You are on page 1of 14

AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

Buying Perception of FMCG Consumers Of Soaps and Detergents Products in Mysore


District A Study At Malls
*Dr.A. Kaboor
**C.Somashekar

*Assistant Professor in commerce, C B M College, Coimbatore.


**Part Time Research Scholar, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore.

1. Introduction:
The research is to understand how is the buying perception of FMCG consumers in
mysore district .The research wants to understand which parameters control the buying
perception leading to a confirmed sale of product belonging to a particular brand or company.
The research want to prioritize the buying perception parameters among the identified
parameters of research such as brand name of the product in market, the packaging of the
product, the friends and others references, the last purchase and use of product, the
reluctance to change the brand to a new one, the quality in utility of product( say in the case
of detergents the washing ability of the detergent) , the attractive discounts and offers for the
product, the availability at the nearest store or mall , the ads influence on the product quality,
etc..
The research would concentrate on the soaps and detergents market and will focus only on
these products - within FMCG products because there are numerous FMCG products and very
generic research would not be able lead the research in right direction towards meaningful
conclusions and suggestions.
The research would find the present buying perception of the consumers w.r.t the soaps and
detergents products to help the marketing managers of the companies to frame their
marketing strategies and promotional plans, distribution network , the place, product quality
and packaging and the big , surprising and extraordinary discounts, offers and gifts with
product purchase ( which challenge the brand loyalty to a product and make customer change
the brand in his present purchase like 1+1 offer, 1+2 offer, 50% discount , worthy useful gift
with each purchase, big sum -cash back, save rs or product or huge discount in all next
purchases coupons ) and generic attributes markets to utilize the understanding to augment
and expand their market.
The present research was conducted at selected few malls in city on the randomly selected
number of consumers on their buying perception, behavior, the decision process w.r.t. the
soaps and detergents products.
2. Literature survey:
2.1 Introduction and definition to buying perception:
Chris blanl article consumer perception theory in smallbusiness.chron.com -2017 state that
Merchants aim to increase their sales by determining what drives their customers' purchase
decisions. Consumer perception theory attempts to explain consumer behavior by analyzing
motivations for buying -- or not buying -- particular items. Three areas of consumer
perception theory relate to consumer perception theory: self perception, price perception and
perception of a benefit to quality of life.
Definition: Consumer perception applies the concept of sensory perception to marketing and
advertising. Just as sensory perception relates to how humans perceive and process sensory
stimuli through their five senses, consumer perception pertains to how individuals form
opinions about companies and the merchandise they offer through the purchases they make.
Merchants apply consumer perception theory to determine how their customers perceive

1
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

them. They also use consumer perception theory to develop marketing and advertising
strategies intended to retain current customers -- and attract new ones.
Self Perception: Self perception theory attempts to explain how individuals develop an
understanding of the motivations behind their own behavior. Self perception by customers
relates to values and motivations that drive buying behavior -- which is also an important
aspect of consumer perception theory. For instance, a study by researchers at the University
of Massachusetts at Amherst addressed how self perception shaped consumers' buying
behavior. The study considered the question of whether consumers believed their buying
decisions had a real effect on issues such as environmental impact. The researchers
concluded that consumers' self perception was a driving factor in whether or not they placed a
priority on socially conscious purchase and consumption practices. Consumers who viewed
themselves as socially conscious tended to place more weight on issues such as environmental
impact when making buying decisions than consumers who did not hold similar views of
themselves.
Price Perception: While mass merchandisers such as Wal-Mart emphasize low prices as an
inherent virtue, upscale merchants attempt to emphasize quality and value for money to
appeal to potential customers. Researchers at the School of Business Administration at
LaSalle University and LeBow College of Business at Drexel University considered several
factors, including price perception -- whether consumers believed they were being charged fair
prices -- in determining whether online shoppers would make repeat purchases through the
same website. The researchers concluded that price perception strongly influenced whether
customers were satisfied with their purchases and whether they would make future
purchases. Two factors that shaped price perception were the perceived quality of the
merchandise or service in question and price comparisons with merchants offering similar
merchandise or services.
Benefit Perception: Many consumers are familiar with this phrase frequently associated with
food advertising. Researchers from Marquette University, Louisiana State University and the
University of Arkansas surveyed customers to determine how nutrition claims associated with
food affected their perception of that food's nutritional value. The researchers found that
consumers tend to reject general, unsupported claims of enhanced nutrition, especially
concerning high nutritional value for foods that are traditionally viewed as unhealthy. The
researchers also theorized that consumers would demonstrate a trend toward applying more
scrutiny to nutrition claims and would demand more specific information about the foods they
purchase.
Stan mack the article Role of Perception in Consumer Behavior -smallbusiness.chron.com -
2013 state that The perceptions consumers have of a business and its products or service
have a dramatic effect on buying behavior. Thats why businesses spend so much money
marketing themselves, honing their customer service and doing whatever else they can to
favorably influence the perceptions of target consumers. With careful planning and execution,
a business can influence those perceptions and foster profitable consumer behaviors.
Influencing Perception: Consumers continually synthesize all the information they have about
a company to form a decision about whether that company offers value. In a sense, consumer
perception is an approximation of reality, notes the book Consumer Behaviour, by Atul Kr.
Sharma. Businesses attempt to influence this perception of reality, sometimes through
trickery and manipulation but often just by presenting themselves in the best possible light.
For example, advertisements often trumpet the quality and convenience of a product or
service, hoping to foster a consumer perception of high value, which can pay off with
increased sales.
Reaching Consumers: A key factor in influencing consumer perception is exposure. The more
information consumers have about a product, the more comfortable they are buying it. As a
result, businesses do all they can to publicize their offerings. However, this causes a problem:

2
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

When every business bombards consumers with marketing messages, consumers tend to tune
out. To influence consumer perception, a business not only must expose its product to
consumers, it also must make its product stand out from the crowd.
Risk Perception: Consumer risk perception is another factor businesses must take into
account when trying to encourage buying behaviors. The more risky a proposition is, the more
difficult it is to get consumers to act. If consumers arent familiar with a brand of product,
they cant assess the risk involved; it could be poorly built, for instance, or too costly
compared to substitutes. Businesses can overcome this hesitancy by offering as much product
information as possible in the form of advertisements or by encouraging product reviews.
Allowing potential customers to handle the product in stores or test it at home also decreases
risk perception, as does offering a flexible return policy.
Customer Retention: Successful businesses dont relax once a customer makes a purchase.
Rather, they continue to foster perceptions that result in profitable behaviors. Once
consumers have tried a product, the task becomes maintaining a good reputation and
establishing brand loyalty. Offering superior customer service is an effective tactic because it
maintains the perception that the business cares about its customers best interests. In
return, customers become loyal to the business, which secures a consistent revenue stream
for the company and makes it more difficult for competitors to poach customers.
Vanessa Cross article The Stages of Perception in Marketing- smallbusiness.chron.com 2015
state that Perception establishes the meaning about a product or brand when a consumer
makes initial contact. In marketing, this is described as consumer information processing. At
this stage all of the senses are engaged in receiving brand marketing communicate messages.
In marketing literature, four distinct stages of perception occur during consumer information
processing: sensation, attention, interpretation and retention.
Sensation: Sensation describes what occurs when a person's senses are initially exposed to
the external stimulus of a product or brand marketing. The sensory receptors of a consumer
are engaged by product or brand cues through sight, sound, smell, taste and texture. For
example, Starbucks engages all the senses in its sensory brand marketing. A customer who
enters a Starbucks coffee shop may hear the sounds and smell the aroma of the grinding of
fresh coffee in the store. Background music and a unique store design round out the
experience of the taste of hot or cold coffee and food products that can be enjoyed in-store at
quaint cafe tables.
Attention: In consumer information processing, attention occurs when a person lingers and
gives mental processing capacity to the external stimulus from a product or brand. Selective
perception is when a consumer pays attention to messages that are consistent with her
attitudes, beliefs and needs. When a product is inconsistent with these factors, the consumer
will withdraw attention.
Interpretation: Interpretation occurs when a person assigns a meaning to the sensory
stimulus from a product or brand marketing. Comprehension is aided by expectations and
familiarity. A consumer scans his memory to retrieve previous experiences with the brand or a
similar brand. Store-brand marketing frequently capitalizes on the interpretation stage when
product packaging design contains logos, colors and other elements that are similar to
national brands that consumers are generally more familiar with.
Retention: The conclusion of the consumer perception process is the retention stage. This is
marked by the storage of product or brand information in short-term and long-term memory.
The marketer's goal is to provide positive stimuli in the proceeding stages that translate into
consumers storing the information about the product or brand into long-term memory.
Elizabeth Mott article by Psychological Factors That Influence Consumer Buying Behavior
state that Convincing consumers that selling what they ought to be buying forms the central
job of the marketer and advertiser. Marketing plans the strategies and tactics; advertising

3
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

implements them and spreads the message. To succeed in positioning brand as the right
solution to consumers' problems or needs, take advantage of the psychological tenets that
explain and predict what people buy. Four basic factors underlie the decisions consumers
make when they spend.
Motivation and Need: Needs motivate buying behavior buy food when you're hungry, protective
gear to feel safe, brand-name clothing to look stylish, education to enable accomplishment
and self-improvement to reach self-actualization, the pinnacle of psychologist Abraham
Maslow's hierarchical pyramid of needs. The more basic they need, the greater the priority it
assumes in driving consumers to fulfill it. If you can convince consumers that your product or
service meets one of their motivating drives, you can convince them to buy what you're selling.
Advertising can help associate a product with need fulfillment.
Perception, Attention, Distortion and Retention: The selective way in which the human mind
views the world around it and the information that reaches it forms the basis of perception. To
get attention, you can use shock tactics, surprise, humor or any device that makes people
watch and listen. Once you get consumers' attention, you must induce them to remember
your message without filtering it through the "distortion field" of their outlooks and mindsets.
Repetition helps make your information stick. That simple concept helps explain how often
you see the same ad and how many times it repeats an important part of its message, such as
the phone number to call in a direct-response TV spot.
Learning and Conditioning: Consumers can gain decision-making information from
advertising, especially about products in categories beyond their experience. If a commercial
message convinces consumers to try a product but their post-purchase experiences prove
dissatisfying, they learn to avoid that product, even if it changes enough to negate their prior
dissatisfaction. In response, the advertiser must try to teach consumers another message
about the product, one that removes prior conditioning in favor of new information.
Conditioning also explains how rewards, gifts with purchases and "but wait, there's more"
messages work to train you to prefer one product in a category over another.
Beliefs and Attitudes: What consumers believe about a seller, product or service affects
whether and what they buy. These attitudes can persist even when the situations that
produce them change. If a company appears to share your values, it may attract your
business. If you perceive a product as beneficial or its competition as harmful, you move
toward one and avoid the other. Advertising strives to position products so they appear
associated with positive traits and to counteract beliefs that interfere with the products' ability
to attract buyers. .
2.2 Introduction to buying perception, buying behavior, buying decision process:
Peter Weinberg. Wolfgang Gottwald. Article Impulsive consumer buying as a result of
emotions, (University of Paderborn, West Germany Journal of business research: Vol10,
issue1, marc 1982, pages 43-57. ) state that The concept of impulse buying is discussed and
characterized as encompassing purchases with high emotional activation, low cognitive
control, and a largely reactive behavior. A study is conducted to investigate whether emotions
causing impulse buying can be identified empirically by interview data and observation of the
mimical expression of buyers and none the results support the validity of the techniques
employed.
V-W.Mitchell & M. Greatorex s article Risk Perception and Reduction in the Purchase of
Consumer Services - Pages 179-200 (Published online: 28 Jul 2001) - The service industries
Journal vol 13, 1993 issue 4. It is suggested that the four main characteristics of services,
intangibility, heterogeneity, perishability and inseparability, greatly increase the degree of
perceived risk in the purchase of services by decreasing the certainty with which purchases
can be made. A review of the literature shows that the only two studies have considered the
difference in risk between goods and services. The present study reports in more detail on the

4
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

differences in perceived risk, its component losses and of the usefulness of fourteen risk
relievers in the purchase of six services. The results confirm the hypothesis that services are
riskier than products and that this riskiness is primarily due to extra uncertainty in the
purchase of services. The importance of losses and the usefulness of risk relievers for six
service offerings are reported and indicate financial loss as being the most important loss and
brand loyalty as most important risk reliever..
2.3 Introduction to FMCG products in Indian market.
Fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) or consumer packaged goods (CPG) are products that
are sold quickly and at relatively low cost. Examples include non-durable goods such as soft
drinks, toiletries, over-the-counter drugs, processed foods and many other consumables.
[7][8] In contrast, durable goods or major appliances such as kitchen appliances are generally
replaced over a period of several years.
FMCG have a short shelf life, either as a result of high consumer demand or because the
product deteriorates rapidly. Some FMCGs, such as meat, fruits and vegetables, dairy
products, and baked goods, are highly perishable. Other goods, such as alcohol, toiletries,
pre-packaged foods, soft drinks, chocolate, candies, and cleaning products, have
high turnover rates. The sales are sometimes influenced by some holidays and season.
Though the profit margin made on FMCG products is relatively small (more so for retailers
than the producers/suppliers), they are generally sold in large quantities; thus, the
cumulative profit on such products can be substantial. FMCG is a classic case of low margin
and high volume business.
The following are the main characteristics of FMCGs:[7]
From the consumers' perspective
Frequent purchase
Low involvement (little or no effort to choose the item)
Low price
Short shelf life
Rapid consumption
From the marketers' angle
High volumes
Low contribution margins
Extensive distribution networks
High stock turnover
ISIC definition :The retail market for FMCGs includes businesses in the following International
Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) (Revision 3) categories:[3] .Fast-moving consumer
electronics : Fast-moving consumer electronics are typically low-priced generic or easily
substitutable consumer electronics, including mobile phones, MP3 players, game players,
earphones, headphones, OTG cables, and digital disposable cameras (9)
Review of journal paper:
Sunil Kumar Dhal article A Study of Consumer Buying Behavior and Perception towards
Laptops in Orissa (International Journal of Innovative Science and Modern Engineering
(IJISME) -ISSN: 2319-6386, Volume-3 Issue-3, February 2015) state that
The technology is changing so fast with the development of computer hardware. It has
observed that last two decade the purchase of laptap has incrased significantly. Now laptop

5
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

purchase is feel like a purchase of fast moving consuming item. Which signifies that the
people are very much interested to handle technological instruments in their day to day
activities. The laptop is the main source of commutation with intra and intercommunication
among the people. The laptop companies in odhisa are interested to study the buying behavior
and perception towards laptop. In order to develop a framework for the study consumer
behaviour it is helpful to begin by considering the evolution of the field of consumer research
and the different paradigms of thought that have influenced the discipline. As described in
this article, a set of dimensions can be identified in the literature, which can be used to
characterize and differentiate the various perspectives on consumer research.
The article concludes that In Present Marketing Scenario, the Study of Consumer Behavior
has become essential. Consumers are the kings of markets. Without consumers no business
organization can run. All the activities of the business concerns end with consumers and
consumer satisfaction. Customer behavior study is based on consumer buying behavior, with
the customer playing the three distinct roles of user, payer and buyer. Consumer buying
behavior has become an integral part of strategic market planning. Through this study we can
draw the conclusion that the customers are interested on service and feature are the most
important dimension to purchase a laptop. Apart from this point the customer also specifies
other eight dimensions are DVD drive, fashion and trend, design, features, embedded
technology, warranty, gaming feature. 3
3. The objective of the research study:
The research study is addressing the issues of FMCG market and its consumers buying
perception, buying behavior and buying decision process
The three malls were selected for study are the Big Bazaar, More and BM Habitat Mall
at Mysore.
As the title of the research speaks out that the overall objective of the present research is
to study and to find and understand and analyze the buying perception of FMCG consumers
of soaps and detergents products in Mysore district and related challenges and issues for the
FMCG industries.
The overall objective of the present research is to study and to find out what is happening
in buying perception of consumers in FMCG markets and related issues in any type of FMCG
products with a special reference to soaps and detergents for profit generation, sustainability,
and growth of product under global competitions.
3.1 The specific major objectives of the research could be listed as follows:
1. To study the importance of buying perception, buying behavior and buying decision
process w.r.t to the consumers FMCG sector.
2. To Study of the priority of the psychological impact of the following parameters of
consumers perception w.r.t FMCG goods:
a) brand name of the product in market,
b) the packaging of the product,
c) the friends and others references,
d) the last purchase and use of product,
e) the reluctance to change the brand to a new one,
f) the perceived quality in utility of product( say in the case of detergents the washing ability
of the detergent)
g) the attractive discounts and offers for the product,
h) the availability at the nearest store or mall
i) the ads influence on the product quality

6
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

3. To Study whether these buying perception parameters is leading to a confirmed decision for
a sale from the customers of FMCG goods.
4. To study whether the buying perception about the particular product can be influenced by
the changes in marketing and promotional aspects of product.
5. To study any other issues of buying perception of FMCG goods which will be useful for
arriving at useful and applicable suggestions and conclusions of thesis.
3.2 Research Hypothesis.
Null hypothesis framed for the present research is as follows:
1. There No need to understand the buying perception, buying behavior and buying decision
process of consumers of FMCG goods from the units.
2. There is No psychological impact and buying perception is controlled by the following
research parameters : ( w.r.t FMCG goods)
a) brand name of the product in market,
b) the packaging of the product,
c) the friends and others references,
d) the last purchase and use of product,
e) the reluctance to change the brand to a new one,
f) the perceived quality in utility of product( say in the case of detergents the washing ability
of the detergent)
g) the attractive discounts and offers for the product,
h) the availability at the nearest store or mall
i) the ads influence on the product quality
3. The buying perception following parameters is Not leading to a confirmed decision for a sale
from the customers of FMCG goods.
a) brand name of the product in market,
b) the packaging of the product,
c) the friends and others references,
d) the last purchase and use of product,
e) the reluctance to change the brand to a new one,
f) the perceived quality in utility of product( say in the case of detergents the washing ability
of the detergent)
g) the attractive discounts and offers for the product,
h) the availability at the nearest store or mall
i) the ads influence on the product quality
4. The buying perception about the particular product can Not be influenced by the changes
in marketing and promotional aspects of product.
The research surveys test the following hypothesis by statistical analysis like chi-square
analysis, correlation and factor analysis.
4. The methodology of the research:
The research was focused on the above evaluation of the parameters and their priorities
among the buying perception on the basis of the importance which make them or push them
to buying decision and related issues in the FMCG marketing and buying behavior pattern to
arrive at following suggestions and conclusions.

7
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

The stratification of data of respondents selected for the research is as follows: Sample
Size
managers consumers Total
Unit 1 - 5 Unit 1 40 Total= 45
Unit II 5 Unit II - 40 Total= 45
Unit III - 5 Unit-III- 40 Total= 45
----------------- ----------------------- -----------------
15 120 = 135 nos.
----------------- ----------------------- -----------------

4.1 Primary and secondary research survey details :


The research of this subject was taken up with a exhaustive primary survey of with 120
respondents who were randomly selected near the soap and detergents shelfs at the three
malls. In each malls around 40 respondents were given small one page questionnaire and get
it filled up to understand the consumers and buying pattern and their perception of particular
brand or products to understand the importance of and priorities of research parameters
For the purpose of this a suitable questionnaire based on the buying perception parameters
was designed.
The second level of research was conducted with exhaustive discussions and interviews of
marketing executives of the malls to take the additional tips for understanding the consumer
behavior and their perception towards the soaps and detergent brands available in the malls.
(Around 5 managers in each mall were interviewed and discussed with).
This empirical study would be conduct a random sample survey of from the respondents form
customers base in malls who have come near to buy the soaps and detergents products ( shelf
FMCG) to have a deeper understanding of the subject matter of the research.
4.2 secondary research survey details :
The methodology also include besides this sample organizational survey , the secondary
survey of Books, management journals, research organization records and research
magazines, conference proceedings and other reports of the on marketing , consumer behavior
and FMCG marketing and also on the sample survey company with additional information
from web sources.
The survey data of the analysis was tested under statistical study using, random sampling
methods, stratification techniques and suitable statistical tests. A survey by way of
discussions and interviews coupled questionnaire methods have brought out the final
suggestions and conclusions.
5. The statistical analysis and interpretations:
The date collected out of the empirical research has been tabulate as follows:
Interpretation: The survey with statistical analysis reveal following aspects with reference to
the rating of the level of buying perception v/s the different parameters are as follows:
1. The above shown factor analysis shows that the date is strong enough to take up
interpretations on the data collected by the survey.

8
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

2. The percentages of preferences and distribution shown (39 % high degree + 22 % high)
shows that there is a great of degree of strength in these parameter in influencing the
perception.
3. The values of units or malls are evenly distributed.
4. The Hindustan livers show a greater degree of preference form its consumers
psychologically.
5. The correlation between the preferences between different units are evenly distributed-
proved by the chi-square tests.
===========
The graphical representation , the data sheet and the chi-square analysis sheet is attached.

5.1 FMCG product analysis


subjective preferences from respondents
questions a(very high) b( high) b(medium)d(low)e(very low) total check
1 brand name 76 23 11 7 3 120 120
2 packaging 21 34 45 11 9 120 120
3 friendes and others refer 78 31 5 4 2 120 120
4 last purchse decision 89 11 9 6 5 120 120
5 reluctnace to change brand 67 11 33 6 3 120 120
6 percepived quality-utility 14 56 33 13 4 120 120
7 attract offers and discounts 34 22 21 24 19 120 120
8 availabality-nearness 22 21 31 22 24 120 120
9 ads influence on mind 26 31 29 23 11 120 120
Total 427 240 217 116 80 1080 1080
percentage 39.54 22.22 20.09 10.74 7.41 ####
average 54.14 26.86 22.43 10.14 6.43
Std dev 30.39 15.59 15.00 6.87 6.00
unit level stratification data
unit level a(very high) b( high) b(medium)d(low)e(very low) total
unit 1 142 76 75 38 29 360 360
unit 2 139 83 64 41 33 360 0
unit 3 146 81 78 37 18 360 0
total 427 240 217 116 80 1080 360
std dev 3.51 3.61 7.37 2.08 7.77 360
cadre level stratification data total
hindustan livers 324 122 89 21 38 594 66
others 103 118 128 95 42 486 54
total 427 240 217 116 80 1080 120
Std dev 156.27 2.83 27.58 52.33 2.83

corrolations 594 66*9


coorolation 0.30861289 1-2 units 0.988 486 54*9
between the hindustan liver products and the others 2-3 units 0.983 1080
3-1 units 0.995

9
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

5.2 FMCG data analysis


chi-square test b/w units of survey
survey a) b) c) d) e)
UNIT -1 142 76 75 38 29 360
UNIT-2 139 83 64 41 33 360
UNIT-3 146 81 78 37 18 360
total 427 240 217 116 80 1080
percentages: 39.5 22.2 20.1 10.7 7.4 100.0
chi-value calculation table :
exp.values for all the column
a) b) c) d) e)
142.33 80.00 72.33 38.67 26.67
142.33 80.00 72.33 38.67 26.67
142.33 80.00 72.33 38.67 26.67
total 427.00 240.00 217.00 116.00 133.33 total of
(E-O) ^2 / total frequency of that column Columns
0.00 0.07 0.03 0.00 0.04 0.14
0.03 0.04 0.32 0.05 0.30 0.73
0.03 0.00 0.15 0.02 0.56 0.77
Total of 3 0.06 0.11 0.50 0.07 0.91 1.65
units calculatedchivalue= 1.65
chi-square value
calculated chi-value
1.65 calculted value less than table value
table chi-value 31.41 hypothesis unit wise proved
degree of freedom : 5 units values- similar and corrolated
level of conficence 95%
p-value = .05
Rating calculations for total values
statistical.rate 5 4 3 2 1 total
rating given between427
1 to 5 240 217 116 80 1080
totals 2135 960 232651 80 4058
4058 out of 5400
Respondents preferences show : skewness 0.983785 positively

10
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

fmcg survey IV
survey values unit wise strtified table
UNIT WISE(- -DATA
) (-) nutral (+) (++
UNIT -1 142 76 75 38 29
UNIT-2 139 83 64 41 33
UNIT-3 146 81 78 37 18
total 427 240 217 116 80

160
Series1 Series2
140
120
100
80
60
40
20 Series3
0
UNIT -1 UNIT-2 UNIT-3

11
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

6. Research suggestions and conclusions :

1. The research suggests that first the Three great need to understand the buying
perception, buying behavior and buying decision process of consumers of FMCG goods from
the units and its team of marketing executives

2. The research finds and suggests that the there is great but varied gegree of psychological
impact and buying perception is controlled by the following research parameters : ( w.r.t
FMCG goods observed in the soaps and detergents products )
brand name of the product in market,
the packaging of the product,
the friends and others references,
the last purchase and use of product,
the reluctance to change the brand to a new one,
the perceived quality in utility of product( say in the case of detergents the washing ability
of the detergent)
the attractive discounts and offers for the product,
the availability at the nearest store or mall
the ads influence on the product quality
3. The research show that these above discussed parameters are leading to a confirmed
decision for a sale from the customers of FMCG goods.
4. The research shows that the buying perception about the particular product can be
influenced by the changes in marketing and promotional aspects of product.
5. Most of hypothesis was proved positive for most research parameters.
The research conclude that the marketing team should concentrate more understanding the
changing consumers ( customers) needs in advance plan accordingly the ad campaign , the
discounts and offers and the quality and utility , safety and security of use of products etc..
Well in advance to e ahead in market.
6. Significance and scope for further research:
The research sincerely would like to help the marketing managers in FMCG organisations in
particular the soaps and detergents range from suitably changing their promotion, ad, and
distribution and packaging strategies.
The same study could be extended to other sector and other FMCG products with suitable
modifications of objectives of research.
Bibliography:
1. Chris blanl article consumer perception theory in smallbusiness.chron.com -2017
2. Stan mack the article Role of Perception in Consumer Behavior -smallbusiness.chron.com
-2013
3. Vanessa Cross article The Stages of Perception in Marketing- smallbusiness.chron.com
2015
4. Elizabeth Mott article by Psychological Factors That Influence Consumer Buying Behavior
smallbusiness.chron.com 2015
5. Peter Weinberg. Wolfgang Gottwald. Article Impulsive consumer buying as a result of
emotions, (University of Paderborn, West Germany Journal of business research: Vol10,
issue1, marc 1982, pages 43-57. )

12
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

6. V-W. Mitchell & M. Greatorex s article Risk Perception and Reduction in the Purchase of
Consumer Services - Pages 179-200 (Published online: 28 Jul 2001) - The service industries
Journal vol 13, 1993 issue 4.
7. Ramanuj Majumdar (2004). Product Management in India. PHI Learning. pp. 26
27. ISBN 978-81-203-1252-4. Retrieved 2010-06-19.
8. Sean Brierley (2002). The advertising handbook By Sean Brierley (2, illustrated ed.).
Routledge. p. 14. ISBN 978-0-415-24391-9.
9. Aydn elen; Tarkan Erdoan; Erol Taymaz (June 2005). "Fast Moving Consumer Goods
Competitive Conditions and Policies" (PDF). Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical
University. Retrieved 2007-07-09., p.2-4
10. Sunil Kumar Dhal article A Study of Consumer Buying Behavior and Perception
Towards Laptops in Orissa (International Journal of Innovative Science and Modern
Engineering (IJISME) -ISSN: 2319-6386, Volume-3 Issue-3, February 2015)
Reference books:
AUTHOR: Solomon, M.R. TITLE: Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having and Being PUBLISHER:
Pearson Education, Inc.[,publishing as Brady/ Prentice Hall/ Addison-Wesley.ISBN-13: 978-0-
13-345089-7, ISBN: 0-13-345089-9 DATE/EDITION: 2014/11th Edition
Schedule I:
ISIC definition: The retail market for FMCGs includes businesses in the following International
Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) (Revision 3) categories:[3]
ISIC 5211 retail sales in non-specialized stores
ISIC 5219 other retail sales in non-specialized stores
ISIC 5220 retail sales of food, beverages and tobacco in specialized stores
ISIC 5231 retail sales of pharmaceutical and medical goods, cosmetic and toilet articles
ISIC 5251 retail sales via mail order houses
ISIC 5252 retail sales via stalls and markets
ISIC 5259 wholesale goods
ISIC 5269 wholesale medical prescriptions
Supplier industries for FMCGs include:
1512 fish and fish products
1513 fruit and vegetables
1514 vegetable and animal oils and fats
1520 dairy products
1531 grain mill products
1532 starches and starch products
1533 animal feeds
1541 bakery products
1542 sugar
1543 cocoa, chocolate and sugar confectionery
1544 macaroni, noodles, couscous

13
www.aeph.in
AEIJST March 2017 - Vol 5 - Issue 03 ISSN - 2348 - 6732

1549 other food products


1551 spirits, ethyl alcohol
1552 wines
1553 malt liquors and malt
1554 soft drinks, mineral waters
1600 tobacco products
2101 pulp, paper and paperboard
2102 corrugated paper, containers
2109 other articles of paper and paperboard
2424 soap and detergents, cleaning preparations, perfumes
2430 men's and women's inner garments, shaving gels, deodorants
Fast-moving consumer electronics : Fast-moving consumer electronics are typically low-priced
generic or easily substitutable consumer electronics, including mobile phones, MP3
players, game players, earphones, headphones, OTG cables, and digital disposable cameras.

14
www.aeph.in