Band see Sharps and Flats .1936 HEATWAVE . .1935 HEARTS OF HUMANITY . . . . . . .1931 HIS BROTHER’S KEEPER . . . .1933 Four Winds see the Strangler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 His Majesty’s Pyjamas see Love In Exile .1936 His Night Out see Their Night Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 HIGH SOCIETY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 FORGER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 HEADS WE GO . . .1936 Gay Lord Strathpeffer see Guest of Honour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 GIRL IN THE TAXI THE . . .1935 HER MIGHT OUT . .1935 Hands Off see East Meets West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 GOD’S CLAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 FROG THE . . . . . . .1928 GAME OF CHANCE A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Healer of Souls see Castle Sinister . . .1936 GYPSY MELODY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 GAUNT STRANGER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 FOUR MASKED MEN . . . . . . . .1933 GIPSY BLOOD . . . . .1936 FULL SPEED AHEAD . . . .1931 Gang see Crime Over London . . . . . . . . .1939 His Excellency Mr Cupid see How’s Chances . . . . . . . . . . .1932 FRAIL WOMEN . . . . . . .1928 FORGET-ME-NOT . . . . .1932 HER REPUTATION . . .1934 GIRL IN THE NIGHT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 HIGHLAND FLING .1935 Her Man of Destiny see Little Napoleon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 HEAD OFFICE . . . . . . . . . . .1930 GREEN COCKATOO THE . . .1935 HAPPY ENDING THE . . . . .1931 GLAMOUR GIRL . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 GRAND FINALE . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 GIVE HER A RING . . . . . .1932 His Promise see A Game of Chance HIS WIFE’S MOTHER . . . . . . . . .1928 GIRLS PLEASE! . . . . . . . .1936 HIGH SEAS . .1931 FREEDOM OF THE SEAS . . . . . . .1937 HEY! HEY1 USA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 GUILTY MELODY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 HIS LORDSHIP REGRETS . . . . .1934 GAY OLD DOG . . . . . . . . .1936 GANG’S ALL HERE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .! . . . .1931 He Was Her Man see We’re Going to be Rich . . . . . .1935 GENTLEMAN JIM . . .1934 GIRLS WILL BE BOYS . .1933 HAPPY DAYS ARE HERE AGAIN . .1935 Gay Reality see Luck of the Turf . . . . . .1933 Her Master’s Voice see Two Heart’s in Harmony . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 HATE SHIP THE . . .1935 GET YOUR MAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 HELP YOURSELF . .1933 Fortune Hunter The see The Gallant Hussar . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Get Out Of It see Stormy Weather . . . . . . .1935 Happy Fugitive see You’re the Doctor .1932 HAPPY FAMILY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 GREAT GAME THE . . . . . . . . . . .1934 FRENCH LEAVE . . . .1937 GLIMPSE OF PARADISE A . . . . . . . .1936 HELLCAT THE . . . .1928 GOING GAY . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 General Goes Too Far The see The High Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 GOOD COMPANIONS THE . . . . . . . .1933 GOODBYE MR CHIPS . . . . .1938 Girl of To-day A see Love’s Option . . .1927 GHOST TRAIN THE . . .1934 GUEST OF HONOUR . . . .1931 GIRL FROM MAXIM’S THE . . . . . . . .1939 GET OFF MY FOOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 FRENCH LEAVE .1927 HELLO SWEETHEART . . .1937 FOUR FEATHERS THE . . .1937 From the Dark Stairway see The Dark Staircase . . . . . .1933 HEAD OVER HEELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 HIGH TREASON .1938 Hide and I’ll Find You see It’s a Bet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 HIS HOUSE IN ORDER .1927 HIS LORDSHIP . . . . .1932 GOLDEN CAGE THE . .1938 GANG SHOW THE . . . . .1932 HARMONY HEAVEN .1938 Good As New see As Good AS New . .1932 FORTUNATE FOOL THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 FROZEN LIMITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 FRIGHTENED LADY THE . . . . . . . . .1931 HAPPY EVER AFTER . . . . . . . . . .1933 GAY LOVE . . . . . . . . . .1934 HIGH COMMAND THE . . . . . . .1934 GHOST CAMERA THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 FULL CIRCLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 GREEK STREET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 GREAT GAY ROAD THE . . . . . . . . .1939 FRIDAY THE THIRTEENTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 French Salad see The Happy Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 GENERAL JOHN REGAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 FORGING AHEAD . . . .1934 Giving You the Stars see Give Her a Ring .1939 GOODNIGHT VIENNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 GOOD OLD DAYS THE . . . . . . . . . . .1932 HER IMAGINARY LOVER . . . . . .1929 Have You Come for Me? see You Live and Learn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 HEAD OF THE FAMILY . . . . . . .1936 HAPPY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Full Tilt see Knights For A Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 HER FIRST AFFAIRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 FOUR JUST MEN THE . . . .1938 Goodwin Sands see Lady from the Sea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 GENTLEMAN’S GENTLEMAN A 1938 Gestapo see Night Train to Munich . . . . .1933 HIGH FINANCE . . . . . . .1935 FURTHER ADVENTURES OF THE FLAG LIEUTENANT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 HANDLE WITH CARE . . . . . . . . . 1933 FOR THE LOVE OF MIKE .1937 GLAMOUR . . . . .1934 GLAMOROUS NIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 HEART’S DESIRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Girl Was Young The see Young and Innocent . . . . .1938 HIS MAJESTY AND COMPANY . . . . . . .1934 Fourth Wife of Henry VIII The see The Private Life of Henry VIII . . . . . . . . . . .1938 Happy go Lucky see Where Is This Lady .1936 Fourth Wall The see Birds of Prey . . . . . . .1932 GIRL IN THE CROWD THE . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Full Steam Ahead see Full Speed Ahead . . . . . .1932 HEROES OF THE MINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 GALLANT HUSSAR THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 IT’S IN THE BLOOD . .1936 HOUSE OF TRENT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 I ADORE YOU . . . . . . . . . . .1932 IMPORTANT PEOPLE . . . . . .1938 I GIVE MY HEART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Josser Goes to Sea see Josser Joins the Navy . .1936 HOTEL SPLENDIDE . .1930 IMMORTAL GENTLEMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 INSPECTOR HORNLEIGH ON HOLIDAY .1937 I SPY . . . .1936 KNIGHT WITHOUT ARMOUR . . . . .1938 KEEP YOUR SEATS PLEASE . .1928 INSIDE THE ROOM . .1934 IRON DUKE THE . . .1936 KING’S CUP . . .1933 KICKING THE MOON AROUND . .1933 JIMMY BOY . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 ‘K’ Formula The see The Right to Live . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 I KILLED THE COUNT . . . . . . . .1928 HOUSE BROKEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 JUNO AND THE PAYCOCK . . . . . . .1935 JOKER THE . . .1931 KEEP FIT . .1935 KING OF THE DAMNED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 HYDE PAKK CORNER . . . . . . . .1928 JENNIFER HALE . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 KNIGHT IN LONDON A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 HOUSE OF THE SPANIARD THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 IRON STAIR THE .1932 KINGDOM OF TWILIGHT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 I’M AN EXPLOSIVE . . . .1935 JUGGERNAUT . . . . . . . . . . .1932 KATE PLUS TEN .1937 IN THE SOUP . . .1936 KNOWING MEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 I SEE ICE 1937 Island Fling see Tropical Trouble . .1936 INTIMATE RELATIONS . . .1936 House Full see Dr Josser KC . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 KEY TO HARMONY . . . . . .1934 Introspection see The Warning . .1930 HOUSE OF THE ARROW THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alphabetical Title Index HOBSON’S CHOICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 KING SOLOMON’S MINES . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 HOUP-LA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Intermezzo see Youthful Folly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Kongo Raid see Sanders of the River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 IF I WERE BOSS . . . . . . .1934 INVITATION TO THE WALTZ . . . . . . . . .1927 King’s Mate see The White Sheik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 JANE STEPS OUT . . . . .1939 INSULT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 JUST WILLIAM . . . . . .1927 Josiah Steps Out see That’s My Wife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 In the Money see Easy Riches . . . . . .1939 JAMAICA INN . . . . . . . . . . .1936 INTERRUPTED HONEYMOON THE 1936 Interval For Romance see The Street Singer . . . .1936 If You Had a Million see The Second Mr Bush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 HUNTINGTOWER . . . . . . . . . .1933 Jewel Song The see Facing the Music . . . . . . . . .1938 JOHN HALIFAX GENTLEMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 I’VE GOT A HORSE . . . . . . . . . .1927 INQUEST .1937 Johnson’s Stores see Bargain Basement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 JOSSER ON THE FARM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .l934 INTRUDERS THE . .1933 BFI Information Services 102 . . . .1931 JEEVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 HOUSE OPPOSITE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 JUST LIKE A WOMAN . . . . .1936 HOW HE LIED TO HER HUSBAND . . . . . . . . .1933 KEEP SMILING . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 KING OF HEARTS . . .1936 HUNDRED TO ONE A . .1937 IT’S NOT CRICKET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 HOOTS MON .1931 HONEYMOON FOR THREE .1937 It’s Not Me Its Him see It’s In the Bag .1933 IMPROPER DUCHESS THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 HOWARD CASE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 I MET A MURDERER . . . . .1935 Island Man see West of Kerry . . .1937 KEEP IT QUIET . . .1935 KING OF THE RITZ .1939 I LIVED WITH YOU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 IT’S A BOY . . . . .1928 Knight Errant The see The Girl in the Night .1936 IT’S A KING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 I’m Not Rich see Mistaken Identity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 HYDE PARK . . . . . . . .1936 It’s no Use Crying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 INFAMOUS ARMY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 I Lost My Heart in Old Heidelberg see The Student’s Romance . .1936 IRISH FOR LUCK . . . .1938 IT’S IN THE BAG . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 INVADER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 HOUSE OF THE ARROW THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 KING OF THE WHALES THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 HOW’S CHANCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 HOME SWEET HOME . . . . . . . . . . .1931 HOLD MY HAND . . .1928 INFORMER THE . . . . . . . . . . .1934 INTERNATIONAL REVUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 IN A MONASTERY GARDEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 KARMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 HONOURS EASY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 JEALOUSY . . . . . . .1937 HOUSE OF DREAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Humpty Dumpty see If I Were Rich .1933 JACK OF ALL TRADES . . . .1935 In Pawn see Women In Pawn . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Josser Joins the Army see Josser in the Army . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 I’LL STICK TO YOU . . . . . . . .1928 JUBILEE WINDOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 JOY RIDE . . . . .1934 KING OF THE CASTLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 JUST FOR A SONG . . . . . . .1939 IMMEDIATE POSSESSION . . . . . . . . . . .1938 HOLIDAY LOVERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 IT’S NEVER TOO LATE TO MEND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 JEWEL THE . . . . . . . .1928 Intruder The see The Invader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 Husbands Don’t Care see Merely Mr Hawkins .1936 IRISH HEARTS . . . . . . . . . .1935 Juan Jose see Life . . .1937 KATHLEEN MAVOUREEN .1934 JOSSER ON THE RIVER . . . .1937 INDISCRETIONS OF EVE . . . . . . .1929 HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES THE . . . . . . . . .1929 INNOCENTS OF CHICAGO THE . .1937 IN TOWN TONIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 HOME FROM HOME . . . . . . .1938 IF I WERE RICH . . .1932 INCIDENT IN SHANGHAI . . . .1937 Husband in Law see Law and Disorder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 JAILBIRDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 KING’S HIGHWAY THE . . . .1933 IT’S A COP . . .1932 IT’S IN THE AIR . . . . . . . . . .1936 KEEPERS OF YOUTH . . . . . . .1939 Horse see Song of the Road . . . . .1930 KITTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Iron Woman The see That’s My Uncle . . . . . .1933 I CLAUDIUS . . . . . . .1929 JURY’S EVIDENCE . . . . . . . . . . .1935 IRELAND TODAY AND YESTERDAY 1928 IRISH AND PROUD OF IT . . . . . . . . .1937 JUST MY LUCK . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 IT’S A BET . . . . . . .1932 HOLIDAY’S END . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Job 1159 see Full Speed Ahead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 ISLAND NATION AN . . . . . .1936 KISSING CUP RACE . .1931 INQUEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 HOUSE OF UNREST THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 KISS ME SERGEANT . .1933 ILLEGAL . .1932 JOURNEY’S END .1934 IMPASSIVE FOOTMAN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 JACK AHOY! . . . . . . . . .1938 HONEYMOON ADVENTURE A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 HOUSEMASTER . . .1936 JUMP FOR GLORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 IT’S YOU I WANT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 JOSSER JOINS THE NAVY . . .1935 Irresistable Marmaduke The see Oh What a Night! . . . . . . .1935 Jack o’ Lantern see Condemned to Reach . . .1933 IT HAPPENED IN PARIS . . . . . . . .1935 INSPECTOR HORNLEIGH . .1933 HOUSE OF SILENCE THE . . . . . . . .1938 JAVA HEAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 KING OF PARIS THE .1936 KENTUCKY MINSTRELS .1927 Kiss and Make Up see She Knew What She Wanted . . .1937 IT’S A GRAND OLD WORLD . . .1933 It’s a Fair Cop see Leave it to Me . . . . . see Miracles do Happen .1933 JEW SUSS . . . . . . . . .1933 HOMME DE LA SUIT L’ . . . . . .1937 Kingdom for Five and Six a see The Lucky Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 KOENIGSMARK . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 KNIGHTS FOR A DAY . .1932 JUST SMITH . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 JERICHO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 JOSSER IN THE ARMY . . . . .1939 INSEPARABLES THE . . . . .1938 I WAS A SPY . . . . . . .1935 IN A LOTUS GARDEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 JACK’S THE BOY . .1932 HOT NEWS . . . .

.1934 LOVE NEST THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 LUCKY JADE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 LOVE ON THE SPOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 LADY IS WILLING THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 LORD BABS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 LUCK OF THE NAVY .1938 LUCKY BLAZE . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 LOST PATROL THE . . . . .1937 LAST TIDE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 LAST COUPON THE . . .1936 LOVE AT SECOND SIGHT . . . . . . .1936 LAND WITHOUT LADIES . . . . . . . .1928 LAST ROSE OF SUMMER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 LOOK UP AND LAUGH . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 LINE ENGAGED . . . . . . . . . .1930 LEAVE IT TO ME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 LAST BARRICADE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 LAST WALTZ THE . . . . .1935 MAN OUTSIDE THE . . . .1931 LIMPING MAN THE . . . . . . . .1938 LITTLE FELLA .Alphabetical Title Index LABURNUM GROVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 MADAME POMPADOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 LEAVE IT TO BLANCHE . . . . . . . . . . .1933 LURE OF THE ATLANTIC . . . . . . . . . .1930 Love Insurance see Glamour Girl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Limping Man The see Creeping Shadows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 La Boheme see Mimi . . . . . . . .1936 London Wall see After Office Hours . .1932 Lucky Star see Once in A New Moon . . . .1932 LITTLE DEVIL MAY CARE . . . . . . .1935 MAN WHO COULD WORK MIRACLES THE . . . . .1929 LAND WITHOUT MUSIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 LATE EXTRA . . . . . . . . .1935 Life of Schubert The see Blossom Tine . . . . . . . .1935 MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH THE . .1929 LIGHTNING CONDUCTOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 LILY OF KILLARNEY . . . . . . . . . . .1935 LAST POST THE . . . . . .1931 LITTLE WAITRESS . . . . . .1932 Lights Out Please see Save a Little Sunshine . . . . . . . . . . .1938 LOVES OF ROBERT BURNS THE . . . . .1935 LUCKY GIRL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 LIEUTENANT DARING RN . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 LAST HOUR THE . . . . .1928 LILAC DOMINO THE . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 LOST CHORD THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 LASH THE . .1933 MAID HAPPY . . . . . . . . .1934 MAN THEY COULDN’T ARREST THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 LADY FROM THE SEA THE .1934 LORD OF THE MANOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 LONDON MELODY . . . . . . . .1931 LORD CAMBER’S LADIES . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 LITTLE BIT OF FLUFF A . . . .1929 LYONS MAIL THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 MAN FROM CHICAGO THE . . .1937 LONDON MELODY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 LOVE AT SEA . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 MAN AT SIX THE . . . . . . . . . .1936 Lilies of the Field see Betty in Mayfair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 LOVE-MIRTH-MELODY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 MAN OF ARAN . . . . . .1939 LIVE WIRE THE . . .1932 MAN IN THE MIRROR THE . . . .1928 LOVE TEST THE . . .1937 LETTING IN THE SUNSHINE . .1932 LITTLE FRIEND . .1933 LOVE’S OPTION . . . . .1936 LAD THE . .1933 LION HAS WINGS THE . . . .1938 LAMBETH WALK THE . .1934 LEST WE FORGET . . . . . . .1934 LEAVE IT TO ME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 MANNEQUIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 LUCKY TO ME . .1933 Lady Jane Grey see Tudor Rose . . .1933 LILY OF LAGUNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 LIVE AGAIN . . .1933 LUCK OF THE IRISH THE . .1938 Light Fingered Freddy see Taking Ways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 LODGER THE . . . . . .1938 LANCASHIRE LUCK . . . . .1932 LUCKY LOSER . . .1927 LITTLE DOLLY DAYDREAM . . . . .1933 MAID OF THE MOUNTAINS THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 LOVE HABIT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 LUCKY NUMBER THE . . .1937 LIVING DANGEROUSLY . . . . .1936 LOVE LIES . . . . . . .1934 LET GEORGE DO IT1 . . . .1930 LAST JOURNEY THE . . . . .1934 BFI Information Services 103 . . .1939 Lullaby see Forget-Me-Not . . . . . .1931 Lover’s Knot see Jane Steps Out . .1927 LANDSLIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Lie Detector The see Who Killed John Savage . .1934 LIFE OF THE PARTY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 LAUGHTER OF FOOLS THE . . . . . . . . . .1936 Live and Let Live see Spy for a DaY . . . .1934 LADY OF THE LAKE THE . . . . . . .1938 Lose Lord The see Girls Will Be Boys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 LOOSE ENDS . . . . .1937 MAKE UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Lady of Pendower The see Breaker’s Ahead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 LOVE CONTRACT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 MAN IN THE SADDLE . . . . . . . .1934 McGLUSKY THE SEA ROVER . . .1931 “Mac” see Rolling Home . . . . .1932 Maid to Order see Maid Happy . . . . . . . . . . .1928 MAN I WANT THE .1928 LITTLE MISS NOBODY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 MADEMOISELLE PARLEY VOO . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 LITTLE MISS SOMEBODY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 LUCKY LADIES . . . . . . . . .1931 MAN WHO CHANGED HIS MIND THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 Love and Lee Love see Sleeping Car .1937 Mademoiselle From Araentieres see Mademoiselle Parley Voo . . . .1928 LADY VANISHES THE . . . . . . . . . . .1933 LITTLE STRANGER . . .1932 LONDONDERRY AIR THE . . . . . . . . .1933 LUCK OF A SAILOR THE . . . .1934 LIFE’S A STAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 LITTLE BIT OF FLUFF A . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 LONG LIVE THE KING .1934 LITTLE DAMOZEL THE . . . . . . . . .1935 LAZYBONES . . . . . . . . .1932 LOVE FROM A STRANGER . . . . . . . . . .1937 Legal Murder see The Man Without a Face . . . .1939 Laying of the Gourie Ghost The see The Ghost Goes West .1929 Luxury see Bright Eyes . .1932 LOVE RACE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 Man From MI5 see Secret Journey . . . . .1932 LET’S BE FAMOUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 LAND OF HOPE AND GLORY . . . .1932 LORD EDGEWARE DIES . . .1934 LOVE UP THE POLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 LASSIE FROM LANCASHIRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 LIMELIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 MAN BEHIND THE MASK THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 LITTLE MISS LONDON .1928 MAD HATTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 LOYALTIES . . . .1934 Lovelorn Lady The see The Perfect Lady . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 LET’S LOVE AND LAUGH .1934 MACUSHLA . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 LET’S MAKE A NIGHT OF IT . . . .1932 LEAVE IT TO ME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 LILY CHRISTINE . . . . . . . . .1937 MADAME GUILLOTINE . . . . . . . .1934 Little Tommy Tucker see Out of the Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 LILY OF KILLARNEY .1933 LORD RICHARD’S PANTRY . . . . . .1935 LAUGH IT OFF . . . . . .1937 LITTLE NAPOLEON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 MAN OF MAYFAIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 LAST CURTAIN THE . .1933 LUCKY DAYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Man Save The Queen see Lady in Danger . . .1936 MAN WHO CHANGED HIS NAME THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 LAW AND DISORDER . . . . . .1935 LUCK OF THE NAVY . . . .1929 LOVE’S OLD SWEET SONG . . .1935 Lion and Lamb see The River Wolves . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 LOVE LIFE AND LAUGHTER . . . . .1932 LOVE ON WHEELS . .1935 LEND ME YOUK WIFE . . . . . .1933 LOST IN THE LEGION . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 LURE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 MADEMOISELLE DOCTEUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 LUCKY SWEEP A . . . .1935 Magenta Street see Money Talks .1938 LAST ADVENTURERS THE . .1938 LIGHT WOMAN A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 LADY IN DANGER . . . . . . .1934 Man Who Could Not Forget see Debt of Honour . . . . . .1933 MAKE IT THREE . . .1928 MAN WHO CHANGED HIS NAME THE . .1932 LONELY ROAD THE . . . .1930 LORNA DOONE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 MAN OF THE MOMENT . . .1938 LAST CHANCE THE . .1932 LOOKING ON THE BRIGHT SIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Lost Lady see The Lady Vanishes .1936 LOVE WAGER THE . . . . . .1937 LOVE IN EXILE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 LET ME EXPLAIN DEAR . . .1935 LEND ME YOUR HUSBAND .1932 Magistrate The see Those Were the Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 MAN FROM TORONTO THE . . . .

. . . . . .1937 MIRACLES DO HAPPEN . . .1933 MURDER BY ROPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 ME AND MARLBOROUGH . . . . . .1932 MIDSHIPMAN EASY . . . . . . .1937 Missing From Home see Missing Believed Married . . . . . . . .1935 MIKADO THE . . . .1934 MURDER AT THE CABARET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Meet the Duchess see Irish For Luck . . . . . . . . . .1930 Navvy see A Real Bloke . .1934 Navy Eternal The see Our Fighting Navy . . . .1936 MURDER ON THE SECOND FLOOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 MOULIN ROUGE . .1933 Medicine Man the see Doctor’s Orders . .1938 NIGHT BIRDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 MEMBER OF THE JURY . .1939 MR WHAT’S-HIS-NAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 MARRY ME . . .1939 MEET MR PENNY . . . . . . . . . . .1932 New Year’s Eve see Indiscretions of Eve . . . . . . . . . .1933 MAN WITHOUT A FACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 MURDER IN SOHO . . .1938 NIGHT IN MONTMARTRE A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FLOSS 1936 MIMI . . . . .1936 MEN LIKE THESE . . . . . . . . .1935 MY IRISH MOLLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Mr Reeder Comes Back see Missing People . . .1937 Music and Mystery see The Singing Cop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 MY HEART IS CALLING YOU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 MELODY OF MY HEART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 NIGHT PORTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 NELL GWYNN . . . . . . . . .1937 MR STRINGFELLOW SAYS NO . . .1939 Mitey Man A see Where’s George? . . .1935 MONEY FOR NOTHING . . . . . . . . . . .1937 MR SMITH CARRIES ON . . .1933 MURDER TOMORROW . . . .1939 MIDNIGHT MENACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 MORALS OF MARCUS THE . . . . .1937 Museum Peace see Museum Mystery . . . .1936 MILL ON THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 Murder Action The see Body Vanishes The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 Narkover see Boys Will Be Boys . . . . .1938 Milky Way The see The Innocents of Chicago . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 MANY WATERS . . . . . . . . . .1936 MELODY AND ROMANCE . . . . . 1934 MILLIONS . . . .1934 MRS DANE’S DEFENCE . . . . . . . . . .1939 MISSING REMBRANDT THE . . . . . . .1933 MRS PYM OF SCOTLAND YARD . . . . . .1933 NIGHT PATROL .1934 MR COHEN TAKES A WALK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 MIDAS TOUCH THE . .1935 MOTHERLAND . . . . . . . . .1938 MAROONED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 NIGHT MAIL . . .1927 MR QUINCY OF MONTB CARLO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 NAUGHTY CINDERELLA . .1937 MERRY COMES TO TOWN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Mr Reeder Sees it Through see Mr Reeder in Room 13 . .1931 MISTAKEN IDENTITY . . . . . . . . . . .1934 MY PARTNER MR DAVIS . . .1931 MISSING BELIEVED MARRIED . . . . . . . . . . .1937 MURDER WILL OUT . . . . . . . . . .1934 Money by Wire see Get Off My Foot . .1938 MINSTREL BOY THE . . . . . . .1931 Money for Nothing see Blind Folly . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 MOUNTAINS O’ MOURNE . .1934 My Heart’s Delight see Heart’s Desire . . .1939 NIGHT OF THE GARTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 NIGHT CLUB QUEEN . . .1937 MENACE . . . . . . . .1931 NIGHT JOURNEY . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 MIDSHIPMAID THE . . . .1936 Murder Gang see Sensation . . .1931 Men of Darkness see Heroes of the Mine .1935 MUSIC MAKER . . .1933 Never Go Home see Irish and Proud of It . . .1931 My Wife’s Husband see Weekend Wives . .1934 Night of the Fire The see On the Night of the Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 MIDNIGHT AT MADAME TUSSAUDS . . .1932 MONKEY NUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 MEM ARE NOT GODS . . . . . .1937 Murder In The Stalls see Not Wanted On Voyage . . . . . . .1935 Mr Faintheart see All at Sea . . . .1934 Mops see Born Lucky . . . . . .1936 MURDER IN COVENT GARDEN . . . . . . . . .1932 MEN OF YESTERDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 MOSCOW NIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Milky Way The see The King of Paris . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 MEDICINE MAN THE . . . .1937 Mr Walker Wants to Know see What Would You do Chums . . . . 1929 BFI Information Services 104 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 NIGHT OF THE PARTY THE . . . . . . . .1937 MICHAEL AND MARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 MIDDLE WATCH THE . . . . . . . . . . .1932 MEN OF STEEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 MIXED DOUBLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 MR SATAN . .1934 MR NOBODY . . . .931 MARIA MARTEN .1936 Never Come Back see Just Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 MAYOR’S NEST THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 MONTE CARLO MADNESS . . . . .1936 MUTINY OF THE ELSINORE . . . . . .1938 Match Point see Darts are Trumps . . .Alphabetical Title Index MAN WHO HADE DIAMONDS THE 1937 Man With a Million The see Salthy . .1933 MARRIAGE BOND THE . .1936 MEN WITHOUT HONOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Moorland Terror see Road to Fortune The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 MISSING PEOPLE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 MOTORING .1937 NEVER TROUBLE TROUBLE . . . . .1936 MANXMAN THE . . . . . .1939 MUSEUM MYSTERY . . . . . . .1927 MOUNTAIN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 MERELY MR HAWKINS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 MIDDLE WATCH THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 NAUGHTY HUSBANDS . . . .1938 MY LUCKY STAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 MONEY HAD . . . . . . . . . .1937 MUSIC HALL . . .1938 MEET MY SISTER . . . . . .1938 Mummers The see My Old Duchess . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 NEW HOTEL THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Murder Party The see The Night of the Party . . . . . . . .1939 MUSIC HATH CHARMS . . . . . . .1935 Mr Hopkinson see Rolling In Money . . . . . .1936 Never too Late to Mend see Its Never too Late to Mend . . . .1927 MARIA MARTEN . . . . . . . . .1938 MURDER IN THE FAMILY . . . . . . .1933 MY OLD DUCHESS .1929 MASTER AND MAN . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 MATINEE IDOL . .1934 Nelson Touch The see His Lordship . . . . . . .1934 MEET MAXWELL ARCHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 NIGHT LIKE THIS A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Murder Pact see The Riverside Murder . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 MASTER AND MAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Money In the Air see Radio Pirates . 1935 Mary Was Love see Those Who Love . . .1939 MIDNIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Mayfair see The Infamous Lady . .1936 Midnight Mail see The Spider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 MONEY MEANS NOTHING . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 MY SONG GOES ROUND THE WORLD . .1935 MY WIFE’S FAMILY . . . . . . .1934 ME AND MY PAL . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 NIGHT ALONE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 MY OLD DUTCH . . . . 1928 MANY TANKS MR ATKINS . . . . . . .1933 MUMSIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 MURDER AT THE INN . . . . .1939 MISCHIEF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 MYSTERY OF THE MARIE CELESTE THE . . . . . .1934 MUSIC HALL PARADE . . . . . .1939 MONEY FOR SPEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 MAYTAIR GIRL . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 MARRIAGE OF CORBAL THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 NIGHT FREIGHT .1935 Natacha see Moscow Nights . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 MARIGOLD . . . .1939 MURDER AT MONTE CARLO . . . . . .1932 MONEY TALKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 MIND OF MR READER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 MAYFAIR MELODY .1931 MISTER CINDERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 MOONLIGHT SONATA . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 MEN OF TOMORROW . . . . . . .1939 MR BILL THE CONQUEROR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 MARRY THE GIRL . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 MR REEDER IN ROOM 13 . . . .1933 Monday at Ten see Money Mad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 MELODY MAKERS . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Man With Your Voice see Talk of the Devil . . . . . . .1937 MY FRIEND THE KING .1933 MASTER OF SOULS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Midnight Special see Midnight Menace . . .1927 MURDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 MY SONG FOR YOU . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 PARADISE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 NO LIMIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 PLAYTHING THE . . . .1937 PEEP BEHIND THE SCENES A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Press Gang see Shadows . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 OHMS . . . . . . . . . .1932 BFI Information Services 105 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Please Teacher see Things Are Looking Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 OWD BOB . .1935 Orders are Orders see Orders is Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Peace in our Time see The Silent Battle . . . . . .1936 OPENING NIGHT . . . . . .1931 PRICE OF A SONG THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 PRICE OF DIVORCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 ONCE IN A NEW MOON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 NOT WANTED ON VOYAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 OUT OF THE PAST . . . . .1936 ON APPROVAL . . . . . . . .1937 Playing The Game see It’s A Grand Old World . . . .1929 PRIDE OF THE FORCE THE . . . . . . . . . . .1931 OUR FIGHTING NAVY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 PICCADILLY PLAYTIME . . . .1939 PEARLS BRING TEARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 PRISON WITHOUT BARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 POPPIES OF FLANDERS . . . . .1935 NON-STOP NEW YORK .1935 OH BOY! . . . . .1933 Princess Priscilla’s Fortnight see The Runaway Princess The Rake see She was Only a Village Maid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 NOT SO QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT . . . . .1937 PARIS PLANE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 On Guard in the Mediterranean see Hell’s Cargo . . . . . . . . .1934 Northing Tramp see Strangers On A Honeymoon . . . .1930 PRICE OF WISDOM THE . . . . . .1934 ONE FAMILY . . . .1932 PURSE STRINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 PENNY POOL THE . . . . . . . . .1934 OH WHAT A NIGHT! . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 OLD MOTHER RILEY . . . . . . . .1933 OVER THE MOON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Norwich Victims see Dead Men Tell No Tales . . .1934 PUBLIC NUISANCE NO 1 . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 PAGLIACCI . . . . . .1928 PICCADILLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII THE . . . . . . . . . .1935 Pelican The see The Sacrifice . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Penny Wise see Penny Paradise .1937 OVER THE GARDEN WALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 PROFESSIONAL GUEST THE . . .1937 OLD CURIOSITY SHOP THE . . . . . . . .1936 NUMBER PLEASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 PRIVATE SECRETARY THE .1934 PRINCE OF ARCADIA .1936 Playboy The see Paradise for Two . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 OVER SHE GOES . . . . . .1935 One in a Million see For Love of You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 PASSING OF THE THIRD FLOOR BACK THE . . . . . . . . . .1935 ONCE BITTEN . . . . . . . . .1928 PAL O’ MINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 PEACE AND QUIET . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 OKAY FOR SOUND . . . . . . .1933 PYGMALION . . . . . . . .1936 RADIO PARADE . . . . . . . .1939 ON SECRET SERVICE . . . .1935 OLD IRON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 ON THE TOP OF THE WORLD . . . . . . . . . .1933 ORDERS IS ORDERS . . . . . .1931 NURSEMAID WHO DISAPPEARED THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 OUTSIDER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 QUEEN WAS IN THE PARLOUR THE . . . . .1931 PARADISE FOR TWO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 PALAIS DE DANSE .1936 PRICE OF THINGS THE . . . . . . . . . .1938 PYJAMAS PREFERRED . . . . . . . . .1928 PRICE OF FOLLY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 PARADISE ALLEY . . .1931 PC JOSSER . . .1932 PERFECT UNDERSTANDING . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 PRIDE OF DONEGAL THE . . .1939 Nine Day Blunder see Cross Currents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 Odds On Love The see Two On A Doorstop . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 OFFICERS’ MESS THE . .1939 OLD MOTHER RILEY MP . .1934 OUT OF THE BLUE . . . . . . .1938 OBVIOUS SITUATION AN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 NIPPER THE .1931 OFFICE WIFE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 PICCADILLY NIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 PHYSICIAN THE . . . . . . .1934 Official Secret see Spies of the Air . . . .1938 QUIET PLEASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 PEG OF OLD DRURY . . . . .1931 Perfect Service see Money Means Nothing . .1927 RACING ROMANCE . . . . .1933 ONE OF THE BEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 RADIO LOVER . . . . .1934 PASSION ISLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 NUMBER SEVENTEEN . . .1935 NINE FORTY-FIVE . . . . . . . . .1934 One Crazy Week see Annie Leave the Room! .1937 NIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH . .1931 PROUD VALLEY THE . . . .1933 Other Men’s Women see Murder at the Inn . . . . . . . . .1939 POLITICAL PARTY A . . .1931 Pyjama Nights in Paris see Pyjamas Preferred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 OH NO DOCTOR! . . . . . . . .1936 OLD BONES OF THE RIVER . . . . . . . . . .1930 ONE GOOD TURN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 OLD ROSES . . . . . . . . . .1935 OLD SOLDIERS NEVER DIE . . .1930 OLD SPANISH CUSTOMERS . .1936 NO EXIT . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 OFF THE DOLE . . . . . . . . .1933 POOR OLD BILL . .1928 NOT SO DUSTY . . . . . . .1933 Parson the see The Bells of St Mary’s . . . .1935 PUPPETS OF FATE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 OH MR PORTER! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 PLEASE TEACHER . . .1935 Private Wives see That’s My Wife . . . . . . . . . . .1936 ODD HAM THE . . . . . . . .1930 Queen The see The Queen’s Affair 1933 QUEEN OF HEARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 NUMBER SEVENTEEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 OUTCAST THE . . . . . .1933 POISON PEN . . . . . . . . . .1936 PLAYBOX ADVENTURE . .1938 PRIVATE LIFE OF DON JUAN THE . . .1927 PATH OF GLORY THE . . . . . . . . . .1929 PASSENGER TO LONDON . . . .1927 QUEER CARGO . .1927 ONE PRECIOUS YEAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 POTIPHAR’S WIFE . . . . . .1936 OURSELVES ALONE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 PAID IN ERROR . . .1933 Prince of Bolivar see Bolibar . .1931 No 7 Blank Square see Bed and Breakfast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 NO PARKING . . . . . .1932 PRISON BREAKER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 PHANTOM LIGHT THE .1934 Oh Listen to the Band see She Shall Have Music . . . . . . .1934 No Escape see Secret Lives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 NO MONKEY BUSINESS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 ONCE IN A MILLION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 PRIMROSE PATH THE . .1937 OH DADDY! . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 Press Button B see Twin Faces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 POT LUCK . . . . . . . . . .1937 Pace see Smashing Through . . . . . . . . . .1937 POINTING FINGER THE . .Alphabetical Title Index NIGHT RIDE . . . . . .1934 OLD FAITHFUL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 NINE TILL SIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 PRINCESS CHARMING .1937 NOTHING LIKE PUBLICITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 QUEEN’S AFFAIR THE . . . . . . . . .1929 PENNY PARADISE . . . . . . .1937 PERFECT FLAW THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Open House see Playbox Adventure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 ON VELVET .1936 POWER OVER MEN .1938 OPEN ALL NIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 PATRICIA GETS HER MAN . . . .1927 Q PLANES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 Norah O’Neale see Irish Hearts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 NO ESCAPE . . . . . .1930 Plunder in the Air see The Live Wire .1933 NO LADY . . . . . . . .1936 NOT QUITE A LADY . . .1931 PASSING OF MR QUIM THE . . . .1934 PERFECT LADY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 NO FUNNY BUSINESS . . . .1935 ON THIN ICE . .1938 Q-SHIPS . . . .1937 PAINTED PICTURES . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 ONCE A THIEF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 PLAY UP THE BAND . . . . . . . . . .1931 OTHER WOMAN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 PLUNDER .1935 PASSING SHADOWS . . . . . .1937 OLD MOTHER RILEY IN PARIS . . . . . . . . .1939 PUBLIC LIFE OF HENRY IX THE . .1929 PREMIERE . . . . . .1937 QUINNEYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 OVERCOAT SAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 Old Boy see Oh Boy! . . . . . . . .1931 OUTSIDER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 OLYMPIC HONEYMOON . .1938 OLD MOTHER RILEY JOINS UP . . .1937 Passing Brompton Rd see Her Reputation .1933 OTHER PEOPLE’S SINS . .1938 PERFECT CRIME THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 Piccadllly Circus see Keep Sailing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 ON THE NIGHT OF THE FIRE . . . . .

. . . . . . . .1932 SHADOW BETWEEN THE . . . . .1934 Shakespeare Murders The see The Claydon Mystery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 SAY IT WITH FLOWERS . . . . . . . .1937 SHIPYARD SALLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Shepherd’s Warning see The House of Trent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 SHOOTING STARS . . . . . . .1932 SAID O’REILLY TO MCNAB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 SACRIFICE THE . .1937 RHODES OF AFRICA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 SECOND MR BUSH THE . . . . . . . .1930 SAILORS DON’T CARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 RETURN OF CAROL DEANE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 SEEING IS BELIEVING . . .1927 Reparation see Beyond the Cities . .1928 SILENT PASSENGER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 REASONABLE DOUBT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 SHOOTING STARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 SAFE PROPOSITION A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 RETURN OF THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL THE . . . . . . . .1933 RED PEARLS . .1934 SCAT BURGLARS THE . . .1931 SEND ‘EM BACK HALF DEAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1937 SHIPMATES O’ MINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 RHYTHM IN THE AIR . . . . .1931 RINGING THE CHANGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 Red Dog The see Pyjamas Preferred . . .1931 SHADOWED EYES . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 RUNAWAY PRINCESS THE . . . . . .1939 RED ACES . . .1931 ROSE OF TRALEE . . .1929 RED WAGON . . . . . . . . . .1931 SABOTAGE . . . . . . . . . . .1930 SHOW FLAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 SIDE STREETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 ROCKS OF VALPRE THE . . . . . . . . . . .1934 RODNEY STEPS IN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 RETURN OF A STRANGER . . . .1934 ROLLING IN MONEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 ROMANCE IN FLANDERS A . . . .1933 SELF MADE MAN THE .1937 RICH AND STRANGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 RIVER WOLVES THE . . . .1933 SHE WAS ONLY A VILLAGE MAIDEN . . . . . . .1932 RIVER HOUSE MYSTERY THE . .1932 Say It with Song see Music Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 SCRAGS 1930 SCROOGE . . .1935 Sexton Blake and the Master Criminal see Sexton Blake and the Hooded Terror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 ROAD HOUSE . . . . . .1937 SECRET JOURNEY . . . . . . . . . .1935 River Mystery the see Sexton Blake and the Bearded Doctor . . . . . . . .1937 SHADOW . . .1935 Secretary in Trouble see Who’s Your Lady Friend . . . .1928 RYNOX . . . . .1936 REMEMBER WHEN . . . . .1927 SAINT IN LONDON THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 Safety First see Crazy People . .1931 SHADOW THE . . . . . . . .1931 RAT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 SERVICE FOR LADIES . . . .1937 RETURN TO YESTERDAY . . . . . . . . . .1930 ROBBER SYMPHONY . . . . . . . . . . .1935 ROYAL DEMAND A .1936 ROBINSON CRUSOE . . . . . . .1935 SCHOONER GANG THE . . . . . .1935 Royal Husband see The Private Life of Henry VIII . . . . . . .1933 SECRET AGENT THE . . . . . . . .1933 Royal Jubilee see Royal Cavalcade . . . . . . . .1938 Save the Queen see Lady in Danger . . . . . . .1927 RINGER THE . . .1936 SILVER GREYHOUND THE . . . . . .1939 She Got What She Wanted see Clothes and The Woman . .1937 SEXTON BLAKE AND THE MADEMOISELLE . . . .1936 SHOW’S THE THING THE . . .1937 SHOT IN THE DARK A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 SCOOP THE . . . . . .1930 SCHOOL FOR STARS THE . . . . . .1932 BFI Information Services 106 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 SAY IT WITH MUSIC . . . . . . .1929 RASP THE .1934 SCARAB MURDER MYSTERY CASE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 SAVE A LITTLE SUNSHINE . . . . .1935 Royal Romance see Everything is Rhythm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 ROMANCE IN RHYTHM . . . . . . . . . . .1937 SAILING ALONG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 Rough Seas see You Know What Sailors Are . . . . .1936 SHE KNEW WHAT SHE WANTED . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 ROME EXPRESS . . . . . . . .1932 Sally Goes to Town see Shipyard Sally .1937 SECOND BEST BED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 SILENT BATTLE THE . . . . . . . . .1932 Radio Revue of 1937 see Let’s Make a Night of it . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 RETURN OF THE FROG THE . . .1928 RISING GENERATION THE . . . . . . . . .1934 SCOTLAND YARD MYSTERYTHE . . . . . . . . .1935 RIGHT AGE TO MARRY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Rift in the Loot The see Birds of a Feather . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 Return of Carol Sawyer The see The Return of Carol Deane RETURN OF MR REEDER . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 RAILROAD RHYTHM . . . . .1937 SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL THE . . . . . . . .1933 ROOKERY NOOK . . . . . . .1931 RED ENSIGN . .1932 SIGHT OF FOUR THE . . . . . . . . .1934 SECRET VOICE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 SILVER BLAZE .1936 SECRET OF THE LOCH THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 ROYAL DIVORCE A . . . . . . . . . . .1934 SAY IT WITH DIAMONDS . . . . . . . .1939 SALLY IN OUR ALLEY . . .1932 Sign Please see Brides to Be . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 ROMANY LOVE . . . . . . . . . .1937 Sharps and Flats see Play Up the Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 REVERSE BE MT LOT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 SEXTON BLAKE AND THE BEARDED DOCTOR . .1936 RHYTHM RACKETEER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 She Wanted Her Man see The Song You Gave Me . . . . . . . . .1939 REUNION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 SHOW GOES ON THE .1929 ROSARY THE . . .1939 SILENT HOUSE THE . .1938 SECOND THOUGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 SALLY BISHOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 RIVERSIDE MURDER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1933 SATURDAY MIGHT REVIEW . . . . . . . . .1937 REMEMBRANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 RING THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 REMBRANDT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Shilling for Candles A see Young and Innocent .1936 77 PARK LANE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 SCHOOL FOR HUSBANDS . . . . . . .1935 RUNAWAY LADIES . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 ROMANCE OF DANCING THE . . . . .1936 SERVANTS ALL . . . . . . . .1931 SEVEN SINNERS . .1935 RIGHT TO LIVE THE . .1936 SECRET OF STAMBOUL THE . . . . . . . 1937 SANDERS OF THE RIVER . . . .1928 RINGER THE . . . . . . . .1928 RIVER HOUSE GHOST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 ROYAL EAGLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 SECOND MATE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 SENSATION . . . . . .1934 ROMANCE A LA CARTE .1931 RIDERS TO THE SEA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 SECRET LIVES . . . . . .1935 Robert Burns see Auld Lang Syne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alphabetical Title Index RADIO PARADE OF 1935 . .1933 SHE COULDN’T SAY NO . . . .1936 SCARLET PIMPERNEL THE . . . . . .1934 Road to Dishonour The see The Flame of Love . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 Secret Agent see On Secret Service . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 ROSES OF PICARDY . . . . .1932 ROOF THE . . . . . . .1935 Shakespeare Murders The see The Third Clue . . .1936 Recipe for Murder see Blind Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 ROYAL CAVALCADE . . .1938 ROMANCE OF SEVILLE A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Radio Revue see Radio Parade . . .1932 Return of Sin Fan The see Chinatown Night . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 RETURN OF BULLDOG DRUMMOND THE . . .1935 Service Flat The see Here’s George . . . . . . . . .1936 SHE SHALL HAVE MUSIC . . . . .1937 SAILORS AHOY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 SHADOW OF MIKE EMERALD THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 ST MARTIN’S LANE WC2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Schooldays see Things Are Looking Up . . .1934 REALITIES . . . . . . . .1933 SHOULD A DOCTER TELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 RETURN OF THE RAT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 RAISE THE ROOF . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Riviera see Dinner at the Rite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 REBEL SON THE . . . . . . .1935 SEXTON BLAKE AND THE HOODED TERROR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 ROAD TO FORTUNE THE . . . . . . . . .1937 REAL BLOKE A .1939 RETURN OF RAFFLES THE . . . . .1934 SAFE AFFAIR A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 2nd BUREAU . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 Show a Leg see Old Soldiers Never Die . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 SHIP’S CONCERT . . . . . .1931 SAM SMALL LEAVES TOWN . . .1931 ROLLING HOME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 SCRUFFY . . . . . . . .

. .1927 SORRELL AND SON . . . . .1934 SONG IN SOHO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 THANK EVANS . . . .1935 Stowaways The see Cocktails . .1931 TEMPORARY WIDOW THE . . .1933 SILVER TOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 SOUTH RIDING . . .1935 SUNSHINE SUSIE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 Sir Tristram Goes West see the Ghost Goes West .1930 STUDENT’S ROMANCE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 Special Assignment see the Star Reporter . . .1932 STEPPING STONES . . . . . . . . . .1930 STORM IN A TEACUP . . . . . . . . . . .1937 THARK . .1938 SWORD OF HONOUR . . .1938 STOCKER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Strange Justice see The Case of Gabriel Perry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 STRANGERS ON A HONEYMOON . . . . . . .1928 SILVER LINING THE .1937 THESE CHARMING PEOPLE .1935 SIXTY GLORIOUS YEARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 SISTER TO ASSIST ‘ER A . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 SPIES OF THE AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 TERROR ON TIPTOE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Television Trouble see Television Talent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 STREETS OF LONDON THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 SISTER TO ASSIST ‘ER A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Sinners All see Help Yourself . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 THEIR NIGHT OUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 SWEET DEVIL . . . . . . . .1935 THAT’S MY WIFE . . . . . . . . . .1939 SPY IN BLACK THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 TERROR THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 SQUEAKER THE .1928 Third Man Lucky BFI Information Services 107 . . .1938 Thief In the Night see Jump For Glory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 SPY FOR A DAY . . . . . . . . . . .1934 TEMPERANCE FETE THE . . . . .1933 STRONGER SEX THE . . . . . . . . .1929 TAXI TO PARADISE A . . . . . .1934 SMALL MAN THE .1931 SIR OR MADAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Swinging the Lead see Calling All Crooks . . . .1930 SLEEPING PARTNERS . . . . . . . . . .1930 TEMPTATION . . . . . . . . .1936 TANGLED EVIDENCE . .1934 THINGS TO COME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 SWEET INNISCARA . . . . . . . .1935 SUCH IS LIFE . . . .1934 Song For You A see My Song For You . . . . . . . .1936 STAR FELL FROM HEAVEN A . . . . . . . .1937 SONG OF FREEDOM THE . . . . . . . .1939 THINGS ARE LOOKING UP . . . . . . .1931 Susie In the Bath see There Goes Susie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 SOUTHERN ROSES . . . . .1930 TELL ME TONIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 TALK OF THE DEVIL . . . . . . .1938 SKY’S THE LIMIT THE . . . . . . .1934 SUSPENSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 SMASH AND GRAB . . . . . .1932 TELL TALE HEART THE .1932 SPIDER THE . . . . . . . .1928 Smile Vicar Smile see Love Mirth-Melody . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 STEPPING TOES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 SKIN GAME THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 THEY DRIVE BY NIGHT . . . . . . .1930 Speed King see Money for Spee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Stormy Weather see Flat No 9 . . . . . . . . .1937 SPRING IN THE AIR . .1930 TAKE A CHANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 THAT’S A GOOD GIRL . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 TAXI FOR TWO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Speed see The Man From Chicag .1928 SO THIS IS LONDON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 SMUGGLER’S HARVEST . . . . . . . . 1936 TERRORS . . . . . . . . . .1933 THIRD EYE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 STRICTLY IN CONFIDENCE . . . . .1930 SWEENEY TODD . . . . .1931 STRANGLER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 SKY RAIDERS THE .1938 STICKPIN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 SLEEPLESS NIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 SQUEAKER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 THERE GOES THE BRIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 SOME DAY . . . . . .1932 THERE AIN’T NO JUSTICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 SUNSET IN VIENNA . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 TAKE OFF THAT HAT . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 SOS . . . . . .1936 STARDUST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 Sookey see The Self-Made Man . . . . . . . .1927 Silver Rosary the see High Seas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 Spring Cleaning see Women Who Play . . . . . .1936 Street Singer’s Serenade see Limeligh . .1936 SPLINTERS IN THE NAVY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 TEN MINUTE ALIBI . . . . . . .1936 STREET SINGER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Sleuths see Medicine Man . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 SOFT LIGHTS AND SWEET MUSIC 1935 SOLDIERS OF THE KING . .1931 STARS LOOK DOWN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 SUNSHINE AHEAD .1928 SPANISH EYES . . . . . .1932 TALKING FEET . . . . . . . . . . .1938 SPECKLED BAND THE . .1936 SPORT OF KINGS THE . . . .1927 SOMEONE AT THE DOOR . . . . . . . . .1931 STREET ANGEL . . .1938 SPY OF NAPOLEON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 SPECIAL EDITION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 SONG OF THE FORGE . . . . . .1937 SLEEPING CAR . . . .1928 STRANGE ADVENTURES OF MR SMITH THE . .1938 STOLEN NECKLACE THE . . .1935 SOMEHOW GOOD . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 SORREL AND SON . . . . .1936 SOMETHING ALWAYS HAPPENS . . . .1938 SPLINTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 TELEVISION TALENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 SONS OF THE SEA . . . . .1930 TESHA . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 SPRING HANDICAP . . . . . . . . .1937 SIMPLY TERRIFIC .1938 Sitting on Top of the World see On Top of the World . . . .1933 Stick ‘em Up see Hey! Hey! USA! . . . . . .1931 Standing Room Only see Busman’s Holiday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 SKYLARKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 STAR OF THE CIRCUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 SORRY YOU’VE BEEN TROUBLED . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Third Degree see The Scotland Yard Mystery . . . .1934 TENTH MAN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 SPORTING LOVE . . . .1928 SO YOU WON’T TALK! . . . . .1938 TAKING WAYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 SILVER SPOON THE .1936 THIEF OF BAGHDAD THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 THERE GOES SUSIE . . . . . . . .1937 SONG OF THE PLOUGH . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Sweet Racket see Just Like a Woman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 STORMY WEATHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 SOUTH SEA BUBBLE A .1936 STRANGE EVIDENCE .1937 STRANGE BOARDERS . .1934 SOMME THE . . .1932 THERE WAS A YOUNG MAN . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 SUMMER LIGHTNING . . .1932 TEA LEAVES IN THE WIND . . . . . . .1934 SOMETIMES GOOD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 STREET SONG . . . . . . . . .1932 SONG OF THE ROAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 TELL ENGLAND . . . .1939 THEY DIDN’T KNOW . .1932 STRANGE EXPERIMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 Stage Folk see Happy Days are Here Again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 SLEEPING CARDINAL THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 SMASHING THROUGH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 STRICTLY BUSINESS . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Song Writers on Parade see Around the Town . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 SWEENEY TODD THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 THEY CAME BY NIGHT . . . . . . . . .1939 SYMPHONY IN TWO FLATS .1938 STAR REPORTER THE . . . . . . .1933 Song of the Rhine see Little Waitress . . . .1936 SUCH IS THE LAW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 SOUTHERN MAID A . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 SONG YOU GAVE ME THE . . . . . . . . . . .1937 STRANGE CARGO . . . . . . . . .1929 SISTER TO ASSIST ‘ER A . . . .1934 Tattenham Corner see All In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 STOLEN LIFE . . . . . .1927 SONG AT EVENTIDE . . . . .1937 Singing Kettle The see This Is the Life . . . . . .1932 Stop Press see Press Gang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 SPLINTERS IN THE AIR . . . . . . .1934 TEN DAYS IN PARIS . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 SQUIBS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 STRANGLEHOLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alphabetical Title Index SILVER KING THE . . . . . . . .1937 SING AS WE GO! . . . . . . . . . .1933 STRIKE IT RICH . .1930 SPOT OF BOTHER A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Stop Me and Buy One see Josser on the River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 SINGING COP THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 TAKE MY TIP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 SONG OF SOHO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 SWINGING THE LEAD . .1935 STAMBOUL .1933 THAT’S MY UNCLE . . . . .1935 THIRD CLUE THE . . . .1939 STARS ON PARADE . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Steel see Men of Steel . . . . . . .1936 Star Falls From Heaven A see A Star Fell From Heaven . . . . . .1935 SPANGLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 VARIETY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 WEEKEND WIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 VERDICT OF THE SEA . . . . . . . .1928 TOMORROW WE LIVE . . . . . . . . .1938 WARM CORNER A . . . .1928 THREE MASKS THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 TWO LITTLE DRUMMER BOYS . .1934 WHAT MEN LIVE BY . . . . . . . . . .1931 TONS OF MONEY . . . . . . . . .1937 VARIETY PARADE .1935 WHAT WOULD YOU DO CHUMS? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 TRIUMPH OF HEARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 Water Nymph The see Man of the Moment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 UP FOR THE CUP . . . . . . .1933 THIS’LL MAKE YOU WHISTLE . .1933 THIS WOMAN BUSINESS . . . . . . .1929 THREE MAXIMS THE . . . . . .1935 VILLIERS DIAMONDS THE .1927 WAKE UP FAMOUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 VESSEL OF WRATH . .1930 WEST END FROLICS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 WEST OF KERRY . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 TURKEY TIME . . . . . . . . . .1930 TOO DANGEROUS TO LIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 TWICE BRANDED . . . .1933 TILLY OF BLOOMSBURY . . . .1936 THREADS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 UNEASY VIRTUE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 TICKET OF LEAVE . .1929 TRIUMPH OF SHERLOCK HOLMES THE . . . .1927 WARE CASE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alphabetical Title Index see Taxi to Paradise . . . .1938 UNDER A CLOUD . .1935 TROUBLE FOR TWO . . . .1928 WARN LONDON . . . . . . . . .1929 TRAITOR SPY . .1933 TWO WORLDS . . . . .1931 VERDUN VISION D’HISTORIQUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREE . . . . .1933 TROUBLE BREWING . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 TWO DAYS TO LIVE . . . . . .1936 TOMMY ATKINS . . . . . .1932 TILL THE BELLS RING . . . . . . . .1928 VANDERBILT DIAMOND MYSTERY THE . . .1937 Three of a Kind see Love on the Spot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 TUDOR ROSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 UNDER PROOF .1927 VIRGINIA’S HUSBAND . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 TWO MINUTES . .1932 TOUCH OF THE MOON A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 WAY OF YOUTH THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 WHAT’S IN A NAME? . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 THIS IS THE LIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 THIS WEEK OF GRACE . . . . . . . . . . .1936 Variety Stars of 1937 see Variety Hours . . . . .1933 VICAR OF BRAY THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 WHAT A MAN! . . . . . . . . . . .1937 WHAT A NIGHT! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 WALTZES FROM VIENNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 UMBRELLA THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 WALTZ TIME . . . . . . . .1927 THOROUGHBRED . . . .1932 WANDERING JEW THE . .1929 Valley of Fear The see The Triumph of Sherlock Holmes . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 THIS MAN IN PARIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 THREE MEN IN A BOAT . . . . . .1935 TWELVE GOOD MEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 TWO HEARTS IN WALTZ TIME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 Toreadors Don’t Care see Old Spanish Customers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 This Marriage Business see This Woman Business . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 Trouble In the House see Twice Branded . . . . . . . . .1933 THIS GREEN HELL .1938 TROUBLED WATERS . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 What Shall it Profit a Woman? See Designing Women .1935 TONI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 TWO WIVES FOR HENRY . .1933 THOSE WHO LOVE . . .1928 THREE WITNESSES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 TRANSATLANTIC TROUBLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 UNLUCKY JIM .1933 UNHOLY QUEST THE . . . . . . . . .1938 39 STEPS THE . . . . . . . .1933 Wanted see What a Night . . . . . . .1931 WEDNESDAY’S LUCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 WEDDING REHEARSAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 Vie De Boheme see Mimi . . . . .1937 UNDER ARABIAN SKIES . . .1931 TWO WHITE ARMS . . . . . . . . . . .1933 UNCLE NICK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 UNDERGROUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 WHAT HAPPENED TO HARKNESS . . . . . .1939 WHAT MONEY CAN BUY . . . . .1931 UP FOR THE DERBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 WEDDING GROUP . .1928 Troopship see Farewell Again . . . . .1933 WATCH BEVERLY . . . . . . . .1931 Third Time Unlucky see Crown vs Stevens . . . .1928 UNDERNEATH THE ARCHES . .1935 TICKET OF LEAVE MAN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 UNFINISHED SYMPHONY . .1937 TIGER BAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 TROUBLESOME WIVES . . . . . . .1936 TO WHAT RED HELL . . . . . .1930 WARNED OFF . .1935 Water Ways see Captain Bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 WEDDINGS ARE WONDERFUL . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 VORTEX THE .1938 WE DINE AT SEVEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 WARNING THE . . . .1934 TRIUMPH OF THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL THE . .1935 TWIN FACES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 THREE MEN IN A CART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 THREE KINGS THE . . . . .1939 THIS MAN IS NEWS . . . . . . . .1937 VIRGINIA’S HUSBANDS . . . . . . .1933 UPTOWN REVUE . . . . . .1933 Triangle see Men Are Not Gods . . . . . . . . .1934 WARREN CASE THE . . . .1938 VICTORIA THE GREAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 TOILERS OF THE SEA . . . . . . . . . .1936 VARIETY HOURS . . . . .1930 Unexpected Journey The see Runaway Ladles . . . . . . . . . . .1937 VILLAGE SQUIRE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 Vienna Sunset see Sunset in Vienna . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 TWO ON A DOORSTEP . .1935 WHAT THE PUPPY SAID . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 THISTLEDOWN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 Thousand Windows The see Crime Over London . . . .1927 TRUNK CRIME . . . . . . . . .1935 VIPER THE . . . . . . . . . .1936 Victoria and Albert see Sixty Glorious Years . . . . . . . . .1930 WANTED . . . . . .1928 Three Men on a Horse see the Live Wire . . . . .1935 THUNDER IN THE CITY .1934 VOICE OF IRELAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 WATER GIPSIES THE . . . . . . . . . . .1939 When East Meets West BFI Information Services 108 . . . . .1935 THIRTEENTH CANDLE THE . . . . . . . .1932 Three Fevers see Turn of the Tide . . . . . . . .1937 VINTAGE WINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 13 MEN AND A GUN . . . . . . . . . . .1934 WHAT THE PARROT SAW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 VICTORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 VANITY . . . . . . . .1937 TWO CROWDED HOURS .1935 TUNNEL THE . . .1932 TO CATCH A THIEF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 TRUST THE NAVY . .1936 Underproof see Great Stuff . . . . . . . . . .1930 Tzigane see Gypsy . . . .1939 TOO MANY HUSBANDS . . . . . .1936 This Irish Question see Blarney . . . . . . .1937 West End see Night Birds . . .1928 WELL DONE HENRY . . .1934 VALLEY OF THE GHOSTS THE . . . . . . .1927 TONIGHT’S THE NIGHT . .1936 TWO’S COMPANY . . .1935 WAIT AND SEE . . . . . .1937 VETERAN OF WATERLOO THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 TO BRIGHTON WITH GLADYS .1930 WHAT HAPPENED THEN? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 TROPICAL TROUBLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 This is The Wife see Too Many Wives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 UNDER THE RED ROBE . . . .1928 THOSE WERE THE DAYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 THIRD STRING THE . . . . .1935 Variety see Just For a Song . . . . . . . . . . .1939 TWO HEARTS IN HARMONY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Vengeance of Kali The see the Dance of Death . . .1931 TO BE A LADY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 Trust Barclay see Adventure Limited .1927 VULTURE THE . . . . . . . . .1931 TIMBUCTOO . .1934 TOO MANY WIVES . . . . . .1932 UP TO THE NECK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 WE’RE GOING TO BE RICH . . .1936 TWO WAY STREET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 Three On A Honeymoon see Where’s Sally . . .1936 WARE CASE THE . .1937 VAGABOND QUEEN THE . . . . . . . .1938 TOO MANY MILLIONS . . . . .1933 TURN OF THE TIDE .1935 THIS ACTING BUSINESS . . . . .1935 TROUBLE . . . . .1933 TIGHT CORNER A . . . . . . . . . .1936 UNSLEEPING EYE THE . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 THREE PASSIONS THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 Trent’s Folly see The House of Trent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 UNTO EACH OTHER . . . . . . . .1928 WHAT NEXT? . . . . . . .1932 TIN GODS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1931 THOROUGHBRED THE . . .1930 TO OBLIGE A LADY . . . . . . . . . . .

. . .1932 WHITE LILAC . . . . . . . . . .1934 WINDBAG THE SAILOR . . . . . .1936 WRITTEN LAW THE . . . . . . .1935 WIND JAMMER THE . . . . . . . . .1933 With The Best Intentions see Beware of Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 WILD BOY . . . . . . .1930 WOMAN FROM CHINA THE . . . . . . . . . .1927 WINGS OF THE MORNING . . . . . . .1939 YOUNG WOODLEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 WRECKER THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 YES MR BROWN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 WHITE SHEIK THE . . . . . .1928 Widow’s Bed the see Early to Bed . . . . .1936 WISE GUYS . . . .1937 WISHBONE THE .1928 YOUR HOROSCOPE .1935 WHISPERING TONGUES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 Wrecker the see Seven Sinners . . . . . .1937 WHEN THE POPPIES BLOOM AGAIN .1937 WIFE OR TWO A .1932 WOULD YOU BELIEVE IT? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 WOMAN ALONE A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 WHO GOES NEXT . .1937 YELL OF A NIGHT A . .1937 Young Apollo see Men of Tomorrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU . .1935 WHERE IS THIS LADY? . . . .1934 WIFE OF GENERAL LING THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 WHITE FACE . . . .1931 WIDECOMBE FAIR .1937 WHOM THE GODS LOVE .1936 WINGS OVER AFRICA . . . . . . . .1929 YOU KNOW WHAT SAILORS ARE . . . . . . . . . .1932 YOU’D BE SURPRISED . . .1939 YOU’RE THE DOCTOR . . . . . .1939 WINDOW IN PICCADILLY A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 WHO’S YOUR FATHER . . . . . .1938 WHO KILLED JOHN SAVAGE? . . . . . . . .1938 BFI Information Services 109 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 WHITE CARGO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 YES MADAM . . . .1933 Wild Justice see The Strange Case of Gabriel Perry . .1935 WHEN LONDON SLEEPS . . . . . . .1935 WHERE’S SALLY? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 W PLAN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1929 WOMANHOOD . . .1937 When We Are Married see Don’t Rush Me . . . . . . . . .1927 WOMAN IN WHITE THE . . . . . . . . . . . . .1935 YOUNG PERSON IN PINK . . . . . . . . . .Alphabetical Title Index see The Woman From China . . .1930 YELLOW SANDS . .1931 WONDERFUL STORY THE .1930 WHEN KNIGHTS WERE BOLD . . . . . .1932 WOODPIGEON PATROL THE . . . . . . . . . . .1936 WOMAN BETWEEN THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1927 Whither Mankind see Things to Come . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1939 Young Nowhere see Some Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1928 Woman in White see Crimes at the Dark House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 WHERE’S THAT FIRE? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 WINDMILL REVELS . .1934 You’re Lucky to See Me see Lucky to See Me .1933 With the Tide see Against the Tide . . . .1939 WOMAN REDEEMED A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1926 YOU LIVE AND LEARN . . . .1929 WHITE ENSIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1938 YELLOW STOCKINGS . . . . . . . . .1930 WINDMILL THE . . . .1936 WHILE PARENTS SLEEP . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 YOUNG AND INNOCENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 WICKHAM MYSTERY THE . .1927 WOMAN TO WOMAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1930 WOMAN HE SCORNED THE . . . . . . . . .1934 WOMAN IPAWN A . .1932 YOUNG MAN’S FANCY . . . . . . . . .1935 White Man’s Honour see Debt of Honour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 YES MADAM? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1936 WIND FALL . . . . . . .1930 World Is All Mine The see Dreams Come True .1937 WOLF’S CLOTHING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1932 WHERE’S GEORGE? . . . .1935 WOLVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1937 WINDOW IN LONDON A .1936 WORLD THE FLESH AND THE DEVIL THE . . . . .1929 WOMEN WHO PLAY . .1931 YANK AT OXFORD A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1934 WHO’S YOUR LADY FRIEND? . . . . . . . . . .1939 WHERE THERE’S A WILL . . . . . . .1939 YOUTHFUL FOLLY . . . . . . . . . . .1937 WHY PICK ON ME? .1932 YELLOW MASK THE . . .1928 WHEN KNIGHTS WERE BOLD . . . .1934 Will Shakespeare see Immortal Gentleman . . . . . .1932 Widow’s Island see A Romance In Flanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1933 YOU MUST GET MARRIED . . . . . . .1933 WITHOUT YOU .1932 WHEN THE DEVIL WAS WELL . . . . . . . . . .1936 WIDOW’S MIGHT THE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

they provide the only instance of serious market research covering British cinema during this period and cover a wide range of enquiries. comparatively few British films are listed in the Kine Weekly box office analysis of the most popular films of the year. there is quite a strong overlap between the popularity of stars and directors as Indicated by the Bernstein surveys and the most popular films listed in the Kine Weekly box office hits. the needs of most markets were met by American and home produced films. were organised by Sydney Bernstein and based on his Granada cinemas. Yet different sources can give different figures for the same circumstances. So although it would be quite valid to use the information if discussing the habits of regular fllmgoers. A small number of US and European statistics have been included in this section. Discrepancies sometimes occur as occasionally it has been necessary to match information from different sources. summaries of which have been re-printed here. one compiler may have examined the situation at the beginning of the year and another at the end.Part 3: Statistics During the Thirties there was very little by way of officially published statistics. Picturegoer. . Also. Most of the statistics in this section come from trade sources. The best surveys. the findings may not be applicable to the population as a whole. had a yearly poll in which its readers nominated their favourite stars in their favourite role. Unfortunately. Yet many British films went out as supporting features and reports in the trade press would indicate that a good support could considerably enhance the popularity of the American main feature. The people who went to the effort of filling in the Korda Questionnaire probably would have been film fans. In particular. In addition to the surveys reproduced in this section the fan magazine. The French and German statistics confirm British trends i. during the second half of the Thirties the Film Daily Yearbook listed the most popular stars in Britain and the most popular British stars. the American film trade.e. Also. Nevertheless. A certain amount of caution has to be exercised when making use of the information provided by these polls and surveys. as is the case today. For instance. so it can be argued that British films were more popular that the surveys would indicate. In the main. discrepancies are small and it is still possible to get a proper overall picture of what was taking place. Aspects of Popular Taste In many ways it is as important to know what people were seeing or wanted to see as it is to know what films were being made. had a very well developed network for overseeing what was a large money maker for American industry. The US statistics indicate the size of the industry against which Britain was attempting to compete. there is very little hard information on box office takings. These BFI Information Services 110 were luxurious cinemas and some historians have suggested that the audiences would include a higher percentage of the middle class than reflected in the population overall and consequently the kind of preferences expressed would reflect middle class taste rather than that of the cinemagoing public in general. it is clearly indicated on the charts themselves when this has occured.

Films Released in the UK
FILMS RELEASED IN THE UK Subject Breakdown of British Films Shown in the UK - Number of Films 1930 Biography Burlesque Comedy Comedy Drama Costume Documentary Drama Extravaganza Fantasy Farce Gangster Drama Melodrama Murder Mystery Musicals Opera Operetta Political Propaganda Reissue Religion Revue Romance Romantic Comedy Romantic Comedy Drama Romantic Drama Ruritania Sex Sex Sex Comedy Sex Drama Tragedy Travelogue War Total 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 2 21 5 1 7 25 25 10 2 5 22 1 12 17 18 9 1 28 11 9 22 42 16 5 11 22 1 19 38 6 24 1 22 11 10 7 17 6 1 11 41 14 14 32 9 14 11 16 2 1 18 30 14 13 1936 1 37 17 12 6 16 2 2 15 1 48 6 22 2 1937 2 18 26 5 12 15 4 16 13 40 9 9 1938 1939 2 2 19 26 2 4 18 7 7 7 22 11 7

15 29 5

11 26 12 11

1 14 8 1 5 14 3 1 6 3 31 10 1 1 1 12 4 2 3

7 4 3

1 1 15

2

1 2 1 4 4 12 6 4 2 4 4 11

2 13 3 4 2 7 13 14 10

17 4 8 6

12

6

9

5

2

1 1

3 2 1 1 7 140 4 1 140 153 196 194 1 5

2 1 2 1 1 3

3

1

1

1

189

221

211

173

123

BFI Information Services

111

Films Released in the UK
Subject Breakdown of British Films Shown in the UK - in Percentages
1930 % Biography Burlesque Comedy Comedy Drama Costume Documentary Drama Extravaganza Fantasy Farce Gangster Drama Melodrama Murder Mystery Musicals Opera Operetta Political Propaganda Reissue Religion Revue Romance Romantic Comedy Romantic Comedy Drama Romantic Drama Ruritania Sex Sex Sex Comedy Sex Drama Tragedy Travelogue War Western 1931 % 1932 % 1933 % 1934 % 1935 % 1.1 14.8 3.5 0.7 0.7 17.6 18.0 7.2 1.4 3.6 15.8 0.7 8.6 12.2 12.9 6.5 0.7 18.3 7.2 5.9 14.4 21.4 8.2 2.6 5.6 11.2 0.5 9.7 19.4 3.1 12.2 0.5 0.8 9.8 3.3 1.6 2.4 11.3 5.7 5.2 3.6 8.8 0.5 5.7 21.1 7.2 7.2 16.9 4.8 7.4 5.8 8.5 1.1 0.5 9.5 15.9 7.4 6.9 1936 % 0.5 16.7 7.7 5.4 2.7 7.2 0.9 0.5 6.9 0.5 21.7 2.7 9.9 0.9 1937 % 0.9 8.5 12.3 2.4 5.7 7.1 1.9 7.6 6.2 19 4.3 4.3 1938 % 1.2 1.2 11.0 15.0 1.2 2.3 10.4 4.0 4.0 4.0 12.7 6.4 4.0 1939 %

10.6 20.4 3.5

7.2

7.8 7.2

0.8 11.4 6.5 0.8 4.1 11.4 2.4 0.8 4.9 2.4 25.2 8.1 0.8

4.9 2.8 2.1

0.6 0.6 9.8

1.0

0.5 1 0.5 2.1 2.1 6.2 3.1 1.5 1.0 2.1 1.1 2.1 2.1 5.8

0.9 1.4 1.8 0.9 3.2 6.2 6.6 4.7

8.6

3.1

9.8 2.3 4.2 3.5

6.3

3.6

1.3

0.5 0.5

1.1 1.7 0.5 0.9 0.5 0.5 1.4 0.8

0.7 0.7 4.9 -

2.6 0.2

0.5

2.6

0.5

0.8

BFI Information Services

112

Films Released in the UK
Subject Breakdown of All Films (incl. British) Trade Shown - Number of Films
1930 Biography Burlesque Comedy Comedy Drama Costume Documentary Drama Extravaganza Fantasy Farse Gangster Drama Melodrama Murder Mystery Musicals Opera Operetta Political Propaganda Reissue Religion Revue Romance Romantic Comedy Romantic Comedy Drama Romantic Drama Ruritania Sex Sex Comedy Sex Drama Tragedy Travelogue War Western Total 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 4 73 54 13 15 160 3 26 170 14 35 69 43 5 6 144 4 24 98 32 17 1 55 45 4 22 130 3 12 130 34 21 66 56 8 20 136 1 8 28 161 34 42 2 56 54 19 13 105 15 3 12 125 46 45 64 50 44 17 111 4 3 21 17 119 50 49 1 1936 2 66 63 21 9 92 6 5 22 13 191 36 57 2 3 1937 2 60 75 12 13 51 13 4 26 63 176 48 32 1938 2 3 50 91 7 4 73 13 2 21 49 122 41 40 1939 4 1 36 56 2 7 80 7 5 14 41 167 23 8 1 2 1 23 4 15 13

7

13 1 68

2 1 70

5

2 6 8 14 16 53 8 11 22

4 7 8 14 11

31

20

4 1 13 11 24 10 30

1 1 13 48 47

37 4 19 34

44

29

31

3 35

2 2 70 719

6 5 82 647

10 1 69 640

5 4 51 685

6 41 680

5 5 2 3 51 664

1 3 4 74 763

3 3 2 3 95 791

3 3 3 4 85 710

2 7 6 2 66 593

BFI Information Services

113

6 3.6 2.9 7.4 3.3 6.8 5.2 13.3 12.9 1.3 0.8 3.1 1.1 0.3 0.5 9.5 1.8 1.1 7.0 6.0 0.2 7.9 22.8 0.1 1936 % 0.9 0.2 1.9 20.7 0.7 0.2 3.9 0.1 0.6 3.2 0.0 0.2 2.8 7.1 2.6 0.3 7.4 0.2 1.7 2.4 5.8 1.1 6.1 1.4 1.4 0.0 2.4 16.5 4.0 12.5 0.9 0.6 9.6 2.6 0.2 8.3 11.2 0.6 2.Films Released in the UK Subject Breakdown of All Films (incl.4 7.3 8.6 0.1 4.5 1.4 3.1 23.2 10.8 0.6 1.2 0.3 1.1 9.2 0.2 6.0 0.6 9.0 0. British) Trade Shown .9 2.3 0.3 1.8 18.7 7.4 6.7 0.2 0.8 5.1 0.4 20.in Percentages 1930 % Biography Burlesque Comedy Comedy Drama Costume Documentary Drama Extravaganza Fantasy Farse Gangster Drama Melodrama Murder Mystery Musicals Opera Operetta Political Propaganda Reissue Religion Revue Romance Romantic Comedy Romantic Comedy Drama Romantic Drama Ruritania Sex Sex Comedy Sex Drama Tragedy Travelogue War Western 1931 % 1932 % 1933 % 1934 % 1935 % 0.9 2.1 Source: New Year Issue of The Cinema BFI Information Services 114 .9 2.1 0.7 1.9 24.0 1938 % 0.1 1.3 9.9 0.7 8.7 0.2 2.0 22.5 2.6 3.9 1.3 3.5 3.8 12.4 7.9 5.8 0.5 1.2 0.3 0.6 11.5 1.7 0.3 0.1 5.7 15.7 1.0 0.2 1.5 5.4 3.3 9.4 15.1 4.2 10.8 1.6 10.0 1.3 0.7 0.6 0.2 1.0 4.9 1.0 0.4 0.2 12.9 6.2 10.6 8.3 0.2 0.4 0.8 0.8 1.8 6.2 0.7 16.2 4.3 3.5 0.6 0.4 0.7 0.8 1 0.3 2.9 0.3 5.9 0.5 0.3 8.7 25.3 2.4 1937 % 0.7 10.8 1.4 0.0 21.2 0.6 7.6 7.5 22.6 0.6 6.6 0.4 0.4 7.3 1.1 5.3 0.4 0.9 17.3 1.6 9.7 4.0 1.1 2.8 0.1 2.9 4.2 2.9 15.9 6.1 6.2 4.7 2.9 6.9 4.3 0.6 6.9 0.4 0.4 1.3 0.3 0.3 8.6 1939 % 0.

Films Released in the UK Films Released in the UK According to Country of Origin 1927 Australia Austria Canada Czechoslovakia Denmark France Germany Greece Holland Hungary India Ireland Italy New Zealand Poland Reissue South Africa Spain Sweden Switzerland UK USA Total 1 2 1928 1929 1930 2 1931 8 1932 3 1933 5 1 4 34 71 1934 5 1 1 16 7 1935 4 2 1 2 10 7 1 1 6 3 1 8 1 1 3 40 723 892 2 142 519 747 1 139 470 647 1 153 449 641 1 196 456 685 1 194 454 680 2 189 478 706 1 221 492 763 211 539 792 173 494 712 123 428 593 2 5 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 4 1936 6 5 7 1 1 16 16 1 3 1937 2 7 2 1 13 8 1938 1939 6 1 32 1 29 22 49 10 16 7 18 1 8 14 2 558 778 495 663 US and UK Releases as a Percentage of Total Releases 1927 % USA UK 81 4 1928 % 72 1929 % 74 1930 % 70 19 1931 % 73 21 1932 % 70 24 1933 % 67 29 1934 % 67 28 1935 % 68 27 1936 % 65 29 1937 % 68 27 1938 % 69 24 1939 % 72 21 Source: The Cinema's Annual Survey .appearing in New Year issue BFI Information Services 115 .

693.304.428.436.660.217 862.057 1.453.086 3.585 989.453.779 854.943 680.257 4.307.557 3. year ended on 31st March Source: Department of Trade BFI Information Services 116 .277 Note: Up to 1937 the year ended on 31st December. 605 525 564 502 459 476 480 503 530 571 535 Footage 3.185.000 ft) British Year 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938-39 No.037 3.376 335. 818 962 987 977 720 621 690 611 612 562 776 Footage 1.881.555.045 1.051 891.037.845 953.085 1.794 4.996 786.197.253 223.142 773 1.066 99.857 1.173 165.754 4.227.674 1.244 4.618 785.539 4.631 70. 91 83 132 145 156 189 190 198 222 225 103 Footage 647.581.049 1.840 Total No.822 Total No.495 1.871 3.299.431 1.943 4.Films Released in the UK Films Registered for Theatrical Release in the UK Long (over 3.975.188 4.223.668 1.186.410.269.562 113.452 697.630 3.104 50.564 Short British No.281 1.040 3.488.113.742 Foreign No.112.183 735.026 806 685 777 756 1. 1938-39.994.200.310.754 5.651 2.277. 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938-39 111 200 98 49 86 64 87 145 196 211 275 Footage 141.930 3.239.893 558.163.814 806.303.742.452 784.162 1.156 903.420.150.938 890.202.061 149.169 951.926.082 3.736 3.427 1.166 213.090 888.647 98.473 3.778 1.051 Footage 1.154 3.106 1.197 1.437 Foreign No. 694 608 696 647 615 665 670 698 752 796 638 Footage 4. 929 1.

5 769 161 72 89 3.057 540 622 1934 17.Column 5 plus 7 (in 000ft) 1929 7.Films Released in the UK Comparison of British Films Registered with Minimum Quota Requirement Year Ending 31 March 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Quota (%) Foreign Shorts Registered (in 000ft) British Shorts Required for Quota (in 000ft) British Shorts Registered (in 000ft) Deficiency in Column 4 (in 000ft) Foreign Long Films Registered (in 000ft) British Long Films Required for Quota (in 000ft) Min.962 566 646 1933 15 893 158 76 82 3.400 276 276 3.5 891 189 128 61 3.5 922 75 185 1930 10 1204 134 150 1931 10 1160 129 88 41 3.649 405 446 1932 12.5 1071 153 73 80 3.331 370 370 3.186 64 Source: Paper given by Simon Rowson to the Royal Statistical Society on 17 December 1935 BFI Information Services 117 . Length of British Films Required for Quota .203 60 1.116 661 722 9 British Long Films Registered (in 000ft) 10 Excess of British Long Films Registered to Quota Requirements (%) 909 230 624 70 803 80 931 44 974 57 1.115 661 750 1935 17.

Pathe and Wardour were merged into ABPC in 1937 Source: 1927. 1935 .The Moyne Report 1936. 1939 Kine Year Book 1929 .The British Film Industry by Political and Economic Planning. 1934.The Distribution of British Films Leading Distributors of British Films in the UK Company ABFD ABPC Ace APD Anglo-American British Lion Butcher's columbia Equity First National FN-Pathe Fox Gaumont (inc. 1937 . 1952 1932. W&F and Ideal) GFD Grand National MGM New Era Paramount Pathe PDC RKO-Radio Sterling 20th Century Fox Twickenham United Artists Universal Wardour Warners WP 1927 1929 1932 1934 6 1935 11 1936 13 1937 18 1939 7 1 1 2 2 3 8 2 2 18 4 18 12 29 2 4 5 11 2 9 11 23 1 3 6 7 6 2 6 13 29 3 14 13 3 2 16 1 8 8 5 4 9 6 4 5 3 2 4 10 13 9 21 17 15 17 6 17 12 9 9 14 8 30 14 19 6 15 13 21 1 3 3 1 4 2 2 9 12 7 1 10 3 18 17 11 2 14 8 9 3 4 4 5 5 3 3 2 2 3 13 2 9 11 22 12 8 13 19 11 5 8 19 15 6 10 3 Notes: In 1927 MGM films were distributed by JMG.Film Daily Yearbook BFI Information Services 118 .

5 11 16 44 32 18 43 23 42 45 210 39 120 51 7 12 8 47 38 31 37 46 66 98 108 89 90 50 37 45 65 98 108 88 59 49 68 49 69 89 98 89 52 113 47 68 49 69 89 97 88 27 113 47 BFI Information Services 119 .The Distribution of British Films The Footage of British Films Registered by British Distributors Operating in Britain compared with the Quota Liability 1933-34 Registered Quota Length Liability in 0000ft British Companies ABFD APD British Lion Butcher's Gaumont Pathe Wardour Foreign Controlled Renters Columbia First National Fox MGM Paramount RKO-Radio United Artists Universal Warners Source: The Moyne Report 1934-35 Registered Quota Liability Length in 0000ft 67 16 39 26 206 33 109 10 3.

British Cinema Statistics British Circuits Year Number of circuits Number of circuits Number of with 10 cinemas and with 11-20 cinemas circuits with 21under 100 cinemas a 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 127 147 149 150 157 138 135 140 142 146 141 144 146 b 595 676 659 663 686 637 628 678 682 652 638 697 703 a 10 12 9 12 14 13 13 12 15 20 25 24 25 b 146 182 117 159 169 176 157 146 203 271 326 324 341 a 3 5 5 5 4 4 5 7 7 5 6 8 10 b 121 187 196 234 190 208 246 325 252 240 237 316 395 Number of circuits with over 100 cinemas a b Total a 140 164 164 168 177 157 155 161 167 175 177 181 185 b 862 1045 1159 1248 1363 1382 1414 1498 1600 1840 2103 2252 2373 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 4 5 5 4 187 192 318 361 383 349 463 677 902 915 934 Note: The total number of cinemas controlled by each circuit is given in column b Source: Kine Year Book BFI Information Services 120 .

London 29 49 14 14 15 21 17 16 16 26 13 13 12 13 14 14 21 18 19 28 19 18 19 36 22 75 24 24 88 26 17 92 25 14 96 39 13 18 14 232 274 441 17 485 564 635 680 688 715 937 1112 1156 1179 20 33 34 20 128 30 177 36 137 40 141 96 100 98 100 38 102 29 77 103 113 118 159 123 192 111 187 22 28 192 23 27 14 15 200 25 16 38 39 201 33 16 36 35 201 37 52 202 42 56 197 44 54 199 23 44 53 197 27 48 54 182 62 54 182 74 55 13 24 30 34 43 52 55 49 34 35 118 31 160 19 182 18 147 14 164 247 296 314 300 Notes: PT came under the controld of Gaumont in 1929. London Bacon's Pictures. Source: Kine Year Book BFI Information Services 121 . London EJ Hinge. London Bernstein Theatres. Glasgow AG Mathews. Leeds Nottingham Pictures. Manchester Cinema Services. John Maxwell who controlled ABC also acquiredd a controlling interest in the Union Circuit in 1938. Manchester Gaumont British. Birmingham Ormiston. Notts Odeon. Manchester AB King. Manchester Eagle Picturedrome JF Emery. London UPT. Sheffield County Cinemas. The Odeon Group and County Cinemas amalgamated in 1937. London Broadhead Theatres. Manchester New Century Pictures. Birmingham EG Clayton. London Bedford Cinemas. Motherwell PCT. Glasgow Shipman & King. London Regent Circuit Scottish Cinemas and Variety Theatres. Glasgow HD Moorhouse. London Union Cinemas. Londno Bicolor Picture Theatres.British Cinema Statistics The Ten Leading Circuits with Number of Cinemas Controlled by Each Circuit 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 Associated British Cinemas.

British Cinema Statistics Number of Cinemas Changing Hands 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 Source: KRS Annual Report 154 112 232 149 167 275 448 308 458 507 613 363 BFI Information Services 122 .

5 34.5 8.25 3.800 Source: "Study of the Motion Picture Industry of the United States" .published by the Industries Studies section of the National Recovery Administration in Washington.5d 21. given in Today's Cinema 22 June 1936 BFI Information Services 123 .British Cinema Statistics Comparative Cinema Statistics for Great Britain and USA in 1935 UK Population (in millions) Average Weekly Admissions (in millions) Average Admission Price (exclusive of tax) Average Annual Admissions per Head of Population Box Office Receipts (in £m) Seating (in millions) Average Seats per Cinema Population per Seat Population per Cinema 45 19.500 USA 127 75 19 28 140 10 700 13 8.9 900 12 10.

535 501 231 347 4.712 528 254 342 4.930 Silent 5 1 1935 3.714 Silent 1 1 1936 3.006 1.614 1.British Cinema Statistics Western Electric Statistics for UK Cinemas with Sound Equipment 1931 Silent England Scotland Ireland Wales UK Total UK Cinemas with Western Electric Equipment 5.666 1.836 6 2 Note: The figures in brackets give the number of silent cinemas Source: Western Electric Surveys BFI Information Services 124 .313 3.611 520 243 340 4.414 1.385 494 209 326 4.750 1933 Silent 128 72 31 27 258 1934 3.

2p 23.000.000 BFI Information Services 125 .300 4.000.000 £50.000 10.600.British Cinema Statistics British Cinema Statistics for 1938 Number of Cinemas Seating Capacity Average Admission Price Weekly Admissions Gross Annual Receipts Source: Film Daily Yearbook 5.

7 6.4 5.4 5.8 38.3 10.5 5.1 10.9 41.5 41. published by Public Relations Department. April 1954 see also European Cinema Statistics table… BFI Information Services 126 .6 39.6 Source: Film industry Statistical Digest.2 10.1 10.2 5.7 38. Britisih Film Producers Association.8 5.British Cinema Statistics Cinema Statistics Admissions in Gross Takings in millions (m) £m Entertainment Duty in £m Average Admission Price 10.1 10.1 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 903 907 917 946 987 990 38.

3 9.500 1.0 Source: Paper delivered by Simon Rowson to the Royal Statistical Society.3 13.2 17. 371 268 307 352 352 381 939 537 365 3872 Aggregate Seats % 9. Dec 17th 1935 BFI Information Services 127 .4 100.8 24.9 9.9 7.501-2.000-1.1 3.000 2.7 10. 500 or less 501-600 601-400 701-800 801-900 901-1.0 No.9 10.9 10.7 7.6 6.5 100.1 9.British Cinema Statistics Number of Cinemas in Great Britain Classified by Number of Seats (end of 1934) Size of Cinema in Seats Cinemas No.1 9.9 9.000 and upwards Total 901 470 460 460 399 395 764 307 149 4305 % 20.7 9.000 1.

499 3.9 8.3 10.1 13.6 8.6 8.0 Note: Population based on 1931 census.6 8 7 7.061 4. 1935.2 10.5 8.047 6.8 8.363 4.9 Per Seat Per House (in 000) 14 14 19 15 12 11 9 10 13 10 9 12 12.2 14 13 9.9 10.5 Population over 14 Per Seat 10.597 3. Seats Houses (in 000) 401 343 277 369 585 534 699 304 62 259 522 4.1 6.4 8.746 1.4 9.5 9.794 4.187 2.133 5.British Cinema Statistics Distribution of Cinemas at the End of 1934 in Relation to the Population Population (in 000) Total London Home Counties Eastern Counties West of England Midlands Yorkshire and District Lancashire North of England North Wales South Wales Scotland Total 6.6 6.538 34.355 462 295 171 268 501 475 684 262 42 201 511 3.844 406 1.9 10.9 12. BFI Information Services 128 .279 2.117 Over 14 4.8 8.1 6.1 7.9 11.843 45.173 4.166 3.240 4. of No.6 10.8 6.8 6.6 5.989 3. Source: Paper delivered by Simon Rowson to the Royal Statistical Society on Dec 17th.7 7.041 6.0 9.338 Cinemas No.8 8.571 532 2.872 Total Population Per House (in 000) 15.406 3.

Elstree B&D.British Studios British Studios (F .the annual "in production" charts indicate feature production in progress at some time during the year in the studio) 1927 Ace Amalgamated. Elstree Bushey Cricklewood Denham Ealing Hammersmith Highbury Islington Marylebone Pinewood Shepherd's Bush Shepperton Southall Teddington Twickenham Walton-on-Thames Welwyn Wembley Whitehall Worton Hall Total 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 2(F) 1937 2(F) 2 1(F) 9(F) 2(F) 1 3(F) 7(F) 3(F) (F) 2(F) 2(F) 2 5(F) 6(F) 6(F) 2 3(F) 1(F) 1(F) 3(F) 2(F) 2(F) 3(F) 73 1938 2 5 1(F) 9(F) 4 1(F) 3(F) 7(F) 3(F) 2 2(F) 2(F) 2 5(F) 5 6(F) 3(F) 1 2(F) 3(F) 2(F) 2(F) 3(F) 75 1939 2 5 1(F) 9(F) 4(F) 1 7(F) 3(F) 2 2(F) 2(F) 2 5] 5(F) 6(F) 1 1(F) 2(F) 3(F) 2 2(F) 3(F) 73 (F) 1 (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) 1(F) (F) (F) 1(F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) 1(F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) 3(F) 1(F) 9(F) 2 1(F) 1(F) 3(F) 1(F) 9(F) (F) 2(F) 1(F) 2(F) 2(F) 3(F) 1(F) 9(F) (F) (F) 2(F) 3(F) 2(F) 2(F) (F) 5(F) 2(F) 2(F) 2(F) 1(F) 3(F) (F) 2(F) 3(F) 42 3(F) 1(F) 9(F) 2(F) 3(F) 7(F) 3(F) 2(F) 2(F) 2(F) 2 5(F) 6(F) (F) 2 1(F) 1(F) 4(F) 2(F) 2(F) 3(F) 63 2(F) 2(F) 2(F) 2(F) 2(F) 2(F) 2(F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) 1(F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) 1(F) 2(F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) 5(F) 2(F) 2(F) 1(F) 1(F) 3(F) 1(F) 2(F) 36 5(F) 2(F) 2(F) 1(F) 1(F) 3(F) 1(F) 2(F) 37 1(F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) 1(F) 2(F) (F) (F) 2(F) (F) (F) (F) (F) (F) 2(F) BFI Information Services 129 . Elstree Beaconsfield BIP Blatter.

125 23.885 8.000 9.250 12.360 8.600 72. Elstree Bushey Cricklewood Denham Ealing Hammersmith Highbury Islington Marylebone Pinewood Shepherd's Bush Shepperton Southall Teddington Twickenham Walton-on-Thames Wembley Welwyn Whitehall Worton Hall Total Source: Kine Weekly New Year Issue/Kine Year Book Note: it is difficult to find information on studio floor space and the number of stages for the late Twenties.750 11.500 12.430 730.412 7.860 6.British Studios Studio Floor Space in Ft.500 6.710 90.325 63.000 8.750 11.675 2.611 BFI Information Services 130 .200 12.500 12.250 11.600 21.000 95.300 20.600 72.750 11.000 23.250 18.000 12.000 800 13.624 10.000 3.800 7.430 602. 1927 Ace Amalgamated.any large building would suffice and because there was no problem about sound proofing it was quite common for more than one production to be underway on a given stage.500 8.000 8.000 7.325 63.025 21.000 6.800 7.325 63.500 8.660 95.277 1938 3.860 6.000 19. Even with the period 1933-39 there are some gaps and anyone making use of the totals should take this into account.000 23.800 17.100 21.000 301.325 63.000 20.885 19.584 341.325 63.252 16.100 21.400 7.500 12.000 20.900 130.125 120.325 20.000 12.124 12.000 14.430 778.675 2. 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 3.336 21.900 1937 3.252 16.125 120.325 63.000 13.710 87.300 120.125 120.000 20.100 12. Elstree Beaconsfield BIP.000 67.252 16.025 21.261 11.000 7.000 9.325 6.710 87.600 67.000 9.000 44.575 269.100 21.000 20.430 798.300 20.000 3.430 12. no totals have been made of the number of studio floors or the amount of square footage for these years.600 72.860 6.800 17.537 1939 3.200 12.200 12.800 7. Elstree B&D.000 7.900 130.200 12.000 6.250 8.252 16.000 13.Sq.000 13.250 8.885 12.900 8.000 3.000 67.860 6.250 8.325 63.250 5.000 11.000 7.710 90.650 7.500 12.250 8.000 23.350 7.000 11.000 44.600 72.000 6.900 8.885 8.000 12.000 95.900 130. Given the shortage of date from 1927-32.400 7.885 12.600 67.000 5.250 14.200 6.575 8. Elstree Blatter.000 23.000 2.000 3. Studios in the early period tended to be more makeshift .000 21.000 6.000 11.325 6.360 8.

May 1936 Highbury . Elstree .September 1929 Blattner. Elstree .September 1930 Teddington .February 1934 Denham . Elstree .May 1936 Pinewood .September 1936 Amalgamated.July 1931 Ealing .November 1928 Blattner. Elstree .May 1932 Hammersmith .British Studios Studios Opened After 1927 Beaconsfield .building started in 1936 but never operational BFI Information Services 131 . Elstree .1928 B&D.April 1928 Whitehall.October 1928 Welwyn .December 1931 Shepperton .1929 Wembley .

Ealing Beaconsfield B&D. Elstree BIP/AB. Elstree Blattner/Rock. Hammersmith Shepherd's Bush Sound City Teddington Walton-on-Thames Welwyn Wembley Whitehall.British Studios Sound Equipment in British Studios 1932 Amalgamated ATP. Elstree Worton Hall not opened RCA Western Electric 1937 Western Electric RCA RCA not open Ambiphone* Visatone*/RCA Visatone Western Electric RCA British Acoustic* Western Electric British Acoustic* British Acoustic* Visatone*/RCA Western Electric RCA Ambiphone* ASFI*/Visatone* RCA Western Electric Visatone not opened not opened RCA Western Electric not opened British Acoustic* Visatone* Western Electric RCA ASFI* Western Electric Source: Kine Weekly New Year Issue/Kine Year Book BFI Information Services 132 . Elstree Cricklewood Denham Highbury Islington Pinewood Riverside.

3 39 7.0 30 5.7 17 2.1 1937 391 64.8 127 21. % No.0 12.0 28 6.9 547 3 0.4 102 16.5 545 Source: Film Facts.6 8 1. % No. % No. % No.6 10 1.6 11 1. % No.0 1939 329 56. % No.2 584 10.0 37 7.5 11.8 7 1.8 59 10.7 2 3. 1942 Source Material of UK Features Original Screen Stories Stage Plays Novels/Short Stories Others Total No.British Feature Production Source Material of UK and UK Features Source Material of US Features 1934 Original Screen Stories Stage Plays Novels Biographies Short Stories Source Unknown Miscellaneous Totals No. % No. % No.5 140 25.0 54 10.8 38 7.8 12 2. % No. 1929 28 32 25 29 25 229 8 9 86 Source: Based on an analysis of films released in the UK 1930 38 38 38 38 12 12 11 11 99 1931 47 35 64 48 15 11 8 6 134 1932 68 45 53 35 25 17 4 3 150 1933 98 54 53 29 26 14 4 2 181 1934 82 45 66 36 27 15 8 4 183 1935 83 45 50 27 46 25 6 3 185 1936 110 50 54 25 42 19 13 6 219 1937 118 55 35 17 43 20 15 7 211 1938 84 53 30 19 29 18 15 9 158 1939 41 42 18 18 34 35 5 5 98 BFI Information Services 133 . % No.0 2. 40.0 92 16.6 519 1936 391 67.3 39 6.5 24.8 2 0. published by the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors Association of America.0 142 26.4 3 6.0 46 7.0 1935 244 47.0 5 0. % No.0 41 8.4 24 4.3 34 5.1 608 1938 316 58.

1933 BFI Information Services 134 .British Studios British Film Studios in 1932 Source: The World Encyclopedia.

28 BFI Information Services 135 .British Studios British Film Studios in 1938 Source: Motion Picture Almanac 1937-38 Source: Motion Picture Almanac 1937 .

Cecil and Trafalgar and Buckingham City Film Corp Columbia Criterion Crusade Film Manufacturing Co.British Feature Production Leading Production Companies 1927 ABPC Argyle ATP B&D B&D-Paramount Barter and Baxter BIF BIP British Filmcraft British Lion British National British Screen Prods Butcher's CAPAD Capitol (incl. George London MGM Neo Art Nettlefold 1928 1929 1930 1931 2 (@) 4 (1) 1932 1933 1 3 13 (2) 7 (4) 1934 1 4 9 (1) 19 (12) 1 20 (7) 10 (6) 1935 2 5 2 14 (9) 4 (2) 12 (1) 6 (4) 2 4 5 1 1 1 1 3 1 2 2 (1) 7 8 8 (1) 8 8 (1) 3 (1) 8 (5) 7 (1) 3 (2) 11 (1) 3 1 2 (2) 12 7 2 1 7 10 (4) 9 (7) 7 (1) 15 (1) 12 (9) 7 (1) 10 10 (4) 8 (1) 13 18 (4) 6 4 2 2 (2) 4 (3) 6 2 3 (2) 1 2 (1) 1 1 2 1 3 1 (1) 5 5 (1) 2 (2) 8 6 (4) 9 1 3 (1) 7 1 2 3 3 2 (1) 3 (2) 5 (1) 1936 1 4 2 10 (4) 1937 8 (1) 1 2 3 10 (6) 1938 14 (3) 2 (1) 4 10 (6) 1939 11 (2) 1 4 (2) 3 6 5 (1) 1 5 (1) 5 (2) 9 (1) 1 1 19 (2) 3 (1) 2 (2) 8 6 15 (3) 4 7 4 2 19 (5) 1 2 (1) 1 27 (7) 3 (1) 1 1 36 (13) 1 1 22 (9) 12 (9) 9 (4) 6 (3) 3 (1) 2 4 2 2 2 3 3 1 4 5 5 (1) 1 2 6 2 (1) 3 2 2 2 1 3 (1) BFI Information Services 136 . First National Fogwell Fox Gainsborough Gaumont Harefield Imperator JH Prods King.

Imperator and Herbert Wilcox Productions. John Starcraft Stoll Strand Triumph 20th Century Fox Twickenham Two Cities UK Prods Venture Warner Brothers WB-FN Welsh-Pearson-Elder Welwyn Whiting. Wilcox.British Feature Production 1927 2 1928 2 3 (3) 2 1 2 (2) 10 (6) 14 (10) 18 (10) 2 (1) 2 2 (2) 1 5 (4) 6 (4) 8 (4) 2 3 (1) 7 (3) 2 (1) 2 5 (2) 3 (1) 5 9 (6) 4 (1) 2 11 (6) 3 (1) 1 1929 1930 1931 2 (1) 7 (1) 1932 4 (1) 3 2 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 New Era Paramount Parkinson. Herbert Wilcox was associtaed with British and Dominions. Some producers had more than one company eg. In 1937 BIP became ABPC Number of Features Made in Britain 1927 Over 70 minutes 40-69 minutes Total Appendix 53 13 66 1928 88 17 105 1 1929 39 23 62 1 1930 64 28 92 8 1931 72 58 130 4 1932 97 46 143 1 1933 80 81 161 12 1934 102 80 182 10 1935 118 60 178 7 1936 152 64 216 9 1937 107 78 185 2 1938 86 18 86 5 1939 66 20 86 3 BFI Information Services 137 . HB Pinebrook QTS Real Art RKO Rock Smith. George Sound City Stafford. Herbert Whitehall 1 4 (3) 3 (3) 3 2 4 (1) 6 (1) 1 3 3 (2) 10 (2) 6 (1) 4 7 12 (5) 5 (1) 2 (1) 2 (1) 2 3 (1) 4 (1) 5 1 1 2 (1) 1 5 (1) 1 2 1 3 (1) 2 (1) 2 1 (1) 2 (1) 6 (1) 5 4 4 (1) 5 (1) 14 (13) 19 (16) 17 (4) 13 (5) 13 (6) 20 (9) 8 (1) 7 (3) Source: The Annual "In Production" charts (The figure in brackets gives how many of the total films made were less than 70 minutes. Edward G.) Notes: Any instance of an American producing films in Britain has been included in the above table.

29 25 58 48 49 38 57 68 64 47 Total 215 270 283 303 349 415 411 337 Source: Money Behind the Screen by Klingender and Legg New Companies 1936 Production Companies Distribution Companies Finance Companies Studios Laboratories Recording Studios Colour Companies Newsreel Companies Capital Involved Source: Kine Weekly.British Film Companies and Investment New Companies Connected with the Film Industry Registered in the UK Year 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936* * 10 months only Production 26 37 59 36 55 46 64 86 108 87 Renting 17 16 3 4 5 7 6 10 13 7 Exhibition 143 94 150 176 174 212 222 251 226 196 Misc. 12 January 1939 1937 1938 94 2 5 1 BFI Information Services 138 .

100 £153.800 £972.344.335 £3.258.921.000 248 326 384 302 243 £1.035 £712.257.709.012. Company Registration Agents BFI Information Services 139 .862.940 £1.718 £1.435 £3.000 Private Companies 196 196 £871.079.290 £1.500 £649.600 £1.440 £10.500 Total 179 201 224 253 259 338 394 320 249 175 £1.000 £150.100 £664.810 11 12 10 9 6 £638.509 £2.800 £822.081.618 £1.035 Source: Jordan and Son.677.432.British Film Companies and Investment New Companies Registered Public Companies 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 6 5 £226.895.565 £1.

000 2.364.620.000 985. Pinewood and Denham 20 other studios 9 Laboratories Total 88 production companies with a capital of 98 renting companies with a capital of 43 sound producing and recording companies with a capital of Total £ 2.000 BFI Information Services 140 .approximately 5.416 730.600 960.000 6.810 3.500 5.000.120.100.320.850 Companies serving cinemas 425 equipment companies 323 allied industries 52 transport companies Total Source: Kine Weekly.500 2.100 Films produced in 1938 4 supers costing 94 other productions Total Cinemas .000 100.706. 12 January 1939 950.000 6.833.000 4.000 50 supers 4.500 3.000 1.760.783.British Film Companies and Investment Capital Invested in the UK Film Industry in 1939 Studios Amalgamated.750.715.226 1.000 72.

225 £ £5.000 No.211 1935-36 No.414.344.British Film Companies and Investment Approximate Statistics for British Film Production during the Years 1928 and 1935-36 1928 No.500 Total area in square feet 795. 12 May 1936 BFI Information Services 141 .600 Total area in square feet 105.557 Source: Evidence to the Moyne Report. 91 £ £489. of Stages 70 £ £4. of Stages Number of Stages and Sizes Value of Studio and Equipment Annual Salaries and Wages (exclusive of artists) Number of Feature Films Produced and their Production Cost 19 £ £555.500 £2.000 £197.250 No.197.

000 ft Cartoons Newsreels Other current events Educational Advertising Other kinds including sound track recorded seperately Substandard films Total Kind of Work #0 Recipts for hire of studios.163 899 323 1. fuel and electricity used Amount paid for work given out Amount paid for hire of studios.064 4. equipment and services As studio owners As tenants of studio owners Receipts for hire of equipment and services not included above Receipts for other work Total Source: Today's Cinema 12th January 1939 1.4 160.626 420 28 Length (Ft) 905.267 5.110 68 159 113 1.6 11.1 £000 3.5 59.5 81.8 632.652 790 1.000ft Not exceeding 3.450 143 150 4 577 132 85 14. Unit Value of Gross Output Cost of materials.3 606.785 626 £0 3.652 BFI Information Services 142 .4 3.118 38 5 296 4 36 99 55 1 3.877 7.Summary of the Result of the Import Duties Act Inquiry for 1937 for Surveying the British Production Industry The number of returns received was 134 and the results were believed to be fully comprehensive of the industry in the UK.8 597.709 1. equipment and services Receipts for other work Total £0 £0 £0 £ 1937 7. The Board of Trade was assisted in the inquiry by the co-operation of all firms in the industry and all the details required were furnished with reasonable accuracy and promptitude.337 117 7. equimpent and services Net output Average number of persons employed Net output per person employed Work done in the year On films produced wholly within the year On films completed in the year of return but not wholly produced in that year On films begun during or before the year of return but not completed by the end of that year Total Receipts for hire of studios.163 Films Produced Wholly Within the Year of Return of Kind of Film Number Entertainment films other than cartoons: Exceeding 3.

8 films totally rejected.Films Certified by the British Board of Film Censors 1927 unable to trace Total Exception taken to 345 films. Source: Kine Weekly 19/5/1930 1932 U A 1929 U 923 721 A 280 182 BFI Information Services 143 .382 368 A 2 348 1928 U 1. Source: Kine Weekly 22/5/1929 1930 U Short Dramas and Comedies Silent Auditory Feature Films Silent Auditory Interest Films Silent Auditory 12 films rejected Source: Kine Weekly 18/3/1931 1933 U Short Dramas and Comedies Silent Auditory Feature Films Silent Auditory Interest Films Silent Auditory Exception taken to 504 films 23 films totally rejected Source: Kine Weekly 16/8/1934 672 1 253 7 321 A 38 unable to trace 420 1 Exception taken to 360 films No total rejections Source: Kine Weekly 24/6/1937 Cartoons.578 A 330 Silent Auditory Exception taken to 300 films. Documentaries & Shorts Feature Films 236 843 182 308 165 155 A 1 19 128 238 Short Dramas and Comedies Silent Auditory Feature Films Silent Auditory Interest Films Silent Auditory 34 films totally rejected Source: Kine Weekly 18/2/1932 1934 1931 U 69 838 44 254 36 322 A 1 51 18 317 1 Short Dramas and Comedies Silent Auditory Feature Films Silent Auditory Interest Films Silent Auditory Exception taken to 382 films 22 films totally rejected Source: Kine Weekly 9/3/1933 1935 U 1. 7 films totally rejected.

1936 Cartoons.632 368 A 31 383 H 2 1937 U Short Dramas and Comedies Silent Auditory Feature Films Silent Auditory Interest Films Silent Auditory 9 films totally rejected Source: Today's Cinema 22/2/1939 1939 Short Dramas and Comedies Silent Auditory Feature Films Silent Auditory Interest Films Silent Auditory Exception taken to 229 films 3 films totally rejected Source: Kine Weekly 18/4/1940 378 1478 5975 A 19 439 8 1 H 1938 U Short Dramas and Comedies Silent Auditory Feature Films Silent Auditory Interest Films Silent Auditory 4 films totally rejected Source: Today' s Cinema 22/2/1939 519 2429 30 1. Documentaries & Shorts Feature Films Exception taken to 391 films 8 films totally rejected Souce: Kine Weekly 24/6/1937 U 1.051 A 28 258 7 H - U 307 1 268 7 807 A 28 312 10 H 11 - BFI Information Services 144 .

000 78.000 250.000 30.500 240.000 129.500 12.500 9.000 125.000.000.000.000.000 28.000 241.000 28.000 86.500 28.000 8.000 Approx.000 135.000 12.000 Source: Film Daily Yearbook/Motion Picture Almanac BFI Information Services 145 .000 241.000 28.000 76. Costs 1931-32 1932-33 1933-34 1935-36 1936-37 1937-38 1938-39 1939-40 185.000.000 133.000 165.500 12.000 8.000.000.000 28.000 135. Hollywood Payroll 76.500.000 110.000.000 241.500 12.000.000 165.000 28.000 236.000 135.500 241.000 72.000.USA US Production Prod.000.000 234.000 10.000.500.000 Estimated Number of People Employed in US Film Industry In Production In Distribution In Theatres 27.000 85.800.000.

USA Films Released in the USA Year 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 USA 678 641 562 509 501 489 507 480 525 522 538 455 483 Foreign 65 193 145 86 121 196 137 182 241 213 240 314 278 Total 743 834 707 595 622 685 644 662 766 735 778 769 761 Source: Motion Picture Association of America BFI Information Services 146 .

USA Films Imported into the USA Year 1928 1929 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 UK 37 28 21 28 26 44 41 40 50 39 44 France 31 19 15 20 20 15 23 17 23 28 36 Germany 83 46 54 106 61 57 90 74 67 77 85 Italy 6 4 9 8 7 3 8 24 17 16 16 Spain 113 3 9 14 4 2 5 14 17 28 5 15 21 Mexico USSR 16 22 14 18 21 19 19 16 15 16 13 Others 20 25 8 14 14 29 43 33 54 65 53 Total 193 145 122 196 157 181 241 235 240 270 272 - Source: Film Daily Yearbook BFI Information Services 147 .

500 46.275 38.000 21.930 163.500 13.000 Year Cost of New Theatres Constructed in $000 23 23 24 25 23 23 23 Source: Film Daily Yearbook/Motion Picture Almanac BFI Information Services 148 .500 20.559 97.580 45.000 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 57 65 95 110 75 60 60 70 75 88 85 85 85 Average Seat Price in Cents Box Office Receipts in $000.300 38.300 36.000 17.USA US Cinema Statistics Average Weekly Attendance in 000.000 526 720 732 719 527 482 518 556 626 676 663 659 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934-Apr 1935 1935-36 1936-37 1937-38 1939-39 1939-40 161.

182 19.098.386 Source: Film Daily Yearbook Number of Cinemas Total Theatres 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 Seats In Operation Theatres Seats Closed Theatres Wired Theatres Seats 9.251 15.USA Number of Cinemas Total 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 13.069.386 14.635 3.818 17.829 10.484 10.740 14.130 2.258 16.126 12.411 11.998 20.880 14.350 13.028.273 15.055 16.829 Open Closed Wired 14.058 1.440.416 13.041 11.931 2.325 9.736 14.701 4.159 826.537 10.311 1.541 17.267 1.823.632 9.137 1.371 18.308.697 2.378 16.413.552 15.381 13.855.767.209.100 19.263 18.161 16.589 4.533 16.121 1.950 11.830 5.750 13.899 10.470.885 15.311 18.128 1.711 3.350 5.560 1.128 18.780 13.505 18.251 15.910 Source: US Department of Commerce BFI Information Services 149 .701 9.030.405 14.920 10.717.924.574 13.996.715 18.858 18.290 2.132.128 13.192 18.895 4.887 1.595 11.

France Films Released in France Country France USA Germany Italy Britain Others Total 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 82 368 91 10 8 21 580 94 313 112 7 23 22 571 52 211 130 3 23 18 437 94 237 111 2 16 18 478 139 220 60 8 8 18 453 157 208 99 4 7 21 496 158 230 113 17 34 20 572 126 220 45 4 29 12 436 115 248 60 10 19 14 466 116 231 41 3 32 25 448 111 230 31 5 29 18 424 122 239 26 5 21 13 426 Source: La Cinematographe Francaise BFI Information Services 150 .

German Censor 1934.1936 .1933 .1935.Germany Films Released in Germany Country Germany USA France Austria Others 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 243 190 28 18 45 221 205 23 20 36 151 97 148 80 139 62 21 15 133 43 123 53 92 41 16 17 25 111 36 11 17 11 57 53 29 29 Total Source: 524 505 305 281 237 205 205 191 186 1927.Bioscope 1931.1928 .Film Daily 1930 .Berlin First Runs BFI Information Services 151 .1932.

103 57.World Cinema Statistics Europe USA Latin America Far East Canada Africa/Nr East Total * 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 19.379 1.984 28.224 775 691 645 689 667 676 813 881 287 391 432 480 610 763 856 19.150 66.000 15.217 17.869 5.228 * 1.292 5.642 27.000 15.932 3.639 4.100 1.617 28.598 3.244 5.228 3.500 20.500 13.858 18.319 57.834 6.819 37.816 * 1.962 3.338 5.401 29.796 1.Bioscope 7 May 1931.693 39.879 97.435 5.056 51.187 63.Kine Weekly.551 60.174 5.571 4.121 1.578 20.100 905 * 559 715 785 * 51.500 22.341 62.885 * N/A 1.347 66.100 1.546 5.000 15.547 60.731 20.629 3.753 12.922 4.712 4.042 1.623 29.000 19.822 20.000 61.617 41.192 18.876 59.121 1.185 5.253 Source: Film Daily Yearbook/Motion Picture Almanac .830 2.068 4.043 11.002 5.338 4.334 92.822 52.925 4.070 87.019 1.858 18.628 64. and 1932 .207 34.201 1.208 3.112 66. 3 March 1932 Notes: The number of cinemas fitted with sound equipment is given in columns with asterisk BFI Information Services 152 .192 18.365 64.316 30.042 19.500 20.933 27.042 1.182 16.628 90.147 2.270 5.182 16.224 705 777 700 883 1.355 4.except 1931 .500 14.044 5.529 2.273 15.956 29.239 * 3.773 21.387 4.539 3.718 5.100 841 883 1.

100 (4.994 5.000 (5.833 (1.293 138 427 2.950 (4.113 (120) 5.300 383 Note: the number in brackets gives the number of sound cinemas The number of cinemas listed for the USSR.300 (1.343) 340 344 (312) 232 242 (214) 4.062 1.878 138 365 2.000) 253 (233) 235 (107) 900 (110) 400 (88) 400 (165) 3.581) 320 340 (330) 4.947 3.800 (2.500) 1.450) 5.900 (640) 300 (220) 220 (111) 3.500 (1.340 (1.631) 1.305 370 285 4.783) 334 (328) 354 (354) 4.987 2.024 (818) 350 (303) 220 (120) 3.500 (1.000 (350) 300 (200) 200 (97) 3. which account for the big increase between 1935 and 1936.950 (4.500 (1.600 (500) 1.691 (3.641 (1.150 224 450 2.366 430 1930 736 (20) 700 (15) not listed 1.271) 5.907 354 5.500 1.900 (3.500 1.300) 5.000 3.182 (15) 302 (15) 4.252 3.500 (484) 245 (201) 245 (76) 900 (100) 405 (36) 400 (135) 1.955 1.700) 5.600 6.000) 2.100 (1.273 (5.900 (2.780) 122 153 (140) 380 400 (362) 3.987 29.221 (2.069 333 247 769 215 372 30.600) 305 (297) 297 (297) 240 (240) 250 (250) 693 (657) 741 (703) 210 (180) 210 (185) 350 (350) 325 (293) 34.071 (3.200) 5. 990 26.500) 310 (302) 4.000 (6.100 4.600) 1. should be treated with caution as many were village halls.850 (4.500 1.079) 255 (240) 220 (175) 795 (353) 250 (107)) 350 (350) 9.800) 4.724) 308 305 (291) 241 225 (205) 728 498 (467) 250 210 (170) 380 301 (298) 9.000 (800) 94 (89) 100 (97) 1.000) 3.500 (1.833 (1.200 264 252 383 120 304 800 1.250 (1.600 (1.500 121 1928 500 700 116 720 300 235 3.100 111 1.068 270 239 3.100) 370 (107) 1933 850 (435) 750 (250) 145 (109) 1.228) 300 (100) 1934 850 (570) 650 (400) 145 (400) 2.550) 5.016 130 3.000) 100 (100) 633 (267) 2.760 273 1929 723 797 131 1.131 2.343) 1.600) 3.385 298 4.000 4.360 2.000) 318 (263) 349 (301) 1.783 (1.000) 150 (50) 520 (181) 2.426 (750) 397 1932 745 (300) 740 (180) 138 (35) 2.608) 352 (352) 358 (348) 220 (210) 265 (265) 4.266 (195) 224 (2) 495 (10) 2.500 (3.074 (295) 1.500 170 524 4.100 (3.405 (40) 236 (50) 212 (2) 750 (50) 130 (-) 357 1.200 (3.414) 338 (184) 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 850 779 (706) 750 790 (725) 128 94 (89) 1.794 4.847 (1.070 (4.337) 3.900) 4.395) 142 (112) 150 (145) 410 (385) 420 (420) 4.800 2.100 (750) 325 (140) 4.200 (2.581 (1.672 (4.Number of Cinemas for Leading European Countries Country Austria Belgium Bulgaria Czechoslovakia Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Italy Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Roumania Russia Spain Sweden Switzerland UK Yugoslavia 1927 580 800 48 680 350 120 2.782 (4. Source: Film Daily Yearbook/Motion Picture Almanac BFI Information Services 153 .000 228 252 428 120 450 450 1.897 5.395 (5.000 150 3.200 (100) 270 (20) not listed 3.600) 843 1.025 157 212 508 140 357 2.000 (3.712) 319 336 (246) 765 ((692) 779 (706) 800 (740) 1.100 (750) 325 (200) 4.950) 5.354 4.700) 100 (70) 505 (198) 2.600 (380) 1.

6 0.800.000 350.800 10.000 2.86 66.800 10.018 318 33.300 25.847 352 220 3.000 92.16 6.440.783 322 5.000 10.2 13.200 15.200 8. US figures include 2.271 150 320 410 190 5.000 1. of Seats per cinema 308 660 321 258 277 538 369 433 478 414 578 305 480 254 288 614 410 196 388 637 292 388 574 Austria Belgium Czechoslovakia Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Holland Hungary Ireland Italy Luxembourg Norway Poland Portugal Spain (pre Civil War) Sweden Switzerland UK Yugoslavia Europe (appox) USA 762 798 1.500 9.312 91.000 darkened halls. The Italian figures included 1.905 12.200 53.7 41.000 153.900 5. Source: Statistics Compiled for the Annual Congress of the International FilmChamber held in Paris and published in Kine Weekly on 26 August 1937.000 29 16 25 39 60 20 39 94 53 51 27 26 25 40 160 32 22 18 33 15 150 33 12 Average no.19 4. BFI Information Services 154 .000 593.400 19.83 22.93 416.000 18.600 7.025.100.000 1.500 1.000 12.700 9.235 25 275 693 350 2.200 46.000 200.75 128 Notes: Sweden had a large number of halls open only 3 times a week.200 3.000 3.000 70.000 16.08 46.06 8.57 3.000 170.200 21.000 13.500 12.000 110.580 527. of Cinemas Seating Capacity Population (m) Cinemas Seat per inhabitant 8.950.000 1.2 8.200.3 2.600 41.000 10.16 14.000 65.192 234.74 8.000 12.000 125.800 8.400 hasll owned by the Fascist party serving their purposes only.632 6.000 61.73 3.600.94 6.68 3 41.000 215.55 6.81 32.European Cinema Statistics for 1937 Country No.700 12.800 12.

Clive Brook* 3. Jessie Matthews 8. Clive Brook 46. Joan Crawford 9. Merle Oberon* 10. Franchot tone 8. George Arliss* 9. Cicley Coutneidge 13. Matheson Lang* 7. Cicley Courtneidge 34. Pola Negri 7. Gracie Fields 28. Tom Walls 35. Douglas Fairbanks Snr 4. Adolphe Menjou 5.Gary Cooper 2. Geoge Arliss* 2. Lionel Barrymore 9. Katheine Hepburn 7. Claudette Colbert 6. Norma Shearer 2. Anna Neagle 31. Vilma Banky 6. Robert Taylor 5. Caroline Griffiths 1928 1. Ann Harding 10. Charles Laughton* 10. Elissa Landi 35. Betty Balfour Delores Del Rio 3. Clark Gable 3. Mary Pickford 1932 1. Most Popular Male Star 1927 1. Greta Garbo 4. Ronald Coleman* 2. Gordon Harker 1937 1. Tom Walls* 14. George Arliss* 4. Kay Francis 9. Anna Neagle 47. Leslie Howard 17. Joan Crawford 10. Jack Buchanan 29. Jeanette McDonald 8. Wallace Beery 4. Cedric Hardwicke 36. Ronald Coleman* 2. Adolphe Menjou 3. Norma Talmadge 5. Maurice Chevalier 6. Gordon Harker 49. John Boles 7. Douglas Fairbanks Snr 1928 1. Maria Dressler 4. Marlene Dietrich 1934 1. Ronald Coleman 7. Robert Montgomery 6. Nova Pilbeam Other British Stars Mentioned Other British Stars Mentioned BFI Information Services 155 . Loretta Young 13. Harold Lloyd Ramon Novarro 6. Marie Dressler 3. Jack Hulbert* 8. Ivor Novello* 4. Greta Garbo 7. Constance Bennett 3. Syd Chaplin* 6. Clive Brook* 5. Gracie Fields* 8. Constance Talmadge 3. Wallace Berry 1934 1. Betty Balfour 2. Herbert Marshall 15. Janet Gaynor 6. Myrna Loy 3. Diana Wynard 14. Charles Chaplin* 1932 1. Norma Shearer 2. Ronald Coleman 2. Ronald Coleman* 6. Elizabeth Allen 43. Ginger Rogers 5. Tom Walls* 9. this was based on questionnaire filled out by patrons of his Granada cinemas. Robert Montgomery 5. Marlene Dietrich 6. Norma Shearer 2. Ralph Lyon 50. Shirley Temple 7. Clara Bow 4. Leslie Howard 14. Mary Pickford 6. Robert Donat* 11. Will Hay 33. Jessie Matthews 26. Jack Buchanan 22. Claudette Colbert 12. Esther Ralston 5. Jack Hulbert 28. Basil Rathbone 48. Herbert Marshall 24. Greta Garbo 4. Clark Gable 3. Frederic March 10. Kay Francis 5. Gloria Swanson 8. Ruth Chatterton 5. Victoria Hopper 1937 1. Milton Stills John Barrymore Reginald Denny" 10. William Powell 7. Ralph Lynn* 8. Lola Moran 9. Richard Dix 3. Janet Gaynor 9.The Bernstein Questionnaires Every couple of years Sidney Bernstein organised a survey of filmgoers tastes and preferences. Laura La Plante 4. Florence Vidor 7. Charles Laughton* 4. Ralph Lynn Most Popular Female Stars 1927 1. William Powell 10.

5 20. Ernest Lubitsch 4. Industry 7. Victor Saville* 5. Graham Cutts* 5. Travel 2. Tom Walls* 3.8 30. George Cukor 8. Animal Life 6. Industry 6. Mervyn Leroy Types of Shorts Preferred . Animal Life 5. Jack Buchanan 19. Cartoons 2. Cartoons 3. Cecil B. Alfred Hitchcock 18. Griffith 3.1 3 1937 % 44. De Mille 6.7 37. Cecil B. Frank Capra 2. Walter Forde 17.4 11. Victor Saville 1932 1.W. Musical 4. D. Sport 3. De Mille 4. W. Science Over 60 1.W. Basil Dean*( 1937 1. Griffith Other British Directors Mentioned 11.Van Dyke 4. De Mille 7. Josef Von Sternberg 7.S. Travel 2. Jack Raymond * indicates Britsh nationality Frequency of Visits to the Cinema Twice a week Once a week Three times a week Less than once a week More than three times a week Programme Preferences For two big pictures For one big picture with short film 1934 % 84. Industry 21-40 1. Science 40--60 1. Alfred Hitchcock* (Female Voters) 1. Science BFI Information Services 156 .5 1927 % 47. Rex Ingram 4. Sport 5. Cecil B. D. Herbert Wilcox 10. De Mille 2. Musical 4.6 4. Alexander Korda* 3. Cecil B.5 15.5 33. Maurice Elvey 3. Frank Capra 9. Ernest Lubitsch 9. Animal Life 7.8 5. Travel 5. Alfred Hitchcock 5. Musical 4. Alexnder Korda* 2. Travel 3. Animal Life 6.5 1934 % 42.5 2.1937 (Question not included in earlier surveys) Under 21 1. Science 7. Rex Ingram 2. Ernest Lubitsch 2. Industry 6.Favourite Film Directors 1927 (Male Voters) 1. Tom Walls* 8. Maurice Elvey 5.5 1937 % 79. Sport 5. Musical 4.5 14.4 15. Herbert Wilcox* 10.Preference Broken Down into Age Group . Cartoons 3. Frank Lloyd 6. Frank Lloyd 10.2 5 12. Lewis Milestone 4. Science 7. Cartoons 2. Alfred Hitchcock* 1934 1.75 4. Tom Walls* 3.

Quicker releases 6. Moving stairs so that patrons need not have to climb to reach their seats in the circle 13.Adventure 2. Love-Romance 6. War 40--60 Over 60 1. Thriller-Adventure 2. Director 9.Preference Broken Down into Age Group 1934 Under 21 1. Society Drama 2. Thriller-Adventure 4. No babies or children to be allowed in the theatre during the evening performance 1937 1. Fewer newsreels 3. Requests for the exhibitions of time sheets. Musical Comedy 4. Thriller. Love-Romance 5. Musical Comedy 3. Comedy 4. Newspapers should devote their weekly film news to the general releases. More knee room 10. Thriller Adventure 4. especially men 5. Love-Romance 5. "sex-stuff". Musical Comedy 3. free soup should be distributed 16. Star 3. War 7. On cold days. Society Drama 2. Society Drama 2. All patrons should remove their hats. Comedy Adventure 5. Comedy 6. Contrasts in subjects in one programme. Love Romance/ Thriller3. Thriller Adventure 7. Love Romance/Comedy 6. Comedy 6. Seats and magazines for queues 8. Comedy 4. Thriller-Adventure 2. Love-Romance 5. not the West End programmes BFI Information Services 157 . Historical 7. Expressions of dislike of "suggestiveness". Cast lists to be shown at the end as well as at the beginning 2. Patrons' cars should be washed and polished free whilsts in a cinema's car park 15. More newsreels 4. Love-Romance 6. and "vamps" (mainly from women) 2. Musical Comedy 2. Travel 1937 1. Love Romance/Comedy 5. Seats with moveable arms 12. Musical Comedy 3. Musical Comedy 3. 1934 1. Society Drama 2. Musical Comedy 3. Thriller-Adventure 7. Picture 2. Society Drama 3.Type of Features Preferred . Society Drama 1. Comedy 4. Expressions of dislike of variety acts (mainly from women) 5. Society Drama 6. Historical 7. A rigid ban on the consumption of peanuts 14. Musical Comedy 3. Cast lists to be shown at the end as well as at the beginning 2. Price of admission 8. No smoking 4. Courtesy of Staff and Services 7. Varieties 6. Historical 7. Society Drama 5. Historical 7. War 1. All seating should be staggered 9. War 21-40 1. Orchestra 4. Historical 6. More orchstral selections and interlude 4. War 6. especially the elimination of two films in one orogramme featuring the same star 7. War 1. Bigger and better ashtrays 3. Double seats for courting couples 11. Travel 7. War 1. Publicity material issued Suggestions for the Improvement of Cinema Entertainment 1927 1. War State in Order of Preference the things which attract you to cinemas 1927 1. Requests that cast lists of feature films should be hung up in the cinema lobby 3. Story 5. Travel 5.

Attitute to Sound Films 1929: Would you welcome the advent of talking pictures? For % 50 30 Against % 50 70

Men Women

1932: Would you welcome the return of silent pictures For % 47 Kine Weekly Box Office Winners From 1937, the trade paper 'Kine Weekly' carried in its New Year issue a survey of the most popular box office films. No information was provided on box office takings. The first survey was in the form of aa general article but in subsequent years there appeated a monthly breakdown of box office winners with films listed in order of their success. An asterisk indicates a British film. Against % 53

1936 (appearing in Kine Weekly on 14 January 1937) Biggest Money Maker: Runner Up: Most Popular British Film: Most Popular and Consistent Star Other Box Office Successes Rose Marie; Captain January; The Little Rebel; A Tale of Two Cities; Follow the Fleet; First a Girl* Modern Times, Under Two Flags; It's Love Again*; Secret Agent*; Queen of Hearts*; Come Out of The Panty*; Boys Will Be Boys*; China Seas; Broadway Melody of 1936; She Married Her Boss; Ourselves Alone; Living Dangerously; I Give My Heart*; Dark Angel. 1937 (appearing in Kine Weekly on 13 January 1938) Biggest Money Maker: Most Successful Output: Most Popular and Consistent Star Winning British Stars: Lost Horizon MGM Shirley Temple Gracie Fields, George Formby Mr. Deeds Comes to Town Mutiny The Ghost Goes West Shirley Temple

BFI Information Services

158

Other Box Office Successes January February March April May June July August September San Francisco; Windbag the Sailor*; Anthony Adverse; Showboat Georgeous Hussy; Sabotage*; My Man Godfrey; Dodsworth; Charilie Chan at the Race Track; His Lordship* The Great Ziegfeld; Romeo and Juliet; Dimples; Keep Your Seats Please*; Craig's Wife; Ramona Libelled Lady; Good Morning Boys*; Dishonour Bright; The General Died at Dawn; Love on the Run; The Great Barrier*; Theodora Goes Wild Three Smart Girls; Come and Get It; Cain and Mabel; Banjo on My Knee The Plainsman; Charlie Chan at the Opera; Love From a Stranger* Jungle Princess; Espionage*; Feather in Your Nest*; Black Legion; The Magnificent Brute Wings on the Morning*; Stowaway; One in a Million; Dark Journey*; Man in Possession After the Thin Man; Camille; King's Solomon's Mines*; Elephant Boy*; A Day at the Races; Lloyds of London; On the Avenue; Shall We Dance: The Charge of the Light Brigade Lost Horizon; The Frog*; They Gave Him a Gun; Seventh Heaven; Maytime Night Must Fall; I Met Him in Paris; Charlie Chan at the Olympics; His Affair; Saratoga; Storm in a Teacup*; Under the Red Robe* Victoria the Great*; Wee Willie Winkie; Tarzan and the Green Goddess, Captain Courageous

October November December

1938 (appearing in Kine Weekly on 12 January 1939) Biggest Money Maker: Runner Up: Most Popular and Consistent Star Most Successful Output: Winning British Stars: Other Box Office Successes January February March April May June July August September October November December A Star is Born; The Good Earth; Oh, Mr Porter*; Knight Without Armour*; Kid Galahad; Big City; Way Out West Firefly; Keep Fit*; Souls at Sea; Stella Dallas; Dr Syn*; The Squeaker The Prisoner of Zenda; A Hundred Men and a Girl; Ali Baba Goes to Town; Stage Door; Leave it to Me*; The Rat*; Non-Stop New York* Marie Walweska; Dead End; The Awful Truth; Heidi; The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel*; Angel Wells Fargo; The Last Gangster; Dead Men Tell No Tales*; Submarine D1; Man Proof; Alcatraz Island Bad Men of Brimstone; Damsels in Distress; You're a Sweetheart; Tarzan's Revenge; Mademoiselle Docteur* I See Ice*; The Buccaneer; Boy of the Streets Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm; The Housemaster*'; Vessel of Warth*; South Riding*; Owd Bob*; A Slight Case of Murder; Mannequin; The Baroness and the Butler Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs; A Yank at Oxford*; The Hurricane; Mad About Music; Test Pilot; Convict 99*; Tovarich; Bluebeard's Eighth Wife; The Girl of the Golden West The Drum*; Alf's Button Afloat*; In Old Chicago; Three Comrades; Joy of Living; The Terror* The Crowd Roars; Blockade; The Adventures of Marco Polo; The Boy from Bernardo's; There's Always a Woman; Vivacious Lady Sixty Glorious Years*; Little Miss Broadway; Hey! Hey!; U.S.A!*; Three Men and a Girl; Spawn of the North; Love Finds Andy Hardy; Crime School; This Man is News*; Sing You Sinners Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs A Yank at Oxford*; Captains Courageous Shirley Temple MGM Gracie Fields, George Formby

BFI Information Services

159

1939 (appearing in Kine Weekly on 11 January 1940) Biggest Money Maker: Most Popular and Consistent Star Most Successful Output: Winning British Stars: Biggest All-Time Turn Up: Other Box Office Successes January Pygmalion*; The Adventures of Robin Hood*; That Certain Age; The Amazing Doctor Clitterhouse; Too Hot to Handle; Alexander's Ragtime Band; The Lady Vanishes*; St. Martin's Lane It's in the Air; Boy's Town; Marie Antoinette; Stablemates; Yellow Sands*; Carefree; If I were King; am the Law The Citadel*; You Can't Take it with You; Keep Smiling; Thaks for the Memory; Old Bones of the River*; Suez; Submarine Patrol; Racket Busters; Men with Wings; Young in Heart; Four Daughters; The Return of the Frog* The Dawn Patrol; Out West With the hardies; The Great Waltz; The Cowboy and the Lady; Kentucky; Stolen Life*; Just Around the Corner Stand Up and Fight; Sweethearts; The Ware Case*; Young Dr. Kildare; Angesl With Dirty Faces; Four's a Crowd; Trade Winds; Service de Luxe Topper Takes a Tip; the Sisters; they Made Me a Criminal; Honolulu; Storm over Bangal Trouble Brewing*; The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Wings of the Navy; Tailspin; Fast and Loose Love Affair; Oklahoma Kid; Captain Fury; Q Planes*; Sergeant Madden; the Little Princess; East Side of Heaven; Jesse James; The Outsider*; Ask a Policeman* The Four Feathers*; Idiot's Delight; Ice Follies; Made for Each Other; The Hound of the Baskervilles; The Face at the Window* Gunga Din; Three Smart Girls Grow Up; The Hardy's Ride High; The Story of Irene and Vernon Castle; Dark Victory; Beau Geste; Stagecoach; Jamaica Inn*; The Mikado* The Lion Has Wings*; Goodbye Mr Chips*; Shipyard Sally; Confessions of a Nazi Spy; DodgetCity; Union Pacific; Nurse Edith Cavell*; Wuthering Heights; Calling Dr. Kildare; It's a Wonderful World; Only Angels Have Wings; The Four Just Men Tarzan Finds a Son; Andy Hardy Gets Spring Fever; Man of Conquest; Under Pup; Stanley & Livingstone; This Man in Paris*; Man About Town; The Sun Never Sets; Spies of the Air*; Five Came Back The Citadel* Deanna Durban MGM Gracie Fields, George Formby Pygmalion*

February March

April May June July August September October November

December

BFI Information Services

160

760 3.0 2.8 10.6 4.7 15. Airforce Agricultural Workers Unemployed % 22.733 5.6 4.000 Age of Filmgoers Under 15 15-21 22-45 46-60 Over 61 Not given Total 139 1.7 1.7 BFI Information Services 161 .4 6.4 4.9 14.989 1.2 0. it appeared in the Daily Mail and its findings were based on the first 10.5 3. a national poll was organised by Alexander Korda.9 4.The Korda Questionnaires In 1935.000 replies received by the paper.792 260 814 416 824 394 Occupational Analysis Business and Clerical Home duties Professional Industrial School/University Business employers and executive Retired and independent Shop Assistants Arts and Crafts State/Municipal employees Independent Shopkeepers Transport Workers Army.9 3.0 9.000 % 1.461 403 275 10. Navy.4 16.7 1.4 1.0 3.3 59.4 17. Breakdown of Frequency of Cinema Visits Daily 4 times a week 3 times a week 2 times a week once a week once every ten days once a fortnight once a month occasionally no replies 153 113 819 2.

Traditions of Independence: British Cinema in the Thirties by Don MacPherson. David and Charles. 1980. 1974. 1978. Alien & Unwin. Best of British: Cinema and Society 1930-1970 by The Film Business: a History of British Cinema 1896-1972 by Ernest Betts. Politics and Film 1918-1945 edited by Nicholas Pronay and D.T. DEAN. reprint. British Film Institute. published by Jonathan Cape. 1973. Hutchinson.B. B. 1973.H.R. Documentary and Educational Films of the 1930s by Rachael Low. 1984. Film Making in 1930s Britain by Rachael Low. BERNSTEIN. Movies from the Mansion: a History of Pinewood Studios by George Perry. Alien & Unwin. W. 1984. Researcher‘s Guide Co British Film and TV Collections edited by Elisabeth Oliver. Minney. Walter Walter Forde by Geoff Brown. 1980. British Film Institute. The Picture Palace: a Social History of the Cinema by Audrey Field. Allen & Unwin. BALCON. FIELDS. 1947. Cathedrals of the Movies: a History of British Cinemas and their Audiences by David Atwell. Woburn-Futura. “Elstree: the British Hollywood” by Patricia Warren. Elm Tree. The Age of the Dream Palace: Cinema and Society in Britain 1930-1939 by Jeffrey Richards. The British Film Catalogue 1895-1970 by Denis Gifford. Anthony Puffin Asquith. Architectural Press. 1976.Appendices BIBLIOGRAPHY Ideological Consensus In British Feature Films 1935-47 by Tony Aldgate (In Feature Films as History by K. A Critical History of the British Cinema by Roy Armes. Hart-Davies. 1977. 1982. FORDE. 1975. Alien & Unwin. Propaganda. British Sound Films: The Studio Years 1928-59 by David Quinlan. Ithaca. Sidney Sidney Bernstein: A Biography by Caroline Moorhead. 1985. Seeker and Warburg. 1983. Anthony Asquith by J. 1973. Short. The History of the British Film. British Universities Film and Video Council. published by B. Basil Mind‘s Eye: an Autobiography by Basil Dean. Weidenfeld & Nicolson.M. 1979. Macmillan. Basil Blackwell. Alien. 1969. a Biography of the Hon. The Illustrated who‘s Who in British Films by Denis Gifford. 1978. Money Behind the Screen: a Report Prepared on Behalf of the Film Council by F. Alien and Unwin. 1970. 1980.T. British Film Institute. Routledge & Kegan Paul. Batsford. Films of Comment and Persuasion by Rachael Low. Batsford. 1985. 1964. Where we came in: Seventy Years of the British Film Industry by Charles Oakley.D. Falcon Press.W. 1983. 1982. The Formation and Early History of Pinewood Studios by Gregg Glaser. FORMBY. 1983. British Cinema History edited by Vincent Porter and James Curran. 1971. Twenty Years of British Films 1925-1945 by Michael Balcon. The Historian and Film by Paul Smith. Spring. Jeffrey Richards and Tony Aldgate. 1975. Gentry Books. Personalities ASQUITH. Croom Helm. MacGibbon. 1976. 1983. 1981). Michael Michael Balcon presents a Lifetime of Films by Michael Balcon. George George Formby by John Fisher. The Great British Picture Show by George Perry. Cambridge University Press. BFI Information Services 162 . Elm Tree. 1918-29 by Rachael Low. Grade Grade Fields by Muriel Burgess with Tommy Keen. Alien and Unvin. Labour Power In the British Film Industry by Michael Chanan. Lawrence and Wishart. British Universities Film Council. 1974. 1984. Researcher’s Guide to British Newsreels by James Ballantyne. 1937. Kllngender and Stuart Legg. Frewin. 1979.

MILLER. No 2. Hollywood’s Message for the World: the British response in the Nineteen Thirties by Peter Stead. Focus on Film. Radio and Television. Radio and Television. 1977. Historical Journal of Film. pp. 1967. 1981.19-34. HULBERT. Vol 2. Jan-Feb 1985. Master of Comedy by Ray Seaton and Roy Martin. The British Board of Film Censors and Content Control in the 1930s: Foreign Affairs by Jeffrey Richards. Herbert Twenty-Five Thousand Sunsets: an Autobiography by Herbert Wilcox. Pressburger and Others by lan Christie. 1977. Laurence Confessions of an Actor by Laurence Olivier. Vol 26. Summer 1977. No 22. pp 15-28. Focus on Film. 1970. Jan-Feb 1985. Archon. 1977. 1983. Screen. Alien. Max Max Miller. 1973 HAY. 1977. Victor Victor Saville National Film Archive. SAVILLE. 1977. Historical Journal of Film. LAUNDER and GILLIAT Launder and Gilliat by Geoff Brown. 1974. pp 33-43. Radio and Television. MATTHEWS. Alexander Alexander Korda. British Film Institute. Jack The Little Woman‘s Always Right by Jack Hulbert. Vol 26. 1974. Screen. Alien. No 1. No 1. Vol 5. No 3. Ivor The Youngest Son by Ivor Montagu. No 1. 1933-1939 by Paul Swann. Screen. Michael and PRESSBURGER. OLIVIER. Michael Joseph. Summer 1977. July-October 1983.pp 19-32. British Film Institute. W. Weidenfeld and Nicolson. Coming of Sound to the Cinema in Britain by Robert Murphy. Anna There“s Always Tomorrow by Anna Neagle. pp 39-48. Alfred Hitchcock’s British Films by Maurice Yacowar. Jack Anything for a Quiet Life by Jack Hawkins. Radio and Television. 1984. Bodley Head. Historical Journal of Film. 1975. the Cheekie Chappie by John M. MASON. Autobiography and Drawings by James Mason. Fantasy Worlds: British Cinema Between the Wars by Robert Murphy. Representing the Nation: British Documentary Film 1930-1945 by Robert Coils and Philip Dodd. Historical Journal of Film. WILCOX. Jessie Over My Shoulder: an Autobiography by Jessie Matthews. 1982. HITCHCOCK. No 3. Arrows of Desire by lan Christie. No 1. Historical Journal of Film. 1974. No 2. Vol 1. Vol 3. Images of Britain by Jeffrey Richards. W. Dawn (1928): Edith Cavell and Anglo-German Relations by James C. NEAGLE. Hamilton. pp 95-116. 1975. James Before I Forget. pp 10-20. 1981. Vol 46.H. Charmed Lives: a Family Romance by Michael Korda. A Rival to Hollywood? The British Film Industry in the Thirties by Robert Murphy.H. Ivor by Sandy Wilson. pp 154-157. A Romance of Finance: Oscar and the Odeons by Allen Eyles. Barrie and Jenkins. No 1. 1972. HAWKINS. Historical Journal of Film. pp 37-54. Alien. pp 21-33. Robert son. Radio and Television. Frewin.O.George Formby: a Biography by Alan Randall and Ray Seaton. 1984. Lawrence and Wishart. pp 96-106. KORDA. published by W. 1979. Vol 24. Vol 1. BFI Information Services 163 .H. W. Alien. by Random House. 1978. 1985. Waterstone. John Grierson and the G. Alien. No 37. East. NOVELLO. the Man Who Could Work Miracles by Karol Kulik. Historical Journal of Film. Alien. Radio and Television. Vol 4. 1985. Vol 4. Sight and Sound. MONTAGU. The Hays Office and the Defence of the British Market in the 1930s by Sarah Street. pp 68-76. 1974. Will Good Morning Boys: Will Hay. No 45.H. JOURNALS 1930s Newsreels: Censorship and Controversy by Tony Aldgate. 1981. W. The Archive of the Film and Photo League by Victoria Wegg-Prosser. Elm Tree Books. Sight and Sound. pp 143-160. W-H. The British Board of Film Censors and Content Control in the 1930s. pp 38-58 Union Cinemas by Allen Eyles. No 1. 1982. POWELL. Ivor Perchance to Dream by Richard Rose. No 1. Vol 46.H. Emeric Powell. Radio and Television. Film Unit.P.

it is worth keeping an eye open to see what films are being screened on television . Some of these can be checked in the British National Film and Video Catalogue. A Catalogue of Viewing Copies 1985 can be purchased from BFI Publications for £7. Published by the British Film Institute. compilation newsreels. * The table on the following two pages contains now out-of-date information. ** Current (2009) information about the BFI’s Research Viewing Service can be found here ou to fd 164 at e .go a letter from their supervisor.75 postage).50 (plus £0. it is in 16mm distribution. there is only room for two people at a time. most public and academic reference libraries are subscribers. The table* shows clearly that only a minute percentage of the films made during the period are in non-commercial distribution. Archive prints are available for study and bona fide research.£2. For details of titles currently available from BFI Film Bookings please see here. not in 16mm or video distribution. the oportunity to view British Thirties films can be supplemented by films which are not generally available but which the television companies have for transmission. there are viewing facilities at 81 Dean St. the Archive does not loan out copies of films. arrangements to see a film will only be made if it is not available from other sources. etc. i.50 for students plus VAT for screenings on an editing table in a viewing cubicle. it covers all films and videos given a non-theatrical release in Britain and Incorporates a subject index. If the distribution company is underlined the film is available on video . the decision to schedule it will not be taken much in advance of its transmission. Fortunately. Screenings in a small vlewing theatre can be arranged at an increased charge. a minimum of six weeks notice is needed but it is advisable to contact the Viewing Officer as soon as possible. Additionally. generally. Although it is always possible to write to the television companies requesting that they show a particular film or season of films. documentaries on aspects of British and American social history or the arts generally.** Prospective viewers may be expected to provide some evidence of their project‘s validity e. however. there is no point in asking to borrow a print of a film which you have seen on television as under no circumstances will it be loaned out.g. and if the Archive has a viewing copy (in general the Archive has viewing prints for only about 20% of its holdings). Channel Four regularly screens British films of the period.otherwise.e.50 an hour of film . The charge made (in 1986) is £7.in particular.AVAILABILITY OF BRITISH FILMS PRODUCED BETWEEN 1927 AND 1939 The table on the following page lists those films which are available for hire. the obvious disadvantage with such films is that there is no means of knowing what is likely to come up or when. The BFI’s National Film Archive has a large number of British films in its collection. Nevertheless. The Archive has fairly limited viewing facilities and these are much in demand. it is possible that useful supplementary study material has been made available on film BFI Information Services or video e. As is the case with television companies. This is a quarterly journal with an annual cumulation. In addition to feature films made during the period. Also unless a film is programmed as part of a major series.

THE BLACKMAIL BOYS WILL BE BOYS CATHERINE THE GREAT CHEER. THE ELEPHANT BOY ELSTREE CALLING FIRST MRS. THE STARS LOOK DOWN. CHEER CHU-CHIN-CHOW CLAIRVOYANT. THE BATTLE OF THE CORONEL AND FALKLAND ISLANDS. THE MIDSHIPMAN EASY MOULIN ROUGE MUSIC HALL NO LIMIT OH. THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HENRY VIII. BOYS. Robert Flaherty Adrian Brunel Sinclair Hill Castleton Knight Sam Woods Victor Saville Anthony Kimmins Anthony Kimmins Alfred Hitchcock Anthony Kimmins Alfred Hitchcock Marcel Varnel Maurice Elvey Michael Powell. THE I SEE ICE IT‘S IN THE AIR JAMAICA INN KEEP FIT LADY VANISHES. MARTIN’S LANE SALLY IN OUR ALLEY SANDERS OF THE RIVEl SAY IT WITH FLOWERS SECRET AGENT. THE Q PLANES QUEEN OF HEARTS RADIO PARADE OF 1935 RED ENSIGN REMBRANDT RICH AMD STRANGE RING. THE CONVICT 99 COTTAGB ON DARTMOOR. THE TROUBLE BREWING VICTORIA THE GREAT WEDDING REHEARSAL WINDBAG THE SAILOR YOUNG AND INNOCENT 1937 1939 1927 1929 1935 1933 1939 1934 1935 1938 1929 1936 1937 1937 1936 1930 1932 1929 1938 1934 1937 1938 1938 1937 1938 1939 1933 1939 1933 1932 1935 1935 1927 1934 1935 1937 1937 1934 1933 1938 1935 1934 1933 1936 1931 1927 1932 1936 1939 1938 1931 1933 1933 1935 1937 1937 1939 1936 1930 1935 1935 1938 1937 1932 1936 1937 Wastso Harris BFI Harris Rank Harris London Harris Harris Rank Harris BFI Harris London London London Harris Harris Harris Harris Harris Harris Harris Blue Dolphin Harris Harris Harris TCM London Harris Harris London Harris BFI BFI Harris Harris Harris Harris London London London Harris Harris BFI London Harris Harris Rank Rank Harris Harris Harris London BFI Rank Harris London BFI Harris BFI London Rank Harris Thorn-EMI London Harris Tim Whelan Marcel Varnel Walter Summers Alfred Hitchcock William Beaudine Paul Czinner Walter Forde Walter Forde Maurice Eluey Marcel Varnel Anthony Asquith Victor Saville Tim Whelan Zoltan Korda Zoltan Korda. CHIPS IRON DUKE. THE SOUTH RIDING SQUEAKER. THE FLYING SCOTSMAN. THE DRUM.THIRTIES FEATURES IN 16MM/VIDEO DISTRIBUTION ACTION FOR SLANDER BAND WAGGON. MR. THE GOODBYE MR. THE ROME EXPRESS SABOTAGE SAINT IN LONDON. Adrian Brunel Maurice Elvey Robert Flaherty Lothar Mendes Carol Reed EA Dupont John Baxter Monty Banks Marcel Varnel Thornton Freeland Alexander Korda Alexander Korda Tin Whelan Monty Banks Arthur Woods Michael Powell Alexander Korda Alfred Hitchcock Alfred Hitchcock Walter Forde Alfred Hitchcock John Paddy Carstairs Tlic Whelan Maurice Elvey Zolton Korda John Baxter Alfred Hitchcock Victor Saville William K Howard Carol Reed Victor Saville Anthony Asquith Alexander Korda Alfred Hitchcock Anthony Kimmins Herbert Wilcox Alexander Korda William Beaudine Alfred Hitchcock BFI Information Services 165 . PORTER! OVER THE MOON PRIVATE LIFE OF DON JUAN. THE LET GEORGE DO IT! LILY OF KILLARNEY LION HAS WINGS. TRASER. THE LOVE. LIFE AND LAUGHTER MAN OF ARAN MAN WHO COULD WORK MIRACLES. THE STORM IN A TEA CUP TELL ENGLAND THINGS TO COME 39 STEPS. Brian Desmond Hurst. THB ST. A DARK JOURNEY DIVORCE OF LADY X.

Martin‘s Lane. Tel 01 836 2444 Watso Film Library. London WC2. Coventry Tel 0203 84735 BFI Information Services 166 . Glenbuck Home. Tel 041 946 1121 Thorn-EMI Video. 168 Holbrook Lane. Upper St. London Films. London Wl Tel 01 437 1517 BFI Film and Video Library.. 81 Dean St.. Harris Films. Tel 0590 74993. Thorn-EMI House. Rank Audio Viaual (Video). Surrey.. c/o Anthony Morris. Surbiton. 15-17 Old Compton St. 6 Goodwln’s Court. Tel 01 399 0022. 120 Queen Margaret Drive.Addressee Blue Dolphin Film Distributors. Brentford. London WC2. London W1 Tel 01 734 6451. Middx. Glasgow. Tel 01 568 9222 TCM/Twentieth Century Movies. Great West Rd. PO Box 70. Glenbuck Rd.

Although the BFI was formed in 1933. pre-1935 issues of the trade paper The Cinema. There are quite a few regional film archives such as the North Western Archive in Manchester and the Scottish Film Archive in Glasgow. These tended to maintain systematic records and It is worth approaching the parent companies to see if these have been kept. its coverage of preSecond World War material is scanty and researchers should not expect the same kind of in-depth coverage as would be available if they were dealing with contemporary cinema. magazines reflected this bias. there is a great deal of scope in what is the largely unchartered territory of exhibition and distribution which. for instance. American companies were an Important source of finance for film production in Britain. anyone doing a specialised project covering the period must be prepared to do some oral history work of their own. for those who wish to pursue and extend such an interest. such as studio heads. The British Film Institute‘s Library Services undoubtedly houses the most comprehensive coverage of film material in Britain. the Basil Dean and the Sydney Carroll Collections but not only are these small in number. Library Services produce a number of leaflets which would be helpful for anyone planning to use the department. Not only was the library staff much smaller at that time. it is rare to come across any detailed interviews with directors. as yet no organisation has initiated an oral history project covering British cinema history and culture which might help compensate for the sizeable gaps in the range of documentation available. British cinema entrepreneurs. the British Library holds books and journals which could be used to supplement the BFI collection e. are as follows: the Public Records Office has any Government records relating to the film industry. writers. Given the present dearth of archived written material. It would be difficult to attempt any large scale project concerned with production without access to central sources. Companies House has material relating to the history of film companies. apart from the BFI. The BFI does hold some special collections which contain material dealing with the period e. some pointers to additional resources are provided below. These would list what films were being shown and where. several American majors have donated their records to US academic institutions. with a few exceptions.GENERAL RESEARCH GUIDELINES One of the aims of this booklet is to encourage an interest in British cinema and with this in mind it is hoped that some useful information has been provided in the previous pages. whom it would be interesting to have on record have already died and as time passes the opportunities to capture memories of the early days of filmmaking become irretrievably lost. However. A full listing of these is given in A Researcher’s Guide to British Film and TV Collections edited by Elisabeth Oliver. also there would be related features. Not all special collections are stored on central premises and special arrangements have to be made in advance to bring up to London those collections housed outside the department.g. would cover local release patterns and audience reception and such work can only be undertaken from a local base. However. particularly those who do not have easy access to national collections. Sadly. consequently. The Thirties was the age of the star and contemporary. Explain to the librarian exactly what the project involves and he/she should be able to give advice about any special collections held by the archive. a large number of Individuals. novels on which films were based. etc. small in size.g. As is the case today. but also film criticism was not widely accepted as a serious endeavour and there were few outlets for critical writing. nearly all boroughs have a local archive which is usually based within the central reference library. If you are unable to trace a copy of the booklet. almost exclusively fan. both Sight and Sound and Monthly Film Bulletin were being published by the Mid-thirties and both are available on microfilm. It may also have subscribed to a film magazine. economics and arts publications. It is usually possible to find basic cast/credit information and trade paper reviews of specific films but not extended analyses. non-film journals which may have carried occasional general articles on the film industry e. producers. your local reference librarian or the film officer for your Regional Arts Association should be able to tell you if there is a local film archive in your area. Central reference libraries should carry back issues of at least one national newspaper and it is worth asking whether the library possesses the subject index for the The Times. writers. they are also. Back issues of local newspapers with particular reference to the entertainment pages should provide a valuable source of information. directors.g. The first step for anyone planning a local research project should be to establish what local research facilities exist and the starting point for this is the local history centre. BFI Information Services Unfortunately. The Thirties was a time of great showmanship and many stunts 167 . The major central sources.

What type of new cinemas were being built? Today cinema-going is concentrated on city centres . The local history archive may also hold a photographic collection. which films do they remember and why. did the difference in audience composition result in a different kind of film being produced? How active was the local watch committee and did a significant amount of local censorship occur? You could try approaching cinema managers to see if they have back records for their cinemas or if any present employees were working in cinemas in the Thirties. a typical geographical-social homogeneous district or severely restricting the time span covered by the project say to two sample years. one each side of the decade. It is possible to start local oral history projects by interviewing relatives and neighbours of an appropriate age and asking them about their memories of cinemagoing in the period: what attracted them to the cinema.were organised to attract publicity. the opening of a new cinema would have been an important event and undoubtedly reports of these would appear in the local press. Local radio and papers could be used to publicise the project.was that the case in the Thirties? Were cinemas built in districts where there was a need or where an existing cinema had proved popular and it was believed a new cinema could take advantage of an established audience? Which were the first-run houses and which second-run? How were British films being released? Were they just supports for American features or did cinemas screen double bills of British films? What sort of films were being shown? A majority of cinemagoers in the Eighties are under 20. This kind of original research can be very time consuming and it is probably best approached as a group project with each member of the group limiting themselves to a small area of research e. The librarian should be able to point you in the direction of any local history society or group which may have members able to advise on what other local facilities are available and how to use them. how often they did they go to the cinema. how do they feel the entertainment provided by the cinema then compares with that now provided by television? etc. who were their favourite stars. It would be worth consulting local rate books. licensing records and planning records. ABBREVIATIONS ABFD ABPC ACT AF AIP APD ARP ASFI ATP B&D BBFC BIED BIF BFI BIP BL BSFP BSS BTP CAFAD CEA CIR FBI FBO FICOS FN GB GFD IFF JMG KRS LCC MGM MPPDA NATKE NPFD PCT PDC PRS RKO SC UA UFA W&F W&P WB Associated British Film Distributors Associated British Picture Corporation Association of Cine-Technicians Audible Filmcraft Associated Independent Producers Associated Producers and Distributors Associated Radio Pictures Associated Sound Film Industries Associated Talking Pictures British and Dominions Film Corporation British Board of Film Censors British Independent Exhibitors’ (Distributors) Co. British Instructional Films British Film Institute British International Pictures British Lion Film Corporation British Sound Film Productions British Screen Service British Talking Pictures Co-operative Association of Producers and Distributors Cinematograph Exhibitors’ Association of Great Britain and Ireland Committee of Imperial Defence Federation of British Industries Film Booking Offices Film Industries Co-operative Society First National Gaumont British Picture Corporation General Film Distributors Independent Film Producers Jury -Metro-Goldwyn Kinematograph Renters’ Society of Great Britain and Ireland London County Council Metro-GoIdwyn-Mayer Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America National Association of Theatrical and Kine Employees National Provincial Film Distributors Provincial Cinematograph Theatres Producers Distributing Corporation Performing Rights Society Radio-Kelth-Orpheum Sound City Films United Artists Unlversun Film Aktiengesellschaft Woolf and Freedman Film Service Williams & Pritchard Films Warner Brothers BFI Information Services 168 .g. was this the case in the Thirties? If not. It should be possible to build up patterns of cinema openings and distribution patterns from the above sources.

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