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Personal Reflection

Building a positive learning environment it is the essential objective of classroom


management, it will not only facilitate students academic achievement, but also
foster their personal and social skill development. Classrooms are expected to be a
place that regulated by the teacher as well as students themselves. In order to manage
the classroom effectively, teachers should build positive relationships with students,
develop the pedagogy taking into consideration the curriculum as well as students
learning needs, and intervene the challenge behaviour of students.

First of all, good communication between teacher and student is vital to a positive
classroom climate because good communication can help build the relationship
between teacher and students, which will increase the effectiveness and efficiency of
classroom management. In order to communicate with students effectively, I will use
verbal communication strategies such as I-messaging and negotiating, as well as non-
verbal communication strategies such as eye contact, gesture and positioning. I should
make sure that the communication strategies I choose is accepted by the students.
Moreover, communication with students is about the exchanging of personal
perceptions between teacher and students. If the teachers personal belief is not
suitable for the teaching context or school environment, it will not be accepted by
students, and the communication may not be helpful for creating positive learning
environment. Effective communicate is the prerequisite of applying the Goal Centred
Theory in classroom, it plays a vital role for teachers to know the need-based
explanation for students misbehaviour and negotiate an alternative way to satisfy the
students needs. From my experience as a pre-service teacher, practically effective
communication with students can be achieved by involving in students chat in the
classroom, talking with students friendly, making guess about students thoughts and
assisting students in their studies and school life.

The second aspect of building positive learning environment is to develop the


academic pedagogy taking into consideration the curriculum as well as students
learning needs. Essentially, I should deliver the knowledge and assess students
learning according to the syllabus, but I can change the way of delivering and
assessing to facilitate students learning. I believe that students best learn through
self-efficacy and motivation, cooperative learning, differentiated teaching, feedback,
values and expectations. Therefore, first, I will assist students to build self-efficacy
and motivate students in their self-learning, so that the classroom learning
environment can be more students regulated and directed. Second, I will facilitate
cooperative learning, such as the think-pair-share model, the co-op model, the jigsaw
model and the Johnson model. Third, I will accommodate different levels of learning,
students with different learning abilities will be assigned with differentiated tasks that
satisfy their diverse learning needs, also the students with lower learning abilities will
get more support. I will also set explicit expectations for students, so that they will
have clear learning objectives. Furthermore, assessment is important because it
motivate students learning, provides data about students learning outcome and
provides feedback for students future learning. I will develop more formative
assessments. In my teaching philosophy, the purpose of learning is not performing
well in the assessments, instead, it is to enrich students knowledge. Formative
assessment can determine whether students make reasonable progress towards the
learning outcomes during the learning process, and the feedback from it can be used
to direct students learning in remaining part of the unit.

When facing challenge behaviours, I will use intervention to maintain the learning
environment. According to my pedagogy, I will use two theories for intervention.
First, I believe that Applied Behaviour Analysis works, because this approach can
enhance the positive development of behaviours in students by involving
consequences, so that students self-regulation can be developed. To use this approach
in practice, I will first, choose one target behaviour, then establish the long- and short-
term behavioural objective, after that I will establish the consequence that can
increase or decrease the target behaviour and monitor the progress over time, and
finally evaluated the intervention. The second approach I am comfortable working
with is the Behavioural Theories, because this approach can change the negative
behaviours that involves little personal beliefs or feelings of individual students. To
use this approach in practice, I will first choose one target behaviour that need to be
modified, then find a replacement behaviour, after that I will reinforce the target
behaviour to students, and finally review the effectiveness of this intervention. The
Applied Behavioural Analysis approach can help students develop their self-
regulation by thinking of the consequence of certain behaviour. However, if students
self-regulation is not effectively developed, then the Behavioural Theory approach
can intervene students behaviours directly.

Finally, I believe professional reflexivity is important to my teaching because it can


help bridge the gap between the theoretical pedagogies and reality implementations,
and between current and evidence-based best practice. By reflection, I can develop
my own pedagogies based on day-to-day teaching activities and my own teaching
characteristics. Especially, I can determine which educational theories works for my
teaching environment and how to implement the theoretical pedagogies according to
my teaching context. As a consequence of this belief, I will first discuss with my
colleagues to get peer reviews. I will also ask experienced and senior teachers to
provide feedback for my teaching activities. In order to achieve the first two
approaches, I will ask colleagues and senior teachers to observe my class if possible.
The third approach is communicating with students directly about their perceptions on
my teaching activities. And the last approach is to read more research articles about
teaching activities, or even conduct an action research by myself.
Bibliography

My personal philosophy comes from the following book:

Lyons, G., Ford, M., & Slee, J. (Eds.). (2014). Classroom management: Creating
positive learning environments (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage
Learning.
Developing your philosophy of classroom
management
John De Nobile
School of Education, Macquarie University
With adaptations by Roberto H Parada , School of Education, University of Western
Sydney

This resource consists of a series of linked activities chapter-by-chapter to Lyons et


al. Classroom Management: Creating positive learning environments 4E. These
activities enable you to progressively work on and develop your own philosophy,
plan and style of classroom management.

A classroom philosophy, simply put, is a statement of what you believe about how to
best manage a class and how you will go about achieving that vision. This resource
will help you build it bit by bit. Complete the activities linked to each chapter of the
text and by the end of chapter 10 you should be able to bring your work together to
form your classroom philosophy.
(Week 1) Chapter 1: Modelling classroom management
In this chapter you have gained a small insight into the hectic world of teachers
starting out, and have been exposed to the bases of a good classroom management
plan through the Lyford Model. The following activities are designed to get you
thinking about your own model of teaching and classroom management.

1.1 What is a good teacher? Think about the teachers from your days in primary
and secondary schooling. What qualities did they have that made them good?
Make a list in the box below.

A good teacher has the following qualities:


Expert in his/her teaching area;
Be friendly and patient to students;
Can deal with complex learning environment issues, such as challenge behaviors
that reducing the overall students wellbeing; and
Can deliver the knowledge and facilitate adolescents development in a way that
students can understand and accept easily.

1.2 Using the Lyford Model as a starting point, what do you think are the key
considerations when a teacher is planning their strategy for classroom
management? After making some rough notes, pick out the most important
ones and list them below.

The key considerations are:


Background knowledge about educational theories
Understanding of the theories or personal teaching philosophy
Reflections from previous implementation of teaching strategies.

In my opinion, the reflection from previous is the most important consideration, as


it can tell me what pedagogies work well and how to implement some theories in
the real world teaching.

1.3 With your responses to the last two activities as a source of ideas, complete the
sentence in the box below.

I believe good teaching is about enriching the knowledge of educational theories,


having a comprehensive understanding of the theories, implementing the
pedagogies effectively, and developing teaching philosophy continuously through
reflection.
(Week 2)Chapter 2: Classroom management theory
In this chapter you have been introduced to some theories of behaviour/classroom
management. More are presented in the online companion. Some of these might
have caused you to react in some way, either negatively or positively. Of the ones
you developed a positive feeling about, was there a particular theory that stood out?
Was there a theory or approach that you felt might fit your view of how children
should be treated and how teaching happens? Think about this before responding to
the activities.

2.1 In the box below, list the theories that you think are not for you under the
heading Not me, and the theories that you think are more favourable under the
heading More like me.

Not me More like me


Choice Theory Goal Centred Theory
Assertive Discipline Cognitive Behavioural Theory
Applied Behaviour Analysis

2.2 Now take a closer look at the theories you placed in the More like me column.
Read the suggested readings provided in this chapter and the online companion.
Get to know the theories more intimately. Use this new knowledge, specifically
the key philosophies behind the theories (or theory), to develop your own
statement of belief about the sort of places classrooms should be. Complete the
following sentence and perhaps add another to accompany it.

I believe classrooms should be places where,


Teacher know the goal of students certain behaviour (or misbehaviour),
and lead students to their goals with the proper behaviours, so that the
positive learning environment can be built for every students.
Regulated by not only the teachers but also the students themselves.
Students self-management skills are built by themselves with teachers
scaffolding, thus, teachers should put into effort to facilitate students
sense of self-esteem and social cognitions.
Every student is considerate about their behaviours. However, students are
still under cognitive development, which means they cannot always
manage their behaviours by cold cognition. Therefore, teachers should
reinforce the consequences if they want to increase certain behaviours of
students, or punish the consequences if they want to decrease certain
misbehaviours of students.
(Week 3)Chapters 3 & 6: Relationships, communication & Professional
reflexivity
Effective communication is a key component of effective classroom management,
and quality teaching depends on it. This chapter describes some very useful skills for
dealing with inappropriate student behaviour in a non-confrontational and positive
way. Being aware of non-verbal cues will lead a teacher to be more sensitive to how
their messages are being received as well as how to send messages and provide
feedback more effectively. Active listening allows teachers and students to interact
with minimal interference from underlying emotional factors. I-messages provide
the teacher with a tool to convey to students how their behaviour is affecting the
class in a non-submissive, informative and positive manner.

Teaching philosophies often describe the way a teacher will interact with their
students and this, in turn, provides a window into the classroom climate that a
teacher is trying to establish. The following activities should help you to identify your
preferred way of communicating with the class generally as well as in dealing with
inappropriate behaviour. After completing them you should have a better idea of
how your classroom philosophy will describe your communication style in the
classroom.

3.1 After reading this chapter and doing some of your own follow-up reading, list in
the boxes below which communication methods you are most attracted to, and
which ones you have not tried but would not mind practising to see if they might
work for you.

My preferred communication style Things Id like to try out


Active listening Asserting
Open questioning Facial expression and eye contact
I-messaging Gesture, posture and positioning
Negotiating Interpreting non-verbal communication
Proximity, touch and physical setting

3.2 You will need to pre-empt the communication paragraph in your philosophy with
a sentence or two underpinning or justifying it. Using your readings of the
chapter, in particular the Relationships and communication, Interference,
Communication process and Non-verbal communication sections, complete the
sentence in the box below. You might need to add a second or even a third
sentence.

I believe that good communication between teacher and student is vital to a


positive classroom climate because good communication can help build the
relationship between teacher and students. For teacher, this will increase the
effectiveness and efficiency of classroom management. For students, this will
increase their sense of belonging to the class as well as their wellbeing in the
classroom.

3.3 To complete your paragraph on communication you will now need to identify
the key strategies you will use. Take another look at the lists in 3.1 and pick the
most suitable of these to complete the section below.

Therefore, I will first ask students about their thoughts in order to know the
reason for them to misbehave, and listen to students actively when they express
their own perceptions. Then I will use the strategies of I-messaging and
negotiating to present my suggestion or intervention to students in order to
prevent further misbehaviours. When I am communicating with students, I should
also involves non-verbal communication such as eye contact, gesture and
positioning to make the conversation relaxing and effective.

This week you also looked at how personal beliefs can help or hinder in your
relationships and communication with students.

3.3 Briefly outline your understanding of how beliefs can help or hinder your
ability to create positive learning environments:

Teacher personal beliefs affect the way we create Positive Learning Environments
by
The choice of communicating strategies: Teachers choose their
communicating strategies with students according to their own beliefs.
However, when the strategies from teachers own belief is not accepted by
the students, then the effectiveness of building positive learning
environment through communication is reduced.
The perceptions or ideas that teacher will deliver to students:
communication with students is about the exchanging of personal
perceptions between teacher and students. If the teachers personal belief
is not suitable for the teaching context or school environment, it will not be
accepted by students, and the communication may not be helpful for
creating positive learning environment.

Chapter 6: Professional reflexivity


The last of the four positive practices is professional reflexivity. Good teachers reflect
on what they do frequently, during lessons as well as afterwards. Examining how
well things worked, or how things didnt work as well as planned, helps teachers to
inform their future teaching and consequently improve their practice. This chapter
discusses at length an action research model that can be used to encourage
professional reflexivity. There are, of course, other models to consider as indicated in
the reference list at the end of the chapter.
Your teaching philosophy should describe how and for what purpose you might
engage in a cycle of professional reflexivity, be it through critical analysis using
various perspectives or an action research model, or both.

6.1 Why should teachers engage in professional reflexivity? By reading this chapter
you will get a clear idea about the benefits of reflection on and in action. Once
you have given this some thought and done some further reading, complete the
following sentence.

I believe professional reflexivity is important to my teaching because it can help


bridge the gap between the theoretical pedagogies and reality implementations,
and between current and evidence-based best practice. By reflection, I can
develop my own pedagogies based on day-to-day teaching activities and my own
teaching characteristics. Especially, I can determine which educational theories
works for my teaching environment and how to implement the theoretical
pedagogies according to my teaching context.

6.2 Having thought up a justification for it, how will you go about engaging in
reflection about your practice in your teaching career? Once you have thought
this out, think of some practical and achievable ways you can engage in
professional reflexivity and complete the next sentence.

As a consequence of this belief, I will first discuss with my colleagues to get peer
reviews. I will also ask experienced and senior teachers to provide feedback for my
teaching activities. In order to achieve the first two approaches, I will ask
colleagues and senior teachers to observe my class if possible. The third approach
is communicating with students directly about their perceptions on my teaching
activities. And the last approach is to read more research articles about teaching
activities, or even conduct an action research by myself.
(Week 4)Chapter 4: Classroom organisation and Curriculum,
assessment and pedagogy
Classroom management is not just about managing behaviour. At the heart of
teaching and learning are the curriculum taught, the pedagogy used and the
assessment designed to measure how well that curriculum was taught and how well
the pedagogy worked. This chapter takes you through these three areas one at a
time.

The next part of your teaching philosophy will be about how you will deliver
curriculum and assess student achievement/growth. After reading this chapter,
please reflect on the following:
What will you take into consideration when planning your teaching program?
How will you know what to teach and where to start?
What are the many ways in which your students could demonstrate achievement
other than tests and quizzes?
What teaching approaches will you use and what philosophical views will your
pedagogies reflect?

4.1 Using the PIR Cycle as a stimulus, explain how you will go about planning your
teaching program in the box below.

When planning my teaching program, I will first refer to the curriculum to make
the purpose of the lesson explicit. I will also plan for classroom management
strategies, such as the implementation and regulation of learning activities, so that
the delivery of content is effective. The most important consideration is the
reviews of previous experience. This will provide me with a benchmark for
planning both the content and classroom management for new teaching activities.

4.2 Why is assessment important? What types of assessment will you develop and
why? Answer these two questions below.

Assessment is important because


it motivate students learning;
it provides data about students learning outcome, so that teachers can use
it to reflect on their teaching activities;
it provides feedback for students future learning.

I will develop more formative assessments. In my teaching philosophy, the


purpose of learning is not performing well in the assessments, instead, it is to
enrich students knowledge. Formative assessment can determine whether
students make reasonable progress towards the learning outcomes during the
learning process, and the feedback from it can be used to direct students learning
in remaining part of the unit, which can facilitate students in achieving the overall
learning outcomes, which serve the essential purpose of learning. On the other
hand, the result of formative assessment will also provide data for teachers, as it
does for summative assessment.

4.3 Pedagogy refers to how you will teach the curriculum. Usually, the type of
pedagogy you implement is influenced by a basic belief about how students best
learn. After considering your pedagogical approach and strategies, complete the
sentences below.

I believe that students best learn through self-efficacy and motivation, cooperative
learning, differentiated teaching, feedback, values and expectations.

Therefore I will
assist students to build self-efficacy and motivate students in their self-
learning, so that the classroom learning environment can be more students
regulated and directed.
Use strategies to facilitate cooperative learning, such as the think-pair-
share model, the co-op model, the jigsaw model and the Johnson model.
However, I will adopt different model based on the teaching context and
students learning abilities.
Accommodate different levels of learning. Students with different learning
abilities will be assigned with differentiated tasks that satisfy their diverse
learning needs, also the students with lower learning abilities will get more
support.
Set explicit expectations for students, so that they will have clear learning
objectives. I will also provide feedback for them to evaluate their previous
learning outcomes and assist their future learnings.
Chapter 5: Classroom organisation
As explained in this chapter, there are several dimensions to classroom organisation.
Each of these put together become the manifestation of your classroom culture.
Your classroom culture is, simply put, the way your class operates and incorporates:
rules and procedures
organisation of the physical space.

It is now time to think about how your teaching philosophy will describe these two
aspects and explain them in terms of an overarching set of beliefs or approaches.
After reading this chapter, complete the next two activities.

5.1 What values do you hold as important to establishing an orderly, productive and
positive classroom? Answer this question below, then list the key
rules/expectations you think flow naturally from those values and which you
want to stress in your class. Complete the section by explaining how rules and
consequences will be established in your classroom.

In order to establish class rules, I will first choose an approach to reasoning. For
younger students, I will choose the inductive approach as it requires less
abstraction; for older students, I will choose the deductive approach to make them
brainstorm a set of principles. Then I will establish main rules that are brief and
essential. Finally I will develop specific rules by brainstorming with students
together.

In the establishment of consequences, I will set positive consequences to facilitate


certain behaviours as well as negative consequences to punish misbehaviours. The
consequences should also presents fairness and justice.

5.2 What should your classroom look like to visitors entering it. Why? Think about
this then answer the question and explain how you might organise:
seating
classroom space (displays, colours, furniture, etc).

Seating: I will allow students to take seats on their own. According to my


pedagogies, I will facilitate cooperative learning, and students are expected to
form group the by themselves. It will be convenient for them if they sit aside their
chosen group members.

Space: I will adopt the regular rows arrangement. This is because most schools
only have rectangular desks in the classroom, so that rows will be the more space-
saving layout. Also students are allowed to move the table according to teachers
instruction when it is convenient for some learning activities. At the beginning of
the lessons, all the desk and chairs should face to the front white board, in order
to make students be ready for teachers notes and instructions.
(Week 5).Chapter 7: Interventions & Evaluation
Interventions bring the focus of your philosophy back to the behaviour management
aspect of classroom management. The first part of this chapter explains intervention
as something that is done to one or more aspects of the classroom milieu to improve
a situation that is getting out of hand (or has the potential to), usually as a result of
inappropriate behaviour that threatens the stability of the learning environment.
The chapter presents approaches to intervention according to the three theoretical
orientations introduced in chapters 1 and 2.

7.1 After reading this chapter ask yourself the following questions and record your
answers.

Which approach am I Why? How would I use this in


most comfortable practice?
working with?
(You can chose more
than 1)
Behavioural Theories Because this approach First, choose one target
can change the negative behaviour that need to
behaviours that involves be modified. Second, find
little personal beliefs or a replacement behaviour.
feelings of individual Then reinforce the target
students. behaviour to students.
Finally, review the
effectiveness of this
intervention.
Applied Behaviour Because this approach First, choose one target
Analysis can enhance the positive behaviour. Second,
development of establish the long- and
behaviours in students by short-term behavioural
involving consequences. objective. Third, establish
the consequence that can
increase or decrease the
target behaviour. Then
monitor the progress.
Finally evaluated the
intervention.

7.2 Did you list more than one approach? If so, how might the two (or more)
approaches work together as a behaviour management strategy (or sequence of
strategies in a plan)?

The Applied Behavioural Analysis approach can help students develop their self-
regulation by thinking of the consequence of certain behaviour. However, if
students self-regulation is not effectively developed, then the Behavioural Theory
approach can intervene students behaviours directly.

7.3 Having thought through the approaches and how you would apply them, it is
time to nail down your intervention strategy. First, write about the approach (or
approaches) you believe will work best and why.

If intervention for behaviour management is needed, I believe that Behavioural


Theories works, because this approach can change the negative behaviours that
involves little personal beliefs or feelings of individual students.
I also believe that Applied Behaviour Analysis works, because this approach can
enhance the positive development of behaviours in students by involving
consequences.

7.4 Now write about how you would put the above into practice.

In line with this thinking for behaviour theory, I will first choose one target
behaviour that need to be modified. Second, find a replacement behaviour. Then
reinforce the target behaviour to students. Finally, review the effectiveness of this
intervention.
For the Applied behavioural Analysis, I will first choose one target behaviour.
Second, establish the long- and short-term behavioural objective. Third, establish
the consequence that can increase or decrease the target behaviour. Then
monitor the progress. Finally evaluated the intervention.

7.5 Having written an overview of your intervention plan, go back to your earlier
statements, particularly your responses to 1.3, 2.2, 3.3 and 5.1. In light of 7.3
and 7.4 do you need to modify any of these? If so, make the changes now.

This week we also discussed the importance of considering evaluation for


interventions

7.6 Briefly outline below how you would go about documenting and monitoring an
intervention with a student(s) or class for effectiveness.

Taking into consideration the need to have objective measures of effectiveness of


an intervention I will monitor student progress in the following ways. First, I can
monitor the progress by seeing whether the target behaviour is decreased or
increased as purpose. Second, see whether the positive behaviours are self-
reinforced by students.4
(Week 6) Chapter 8: Stories from the field (Personal Reading)
In this chapter there are 10 stories where teachers and others describe an aspect of
their experience with classroom management in the real world. The online
companion website presents even more. To complete the activity below please read
between three and five of these. They will provide you with a variety of models of
practice in classroom management and might trigger new ideas to include in your
philosophy of teaching.

8.1 After reading some of the case studies (E.g., 8 in the text Lisa, 9 Andrew, 10
Wendy and 16, 19, 20 etc online), what would you add about aspects of your
classroom management that have not been mentioned so far in your
philosophy? Add these in the box below in rough draft form. You can refine
them later in 10.1.

Encourage engagement by making students recognise and reflect on the


feeling of success.
Make the classroom fair, and make the lessons fun.
Know the teaching context or school environment.
Apply different educational theories according to the circumstance.
(Week 7) Principles of Behaviour Modification. Zirporli T.J. (2012).
Ch10 and Killu, K. (2008)

This week we looked at fundamental aspects of behaviourism and learning. Ziporli


and Killu provide examples of the application of such theory and research to
classroom management and behaviour change. Important concepts such as
reinforcement, functional purpose of behaviour and behaviour shaping are discussed

7.1 After reading Ziporli and Killu and reflecting on the lecture content what would
you add about aspects of your classroom management that have not been
mentioned so far in your philosophy? Add these in the box below in rough draft
form. You can refine them later in 10.1.

Apply different types of reinforcer in the intervention program.


Promoting generalisation and maintenance of behaviour changes.

(Week 8) Social Emotional Learning in Schools. Cohen, J. (2006) & Zins,


et al (2007).
Social and Emotional Learning brings your attention to focus efforts on promoting
students social and emotional competencies. Many leaders in the field underscore
the importance of skills-based teaching and learning to properly address this
important facet of teaching the whole child.
8.1 After reading Cohen and Zin and reflecting on the lecture content what would
you add about aspects of your classroom management that have not been
mentioned so far in your philosophy? Add these in the box below in rough draft
form. You can refine them later in 10.1.

Develop students social emotional competence.


(Week 9) Chapter 9: Your theory into practice
Early in the chapter you are asked to write up a statement of your theoretical
approach to classroom management. You should read the rest of the chapter, as it
takes you through the steps of constructing a philosophy of teaching. You already
started this process in activities relating to chapters 1 and 2, but now you have a
chance to refine it by altering your responses in 1.3 and 2.2. This may require
changes to sentences or even some considerable rewriting, but as the authors say, if
a job is worth doing, it is worth doing it well.

9.1 Now that you have reviewed your overarching philosophy and settled, more or
less, on your approach to teaching and classroom management, it is time to
combine the bits that you have been working on into your first (draft) teaching
philosophy. It is simple now. All the hard work has been done. Simply cut and
paste your responses in the order suggested below, into the box.

Cut and paste in the following order leaving a line space between each section:
1.3 > 2.2 > 3.2 > 3.3 > 5.1 > 5.2 > 4.1 > 4.2 > 4.3 > 7.1 > 7.3 > 7.4 >8.1> 6.1 > 6.2

My personal reflection/teaching philosophy (Draft 1)


Building a positive learning environment it is the essential objective of classroom
management, it will not only facilitate students academic achievement, but also
foster their personal and social skill development. Classrooms are expected to be a
place that regulated by the teacher as well as students themselves. In order to
manage the classroom effectively, teachers should build positive relationships
with students, develop the pedagogy taking into consideration the curriculum as
well as students learning needs, and intervene the challenge behaviour of
students.
(Week 9) Chapter 10: Contemporary issues (Personal Reading)
This chapter describes some of the current issues and trends that schools and wider
school systems are dealing with. After reading the chapter, you should consider if
any of these movements require presence in your teaching philosophy. For
example, once you have visited the AITSL website and examined the national
teaching standards, do you feel the need to address any of these standards in your
teaching philosophy? After reading about time outs, exclusion and expulsion, do you
feel your classroom management intervention approach needs to change or is it OK
as it is? These are just two example of areas where wider issues that teachers might
want to address in their philosophy.

Ask yourself these questions after reading your draft philosophy from 9.1:
1 Have I covered everything I want to cover in my philosophy and if not, what do I
need to add? This might be from chapter 10, but dont forget about things you
might have written in 8.1. Now is the time to consider how they will fit into your
draft.
2 Does the philosophy read right to me? If not, then make your changes. Move
sections around if you feel they sit better.
3 Do I need an opening quote/sentence and do I need a conclusion to round things
off? If so, jot down some rough notes.

10.1 After considering questions 1, 2 and 3 above, edit your teaching philosophy. It
would be a good idea to leave the draft you had in 9.1 alone, cut and paste that
here and make the changes here just in case you need to refer back to your
original draft.

My personal reflection/teaching philosophy (Draft 2)


Building a positive learning environment it is the essential objective of classroom
management, it will not only facilitate students academic achievement, but also
foster their personal and social skill development. Classrooms are expected to be a
place that regulated by the teacher as well as students themselves. In order to
manage the classroom effectively, teachers should build positive relationships
with students, develop the pedagogy taking into consideration the curriculum as
well as students learning needs, and intervene the challenge behaviour of
students.

Ready to roll
Now that you have made the changes, read it to yourself. How does it read now?
If you are happy with the result, you have your first teaching philosophy.
Congratulations! You have done it! Now its time to prepare your final submission.
Look at the Unit Learning Guide and now write your own personal reflection and
philosophy Ability to clearly and coherently reflect on specific learnings in this unit
and their implications for their personal philosophy in relation to the management of
students challenging behaviour, learning and wellbeing in a positive learning
environment.

Into the future!


However, please be aware that your philosophy may well change as you gain
experience in teaching and are exposed to other ideas from your ongoing
professional development, your interactions with peers and other sources of
inspiration. It will be an interesting task for you to go back to this philosophy you
have just completed in 10 years time and compare it to the one you have then. Will
it have changed much? How have your approaches evolved? What kind of teacher
have you become?