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Arts Page 16
NEWS@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM OFFICE: 604-247-3700 DELIVERY: 604-247-3710 CLASSIFIED: 604-575-5555 NEWSROOM: 604-247-3730
Tomas Collier-Pandya, 14, of the Richmond-Delta 4-H Holstein Club celebrates with
his award-winning animal at the Fair at the Pacific National Exhibition in Vancouver.
High-rises
eyed for
Steveston
Waterfront could become
home to village’s first
concrete towers
by Matthew Hoekstra
Staff Reporter
A pair of high-rise towers
and a new city park could soon
be built on the Steveston wa-
terfront if the latest rezoning
application for a contentious
property is approved.
The Onni Group of Com-
panies is proposing to build
two residential towers—one
10 storeys, the other 12 sto-
reys—on its Bayview Street
property, east of No. 1 Road.
As part of the plan, which
would bring 200 new homes
to the village, Onni would do-
nate over half its 1.41-hectare
site to the city.
“Through the last rezoning,
what we have continued to
hear is that the community
and council would love more
acreage on the waterfront for
public use,” said Onni’s Chris
Evans.” They want public
space on the water, and this
obviously achieves that.”
Evans said the city would
net two acres of waterfront
land under the proposal, giv-
ing Richmond the chance “to
create a lasting legacy on the
waterfront in Steveston.”
The rezoning plan for the
narrow strip of land has yet to
be considered by city council’s
planning committee.
For years Onni has attempt-
ed to rezone the last of its Im-
perial Landing parcels to allow
for more residential space and
to open up the restrictive in-
dustrial zoning to allow for a
range of commercial tenants
on the ground floor. But Onni
has faced a backlash from
scores of residents and politi-
cians over its past plans.
Current zoning allows six
buildings to a maximum
height of four storeys, with
ground-floor space reserved
for commercial tenants that
support the maritime indus-
try.
Under the latest high-rise
proposal, the entire devel-
opment would be residential
and contained in two build-
ings near Phoenix Pond. Onni
has also pledged to donate
$500,000 to the Steveston
Community Centre.
Coun. Harold Steves said
land at Britannia Heritage
Shipyard went through a
similar process.
See Page 5
City agrees
to signals
for visually
impaired
by Rebekah Hammond
Contributor
The City of Richmond won’t
be going to a B.C. Human
Rights Tribunal hearing regard-
ing crosswalks said to discrimi-
nate against visually impaired
pedestrians.
A settlement was reached
late last week between the
city and Rob Sleath, chair of
Access for Sight-Impaired Con-
sumers.
“We agreed...that the hear-
ing scheduled to commence
(Monday) would not proceed,”
said Sleath. “There’s no need
to go to hearing as a result of
that settlement.”
Sleath, who lost his vision
in 1992, filed a complaint ear-
lier this month against the city
stating that Richmond’s cross-
walks discriminated against
visually impaired pedestrians.
Lack of audio technology at
intersections was making it
dangerous for Richmond’s 600
blind and visually impaired citi-
zens, according to Sleath.
Both parties involved, how-
ever, are satisfied with the
settlement that agrees to make
Richmond crosswalks more ac-
cessible to visually impaired
pedestrians.
“The city is very please with
the agreement,” said city
spokesperson Cynthia Lockrey.
“It’s given an opportunity for
Richmond to become a leader
in providing accessibility for all
our residents.”
See Page 7
Holsteins a family affair
Matt Langelaan is no stranger
to the Fair at the PNE as he has
been part of 4-H for nearly three
decades. The Richmond father
of three young children eagerly
awaits the opportunity to contin-
ue the family legacy and intro-
duce his daughters to dairy cows.
Born into a family of farmers,
Langelaan got started in the 4-H
club at age seven. He met his
wife, Janet, through 4-H.
Tomas Collier, a 14-year-old
member of the Richmond-Delta
4-H Holstein Club, led by Lange-
laan, took home the Reserved
Grand Champion Award on Sun-
day. See Page 7.
New street
signals coming
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T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e A 3
Albert Normandin photo
The rapid-transit link between Vancouver, Richmond and the airport now transports 107,000 riders on a typical weekday.
by Jeff Nagel
Black Press
One year after its opening
and 36 million passengers
later, the $2-billion Canada
Line has proven to be a popu-
lar transportation option, car-
rying far more people than
expected by this point.
The rapid-transit link be-
tween Vancouver, Richmond
and the airport now trans-
ports 107,000 riders on a
typical weekday, and aver-
ages 100,000 daily trips even
counting weekends.
“We’ve hit that 100,000
rides per day about two
years ahead of schedule,”
said TransLink spokesman
Ken Hardie.
He said the Canada Line
is also spurring increased
use of the rest of the Metro
Vancouver transit system,
because more people now
take SkyTrain, the SeaBus or
transit buses to connect to
the Canada Line.
“The ripple effect has been
not bad.”
The new 19-kilometre line
was key to TransLink’s gold
medal people-moving perfor-
mance during the Olympics.
“The Olympics created a sit-
uation where people needed
another way to get into down-
town Vancouver and voila,
there was the Canada Line,
along with the supporting
transit lines from South Sur-
rey, White Rock and Delta,”
Hardie said.
The record for moving peo-
ple came during the 2010 Win-
ter Games on Feb. 19, when
287,379 passengers were
counted.
Ridership stats since then
show transit use has been
higher post-Olympics relative
to the months before, sug-
gesting thousands of transit-
averse residents have been
converted, partly thanks to
the shiny new train line.
TransLink passenger sur-
veys show 51 per cent of
Canada Line users are using
the new SkyTrain line to make
the same journey they used
to take by bus.
Hardie said that suggests
the rest—a huge number of
passengers—either hadn’t
been taking the trip at all
before or had been taking it
by car.
“We’ve indeed picked up
new riders,” he said.
Every YVR-bound train car-
ries luggage-toting passen-
gers delighting in no longer
having to drive and park at
the airport or take a taxi.
But prior to the August, 2009
launch, there was trepidation
about the new line.
Regular bus commuters to
Vancouver from areas like
South Surrey and White
Rock feared the loss of their
relaxed one-seat no-transfer
ride downtown.
Richmondites fretted the
“crime train” would bring a
tide of theft and social ills.
Vancouver neighbourhoods
braced for a wave of new
development and densifica-
tion.
The long-term changes to
land-use patterns are just
beginning, but a huge new
development with towers up
to 35 storeys is already pro-
posed near the Marine Drive
station in Vancouver, along
with upscale new housing
projects in Richmond.
Transit Police ushered in the
new line with a policing blitz
to ease local concerns.
And the express buses
that used to go all the way
downtown now terminate at
the Canada Line’s Bridgeport
Station.
That’s less convenient for
some riders, but Hardie ar-
gues it freed up large num-
bers of buses to boost service
elsewhere.
Not only did the Vancouver-
bound buses bog down in
heavy traffic the closer they
got to downtown, they also
deadheaded back empty in
the reverse-peak direction.
The resulting reallocation of
buses has allowed TransLink
to boost service levels from
the Semiahmoo Peninsula
and South Delta by 38 per
cent while using the same
number of buses, Hardie
said, adding service was also
boosted on east-west routes
through Vancouver.
More frequent buses con-
necting from the south has
in turn made the Canada
Line even more attractive
to new riders, who often fly
past jammed single-occupant
cars on congested Highway
99 thanks to the extension
of bus-only lanes on the cor-
ridor.
“The Canada Line trip to
downtown is much faster,
so now we’re moving more
people more quickly and
reliably,” TransLink CEO Ian
Jarvis said.
The line was not without
detractors.
Businesses disrupted by the
cut-and-cover construction
along Cambie Street are still
in court for compensation.
Metro Vancouver politicians
contend the line should not
have been built ahead of the
long-time top priority of con-
structing the Evergreen Line
to the northeast sector.
And other critics say it
shouldn’t have been built
period—that the huge in-
vestment could have instead
connected many more neigh-
bourhoods had it been spent
on cheaper tram or light rail
lines.
Higher ridership does mean
the line is on track to finan-
cially break even at least a
few years sooner than the
projected date of 2025.
There are, however, still big
question marks over the Can-
ada Line’s opaque operating
agreement and whether ser-
vice can increase fast enough
to keep pace with demand.
TransLink says it will pay
operator InTransitBC to fi-
nance the running of an ex-
tra two peak period trains—
an increase from 14 now to
16—starting next August,
bringing a 12 per cent capac-
ity boost.
It also says more trains and
a third car can be added to
each existing train pair in the
future if necessary, providing
capacity to carry 300,000 a
day relatively easily.
Debate rages on over which
transit technologies to use on
future lines.
But the Canada Line has si-
lenced much opposition.
If anything, it has gal-
vanized demand for more
rapid-transit links—not just
the Evergreen Line, but also
promised new lines through
Surrey and across Vancouver
to UBC.
Negotiations underway
between Metro Vancouver
mayors and transportation
minister Shirley Bond are ex-
pected to conclude this fall
with a new formula governing
the financing of future lines.
Canada Line marks one year
Canada Line celebrating ridership that tops 100,000 people a day
by Matthew Hoekstra
Staff Reporter
The Musqueam Indian Band
has fired back against the City
of Richmond in an effort to
rule the city’s $59.2-million
purchase of the Garden City
lands invalid.
The latest B.C. Supreme
Court filing in the battle for
control of the contentious
parcel of farmland suggests
the city “failed to act honour-
ably” by not upholding an ex-
isting three-way development
deal for the lands.
“In particular, the defendant
failed to uphold its promises
as well as its contractual and
fiduciary obligations as re-
flected in the” original deal,
wrote Musqueam lawyer Ma-
ria Morellato in the band’s re-
ply to Richmond’s statement
of defence.
The city claims that once the
Agricultural Land Commis-
sion denied removal of the
55-hectare parcel from the
protected land reserve, the
deal was “null and void,” the
statement says. If the com-
mission did grant removal,
approximately half the land
would have been developed
by the band and Canada
Lands Company.
“If there were anything left
over (following the commis-
sion’s ruling), the sale of the
property would have taken
care of all that,” said John
Hunter, a lawyer acting for
the city, in an interview with
the Review earlier this sum-
mer. “They got more than it
was worth.”
Days after the city finalized
a deal to buy the land, the
Musqueam filed a lawsuit, in
April, claiming damages for
breach of contract. The band,
which earned $29.6 million
in the sale, is also asking the
court to declare its original
three-way deal still valid.
The Canada Lands Company
originally purchased the land
from the federal government
for $9.54 million.
Correction
Ron Fentiman, an air cadet
in high school and member of
the Richmond High class of
1950, won an air cadet flying
scholarship. He later joined
the Royal Canadian Air Force
and served for 35 years, the
last three years in the rank of
Brigadier General. Incorrect
information appeared in the
Aug. 21 story, “Saviours of
Lulu Island reunite.”
Latest shot
fired in lawsuit
over Garden
City lands
Musqueam
says city
didn’t ‘act
honourably’
“The Canada Line
trip to downtown is
much faster, so now
we’re moving more
people more quick-
ly and reliably.”
- Ian Jarvis
P a g e A 4 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
City of Richmond • 6911 No. 3 Rd. Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 • Tel: 604-276-4000
www. ri chmond. ca
letsTALKrichmond.ca
Check out Richmond’s new
online community
Have a seat, relax, there’s
lots happening in your
community. Visit
www.letsTALKrichmond.ca and join
conversations about important topics
shaping Richmond’s future.
The City has launched this robust
and easy-to-use online portal last
week. It gives visitors access to topic-
specific discussion forums where
you can respond to City questions
and converse with like-minded
community members. There are links
to related photos, videos, frequently
asked questions, project team
members and more.
letsTALKrichmond.ca will initially run
as a three month pilot program.
Visit www.letsTALKrichmond.ca today
and help shape Richmond’s future.
2011 City Grant
Program Open
Applications accepted until
October 15, 2010
The City of Richmond
supports the enhancement
of a positive quality of
life for all its residents, and City
Council recognizes that one means
of helping to achieve this goal is
through an annual Grant Program
to support the work of community
service groups.
The City Grant Program and
Application Form are available
online through the City’s website
at www.richmond.ca, or from the
Information Counter at City Hall,
6911 No. 3 Road, 604-276-4000.
Applications will be considered
from non-profit organizations
meeting the program criteria.
Completed applications must be
received at the Richmond City Hall
Information Counter by 5:00 p.m.
on Friday, October 15, 2010.
If you have any questions regarding
the program or your application,
please contact Lesley Sherlock,
Social Planner, at 604-276-4220.
Environmental
Sustainability
Workshops
Register for free classes
This series of workshops will
show you ways to reduce
pesticide use and create a
more sustainable community. The
workshops are part of the City’s
Pesticide Risk Reduction Policy
and sustainability, waste reduction
and water conservation initiatives.
The workshops are free, however,
registration is required.
There are two ways to register:
• Online at www.richmond.ca/
register
• Through the registration call centre
from Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. –
5:30 p.m. at 604-276-4300
(press “2” at the prompt)
If you register but cannot attend,
please contact the registration call
centre to make your space available
for someone else.
Pesticide free gardening
Saturday, August 29:
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Reg #38401, Free, 16+years
Thompson Community Centre,
5151 Granville Ave
Beautiful gardens without
pesticides
Saturday, September 25:
9:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Reg #62802, Free, 16+ years
Richmond Nature Park,
11851 Westminster Hwy
Grow the most food in the
smallest space
Saturday, September 25:
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Reg #62801, Free, 16+ years
Richmond Nature Park,
11851 Westminster Hwy
Organic fall vegetable gardening
Wednesday, September 15:
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Reg #46151, Free, 16+ years
West Richmond Community Centre,
9180 No. 1 Rd
Organic winter vegetable
gardening
Wednesday, September 29:
7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Reg #61951, Free, 16+ years
Hamilton Community Centre,
5140 Smith Drive
Safe & sensible lawn care (Fall)
Saturday, September 25:
12:30 – 2:00 p.m.
Reg #55924, Free, 16+ years
Richmond Nature Park,
11851 Westminster Hwy
For more information on the
workshops, email ESOutreach@
richmond.ca or call 604-233-3318.
Grow Up!
Activities for the
whole family –
Saturday, August 28
In conjunction with the
exhibition Strange Nature,
Richmond Art Gallery, in
partnership with Richmond Food
Security Society, presents Grow
Up!, with activities for the whole
family.
Visit Minoru Plaza (7700 Minoru
Gate) at the Richmond Cultural
Centre on Saturday, August 28
between 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Plant Exchange: bring a plant to
get a plant; Food Bank: bring a
non-perishable food item to get an
extra ticket for the door prize draw.
There will be an artist talk with
Robin Ripley, a seed bomb
workshop for teens, a bee hive
demo, children’s art activities,
and a Bannock making demo.
There will also be a City of
Richmond Natural Yard Care
and GREENCAN program info
session, music, door prizes,
sale items (500 winter vegetable
seedlings) and more.
For more information, please call
the Richmond Art Gallery at
604-247-8300.
Please Don’t Cycle
on Sidewalks
Riding on sidewalks is illegal
unless specifically directed
by a sign
Bicycles belong on the
roads. Sidewalks are
reserved for pedestrians
only and are intended to provide
a safe walking environment that
is separate from moving vehicles,
both cars and bicycles.
As a cyclist, you might feel safer on
sidewalks than on busy roads but
research has proven that cyclists are
far more likely to be involved in a
collision with a vehicle when using
a sidewalk, especially in the wrong
direction of travel, than on the
roadway. Riding on the sidewalk
makes a cyclist less noticeable and
less predictable to drivers, thereby
increasing the risk of crashes at
driveways and intersections.
Riding on sidewalks is also a hazard
to pedestrians. Cyclists travel faster
than walking speeds and can startle
pedestrians when approaching
without warning from behind, which
can lead to a collision. Pedestrians
can change their direction and
speed instantaneously, which leaves
a cyclist with insufficient time to
react to avoid a collision.
Cyclists are much safer in the
street, following the rules of the
road for drivers of vehicles. When
riding on off-street trails, always use
a bell to let pedestrians know you
are approaching.
Register for free
environmental
sustainability
workshops
Community news covering August 26 – September 2, 2010
CI T Y PAGE
Make your point.
A new online community shaping the future
Social Planning Strategy and Official Community Plan.
Visit:
letsTALKrichmond.ca

Richmond
Calendar
There are no other
scheduled meetings for
the month of August.
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e A 5
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon.-Fri. 8am-6pm Sat. 9am-4pm Sun. 11am-5pm
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the richmond
*Limited distribution
Best Buy*
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Future Shop*
Home Depot*
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Little Caesars Pizza*
New Local Homes*
Rogers Wireless*
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Save-On-Foods
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Source by Circuit City*
TV Showcase*
The Brick*
Visions Electronics*
Walmart*
Bylaws 8619 and 8598 are scheduled for adoption on
September 13, 2010.
Business Licence Bylaw 7360
Amendment Bylaw 8619
The proposed amendment will establish definitions, regulations and permit fee
for professional dog walkers.
Animal Control Regulation Bylaw 7932
Amendment Bylaw 8598
The proposed amendment will amend the regulations for dog designated off-
leash areas.
Written submissions may be made to Council on the proposed bylaw
amendments by writing to the City Clerk c/o 6911 No. 3 Road, Richmond, B.C.,
V6Y 2C1 or by sending a fax to 604-278-5139.
Arrangements may also be made for oral submissions to Council by calling
604-276-4163. All submissions received prior to the adoption of the bylaws
will be forwarded to Council for consideration. Complete copies of the
reports are available on the City Website at www.richmond.ca (Home>City
Hall>City Council>Agendas & Minutes>Council Meetings>2010 Agenda &
Minutes>(Tuesday, July 27, 2010) or by calling the Parks Division at
604-244-1275.
Proposal mirrors Britannia plan
From Page 1
A developer had zon-
ing to build three-storey
apartments on the site,
but the city allowed high-
rises instead, in exchange
for land. Incidently, the
developer only built the
structures to six storeys
due to market conditions
at the time.
“Britannia is a major
park and heritage site,”
he said. “It wouldn’t
have been possible if we
hadn’t proposed those
two high-rise buildings
on that site—that never
got built.”
The tallest building in
Steveston today is the
eight-storey Lions Man-
or behind the Steveston
Community Centre, ac-
cording to Steves.
Steves said river views
of apartment dwellers
behind Onni’s proposed
high-rises would be
blocked even with the
smaller structures al-
lowed under the current
zoning.
“It’s an interesting con-
cept and we’ll see what
the public has to say
about it, but if it’s any-
thing like the Britannia
thing they’ll go for it.”
Onni is also developing
a trio of high-rises across
from the Richmond Olym-
pic Oval.
Imperial Landing proposal
•Two buildings, 12 and 10 storeys, 210,000 square feet of density, 200 residential units, two acres of
land donated to city, 1.5 acres of land to be developed
Mark Patrick file photo
Onni has finalized a new plan for its last land parcel on the Steveston water-
front, one that will see a pair of high-rises and potentially a city park.
Onni’s proposed development site is limited to the eastern side of its land.
P a g e A 6 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
1. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8373
(RZ 09-506728)
Location/s: 4111 Williams Road
Applicant/s: Sarah A. Mercer
Purpose: To rezone the subject property
from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Single Detached
(RS2/C)”, to permit development of two (2) residential
lots with vehicle access from Williams Road.
City Contact: Edwin Lee
604-276-4121
Planning and Development
Department
BYLAW 8373
2. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8597
(RZ 07-379075)
Location/s: 10071 Williams Road
Applicant/s: Guravtar Singh Sandhu
Purpose: To rezone the subject property
from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Compact Single
Detached (RC2)”, to permit development of two (2)
residential lots with vehicle access from an existing
rear lane.
City Contact: Edwin Lee
604-276-4121
Planning and Development
Department
BYLAW 8597
3. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8638
(RZ 10-508885)
Location/s: 4800 Garry Street
Applicant/s: Raman Kooner
Purpose: To rezone the subject property
from “Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Single Detached
(RS2/A)”, to permit development of two (2)
residential lots with vehicle access from Garry Street.
City Contact: Edwin Lee
604-276-4121
Planning and Development
Department
BYLAW 8638
4. Zoning Amendment Bylaw 8639
(RZ 10-525049)
Location/s: 9751 No. 3 Road
Applicant/s: Parmjit Randhawa
Purpose: To rezone the subject property from
“Single Detached (RS1/E)” to “Coach Houses (RCH)”,
to permit the property to be subdivided into two (2)
lots, each with new single-family dwelling and a coach
house above a garage, with vehicle access to the
existing rear lane.
City Contact: Cynthia Lussier
604-276-4108
Planning and Development
Department
BYLAW 8639
How to obtain further information:
• By Phone: If you have questions or concerns, please call
the CITY CONTACT shown above.
• On the City Website: Public Hearing Agendas, including
staff reports and the proposed bylaws, are available on the
City Website at http://www.richmond.ca/cityhall/council/
agendas/hearings/2010.htm
• At City Hall: Copies of the proposed bylaw, supporting
staff and Committee reports and other background
material, are also available for inspection at the Planning &
Development Department at City Hall, between the hours
of 8:15 am and 5 pm, Monday through Friday, except
statutory holidays, commencing August 27, 2010 and ending
September 7, 2010, or upon the conclusion of the hearing.
• By FAX or Mail: Staff reports and the proposed bylaws may
also be obtained by FAX or by standard mail, by calling 604-
276-4007 between the hours of 8:15 am and 5 pm, Monday
through Friday, except statutory holidays, commencing August
27, 2010 and ending September 7, 2010.
Participating in the Public Hearing process:
• The Public Hearing is open to all members of the public.
If you believe that you are affected by the proposed bylaw,
you may make a presentation or submit written comments
at the Public Hearing. If you are unable to attend, you may
send your written comments to the City Clerk’s Office by 4
pm on the date of the Public Hearing as follows:
• By E-mail: using the on-line form at http://www.richmond.
ca/cityhall/council/hearings/about.htm
• By Standard Mail: 6911 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC, V6Y
2C1, Attention: Director, City Clerk’s Office
• By FAX: 604-278-5139, Attention: Director, City Clerk’s
Office
• Public Hearing Rules: For information on public hearing
rules and procedures, please consult the City website at
http://www.richmond.ca/cityhall/council/hearings/about.htm
or call the City Clerk’s Office at 604-276-4007.
• All submissions will form part of the record of the hearing.
Once the Public Hearing has concluded, no further
information or submissions can be considered by Council.
It should be noted that the rezoned property may be used
for any or all of the uses permitted in the “new” zone.
David Weber
Director, City Clerk’s Office
www.richmond.ca
Notice of Public Hearing
Tuesday, September 7, 2010 - 7 p.m.
Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Richmond City Hall
City of Richmond • 6911 No. 3 Rd., Richmond BC V6Y 2C1 • Tel: 604-276-4000 • Fax: 604-278-5139 • www.richmond.ca
TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the City of Richmond will hold a Public Hearing as noted above, on the following items:
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From Page 1
Six new special cross-
walks are scheduled for
installation, according to
Lockrey. For now, terms of
the agreement prevent the
city from revealing when
the new signals will be
put in.
The accessible pedes-
trian signals will be im-
plemented both at high
pedestrian-traffic street
intersections and special
crosswalks with amber
flashing lights.
Once installed, the sig-
nals will be combined
with tactile surfaces and
Braille to make crossing
the streets safer and more
convenient.
“Most importantly, it will
provide blind and visually
impaired pedestrians with
the street identification
verbal message we were
looking for,” Sleath said.
Changes to the signals
will also allow audio level
adjustment.
“These new installations
will utilize devices that
are a lot quieter where
the individual pedestrian
can raise the volume for
a single street crossing if
necessary,” Sleath said.
Between September and
November the city will also
be holding several public
evaluations to discuss
implementation strategies
for test sites.
The special crosswalks
will cost an estimated
$3,000 per location while
regular traffic signs are an
estimated $12,000.
There are 60 special
crosswalks in Richmond.
“The challenge is there’s
no national standard for
audible signals,” Lockrey
said. “So this is an oppor-
tunity for Richmond to pilot
and pioneer in this audio
messaging.”
High traffic spots
eyed for signals
“It will provide
blind and visu-
ally impaired
pedestrians with
the verbal mes-
sage we were
looking for.”
- Rob Sleath
Third decade of
4-H for local dad
by Jessica Tieszen
Contributor
Matt Langelaan is no stranger to the Fair at the PNE
as he has been part of 4-H for nearly three decades.
The Richmond father of three young children eagerly
awaits to continue the family legacy and introduce
his daughters to dairy cows.
Born into a family of farmers, Langelaan got started
into the 4-H club at seven years old.
“My father was in 4-H in the mid-60s and he got me
involved. Now my six-year-old daughter Kylie will join
in January,” said Langelaan, 34.
Langelaan is leader of the Richmond-Delta 4-H club,
whose 14-year-old member Tomas Collier-Pandya
was named reserve grand champion at Sunday’s
calf picking.
“I’ve been taking care of this cow for four months
now, and this is my first time showing in the PNE,” said
Collier-Pandya. “I was very excited that I won.”
Langelaan’s club consists of seven girls and two
boys all between the ages of six to 20. The club gives
them a chance to show their beef, dairy, and poultry
projects in competitions.
4-H originally began as the Boys and Girls Club in
1914 until the name changed to represent the four
H’s— head, heart, hands and health. The club was
designed for farm kids to learn the importance in
raising, caring, and training farm animals.
“Every April, members of the club choose a calf as
young as seven months old, working to train them,”
explains Langelaan. “They have to keep logs of what
their calf eats, how much he or she measures in
weight, and record any sickness or change in disposi-
tion. Before each show or competition, the calves get
washed, clipped and practice their walk.”
During the fair at the PNE, members are judged
against other 4-H districts on showmanship and calf
placing, awards are also distributed to best record
keepers.
Collier and other members from 4-H have been
living in dorms provided by the PNE from Aug. 21 to
24. The 4-H festival brings in 450 members from all
across the province, competing in various projects
in hopes of bringing home a portion of prize money
from the PNE.
P a g e A 8 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
F
ans of Bill Vander
Zalm’s harmo-
nized sales tax
“extinguishment”
petition were quick to
gloat when the B.C.
Supreme Court ruled
Friday that the petition
can proceed to the
next step.
“I hear there’s a special
today on crow pie,” a
Vernon reader said in one
of the more polite e-mails I
received.
The same reader scoffed
at my argument of last
week that scrapping the
HST would result in a
“nightmare of service
cuts” in B.C. “If revers-
ing the HST would be a
mess, lay the blame where
it belongs – at Gordon
Campbell’s feet.”
I guess if blame is all
that’s important to you,
this is sufficient. But it’s
our grandchildren who
might be eating crow pie
and dandelion greens if my
generation of baby boom
voters continues to gobble
up more and more expen-
sive services while paying
less and less income tax in
a world that’s quite happy
to take away our industrial
base.
And make no mistake,
scrapping the HST would
be a mess, and a costly
one. Vander Zalm’s peti-
tion calls on the govern-
ment to reimburse “all
British Columbians on a
per capita basis” for any
HST paid beyond what
would have been charged
by the provincial sales tax.
I asked Finance Minister
Colin Hansen what that
might cost. He declined to
speculate, except to say
that it would be “admin-
istratively very difficult.”
I’ll say. And the huge cost
would of course be on top
of repaying the $1.6 billion
federal transition fund.
Then there are the
rebates. If you are in the
lower income range and
were receiving quarterly
GST rebate cheques from
the federal government,
you will now start receiv-
ing larger HST rebates.
Vander Zalm’s petition
neglects to consider those,
just as it forgets about the
hotel room tax that made
way for the HST.
If the HST is scrapped,
the government could
try to claw back all those
low-income rebates. But
since that would also be
administratively difficult,
not to mention politically
suicidal, the government
of the day would probably
just let the provincial defi-
cit grow some more. Our
grandchildren can pay it
back, if they can find jobs
in B.C.’s uncompetitive tax
structure. But hey, we sure
would teach the federal
and provincial govern-
ments a lesson.
Contrary to the wishes
of some HST haters, Chief
Justice Robert Bauman of
the B.C. Supreme Court
did not endorse Vander
Zalm’s petition, or deter-
mine whether any work-
able outcome can result
from it.
Bauman narrowed his
ruling to get this political
hot potato off his desk,
and that of the much-
maligned Chief Electoral
Officer. He declined to
consider whether Vander
Zalm’s proposed legisla-
tion is constitutional,
noting that it “may never
be enacted in that initial
form,” given that it could
be amended or defeated in
the legislature.
Even if it passes more or
less as is, the proposed
legislation only calls for
B.C. to withdraw from its
five-year HST agreement
with Ottawa. The federal
legislation to collect the
tax would remain.
“Whether that will lead
to … the extinguishment
of the HST in British
Columbia remains to be
seen,” Bauman wrote.
The petition was formally
sent to the legislature on
Monday and the stand-
ing committee must con-
vene its first meeting in
September. It will have
until December to debate
the draft legislation that
was included in the peti-
tion.
Look for the B.C. Liberal
majority on the committee
to push through amend-
ments, such as raising
taxes to repay the $1.6
billion federal fund. Then
we might find out where
the NDP actually stands on
this thing.
Tom Fletcher is legisla-
tive reporter and colum-
nist for Black Press and
BCLocalnews.com. He may
be reached at tfletcher@
blackpress.ca.
140-5671 NO. 3 RD., RICHMOND, B.C. V6X 2C7
604-247-3700 • FAX: 604-606-8752 • WWW.RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
SPORTS EDITOR
DON FENNELL, 604-247-3731
SPORTS@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
Canada Line proves
value of transit
O
ne year ago, the Canada Line opened to
much fanfare. People pushed their way
through crowds in Richmond to become
the first passengers on the rapid transit train that
links to downtown Vancouver and the airport.
Some skeptics doubted the passenger volumes, but
rerouted buses made it a near certainty that this train would
be busy. One year later, no one can question the demand for
rapid transit.
The Canada Line has carried 36 million passengers since
its opening, transporting over 100,000 riders each day. With
that number, TransLink has hit its ridership target two years
ahead of schedule.
As most passengers know, the train is regularly jammed—
as it was Feb. 19, when a record number of people, 287,379,
boarded the train during the middle of the 2010 Winter
Olympics.
TransLink surveys show half the train’s users are used to
public transit, having boarded a bus before the new shiny
trains began shuttling down the elevated guideway. The rest
have either abandoned their car or simply never made the
trip before. That in itself proves that rapid transit is worth the
enormous price tag its construction comes with.
Let the debate over elevated or at-grade persist, the popu-
larity of the Canada Line goes beyond that. It shows that
people are willing to get out of their cars or make a trip they
never had before, if the transportation method is convenient.
Riding the line isn’t always comfortable—hello Olympics—
and can be expensive—$25 for a family of four travelling
midday without transit passes—but the appetite for rapid
transit is enormous in our growing city and region.
Providing useful rapid transit links to existing lines is the
task TransLink now has before it.
But be it the oft-discussed Evergreen Line, an extension of
the Expo Line, a Broadway corridor line, a South Fraser link
to the valley or even an extension of the Canada Line, build-
ing new rapid transit lines is hardly rapid.
Without a cash train serving as a silver bullet, taxpayers
must be willing to bolster their weak embrace of public-
private partnerships and loosen their pursestrings to grow a
form of proven public transit.
The Richmond Reviewis a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body gov-
erning the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints fromthe public about
the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input
fromboth the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not
resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council.
Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201
Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2.
REVIEW
the richmond
Published in Richmond every Thursday and Saturday by Black Press Ltd.
PUBLISHER
MARY KEMMIS, 604-247-3702
PUBLISHER@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
CIRCULATION MANAGER
RACHAEL FINKELSTEIN, 604-247-3710
CIRCULATION@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER
JAANA BJORK, 604-247-3716
JAANA@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
STAFF REPORTER
MARTIN VAN DEN HEMEL, 604-247-3733
MARTIN@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
ACTING EDITOR
MATTHEW HOEKSTRA, 604-247-3730
EDITOR@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
opinion
Sorry, HST isn’t going anywhere
B.C. Views
Tom Fletcher
Make no mistake,
scrapping the HST
would be a mess,
and a costly one.
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e A 9
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GARDEN CITY RD.
AUGUST 27 - AUGUST 30
Specials valid while stock lasts and are subject to change.
China World Supermarket
8777 Odlin Road
Richmond
Sun.-Thurs. 10am-8pm
Fri.-Sat. 10am-9pm
Fresh Values in Store This Week!
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Mizumi Drink
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450ml
Bao Ming Toilet
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10 rolls
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Pork Shoulder
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Bean Sprout 39
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Sifto 1 kg Salt 89
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Chicken Bone 59
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Rosemary Garlic Lamb Rack
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Five Rose Flour 20 kg
$
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Star Brand Vegetable Oil 16L
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$
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ef Shan
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letters
Move Artisans’ Galleria
to cyberspace
Editor:
It is very sad to learn that the Artisans’ Gal-
leria is closing due to financial difficulties. It is
a favourite shop for not only many Richmond
residents, but also for many people in the rest
of Metro Vancouver. The bad economic times are
hard on everyone, especially the non-profile or-
ganizations.
To survive in this difficult economic climate,
we need to adapt to the changing econom-
ic times. Instead of occupying a 1,500-square-
foot space, the shop might stay open by moving
to a smaller space.
If downsizing is not an option, moving the store
into cyberspace definitely can be an option, at
least for now. Many brick and block shops have
moved to the Internet successfully in order to
save on costly expenses.
If having an online shop website is too costly or
too technically challenging, moving the shop to
eBay is another possibility.
If artists don’t want to sell their artworks side-
by-side with other people’s stuff, moving the
shop to an online shopping mall is a cost-effec-
tive option. There are few such services available.
A recently launched eMarket99.com is a sample.
In short, if we keep our options open and use
the web to our benefit, we can keep the Artisan’s
Galleria open even during these tough economic
times. There will be some challenges relating
to making any change, but if we use the resourc-
es available out there the transition will hopefully
be smooth and painless as well as economically
successful.
Jeynithin Kumar
Richmond
City isn’t following its
own community plan
Editor:
In years past, Richmond residents made it abun-
dantly clear that they wanted the older subdivi-
sions protected from re-development. The city’s
1999 official community plan states, outside City
Centre, residents want to move beyond subdivi-
sions towards mature neighbourhoods with a
strong sense of community.
But since 1999, we’ve seen incredible devasta-
tion in neighbourhoods where mega buildings are
replacing older dwellings and their beautifully-
landscaped lots. What happened to the plan to
protect mature neighbourhoods?
It appears that the problem is the current bylaw,
which controls the size of dwellings according to
the area of the lot. It encourages the destruction
of family homes in favour of mega houses, each
one more inflated and higher than the previous.
As a community, we did not agree to the current
destruction going on in our older neighbour-
hoods, turning them into land banks for those
who use the term “tear-down” to describe any
older dwelling. This is language used by bullies,
intended to convince people that their homes
have no value. Richmond residents do not want
to be pushed out of their beloved neighbour-
hoods so that foreign interests can invest in
expensive properties.
Let’s recognize older houses for what they are:
perfectly good family homes with yard space
enough for trees, lawns, gardens and play areas.
These are the essentials of the quickly disappear-
ing Garden City.
There are three things that we can do. The first
is to keep writing letters to the editor and send-
ing copies to our local mayor and councillors. The
second is to provide input into the new official
community plan, which will be the guiding docu-
ment up to 2041 (see letstalkrichmond.ca).
The third thing we can do is make change hap-
pen by voting to save our dwellings, neighbour-
hoods, trees and backyards in the next election.
Marion Smith
Richmond
Tighten up name-change
rules
Editor:
Re: “New fingerprinting rules for volunteers,”
Aug. 21. There is something eerie about becoming
a volunteer and having to be fingerprinted, I admit.
Although I would accept it as a parent, knowing
my child is in safe hands, I believe the holes in the
system could be tightened in the name-changing
area and not the fingerprinting of innocent people.
A simple promise to destroy these prints is not
enough. Tighten up the name-change application
and records. Keep a record of all name changes.
Flags of past serious offences should be trans-
ferred to the new name. If it is a bank robber, they
may volunteer in certain areas, but maybe not at a
bank or in a financial role. A sexual predator would
be flagged for any coaching, teaching, or any other
risky positions.
Andrew Caras
Richmond
P a g e A 1 0 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
C
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Luxury is not about opulence or great expense. It is the pleasure and joy of
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letters
Taking a break from filling sandbags in this 1948 photograph are (from right) John Baumeister, John Hay-
duk, Paul Drescher, Jim Tremier, Ron Fentiman and an unidentified boy.
Others helped in the sandbagging operation
Editor:
Re: “Saviours of Lulu Island reunite,” Aug. 21. Un-
fortunately there were some of us that participated
in the sandbagging operation but weren’t invited to
the grad party because we didn’t graduate.
I recently donated a picture to the Richmond
Archives showing five of us handsome gentlemen
on top of a sandbag hill. We filled bags at the south
end of the old wooden Fraser Street Bridge and the
north end of the No. 5 Road—right on the dyke.
If Bob Moller or Art Cooke, whom I remember
very well, would contact me I would like to have a
look at the large poster they are holding. My phone
number is 604-272-2474.
John Baumeister
Richmond
Letters to the editor
•The Richmond Review welcomes letters
to The Editor on any subject. Send letters to
news@richmondreview.com. Letters must
include first and last name and contact info.
Ispos Reid indicates most Richmond
prefers to read The Review
Ipsos Reid, 2010
REVIEW
the richmond
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COQUITLAM
1-1315 United Blvd (604-540-2665)
LANGLEY
19495-56th Ave (604-530-1155)
VANCOUVER
8488 Main St (604-321-6644)
The Chemist Compounding Pharmacy
115-6180 Blundell Rd., Richmond, BC
Tel: 604-277-3747
Professional care tailored
to your needs
• We are experts in compounding medications
(Bio-Identical Hormones, Dental, Veterinary)
• We offer natural supplement and medical advice
• Quick and easy transfer & preparation of prescriptions
• Free city wide delivery • Free blister packaging
letters
Ode to a
green can
Editor:
This is the first year
we have gone from
yard bags to green
cans. And this is the
first week this year
that I’m able to fit all
my grass cuttings into
my two green cans.
Thank you hot, dry
weather.
I have, in weeks past,
been able to get the
back and front green-
ery to fit in both cans,
but not legally. I took
a page from the K-Tel
Patty Stacker of the
’70s and fashioned a
similar compressing
device for the rear end
deposits of my lawn-
mower. What I wound
up with was grass that
had the density of
lead in two neat cans.
Oh sure I had to have
three friends help
me drag each can to
the curb, but I wasn’t
going to buy any more
garbage cans.
My father-in-law has
enough garbage and
green cans to meet his
needs but his carport
looks like an East
Hastings back alley.
Well as it turned
out the joke was on
me, they didn’t want
my two cans of yard
waste. Something
about being too heavy,
the bright orange
sticker read. So now
what do you do with
two cans of wet grass,
knowing that this
week you’ll have the
same amount, or more
again. You get cre-
ative!
I became like the
prisoners from the
movie The Great
Escape. I’d fill up my
pockets with grass and
go for long walks, each
step secretly dropping
bits of grass around
the neighbourhood.
We’d sometimes go
as a family, each with
a pocket or two of
grass, leaving behind
us a green slug trail of
unwanted yard trim-
mings. On occasion
we’d get lucky and find
an unlocked car and
quickly rid ourselves
of our burden we call
grass.
But all this still
wasn’t enough, I
couldn’t keep up. I
was like a drug kingpin
with too much money,
only with grass, I
needed new methods
to deal with a growing
problem. I rented a
storage locker under
a false name and ad-
dress. I had the grand-
kids do a craft project
and glue the yard
clippings into illegal
looking plants (unbe-
knownst to them) and
had the police raid my
residence.
I then tried just leav-
ing the cuttings on the
lawn, only to have the
dog and the grandkids
track it all into the
house for my wife to
vacuum up. Let’s just
say I’d rather deal with
the police again than
listen to my wife go on
for two hours about
her bad back and
how she needs a new
vacuum with a big yel-
low ball on it like her
sister has.
But this week was
different! All my green-
space clippings are
gone! The lawn I use to
love, water and fertil-
ize, I now despise. I’ll
never give it another
drink or feed it again.
My three boxes of
plastic yard bags from
Costco sit unused and
alone.
Cool wet weather’s
coming, where can I
hide grass this fall?
Bob Niles
Richmond
P a g e A 1 2 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
CARTWHEELS INC. CELEBRATES
IT’S 8th ANNIVERSARY!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, SEPT. 12TH
Present this coupon for your free trial class and receive $5 off your
registration or Birthday party booking. For new members only.
Please pre-register for FREE class. Classes fill quickly.
Come join us for our 8th Anniversary Celebration
Free Trial Class - Sunday, September 12 - 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m
Free Classes! Club Tours! Prizes! Refreshments! Fun!
Check out our NEW Website!
Fall Registration on NOW!
Cartwheels Incorporated
#145-12417 No. 2 Road, Richmond, BC, V7E 6H7
Phone: 604-275-0020
Email us: info@cartwheels.ca
www.cartwheels.ca
• Gymnastics • Day Camps • Special Needs
• Birthday Parties • Field Trips
Chimps
18mths - 3yrs
9:30-10:00
10:15-10:45
3 All Me
3 - 3 ½ yrs
11:00-11:30
Monkeys
3 ½ - 4 ½ yrs
11:45-12:15
Swingers
4 ½ - KG
12:30-1:00
Achievement
6yrs & UP
1:15-2:00
Come find out why hundreds of Richmond children
have enrolled at Cartwheels Inc.
$5 $5
For 20 years we’ve inspired
young dancers!
BALLET • JAZZ • TAP • MODERN
MUSICAL THEATRE • BREAKDANCE • HIP HOP
PIZZA with JAZZ and TAP CLASS 6-9 yrs
Bring a friend and join this great class where you’ll enjoy pizza and a beverage
and then learn some great new dance moves–while mom and dad are enjoying
an evening out together or catching up on family errands.
N
E
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THE ARTS CONNECTION
#170 - 3900 Steveston Hwy.
(Minato Village)
Check out our website for more details: www.theartsconnection.org
For further information and registration: 604.241.0141
back to school
• Check what time your
child’s classes start. Stu-
dents in different grades
may start at different
times.
• Get your children used
to the back-to-school
routine before the first
day of school by having
them shift to their school
bedtime and wake-up
routine the week before
school begins.
Parents play a key role
during the school year
by keeping their children
safe and healthy. Here
are some ways to achieve
this:
• Make sure your
children eat breakfast
every day so their minds
have the fuel they need
to learn.
• Keep nutritious
snacks, like cut-up fruit
and vegetables, cheese
sticks, low-fat yogurt and
butter-free popcorn on
hand to make healthy
eating easier.
• Schedule regular
dental and any necessary
medical checkups for
your children.
• Ensure your children’s
backpacks are no more
than 10 to 20 per cent of
their body weight and
that your children use
both shoulder straps.
• Make sure your
children know safe routes
to and from school. Start
a Walking School Bus
or Bicycle Train program
in your neighbourhood,
or find out how your
children can join an exist-
ing one.
• Limit your children’s
screen time. Explain to
your children that it’s
important to sit less and
move more in order to
stay at a healthy weight.
Students are often
more successful in school
when they develop good
study habits early on.
Parents can help their
children study by:
• Setting up a home-
work area away from
the television and with
adequate supplies and
lighting.
• Setting up a regular
time to work together
with your children.
• Letting your children
see you reading and set-
ting aside time each day
to read as a family.
— source: Ministry of
Education
Book puts a hopeful spin on
facing a new school
A
long with all the supply
buying, the new tech-
nology and the back to
school retail campaigns, many
parents are dealing with the
emotional toll that moving to
a new community and school
might have on their children.
Artist and writer Beate Epp identifies
these familiar fears that many children
go through in her new book The Magi-
cal Horses: A Journey of Adventure,
Mystery & Hope.
“Being uprooted and having to start
in a new school can be very scary for
children, and they might not always
admit that they are scared of their
new situation. In my book, I chose
to explore those feelings with the
character of nine-year-old Kiran who
has to start a new school in unfamiliar
surroundings, without the support of
his parents- one of whom has a bad ac-
cident,” says Epp.
In an era when even friends seem to
be enemies, sometimes kids need a lit-
tle something extra to make it through
tough times. Beate also provides her
readers with recipes that are excellent
for parents to consider when packing
all of those lunches.
“It’s so important to provide as much
security and consistency to children
when they suddenly find themselves in
unfamiliar emotional situations. Keep-
ing them healthy and giving them hope
is the message that I want to spread
with my work,” says Epp, who is start-
ing a Cross Canada tour to bookstores
and schools to share her stories.
The Magical Horses is the first book
in a trilogy and is now available across
Canada.
How to give
your child a
good start
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e A 1 3
vv1
12280 Trites Rd.
(604)
275-KICK (5425)
Call now for a free one on one private class!
A family that trains together,
stays together!
Shinka Donates partial proceeds of all tuitions
to Kiva Charities, and provides memberships at
90% off to all Richmond School Teachers.

Name: ________________________
Phone No.: (
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a FREE 1 Year
UNLIMITED
Membership!
Win
For details go to Shinka.ca. Draw date Sept. 13.
Moncton St.

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Let Shinka help you discover
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SHINKA
D R I V E B A S K E T B A L L
To register go to www.drivebasketball.com or for questions please email
us at info@drivebasketball.com or call 604-818-SLAM (7526)
www.drivebasketball.com
• Elite Development
Training
• Competitive
Basketball League (DBL)
• Basketball Lessons &
Ongoing Skills Programs
• For Boys & Girls ages 7-17
• Programs available for all skill levels
• Elite Development
Training
• Competitive
Basketball League (DBL)
• Basketball Lessons &
Ongoing Skills Programs
• For Boys & Girls ages 7-17
• Programs available for all skill levels
Start the School Year
on the Right Note!
Rent your school
band instrument from
Long & McQuade!
6760 No. 3 Road, 604.270.3622
Learn guitar, bass, piano, drums, voice
brass, woodwinds, strings and more
All ages, levels and styles
Register for Music Lessons Today!
back to school
S
tudents and
their parents
are preparing
for the beginning
of a new school
year. With the high
volume of sales
made during this
time of year and an
increasing number
of youth making
their own pur-
chases, Consumer
Protection BC and
Better Business
Bureau remind
students that it
pays to be a smart
consumer.
Consider these tips
while doing your shop-
ping:
• Ask about returns
and refunds. Shopping
for new clothes, ac-
cessories and gadgets
is one of the high-
lights of going back
to school. When you
buy your new gear,
ask the store about
their return policy
and always keep your
receipts. Most people
don’t know that in
B.C., stores are not
legally required to
exchange an item or
give you a refund.
• Read the fine print
when getting a credit
card. Credit cards can
be very useful and
we get offers for new
cards all the time.
Don’t get yourself
in a financial jam by
signing up right away
for a new card. Find
out what the new card
gives you and defi-
nitely make sure you
know what the interest
rates is, how long any
introductory interest
rates apply for and
when interest begins.
• Find out the details
about your new cell
phone plan. You don’t
want to sign up for
something that you
didn’t want. Ask about
the time commitment,
billing details, replace-
ment costs and how
you can get out of the
contract if you need
to. If you are consider-
ing data use for things
like social networking
sites, e-mail, texting or
web-browsing on your
device, the charges
associated with data
are often higher than
those of calling plans.
Get a copy of the con-
tract and make sure
you read all the terms
and conditions.
• Do your research
before buying a new
computer. Decide what
your needs will be and
what the computer is
to be used for, such
as word processing,
video-calling, graphic/
web design or gaming.
This will determine
the type of hardware
and software that will
be required and how
much you will pay in
the end. Shop around
for a good price and
find out what you have
to do (and pay!) if
your computer breaks
down. Consider leas-
ing to reduce the costs
of upgrading your
system but make sure
you know the details
of your contract.
See Page 14
Better Business Bureau offers
consumer tips to students
P a g e A 1 4 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
READ¦NC º MATH º WR¦T¦NC º STUDY SK¦LLS
School success is just
a phone call away.
Our highly personalized approach builds the skills, habits and
attitudes your child needs to succeed in school and in life.
Develops independent
work habits
Improves attitudes
Motivates learning
Provides feedback for
parents and teachers
www.sylvanbc.ca
604.273.3266
R¦CHMÒND
Back-to-School Offer!
$
50 OFF
SYLVAN SKILLS
ASSESSMENT
®
Not valid with any other offer. Expires 10/15/10.
Musr presenr od or rime ol Assessmenr. Limir one
per cusromer.
CALL NOW!
The rules
are just
one thing
they’ll
learn.
Take advantage of this opportunity
for your 4-5 year old child to learn
the fun of team sport and the great
game of ice hockey.
RICHMOND MINOR
HOCKEY ASSOCIATION
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY.
JOIN US TODAY.
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
www.richmondminorhockey.com
OR CALL THE HOCKEY HOTLINE AT
604-241-4192
Open to all
12-18 years
Information Session
September 9, 2010
i
692 BCIT AEROSPACE
RCAC SQUADRON
NOW RECRUITING
Begins 7:00 p.m.
@ BCIT AEROSPACE CAMPUS
3800 Cessna Drive,
Richmond, B.C.
Visit our website
www.cadets.ca/lhq/692air
For information
call 778-833-0038
or email: co692@cadets.net
back to school
From Page 13
• Know what to expect
with gift cards. It’s true
that most gift cards
can’t have fees or expiry
dates anymore. How-
ever if you are buying a
mall card for that teen
in your life so they can
shop on their own, you
should know that these
cards are allowed to
have fees. Make sure
you find out the details
so that you can make
an informed decision.
(Note that the law
doesn’t apply to pre-
loaded credit cards.)
• Ask yourself if you
really need that free
gift. Carefully consider
offers of free gifts that
come with a purchase.
Do you need the item
you are buying? If not,
then this free gift may
not be worth the invest-
ment in the end.
• Know the true
cost of what you are
purchasing. You might
be moving out for the
first time and buying
new furniture. If you
are buying an item on
credit, make sure you
are aware of not only
the interest rate being
charged, but any addi-
tional fees and costs as-
sociated with purchas-
ing on credit. Also read
the fine print on your
obligations regarding
interest payments and
any penalties for late
payments.
Consumers have
rights and responsibili-
ties under B.C. law, find
out what yours are by
visiting the Consumer
Protection BC website
at consumerprotection-
bc.ca or by contacting
your local BBB (www.
mbc.bbb.org). The key
to being a smart con-
sumer is to know what
questions to ask and
reading the fine print
before entering into any
kind of transaction.
Students
warned
to get
informed
The key to being
a smart con-
sumer is to know
what questions
to ask and read-
ing the fine print
before entering
into any kind of
transaction.
Consider insurance for
those pricey electronics
D
uring the coming weeks,
thousands of B.C. students
will be heading off to univer-
sity and college, loaded down with
books, clothes, and electronics.
BCAA Insurance reminds parents
at this time of year to review their
home insurance policies to ensure
their children’s belongings are ad-
equately covered for loss or damage
while they’re away from home.
A recent poll from the National Re-
tail Federation indicates that back
to school purchases have increased
10.5 per cent over the past year.
“Students have more to insure
than ever before,” says Brooke
Moss, BCAA home insurance prod-
uct manager. “They have a lot of
expensive and portable consumer
goods that are vulnerable to loss,
theft or damage.”
The list of pricey electronic equip-
ment includes desktop computers,
laptops, iPads, MP3 players, porta-
ble TVs, cell phones, smart phones,
stereos, video game equipment
and digital cameras. Other items to
consider are bicycles, boarding and
ski equipment, and jewelry.
The poll also reveals the number
of students choosing to leave the
family home to live on campus or
somewhere nearby has increased
compared to last year.
“Moving away from home also
means students will need their own
household items such as a micro-
wave, bedding and furniture, which
are also vulnerable to damage,”
adds Moss.
“Electronic or not, the loss of
belongings could put a big dent
in the finances of a student with a
limited budget or of a parent paying
for a child’s tuition, books and living
expenses.”
While most home insurance
policies extend some coverage to
students living away from home,
Moss cautions parents and students
to be aware of any limits on student
property as well as limits on indi-
vidual items.
“Take stock of all your child’s
items,” urges Moss. “Then talk to
your insurance advisor to find out
what’s covered—and what’s not—
under your existing policy. If the
value of the belongings exceeds the
limits, you should consider buying
additional coverage.”
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e A 1 5
Burke Academy
of Dance
#200-13040 No. 2 Road, Richmond, BC V7E 2G1
www.burkedance.net • For information, Ph. 604-271-1271
Register NOW
for classes
CLASSES BEGIN
Monday,
September 13th
REGISTRATION: Sunday, August 29th 12-2pm
Wednesday, Sept. 1st 5-6pm
Wednesday, Sept. 8th 5-6pm
Saturday, Sept. 11th 12-2pm
BALLET: Royal Academy of Dance: Graded & Vocational exams
HIP HOP: Jazz, Lyrical, Modern, Tap, Musical Theatre
Pre-Professional Division (by Audition)
Director: Mary Burke R.A.D. R.T.S.
P I L A T E S
G R O U P
T
H
E
SCULPT YOUR BODY WITH PILATES!
Reduce back pain, tone your abs & increase flexibility.

TO REGISTER CONTACT THE PILATES GROUP
at 778-895-4148 or pilatesgroupinfo@gmail.com
Learn the Pilates method...
...from the professionals
SPACE IS
LIMITED!
Mat Level 1 & Mat Level 2 SPECIAL PROMOTION!
SATURDAYS THURSDAYS INTRODUCTORY REFORMER
Sept 11 - Oct 30 Sept 9 - Oct 25 SERIES
10:15AM - 11:15AM 7:30PM - 8:30PM
* Strengthen your core muscles
*Improve flexibility
8 classes for $112.00 + tax
Maximum of 10 persons per class
4 weeks only!
Sept 9th - 30th
THURSDAYS:
6:30PM - 7:30PM
COST: $120.00 + tax
*Must register for all 4 classes*
Richmond Music School
1980-2010
Now in its 30th year.
11371 No. 3 Road, Richmond BC V7A 1X3
Phone: 604-272-5227 • Fax: 604-272-5267
Email: richmondmusic@telus.net
On the Web: www.richmondmusicschool.ca
Register Now For September!
For students of all ages:
• Private lessons in most instruments and voice
• Shared Guitar & Cello lessons for Beginners, for Children and Adults
• Special starter lessons for beginner piano
• Children’s Choir
• Theory, Harmony & History
• Concerts, recitals, festivals, scholarships, bursaries
• Students prepared for all examination boards
• Cdn Representative;Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music
RICHMOND DENTAL CENTRE
DR. INDERJIT DULAY
8211 Cook Road • 604-273-3368
richmonddentalcentre@telus.net • richmonddentalcentre.com
Implants
Invisalign
Ortho
Zoom Whitening
Cosmetic
Family Dentistry
NEW
PATIENTS
WELCOME
Get set
for a new
school
year.
back to school
W
hen it
comes to
backpack
safety, most people
tend to think about
injuries caused by
a heavy backpack
or one worn im-
properly. However,
there are other
dangers associated
with backpacks
and caution should
be used.
Backpacks come in all
shapes and sizes and
can be a handy tool
for students or adults.
When worn correctly,
with weight evenly
distributed across the
back and shoulders,
backpacks can be safer
and more effective than
using a purse or brief-
case. But many people
wear overly loaded
backpacks slung over
one shoulder, which
can pose problems
with posture and lead
to back issues.
In addition to the
physical strain back-
packs can cause,
they can be a danger
in other ways. Many
people fail to recognize
how much space a
backpack can take up.
Entering the tight quar-
ters of a school bus or
commuting on a train
or bus means a bulky
backpack can knock
into other people. If
that backpack is full
of heavy, cumbersome
books or even a laptop
computer, an inadver-
tent bump by the pack
can cause injuries.
Also, backpacks taken
off and placed in bus
aisles can be a tripping
hazard.
Students also can be
injured if a heavy pack
falls on them. Children
tucking backpacks into
lockers or classroom
cubbies may find that
they slide out and hit
another classmate.
Backpacks change
the way individuals
walk. Because the
person is carrying
around extra weight,
he or she may lose
balance or trip and fall,
especially when going
down steps.
To avoid these sec-
ondary hazards from
backpacks, consider
these tips.
•Don’t overload a
backpack. Carry only
what is necessary. If
too many books are
the issue, parents
should talk to the
school administrators
and teachers to reach a
happy medium regard-
ing textbook usage.
•When on the bus,
safely store the
backpack on a lap or
under the seat. Be sure
straps or the pack itself
is not extending into
the aisle.
•Avoid rolling back-
packs, which can be
difficult to roll. Some
schools ban these
styles because of trip-
ping hazards.
•Recognize how
much space the back-
pack takes up when
worn. Be conscious of
others when turning
around or entering a
confined space.
•Hold onto stair rails
and do not run with a
heavy backpack to help
avoid slips and falls.
•Choose a light-
weight backpack.
Canvas backpacks are
generally lighter in
weight than leather
backpacks. Do not add
extra weight unneces-
sarily.
Backpack safety goes
beyond back pain
Many people wear overly loaded backpacks
slung over one shoulder, which can pose prob-
lems with posture and lead to back issues.
P a g e A 1 6 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
arts & entertainment
Family farm
lives on in
midst of city
A
fter Helen
Jang at Tai On
Farms posted
notice that she had
sold the farm and
would no longer be
selling fresh pro-
duce, customers
complained, “You
can’t do that; I just
found you.” Alas,
they found her too
late.
There are few
family-run farms left
in Richmond. As one
generation ages, the
younger folk are taking
advantage of all the op-
portunities their grand-
parents and parents
didn’t have. So who is
minding the farm?
On a Saturday morn-
ing, I drove along
Beckwith Road, behind
Costco, and kept going
until I reached the end,
where Cherry Lane Farm
begins. I parked on the
road and walked along
the dirt road to the
storefront.
I passed the orchards,
tall tomato vines, rows
of zucchini blossoms
and lettuce; a picnic
table, tractor, a ladder
leaning against an
apple tree, a wheelbar-
row full of apple pulp.
Grape vines hug the
storefront and I duck to
enter.
“Can I help you?” asks
Miles Smart. He’s wear-
ing a Van Halen T-shirt
and his hair falls to his
shoulders. This is Milo
Savkovic’s grandson.
Milo is now 93, or
thereabouts (they’ve
lost count). Miles is 21
years old.
“It’s a bit of a mess,”
he says. “There’s so
much to do.”
With the help of
Sewak, a farm owner
from India whose been
working at Cherry Lane
for more than a decade,
Miles has been carry-
ing on his grandfather’s
legacy for the past
three years.
In his younger years,
Mile’s grandfather al-
lowed him to mow the
lawn or pick berries, but
never involved him in
the day to day toil. He
thought Miles wouldn’t
like it. For a few years,
Miles worked with his
father in advertising,
but didn’t find the
industry satisfying. One
day, his grandmother
asked him what they
paid him, and offered
him a job on the farm.
He accepted and dis-
covered he liked it.
Every day on the farm
is the same, he says.
But each day has its
own theme. One day
it’s weeds, another it’s
blight, and another
might be a lack of
customers. Business
has been slower than
expected these past
few years. While people
have been pinching
pennies, they think they
are saving by shopping
at grocery stores and
buying fast food, but,
says Miles, they would
save money if they
came here.
“There’s a stigma that
our farm is too far out
of town,” he says, “But
we are only 15 minutes
from Kitsilano.”
“And people still have
that expectation that
they can get anything
anytime. And you can’t
if you eat local,” he
says. “Someone called
the other day and asked
if they could pick cher-
ries. I told them that
cherries are two months
out of season.”
As he chats, Sewak
brings in containers of
sweet purple grapes
and tiny champagne
grapes from the
greenhouse and places
them besides bins of
grape tomatoes, garlic,
zucchini, eggplant, and
rows of fresh-pressed
apple juice. Sewak
disappears and comes
back with fresh-picked
green leaf lettuce,
romaine, and bunches
of basil.
“This is what we do,”
says Miles as he rings
the amounts into an old
cash register and bags
them for a customer.
Milo doesn’t remem-
ber a lot of what he
used to know, so Miles
refers instead to books,
trial and error, and ask-
ing advice from farmers
like Bill and Sandra
at W&A Farms. For
example, he is, he says,
insanely jealous of their
15-pound cabbage and
asked them about spac-
ing cabbage.
He’s learned what
farmers have always
known: with farming,
there is a lack of time
and money.
And he’s learning
about the symbiotic
relationship with plants
and soil and insects.
“I’m learning thing
after thing after thing,
and I’m trying to be as
organic as I can, but
there are things I can’t
control, like air pollu-
tion (as we stop our
conversation while a
plane passes overhead)
and city water.”
He’s finding his way.
“We supply the majority
of produce for Trafal-
gars Bistro in Vancou-
ver,” he tells me as we
walk past the blueberry
bushes, picking some
ripe fat berries.
“My approach is to
bring in native plants to
reduce the amount of
insects. I planted milk
thistle to attract soldier
beetles because they
eat aphids. The result
was the most amazing
cabbage.”
He shows me his 13
bee hives and points
out the hazelnut or-
chard.
“Miles,” his father
appears and points to
two hoes lying on the
ground. “Pick those up
before someone gets
hurt.”
Arlene Kroeker photo
Miles Smart at Cherry Lane Farm, a green pocket in the midst of Richmond’s busy city centre.
Food for Thought
Arlene Kroeker
Forgotten by some, Cherry Lane
Farm is a gem to those who know it
“There’s a stig-
ma that our farm
is too far out of
town, but we are
only 15 minutes
from Kitsilano.”
- Miles Smart
Canada gave musician new life
T
he Music at the Cannery series
continues Friday, Aug. 27, with Paul
O’Brien in concert.
O’Brien is a singer, songwriter and in-
strumentalist with a gift for going straight
to the emotional heart of the story, and
taking his listeners with him. Born and
raised Irish Catholic in an English inner
city, he spent the first 20-odd years of his
professional life playing traditional Celtic
music for pub gigs, folk festivals, folk
clubs and private concerts throughout
the UK, Europe, the United States and the
Middle East.
At age 38, finding himself burned out,
creatively stifled and desperately un-
happy, he turned off and checked out. In
2004 he left the UK and his music career
behind, moving with his family to Victoria
for a fresh start as a classroom teacher.
The immigration experience created a
tectonic shift in O’Brien, unleashing a
creative energy he had long suppressed.
Suddenly, the gifted songwriter thrash-
ing around inside him wanted out. While
teaching full time, O’Brien wrote and
recorded two CDs of original songs.
The gigs started coming in. O’Brien’s
full-time teaching job became a part-time
teaching job, and then he left teaching
entirely to focus on this second iteration
of his music career. Along with regular ap-
pearances in and around his home base
of Vancouver Island came a burgeoning
international career.
After touring England, Scotland and
Ireland in early 2009, O’Brien was signed
by a German label.
O’Brien has developed an eclectic folk
style that is broadly appealing and not
easily categorized. His experiences as
an immigrant, musician and teacher, his
natural instinct for humour and storytell-
ing, and his empathy for the underdog
have combined to produce an insightful
and entertaining artist. O’Brien’s concerts
are dynamic affairs, and his connection
with the audience is palpable.
The Music at the Cannery series is
presented in collaboration with the Beat
Merchant and the Steveston Folk Guild.
Paul O’Brien
•Friday, Aug. 27 at 6:30 p.m.
•Part of the Music at the Cannery
Series, presented by the Beat Merchant
and the Steveston Folk Guild
•Gulf of Georgia Cannery, 12138
Fourth Ave.; admission is by donation
Paul O’Brien plays Richmond on Friday night.
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arts & entertainment
W
hat’s the
definition
of tongue-
in-cheek humour?
It’s How to Raise
a Jewish Dog by
the rabbis of Boca
Raton Theological
Seminary as told
to Ellis Weiner and
Barbara Davilman.
This spoof on dog
training by this fictitious
group of religious leaders
is side-splitting. Hitting all
the high points of Jewish
cultural belief, practices,
neuroses and general
mishagas, How to Raise
a Jewish Dog is filled with
riffs on how to use guilt,
shame, passive aggres-
siveness and sarcasm to
get your dog to do what
you want.
Even though the
pretext is dog rearing
Jewish-style, the real
focus is on the Jewish
owner. Because heaven
forbid we should get any
attention. Jews—and
I’m using a broad brush
stroke here—can tend to
be inwardly focused, to
the exclusion of every-
thing else around them.
Like children, the world
revolves around us. So
bring a dog into this
equation, and you have a
recipe for, well…hilarity.
The rabbis’ system
focuses on “raising dogs
the way we ourselves
were raised as Jewish
children. The goal is
to instill in the dog the
assumptions and values
our parents instilled in us.
They include:
•The knowledge that
we have to be perfect or
we’ll be very disappoint-
ing to those who love us.
•The knowledge that
we must be very careful
whenever we leave home
because the world is full
of lunatics. Etc., etc.
You get the picture.
The basis for Jewish dog
training here is emotion,
not discipline. Their tenet
of “Conditional Uncondi-
tional Love” pretty says it
all. And of course there’s
also “Situational Martyr-
dom,” where the owner
views him/herself as a
“well-meaning, unjustly
abused victim of the
dog’s bad behavior.”
If you’re a Jewish dog
owner, you might want
to try another technique
posited here: Use subtext
to convey your message
to your dog. After all, “Us-
ing subtext is important…
because that’s how we
convey the Four Essential
Messages (‘You’re great’
/ ‘You’re terrible’ / ‘You
need me’ / ‘I’ll die if you
die’).” For example, when
your dog does something
bad, “you can say ‘No, no’
in a gently chiding voice,
but what you really mean
is: ‘Look, I don’t really
care that you did this.
Life is short and I’m crazy
about you. So ignore me.
Just don’t do it again.’”
On using guilt to train
your dog: “When he is
bad, a Jewish dog is not
only informed that his
behavior may be bad
in and of itself, or even
possibly dangerous to his
safety, but that his bad-
ness harms the owner.”
For example: “You went
through the garbage
again? Why do you do
this to me?”
The Jewish tendency
to guilt, over-reaction
and self-absorption are
all mocked here, with
tongue firmly planted in
cheek. You can’t help but
find this book funny. Un-
less of course you have
no sense of humour. And
then it would be the dog’s
fault anyway.
Shelley Civkin is
communications officer
with Richmond Public
Library. Her column ap-
pears every Thursday in
The Richmond Review.
Book Club
Shelley Civkin
It’s the dog’s fault
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arts & entertainment
The Cinevolution Media Arts Society
is presenting a public screening of the
Dream Project on Sunday.
The Dream Project is an outreach ini-
tiative of the New Asia Film Festival,
giving students hands-on experience
and training in professional filmmaking,
animation and multimedia art installa-
tion techniques.
Sunday’s screening is a chance for
the public to see the work of Richmond
youth, ages 11 to 20, involved in the
project this summer.
The event gets underway at 2 p.m.
on Aug. 29 at the Richmond Cultural
Centre, 7700 Minoru Gate.
Work of young film students showcased
Students in the Dream Project prepare their film.
Tanya
Tucker in
concert
Country music legend
Tanya Tucker will play
River Rock Show The-
atre Friday, Aug. 27, at
8 p.m.
Tucker started sing-
ing at talent contests as
a young child after she
and her family moved to
Arizona. She was only 13
when a Las Vegas song-
writer introduced her to
legendary record pro-
ducer, Billy Sherrill, who
signed her to Columbia
Records and recorded her
first big hit song, “Delta
Dawn.”
She followed with
“Love’s the Answer” and
“Jamestown Ferry” then
brought another mega-
hit, “What’s Your Mama’s
Name.” At age 15, she
had a Country Music
Association Award, a
Grammy nomination and
her face on the cover of
Rolling Stone.
The hits kept on coming
throughout the ‘70s and
‘80s with “Lizzie and the
Rainman,” “Texas When I
Die,” “Pecos Promenade,”
“Strong Enough to Bed,”
“It’s A Little Too Late” and
“Tell Me About It.”
In recent years she has
penned two books, and
last year released a new
album.
Tickets, $49.50 to
$59.50, at ticketmaster.
ca or 604-280-4444.
Chicago plays River Rock
A band formed in their namesake city and made famous with 21 top-10
singles will play Richmond Saturday night.
Chicago will take to the River Rock Show Theatre stage for an 8 p.m. show
Aug. 28. The band is known for hits such as “If You Leave Me Now,” “Does
Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?” “Beginnings” and “25 or 6 to 4.” Their
hits drove them to become the first American band to chart a top-40 album
in five consecutive decades.
Today’s lineup includes original band members Robert Lamm on vocals and
keyboards, Lee Loughnane on trumpet, James Pankow on trombone and Walt
Parazaider on woodwinds.
Tickets, $84.50 to $104.50, at ticketmaster.ca or 604-280-4444.
P a g e A 2 0 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
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Featured Contest
community
Event
encourages
gardeners
to grow
through
winter
On Saturday, Aug. 28,
the Richmond Food Secu-
rity Society and Richmond
Art Gallery will stage
Grow Up!, an event en-
couraging locals to keep
growing food through the
fall and winter.
Set for the Richmond
Cultural Centre from 1 to
4 p.m., the event includes
vegetable seed sales,
bee workshops, seed
bomb workshops and
food stamping activities
for young children.
As the nights get cooler,
gardeners are beginning
to think about vegetables
that will keep producing
into the fall and winter.
This year, the Richmond
Food Security Society
asked the Sharing Farm
in Terra Nova to start over
500 seedlings just for this
sale. Purple Sprouting
broccoli, January King
cabbage, and Perpetual
Spinach chard are just a
few of the varieties that
will be available.
Gardeners should come
early to get the best se-
lection of plants but
should plan to stay for
the day to take advan-
tage of workshops by
well-known bee expert,
Brian Campbell and artist
Robin Ripley.
Entertainment will be
provided by local bands
and a bannock-making
workshop will also be
held around noon.
Ignatieff summer tour lands in Richmond
Michael Ignatieff addressed a Rich-
mond crowd Saturday morning as part
of his summer tour across Canada.
The federal Liberal leader spoke at
length about the differences between
Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s record
and the Liberal platform.
“Everywhere we go, we will be mak-
ing the case that our Liberal team is
the progressive, compassionate, re-
sponsible alternative to the Harper
government.”
Ignatieff’s speech was well received
by the packed crowd gathered at the
Richmond Cultural Centre. Among
those in attendance was Richmond
Liberal candidate Joe Peschisolido.
“Give hope to the Liberal team to take
back Richmond and give it the respect
and relationship it deserves,” Ignatieff
concluded. “We need your patience,
your support and your phone calls to
get Joe Peschisolido into the House of
Commons.” — Jessica Tieszen
BusinessReport
SUI TE 101 - SOUTH TOWER, 5811 COONEY, RI CHMOND, BC. V6X 3M1 | T. 604. 278. 2822 | F. 604. 278. 2972 | r i chmondchamber. ca
R I C H M O N D C H A M B E R O F C O M M E R C E M O N T H L Y N E W S L E T T E R
CHAMBER PARTNERS:
Beavis, Wong & Associates/
Chambers of Commerce Group Insurance
EmployMe BC
Vancouver Airport Authority
SIGNATURE SPONSOR:
RBC Royal Bank
The Richmond Chamber Of Commerce • Published Monthly
The Richmond Chamber of Commerce has been “Proudly serving our community
for since 1925”. In partnership with the Richmond Review the Chamber produces
Business Gateway once per month. The statements and views expressed in this
monthly publication are not necessarily those of the publisher. This publication’s
intent is to keep Chamber members and prospective members informed on
important information, events and educational items. The Richmond Chamber
of Commerce is located at Suite 101 - South Tower - 5811 Cooney, Road,
Richmond, BC, V6X 3M1.
For more information and to reserve for the events, please phone 604-278-2822; Email: rcc@richmondchamber.ca or see us online: richmondchamber.ca
RICHMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
BUILDS BUSINESS BRIDGE TO CHINA
On September 17th Richmond
Chamber of Commerce and 14 of
its members will be embarking
on a Business related trip to
China to visit Xiamen and
Shanghai. The main purpose
of this trip will be to further
enhance the already fostered
business relationships with
Richmond’s Friendship City
Xiamen.
Following the successful
visits of delegates, Mayor
and Vice Mayor of Xiamen
to the Chamber in 2008 and
2009, Richmond Chamber of
Commerce has accepted the
kind invitation to visit Xiamen
to further develop business
relationships. Richmond
Chamber of Commerce members
taking part in the delegation
represent sectors such as;
Agriculture, Business services,
Green Lighting, Residential
Services, Education, Food
Processing, International Freight
Services, IT Solutions and
Banking services.
The itinerary of the trip
includes a day with Xiamen
Chamber of Commerce, tours
of Xiamen Hi-tech region and
business meetings with Xiamen
companies and the Mayor of
Xiamen. The groups will then
move on to Shanghai were they
will continue networking and
attend ‘Richmond Day’ hosted
in the Canadian Pavilion at the
Shanghai Expo.
Following the recent Approved
Destination Status (ADS) given
to Canada in June this year,
focus on Chinese business trade
is at an all time high.
Richmond Chamber of
Commerce President, Tony
Kwan comments “Over the
years, the Richmond Chamber of
Commerce, with the assistance
of the City of Richmond, has
worked very hard to develop
a business relationship with
the City of Xiamen. This trip
marks the first significant
business delegation consisting
of Chamber members to visit
Xiamen. The Chamber hopes
to continue to open business
opportunities for Richmond
businesses in Xiamen and other
international markets”.
Richmond Chamber of
Commerce looks forward to
strengthening its bond with
Xiamen and introducing some
of its members to its business
contacts, education and culture.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8
Strictly Networking
Breakfast 2010
Holiday Inn Vancouver Airport
10720 Cambie Road. Limited Seating!
Registration & Breakfast 7 - 7:30 am
& Networking 7:30 - 9 am
Tickets: Members $15+HST
Non-Members $25+HST
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16
9 and Dine
RCC 9 and Dine Specials at Quilchena Golf &
Country Club. All golfing levels are welcome to
join us for a non-competitive, fun evening of Golf
& Dinner. Sign up as a single or better yet, get a
group together! Golf 9 holes (tee off 4:30-6:30
pm). $10 Golf Shop Coupon & Dinner.
All for only $50 + tax
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22
Luncheon with Keynote Speaker
James Hoggan, President,
Hoggan & Associates
Sheraton Vancouver Airport Hotel
7551 Westminster Hwy.
Registration 11:45 am
Tickets: Members $35 + HST
Non-Members $45 + HST
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23
HST Seminar – “HST for
Confused Business Owners”
Hosted by the Richmond Chamber
& Reid Hurst Nagy Inc.
Limited Seating! 5:30 – 8:30 pm.
Richmond Chamber Board Room
Suite 101 5811 Cooney Road.
Tickets: Members $15 + HST
Prepaid in advance.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
Business After 5
Join us for a great “Members Only” Networking
experience with our hosts at the
Riverside Palace Banquet Halls.
5 pm – 6:45 pm Details TBA
Please note reservations are required for
all events
UpcomingEvent s
A Supplement to The Richmond Review BusinessReport | AUGUST 26, 2010 21

richmondchamber.ca
AUGUST 26, 2010 | BusinessReport A Supplement to The Richmond Review 22

richmondchamber.ca
Q
Who is Whitewater?
A
Established in 1980,
WhiteWater is a
vertically integrated
supplier of the most
successful waterpark
attractions in the
world. Specializing in
waterslides, AquaPlay
multi-level interactive
play structures,
wave-generating
equipment, stationary
surfing machines and
Prime Play™ soft
modular play systems,
our award winning
products and industry
leading technology
can be found at more
than 4,000 projects
worldwide. Our depth of
expertise includes park
planning, engineering,
manufacturing and
installation. Markets
include indoor and
outdoor waterparks,
hotels, resorts and
cruise ships, amusement
and theme parks and
municipal aquatic
facilities.
Q
Why did you choose
this business?
A
Founder and CEO
Geoff Chutter built
his own waterpark in
Penticton, BC, in the early
1980s, when the industry
was in its infancy. He
saw an opportunity to
improve on the design
and entertainment value
of waterparks, so he
established WhiteWater
and grew it into the largest
designer of waterparks
and largest manufacturer
of waterpark attractions in
the world.
Q
How do you try to
stand out from the
competition?
A
WhiteWater doesn’t
just sell waterpark
attractions, we offer
expertise in conceptual
planning, engineering,
installation and service to
help our clients develop
the most successful
waterparks possible.
We offer the widest
range of waterpark
attractions – wave
equipment, interactive
play structures, stationary
surfing machines and of
course, waterslides; we
have the largest in-house
engineering team in the
business; and we have the
most experienced team
of architects and planners
in the aquatic recreation
and entertainment world.
This unique combination
of skills, products and
services sets us apart from
the competition as ‘the
Waterpark Company’.
Q
Tell us about some of
your recent awards?
A
2010 - Aquatics
International – Most
Valuable Products –
SilkTekTM fiberglass
moulds
1999 to 2009 Amusement
Today’s Golden Ticket
Award for Best Waterpark
Ride – Master BlasterTM
2009 - Honorable
Mention: IAAPA*
Best New Product -
AquaLoopTM
2009 - Green Building of
America – for excellence
in Green Building
2008 - IAAPA Best
New Product – Family
BoomerangoTM
2007 - IAAPA Impact
Award & Best New
Family Entertainment
Center Attraction /
Comfy Entertainment
Centers: The Comfyland
Experience
Designer and supplier of
IAAPA’s 2007 Must-See
waterpark, Chime Long
Waterpark in Guangzhou,
China
*International
Association of Amusement
Parks and Attractions
Q
This month we are
focusing on the
Richmond Chamber‘s
business relationships
with China. Can you
tell us a little about your
company’s presence
in China?
A
WhiteWater has been
doing business in
mainland China since
1990, when we built
equipment for the Beijing
Recreation Center, then
host city of the Asian
Games. China continues
to be an important
market for WhiteWater,
and our business there
continues to grow as the
local waterpark industry
matures. Here are some
of our recent notable
projects:
a)WhiteWater provided
all but one attraction
and 100% of the
design, engineering and
schematics for Chime
Long Waterpark, the most
successful waterpark
in Asia. Chime Long
recouped their initial
capital investment in
under 12 months, and
today boasts the highest
annual theme park
attendance behind Disney
parks in Tokyo and Hong
Kong.
b)WhiteWater attractions
are front and center at
the Beijing Watercube,
the venue for the 2008
Summer Olympics
swimming events and
now a world-class multi-
purpose aquatic facility.
c)Bali Waterpark in
Shenyang will be China’s
largest combined indoor/
outdoor waterpark, 100%
designed, engineered and
supplied by WhiteWater.
Scheduled to open in
summer 2011.
d)Yangcun Mini World
near Tianjin features
original themed waterpark
attractions as part of its
unique 32-hectare tribute
to famous landmarks
and historical sites from
around the world.
The image above is taken
inside the Watercube in
Beijing, China, site of the
2006 Summer Olympics
swimming events. The
rider is inside one of
our SilkTek translucent
flume body slides, and
the purple ride that
forms the outside border
of the picture is the
AquaLoop, the world’s
first near-vertical looping
waterslide and the first of
its kind in China.
Small Company Profile Questions
FR
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H
&

LO
C
A
L
REVIEW
the richmond
FAMILY
FUN FOR
ALL!
THIS SUNDAY,
AUGUST 29
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10 am - 4 pm
Meet with friends and neighbours while
you shop locally and eat seasonally!
More produce and plants are arriving weekly!
Every market – Children’s Tent.
Come make a craft for FREE!
Book Swap: Bring a children’s book
and swap it for a different one.
For further information visit www.sfam.ca
or call Paula at 604-729-7326
or email marketmanager@shaw.ca
Located at the corner Chatham St.
and 4th Ave.
Reg. $9.00m
www.fabriclandwest.com
VANCOUVER
1678 Southeast
Marine Drive
604-321-1848
Store Hours
Mon. - Wed.
& Sat. 10 - 6
Thurs. & Fri.
10 - 9
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1 blk from Knight St. Bridge
A Supplement to The Richmond Review BusinessReport | AUGUST 26, 2010 23

richmondchamber.ca
THIS AUDIENCE FAVORITE IS
BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!
From treacherous wire-walking to
trick-cycling, precision tumbling,
astonishing juggling and maneuvers
atop a precarious pagoda of chairs,
the Peking Acrobats are a must-see
attraction at the Fair at the PNE.
Be sure to catch these masters of agility
and grace as they defy gravity with
amazing displays of contortion, flexibility
and control and push the envelope of
human possibility.
SHOW
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EEKENDS.
Abbotsford Heat
Hockey Club
300-33800 King Rd
Abbotsford, BC V2S 8H8
Phone: 604-743-5066
Contact: Dave Darling
ClearOne Sports Ltd.
#101-1525 Broadway Street
Port Coquitlam, BC V3C 6P6
Phone: 604-808-9127
Contact: Darryl Yung
FocalPoint
Business Coaching
1958 West 35th Avenue
Vancouver, BC V6M 1H7
Phone: 604-564-3107
Contact: Shelley Lecerf
G.A.I.N.
Counselling Services
104 - 7291 Moffat Road
Richmond, BC V6Y 1X9
Phone: 778-297-6066
Contact: Sylvana Yeomans
Glory Language
School Society
10280 Cambie Road
Richmond, BC V6X 1K5
Phone: 604-821-0868
Contact: Umay Chan
Haji’s Sleep Shop
& Upholstery Inc.
1- 12800 Bathgate Way
Richmond, BC V6V 1Z4
Phone: 604-278-4151
Contact: Haji Manji
Intertech Building
Services Ltd.
201 - 10451 Shellbridge Way
Richmond, BC V6X 2W8
Phone: 604-270-3478
Contact: Rob Gillespie
Royal Canadian Security
#5108 - 13562 Maycrest Way
Richmond, BC V6V 2J7
Phone: 778-883-1969
Contact: Gurjinder Bains
The Westin Wall Centre
Vancouver Airport
3099 Corvette Way
Richmond, BC V6X 4K3
Phone: 604-303-6565
Contact: Kyle Matheson
Tom MacDonald /
Dominion Lending
Delta Equities
#4 - 8500 Anderson Road
Richmond, BC V6Y 1S6
Phone: 778-938-0400
Contact: Tom MacDonald
Transglobal
Ventures Canada
207 - 1005 Queens Avenue
New Westminster, BC
V3M 1M4
Phone: 604-777-1938
Contact: Ramon Agbayani
Welcome
NewMembers
T
here are Over 12,000 potential
nominees in the Richmond
Business Community.
Do you know 11 worthy candi-
dates?
The Richmond Chamber of
Commerce and the City of Richmond
proudly celebrate the
33rd Anniversary of the Richmond
Business Excellence Awards on
November 16th, 2010. The awards
recognize businesses that have
achieved excellence in the com-
munity through their own abilities,
efforts and initiatives.
How does a business demonstrate
excellence?
In keeping with the values of the
Richmond Chamber of Commerce
recipients of a Business Excellence
Award are businesses or business-
persons that display a significant and
sustained commitment to positive
business development, economic
growth and diversity the City of
Richmond.
Award Selection
Award selection is based upon the
following criteria:
Demonstration of how the
Association exemplifies innovation
Explanation of how the Association
demonstrates vision in the develop-
ment of new services
Explanation of how the Association
has demonstrated the ability to take
risks
Other noteworthy contributions and
accomplishments.
Judges for the Chamber’s Business
Excellence Awards are established
members of the Chamber and local
business community. Identities of the
judges will be kept confidential.
AWARD CATEGORIES
• Young Entrepreneur
• New Business of the Year
• Business of the Year 1 – 25
Employees
• Business of the Year 26 to 75
Employees
• Business of the Year 76+ Employees
• Innovation Award
• Business Leadership Award
• Hall of Fame Award
• Newsmaker of the Year
• Outstanding Workplace Award
• Outstanding Customer Service
Award
To nominate a business or your
own business download the form in
the category you have selected from
www.richmondchamber.ca and send
it by mail to: Business Excellence
Awards, Richmond Chamber of
Commerce, Suite 101 - South Tower,
5811 Cooney Road, Richmond, B.C.
V6X 3m1, by fax to 604-278-2972 or
by email to caroly@richmondcham-
ber.ca. Deadline for nominations
is noon on Monday September 13th,
2010. The winners will be announced
during the Business Excellence
Awards dinner on November 16th,
2010.
Business Excellence Awards
Celebrating Richmond’s Best Businesses!
Celebrating Richmond’s Best Businesses!
REGISTER ONLINE and raise funds to help homeless animals

Garry Point Park
Steveston
2pm Registration
4pm Walk
Richmond Community Foundation salutes
Mr. Robert Bitcon who established a fund with the Richmond Community
Foundation to honour and mark the passing of his wife, Etta Demerse, in the
mid 1990’s. He wanted to support students as they left secondary school
in Richmond and pursued post secondary studies. Since 1997 this fund has
provided scholarships for over 50 students and has paid out over $20,000.
Today the fund has grown to over $57,000 — a truly impressive legacy.
Every year Mr. Bitcon enjoys his work on the RCF Scholarship Selection
Committee as he reads through the applications. He is inspired by the
commitment of today’s students, not just to their studies but to volunteering
their time and efforts to make Richmond a great place to live, work LEARN
and play.
In addition to the wonderful Etta Demerse Scholarship Fund, the Richmond
Community Foundation works closely with School District #38 and is proud
to be one of the largest contributors to scholarships in our School District.
If you would like more information on how you or your organization can
establish such a fund, please call 604-270-4483, or go to our website at
richmondfoundation.org.
Visit us at richmondfoundation.org
Working to make Richmond a better place to Live, Work, LEARN and Play.
6846 No. 3 Road, Richmond l 604.279.8936
www.miaboutique.ca
Wedding Gowns
Bridesmaid Dresses
Prom Dresses
Special occasion apparel
for children and women,
bridal jewellery
and accessories
Mia Boutique
BRIDAL & OCCASIONS
8420 Cambie Road, Richmond
Phone: 604-273-3748
Fax: 604-273-1697
Email: richmondfh@arbormemorial.com
Web: www.richmond-funeral.ca
CANADIAN OWNED & OPERATED
RICHMOND FUNERAL HOME
CREMATION & RECEPTION CENTRE
The Richmond Funeral Home
would like to invite you to our
65th Anniversary
Free Food • Games
Live Music • Prizes
Info Booths • Tours
OPEN
HOUSE
BBQ
Sat., Aug. 28, 2010
12:00pm to 4:00pm
Building Security and Trust
Computer and
network professionals
for all business types.
Free initial consultation.
604-230-8114
info@amuleta.com
http://amuleta.com
Amuleta
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Dale Jackaman
Chief Security
Officer
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FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (1985) LTD.
Tel: (604) 270-1142
210-13900 Maycrest Way,
Richmond, BC V6V 3E2
Email: info@dupuislangen.com
Web: www.dupuislangen.com
Corporate & Personal Financial Planning
Employee Benefit Programs
AUGUST 26, 2010 | BusinessReport A Supplement to The Richmond Review 24

richmondchamber.ca
Around The Chamber
RCC announces staff appointments
Sara Sands
Manager, Communications & Policy
With over 7 years Advertising, PR
and Marketing experience, Sara joins
Richmond Chamber of Commerce.
Sara will be leading the communication
and policy development function of the
Richmond Chamber of Commerce.
Developing strategic and tactical
implementation plans to best
communicate policy research findings
and positions.
Shelby So
Manager, Member Development
With 5 years Sales experience,
Shelby joins Richmond Chamber of
Commerce. Shelby will be primarily
responsible for implementing and
developing growth strategies,
retention strategies and Stakeholder
relationships.
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T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e A 2 5
sports
SPORTS EDITOR: Don Fennell
Phone: 604 247 3732
E-mail: sports@richmondreview.com
by Don Fennell
Sports Editor
The story of the Rich-
mond Kigoos Swim Club
is as much one of con-
tinued achievement as
longevity.
Now into its sixth de-
cade, the Kigoos—a First
Nations word meaning
“fish that swims fast,”
remain a model for other
summer clubs throughout
the province to emulate
after coming in third over-
all at last week’s annual
provincial championships
in Kamloops. They were
second in 2009.
Kigoo swimmers com-
bined to win three gold,
four silver and five bronze
medals and also excelled
in relays, with the Division
One boys placing first and
third.
“We definitely felt great
about the performance
from all our swimmers,” coach Sean
Connacher said.
Connacher, 19, heads up the Inter-
mediate B swim group and as much
as anyone exemplifies what it is to
be a Kigoo.
A Queen’s University student, he
returns home each summer eager
to contribute to the club of which
he’s been a member since he was
13 years old.
Each of the other 12 members of
the coaching staff, headed up by
Cody Denoon and including Benji
Hutton, Matt Girard, Liam Finlay,
Heather Price, Jennifer Christie,
Andrew Christie, Cameron Howie,
Micaela Millar, Ella Koonar, Nadia
Dale and Julia Morris, are equally
dedicated.
“Overall the leadership with-
in the club from the coaches and
swimmers added to how the season
went,” Connacher said. “Everyone is
passionate about the club and the
sport they’re participating in. I think
we’ve progressed to become an even
stronger club in our 51st
season.”
Connacher attributes
the ongoing dedication
and success to the long
history of the Kigoos and
a determination and com-
mitment that is passed on
from generation to gener-
ation—from both volun-
teers and swimmers.
“When you’re passion-
ate about something like
that it translates,” he
says. “Because our club
is a very inclusive envi-
ronment we make sure
every swimmer or parent
is involved, whether it’s
competing or support-
ing the team. And we
make sure there are lots
of social events where
everyone feels included.
That mindset allows for
sustainable growth within
the club.”
Many s wi mmer s
achieved personal best
times during the season, capped by
their efforts at the recent regional
and provincial championships.
•See richmondreview.com for
Kigoos results from the provincial
championships.
Kigoos continue to pool excellence
The Richmond
Kigoos’ 2010
coaching staff
poses for a
portrait with
the club mascot
“Kigoo” on
the eve of the
Fraser South
regional meet
at Waterma-
nia. The staff
is led by head
coach Cody
Denoon (front
and centre).
The remain-
ing coaches
are (from left):
Matt Girard,
Liam Finlay,
Nadia Dale,
Ella Koonar,
Sean Con-
nacher, Benji
Hutton, Jen-
nifer Chrisite,
Micaela Millar,
Julie Morris,
and Cameron
Howie.
Bob Frid photo
Now into its sixth decade, Richmond summer swim club still one of province’s best
Bob Frid photo
Dakota Chan won the girls’ Division 2
50-metre breaststroke in 46.10 seconds.
Bob Frid photo
Brandon Lam won the boys’ Division 4
100-metre breaststroke in 1:30.46.
Bob Frid photo
Luke Gilmore won the boys’ Division 5
100-metre breaststroke in 1:22.81.
P a g e A 2 6 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
Do you know someone who could benefit from a
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full name, a recent photo and why they require a makeover.
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Join hundreds
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sports
by Don Fennell
Sports Editor
Jeff Tambellini grew up
a Vancouver Canucks fan,
always hoping to one day
play for his hometown
team. Signing a one-year
free agent contract with
the NHL club July 1 has
provided the chance.
“It was an easy deci-
sion, especially with
where the team is now
and the depth they
have,” he said, prior to
skating with some other
pros at the Vancouver
Hockey School recently
at the Richmond Ice
Centre. “This is a great
opportunity to be part of
something special.”
Tambellini, 26, said he’s
more excited than ner-
vous at the prospect of
playing for the Canucks.
He said everywhere
he goes in B.C. further
emphasizes how much
people care about the
team.
Unlike the young, re-
building New York Island-
ers for whom he played
36 games last season
(scoring 14 points) and
parts of the previous five
seasons, the Canucks are
an older, established
team expected to con-
tend for a championship.
Tambellini has designs on
a third line role, either at
left wing or centre with
the Canucks, but said
it’s up to him to earn the
chance during the exhibi-
tion schedule.
“It’s more important to
take advantage of the
opportunity when it’s in
front of you,” he said. “I
want to come in and be a
strong two-way guy and
add scoring depth. I have
to add a scoring dynamic
for me to be successful,
but also to bring reliabil-
ity. I have to be counted
on to kill penalties or play
four-on-four or five-on-
five and to be solid on
the ice.”
Tambellini enjoys the
challenge of playing
while his team is short-
handed. A couple of
seasons ago with the
Bridgeport Sound Tigers,
the Islanders’ top affiliate
in the American Hockey
League, he teamed with
Frans Nielsen to become
one of the league’s dy-
namic duos. Not only did
they routinely shut down
the opposition, but also
were a threat to score.
“We had teams kind of
worried with our speed,
they weren’t just sitting
back and shooting at us.
It’s a responsibility I enjoy
because you’re shutting
down the other team’s
best players.”
The NHL game has
changed quite a bit since
Tambellini was drafted
27th overall by the Los
Angeles Kings in 2003,
fresh off an impressive
freshman season at
the University of Michi-
gan where he tallied 45
points in 43 games as a
Wolverine. Today’s game
is predicated on skating,
but that suits him just
fine. Though he doesn’t
take it for granted, Tam-
bellini is a naturally
gifted skater capable of
keeping pace with such
other elite fleet-of-foot
players as Chicago Black-
hawk Patrick Kane and
Montreal Canadien Brian
Gionta—both smaller
players whose skating
prowess has provided
with them not only with
the opportunity to play in
the NHL but to excel.
“You see new guys com-
ing up and how talented
they are, so if you’re not
constantly working your-
self to become better at
your personal skills you
begin to be passed by,”
he said.
The son of former
Vancouver Canuck and
current Edmonton Oil-
ers general manager
Steve, Tambellini grew
up around the Canucks.
But as much as he’s part
of a close-knit family, he
has deliberately tried to
avoid playing for a team
managed by his dad.
“It’s nice to be close and
I enjoy playing against
his teams, but to be on
the same team puts a lot
of stress and pressures
on both parties I think,”
he said.
Tambellini jumped at
chance to be a Canuck
Don Fennell photo
Skating at the Richmond Ice Centre recently, Jeff
Tambellini is hoping to cap his homecoming by earn-
ing a a roster spot with the Vancouver Canucks.
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P R E S E NT E D B Y:
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e A 2 7
UNITED
Community Worship
SOUTH ARM UNITED CHURCH
11051 No. 3 Road, Richmond 604-277-4020
sauc@telus.net www.southarmunitedchurch.ca
Minister of the Congregation - Rev. Dr. Gary Gaudin
Children & Youth Team Ministry
Music Ministry - Ron Stevenson
Worship Service & Church School - 10:00 am
ALL ARE WELCOME!
STEVESTON UNITED CHURCH
3720 Broadway Street (at 2nd Ave.)
Rev. Rick Taylor
Please join us at 10am Sunday, August 29 for
Worship Service and Sunday School
604-277-0508 • www.stevestonunitedchurch.ca
A caring and friendly village church
Meeting in the Historic Pioneer Chapel
No. 3 Road and Steveston Highway
11:00 am Sunday
Call (604) 644-5073 for information
Visit our website at
www.richmondbiblebaptist.com
Bible Baptist Church
BRIGHOUSE UNITED CHURCH
an evangelical congregation
8151 Bennett Road, Richmond, 604-278-7188
www.brighouseunitedchurch.org
10 a.m. Worship
Nursery and Sunday School
Rev. Stuart Appenheimer - Minister
Visitors Always Welcome
Come home to RBC. There are no perfect people here.
We’re all in the process, by the grace of God, of becoming all we can be.
We’d love to have you walk with us on our journey towards the heart of God.
Worship Service: 10:30 am Relevant, biblical preaching
that touches the heart
Uplifting worship
Call Church office for more info: 604-277-1939
Richmond Baptist Church
Love God…Love People
6640 Blundell Road, Richmond BC • 604-277-1939
office@richmondbaptist.com
www.richmondbaptist.com
Richmond United Church
8711 Cambie Rd. (near Garden City Rd.) 604-278-5622
Come for 10am Worship and
Children’s Sunday School
and after-service coffee and fellowship.
Founded 1888. Richmond’s Oldest Church
ANGLICAN CHURCH OF CANADA
ST. EDWARDS ANGLICAN
10111 Bird Road, Richmond V6X 1N4
Phone/Fax: 273-1335
Priest-in-charge: Rev. Gord Dominey
Sunday Service: 8:30 &10:30 am
Sunday School
St. Alban
an Anglican parish in the heart of Richmond
Services at 8:30 and 10:00 am
Sunday School 10:00 am
The Reverend Margaret Cornish
7260 St. Albans Road, Richmond
604-278-2770 • www.stalbansrichmond.org
ADVENTIST
Richmond Seventh-Day ADVENTIST Church
Worship Location and Time:
Sat. 9:15 a.m.
8711 Cambie Road, Richmond
www.richmondsda.org
778-230-9714
INTERDENOMINATIONAL
10351 |o. 1 Road
i1 o|oc| Sou|| ol w||||arº Road)
Surda] Ce|eora||or. S|ar|rç & T|e word · 10:00 a.r.
www.myecc.org 604-270-4685
Kids Sunday School
Youth Activities
Everyone Welcome
St. Anne’s - Steveston Anglican Church
4071 Francis Road, Richmond, BC
604-277-9626
The Rev. Brian Vickers, Rector
Sunday 8:30 a.m. - Contemplative Eucharist
10:00 a.m. Family Eucharist with Church School
Sanctuary open for quiet prayer 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. weekdays
• www.stannessteveston.ca
To Advertise in the Community Worship page
Call Paula at 604-575-5355 or Rita at 604-575-5353
PRESBYTERIAN
Rev. Frances Savill, Minister • www.richpres.com
Come and worship — All are welcome
TWO SERVICES EVERY SUNDAY
9:00 AM – Contemporary Worship • 11:00 AM – Traditional Worship
Coffee and fellowship after each service.
Nursery, Preschool, Kindergarten at Traditional Services
Richmond Presbyterian Church
7111 No. 2 Road 604-277-5410
FOURSQUARE GOSPEL CHURCH OF CANADA
www.rcfonline.com
phone: 604-270-6594
6611 No. 4 Rd., Richmond
10:30 am
Friendly, family fellowship.
Pastor George Donovan
Sermon series – ‘The Power of Spiritual Gifts’
BAPTIST
8140 Saunders Road, Richmond, BC
604-277-8012 www.bbchurch.ca
Worship Service - 10:30 a.m.
Sonshine Adventures for Kids
Senior Pastor - Dr. Tom Mei
Broadmoor Baptist Church
A safe place to connect with God and fellow
travellers on your spiritual journey
LUTHERAN
OUR SAVIOUR LUTHERAN
6340 No. 4 Road, 604-270-0085
Pastor Tim Le Drew
SUNDAY
10:00 Worship with Holy Communion
www.oursaviour.ca
OU
10
CHRISTIAN REFORMED
Immanuel Christian Reformed Church
7600 No. 4 Road, Richmond, B.C. V6Y 2T5
604-276-8250 immanuelcrc@hotmail.com
Sunday service 11.30am.
Preachers: Rev. David Cheung & Rev. Peter Lim
MANDARIN
WORSHIP SERVICE
Welcome to our Sunday Worship Services at the
Fujian Evangelical Church
• English Services: 9:00 & 10:30 a.m.
• Minnanese Service: 10:30 a.m.
12200 Blundell Rd., Richmond, B.C., V7E 1R7
Telephone: 604-273-2757
www.fujianevangelical.org/
STARTING SEPT. 12, 2010
Every Sunday at 9:00 a.m.
FUJIAN EVANGELICAL
Garry Point Park
Steveston
2pm Registration
4pm Walk
REGISTER ONLINE and raise funds to help homeless animals

REVIEW
the richmond
Media Sponsor
sports
by Don Fennell
Sports Editor
Hugh McRoberts Secondary’s
reputation as a producer of rugby
talent continues.
Five boys attending the Rich-
mond school were selected to
play on various B.C. teams at last
week’s national championships.
The representative players were
Kapi Vataiki (under-18), Anton Met-
alnikov and Harjun Gill (under-16),
and Spencer Walker and Nick Wu
(under-14). Metalnikov was the
youngest player selected to the
under-16 A team, while Gill was
the second youngest.
“This is a significant achievement
as only seven other schools in the
province had five or more players
selected for the national tourna-
ment,” said Al Smith, one of the
McRoberts coaches.
The selection process for the
B.C. under-18 and under-16 teams
started at the provincial regional
championships at the University of
B.C. a month ago. Besides Metal-
nikov and Gill, the Vancouver West
team also featured Strikers Taran
Dhesi, Austin Matilda, Som Ghosh
and Danny Chang. The selection for
the provincial under-14 squad was
made at the recent B.C. Summer
Games with McRoberts represent-
ed by Nolan Howell, Cody Krajic,
Nicolas Morowat, Alvaro Lopez as
well as Walker and Wu.
Three McRoberts grads—Bryan
Tyrer, Alex Kam and Connor Fuller—
were members of the Vancouver
under-20 team that narrowly lost
to Newfoundland and Labrador in
the national championship.
“It is especially encouraging for
the coaching staff in that four of the
five B.C. players are either entering
grades 9 or 10,” Smith said.
•Through its oval rugby program,
the Richmond Rugby Club has
given out $500 in honorariums to
three local high school players.
Selected to receive the awards
were R.A. McMath students Erik
Favroldt and Michael Tolman and
McRoberts’ Nick Wu.
Five Strikers play rugby for B.C. at nationals
P a g e A 2 8 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
Jody Copple
604.818.7957
jodycopple.com
Let an
experienced
Realtor
®
go to work
for you
Serving you in English,
Spanish & French
*
JUST LISTED
*
11240 MELLIS DRIVE
Mellis Gardens is a unique, extremely well-
managed adult oriented building that offers
owners security, peace of mind and real
community atmosphere.
The building has been 100% rainscreened
including a new roof and windows. All suites
are much larger then your average apartment
and can accommodate house-sized furniture.
Just a short walk to the Cambie and No. 5
shopping centre with easy access to Vancouver.
A bonus of very low maintenance fees.
TWO FABULOUS SUITES IN MELLIS GARDENS
SUITE 308 — $319,900
TOP FLOOR, 1300 sq. ft. 2 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, immaculate, bright, south fac-
ing, with huge entertaining size living and dining rooms plus a separate eating area off
the kitchen, great size bedrooms, excellent in-suite storage and two balconies. Lovingly
maintained by the original owners.
SUITE 304 — $398,000
TOP FLOOR, 1628 sq. ft. Massive 2 bedroom, 2 full bathroom suite- feels like a rancher!
This bright home boast skylights, huge dining room and master bedroom, two balconies,
great in-suite storage. The flexible floor plan gives you the option for a den or even a 3rd
bedroom. Newer kitchen, flooring, crown mouldings and paint. A very comfortable home!
A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO ALL MY CLIENTS, COLLEAGUES, FRIENDS AND FAMILY FOR SUPPORTING
ME IN THE 2010 WEEKEND TO END BREAST CANCER. THANKS TO YOU I HAVE RAISED MORE THEN
$30,000 FOR THE BC CANCER FOUNDATION OVER THE PAST 7 YEARS. AN EXTRA SPECIAL
THANK YOU GOES OUT TO GORD PIPKEY OF REALMORTGAGE SERVICES FOR HIS EXCEPTIONALLY
GENEROUS DONATIONS YEAR AFTER YEAR.
OPEN HOUSE
August 29th
• 12-4pm
• $5 drop in fee
September 1st
• 6-9pm
• $5 drop in fee
PHONE: 604-278-1722
WEB: WWW.RICHMONDCURLING.COM
CURLERS
Wanted!
sports
Pre-season prep
Richmond Sockeyes began their 2009-10 Pacific International Junior Hockey League pre-season schedule in impressive fashion Saturday, blank-
ing the defending playoff champion Aldergrove Kodiaks 8-0 at the Richmond Ice Centre. Sockeyes play the North Delta Devils in a home-and-home
series, beginning tonight (8 p.m. Thursday) at the Richmond Ice Centre and Saturday at 6:15 p.m. in North Delta. Richmond also hosts Abbotsford
Pilots at 5:15 p.m. Sunday at the Ice Centre.
Bantam girls’
baseball
on deck
The tryouts, qualifying and or-
ganizing are done. Now, it’s time
to “Play Ball.”
That’s just what seven Bantam
girls’ baseball teams plan to do
beginning today (Thursday) at
the national AAA championship
in Richmond.
Hosted by the Richmond City
Baseball Association under
the guidance of co-chairs Pat
Weatherill and Warren Kars-
gaard, treasurer Lisanna Lewis
and Baseball Canada rep Holly
Lapierre, the tournament will
feature two teams from B.C.—the
provincial champions and a host
squad. Also participating are
provincial winners from Alberta,
Saskatchewan, Ontario, Quebec
and Nova Scotia.
Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia
are scheduled to get the action
going with a 9 a.m. game at
Brighouse Park. At noon, Ontario
and Quebec are slated to meet at
Brighouse, while Richmond and
Alberta play at Blundell Park. And
at 3 p.m., Saskatchewan and B.C.
will play at Brighouse Park.
The remainder of the schedule
(all games at Brighouse Park) is
as follows:
•FRIDAY, AUG. 27
9 a.m.—Alberta (Pool A) vs.
Quebec (Pool A)
Noon—B.C. (Pool B) vs. Nova
Scotia (Pool B)
3 p.m.—Host (Pool A) vs. Ontario
(Pool A)
6 p.m.—B.C. (Pool B) vs.
Saskatchewan (Pool B)
•SATURDAY, AUG. 28
9 a.m.—Nova Scotia (Pool B) vs.
B.C. (Pool B)
Noon—Alberta (Pool A) vs.
Ontario (Pool A)
3 p.m.—Nova Scotia (Pool B) vs.
Saskatchewan (Pool B)
6 p.m.—Quebec (Pool A) vs.
Host (Pool A)
•SUNDAY, AUG. 29
9 a.m.—Second in Pool B vs.
First in Pool A
9 a.m.—Second in Pool A vs.
First in Pool B (Blundell Field)
Noon—Third in Pool B vs. Third
in Pool A
3 p.m.—Bronze medal game
6 p.m.—Gold medal champion-
ship game
Stone on Canada’s Commonwealth field hockey team
Richmond’s Amanda Stone is one of 16 athletes
to be selected to Canada’s women’s field hockey
team for the upcoming Commonwealth Games
in New Delhi, India this October.
The field hockey competition is traditionally
strong at the Commonwealth Games. Five of
the women’s teams qualified for Delhi will be
competing at the World Cup in Argentina early
September.
“The team selected is relatively young in terms
of experience,” said Louis Mendonca, coach of
the Canadian women’s team.
“The Commonwealth Games will be a great
testing ground for measuring present prog-
ress and preparing us for future important events
such as the Pan American Games and Olympic
Qualifier. We had some good results in a series of
matches against India and Chile, but we now need
to bring more consistency to our performance to
be competitive against teams in the top 10.”
In pool play, Canada will be playing England
and New Zealand, both coming straight from the
World Cup. This will provide the team with an op-
portunity to prepare for the 2011 Pan American
Games, which will be its first chance to qualify
for the 2012 Olympic Games.
Canada is ranked 19th in the world.
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e A 2 9
The Award-Winning North Shore Outlook newspaper has
an outstanding opportunity for a full-time Advertising Sales
Consultant.
The candidate must have the ability to build relationships
with clients and ofer superior customer service. The winning
candidate will be a team player and will be called upon to
aggressively grow an existing account list. The ability to
work in an extremely fast-paced environment with a positive
attitude is a must.
The successful candidate will have sales experience -
preferably in the advertising or retail industry. The position
ofers a great work environment with a competitive salary,
commission plan and strong benefts package.
The Outlook is part of Black Press, Canada’s largest
independent print media company with more than 170
community, daily and urban newspapers across Canada
and the United States.
Please submit your resume with cover letter by
Friday August 27th, 2010.
To: Ad Manager, North Shore Outlook
admanager@northshoreoutlook.com
fax 604 903-1001
#104 – 980 West 1st Street
North Vancouver, B.C.
V7P 3N4
Advertising Sales Consultant Advertising Sales Consultant
Train to become an
OPTICIAN
(& Contact Lens Fitter)
* Start Your Own Business!! *
BC COLLEGE of OPTICS
#208 - 10070 King George Hwy., Surrey
604-581-0101
w w w. b c c o l l e g e o f o p t i c s . c a
* 6 month days...
begins Sept. 13
th
* 12 month eve
begins Oct. 19
th
Universal
Learning
Institute
Richmond Campus: #200-6760 No. 3 Rd.
604-248-1242 (across from Richmond Centre Mall)
E/I Supported Training
Financial assistance may be
available to those who qualify.
Office Administration Diploma
Computerized Accounting Software
Payroll Specialist
Microsoft Office Specialist
TrainingForJobs.com
Opportunity for an outstanding
Graphic Designer
Black Press Lower Mainland is looking for an
experienced Graphic Designer to fill an im-
mediate full time opening in Maple Ridge.
The successful applicant will be creative,
organized and work effectively under tight
deadlines, interacting with advertising clients,
sales representatives and the creative team.
Speed, accuracy and attention to detail is a
requirement.
A comprehensive working knowledge is re-
quired of CS3 on Mac OS X.
If you’d like to be part of a successful company,
please send a resume with a portfolio show-
casing your talent to:
Carly Ferguson
Advertising & Creative Services Manager
Maple Ridge Pitt Meadows News
22328 - 119th Avenue,
Maple Ridge, BC
V2X 2Z3
admanager@mapleridgenews.com
Closing date: Friday, Sept. 10, 2010
Black Press is Canada’s largest independent
newspaper group with more than 150 com-
munity, daily and urban weekly newspapers
located in BC, Alberta, Washington State,
Ohio and Hawaii.
THE NEWS
Serving Maple Ridge & Pitt Meadows since 1978
Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers
either! Deliver 2x week, Thursdays and Saturdays, right in your
neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.
Call JR 604-247-3712
or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com
Kids and Adults Needed
Route Boundaries Number of Papers
14903089 4000 blk River Rd (between No 1 Rd & McCallen) 23
14901173 Langton Rd 91
14100220 7th Ave, 6th Ave (Steveston) 63
14903077 Richards Dr, Semlin Dr,Trutch Ave (Terra Nova) 54
14100243 3000 Blk Garry St (Steveston) 77
14903050 5000 and 6000 Blk No 1 Rd (Terra Nova) 64
14903070 Cornwall Dr, Crt, Pl, Dewdney Crt (Terra Nova) 115
14902140 Montana Rd 57
14201126 Cornerbrook Cres, St Brides, St Vincents 63
14100253 4000 Block Garry St (Steveston) 122
14201121 Gander Crt, St Johns 64
14201135 Argentia Dr,Trepassey Dr 46
14201125 Fortune Ave 67
14901172 Langtree Ave, Laurelwood Crt, Lynnwood Dr 63
14901116 Ledway Rd 91
14201124 Cavendish Dr, Pugwash Pl 70
FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS
5 IN MEMORIAM
ERNIE WATSON
Aug. 24, 2009
It has been a year aleady since
your passing. Death leaves a
heartache no one can heal, and
love leaves a memory no one can
steal.
Always remembered and
missed Marie and her Family
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
33 INFORMATION
#1 IN PARDONS. Remove your
criminal record. Express Pardons
offers the FASTEST pardons,
LOWEST prices, and it’s GUARAN-
TEED. BBB Accredited. FREE
Consultation Toll-free 1-866-416-
6772, www.ExpressPardons.com.
ADD YOUR business on
www.BCLocalBiz.com directo-
ry for province wide exposure!
Call 1-877-645-7704
DENIED CANADA PENSION PLAN
DISABILITY BENEFITS? The
Disability Claims Advocacy Clinic
can help. Call Allison Schmidt at
1-877-793-3222. www.dcac.ca.
REVIEW
PAPER
DELIVERY
PHONE NO.
604-247-3710
041 PERSONALS
DATING SERVICE. Long-
Term/Short-Term Relationships,
FREE CALLS. 1-877-297-9883.
Exchange voice messages, voice
mailboxes. 1-888-534-6984. Live
adult casual conversations-1on1,
1-866-311-9640, Meet on chat-
lines. Local Single Ladies.1-877-
804-5381. (18+).
FREE TO TRY. LOVE * MONEY *
LIFE. #1 Psychics! 1-877-478-4410
$3.19 min. 18+ 1-900-783-3800
21 COMING EVENTS
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
42 LOST AND FOUND
LOST DOG: Mini Multi-Poodle,
white, F, last seen Thurs, Aug 12 nr
Railway & Williams & Francis. Pls
call (604)313-9840.
TRAVEL
61 ADVENTURES
HELLS GATE JET BOAT TOURS
An amazing experience jet boating
the Fraser Canyon
Hope to Hells Gate $99 per person
Toll Free 1-866-771-3474
www.hellsgatejetboattours.com
74 TIMESHARE
SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE
FOR CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Ser-
vices will Sell/ Rent Your Unused
Timeshare for CASH! Over $78 Mil-
lion Dollars offered in 2009!
www.sellatimeshare.com
(800) 640-6886
75 TRAVEL
SUNNY Spring Specials At Florida’s
Best Beach-New Smyrna Beach
Stay a week or longer Plan a beach
wedding or family reunion.
www.NSBFLA.com or
1-800-541-9621
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
ADD YOUR business on
www.BCLocalBiz.com directo-
ry for province wide exposure!
Call 1-877-645-7704
BE YOUR OWN BOSS with Great
Canadian Dollar Store. New
franchise opportunities in your
area. Call 1-877-388-0123 ext. 229
or visit our website:
www.dollarstores.com today.
COMMISSION TRAVELONLY has
500 agents across Canada. Busi-
ness opportunities with low invest-
ment, unlimited income potential,
generous tax/travel benefits. Run
your travel company, full-time,
part-time from home. Register for
FREE seminar, www.travelonly.ca,
1-800-608-1117, Ext. 2020.
21 COMING EVENTS
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
Direct reach to BC Sportsmen
and women...Advertise in
the 2011 BC Freshwater Fishing
Regulations Synopsis, amazing
circulation 400,000 copies, year
long impact for your business!
Please call Annemarie at
1 800 661 6335.
114 DRIVERS/COURIER/
TRUCKING
Class 1 O/Ops &
Highway Drivers
Linehaul position, steady
regular miles running BC/AB
Send resume: jobs
@bstmanagement.net
or Fax 1.888.778.3563
115 EDUCATION
Become a Psychiatric Nurse -
train locally via distance education,
local and/or regional clinical place-
ments, and some regional class-
room delivery. Wages start at
$29/hour. This 23 month program is
recognized by the CRPNBC. Gov’t
funding may be available.
Toll-free: 1-87-STENBERG
www.stenbergcollege.com
DGS CANADA
2 DAY
FORKLIFT
WEEKEND
COURSE
Every Saturday at 8:30am
#215, 19358-96 Ave. Surrey
NO reservations: 604-888-3008
www.dgscanada.ca
Ask about our other Courses...
*Stand up Reach *Fall Protecton
*Aerial Lift *RoughTerrain Forklift
*Bobcat *WHIMIS & much more.
“Preferred by Employers
INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR SCHOOL
Train on full-size Excavators, Doz-
ers, Graders, Loaders. Includes
safety tickets. Provincially certified
instructors. Government accredit-
ed. Job placement assistance.
www.iheschool.com
1-866-399-3853
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
130 HELP WANTED
A Phone Disconnected? We
can help. Best Rates, Speedy
Connections, Great long Dis-
tance. Everyone Approved.
Call Today! 1-877-852-1122
Pro-Tel Connect
APPLY NOW
Production / Back-Up Delivery
Candidates wanted in Burnaby.
Stable work history w/ref’s
vancouverjobs@larsonjuhl.com
FLAGGERS NEEDED
If not certified, training available for
a fee. Call 604-575-3944
GRANT PRODUCTION TESTING
requires Supervisors, Night Opera-
tors, Operators, immediately for
Grande Prairie and Red Deer area.
Must have valid drivers licence and
pass drug test. Excellent wages
and benefits. Forward resume to:
Fax 780-539-3008 or email:
cbean@grantpts.com
Labour work for day and night.
Power sweeping, power scrubbing
and line painting. Must be hard
working with a good attitude. $15/hr
to start. Rapid increases based on
performance. Experience beneficial
but will train. Email: info@atlasg.net
LEMARE GROUP Production Ac-
countant. Successful applicant will
have a strong accounting back-
ground that might include 4th level
CGA courses or better. Computer
literacy is essential with Accpac,
Word and Excel experience an as-
set. The successful applicant will
have experience in the forest indus-
try. Strong organizational skills are
required to be effective in this busy
environment. Competitive salary is
commensurate with experience. Ap-
plicants must be willing to relocate
to Port McNeill, Vancouver Island.
Please forward resumes to: Box
609 Port McNeill, BC V0N 2R0 Fax:
250-956-4888 or email: ray@le-
mare.ca.
LIVE-IN CAREGIVER, F/T req’d
w/exp to look after 1 child; Supervi-
sion of child’s activities; taking care
of general hygiene; preparing &
providing timely meals. Sal: $11/hr
Knowledge of English, Punjabi an
asset. Contact Mr. Meharban at
Email: ranautamehar@yahoo.ca
Fax: 604-270-9374 Location: 10100
River Drive, Richmond, BC
NEED 29 People: Work at Home
Online. Earn up to $1500 PT /
$4000 FT. call 604-864-1944
115 EDUCATION
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
134 HOTEL, RESTAURANT,
FOOD SERVICES
FOOD & BEVERAGE SERVER
reqd. Sal: $11.50 /hr Duties: Take
orders & relay to kitchen, prepare
food for customers, portion or wrap
food; Order & maintain inventory;
stock refrigerators; may receive
payments. Contact Sam Bath:
email: Sbath@marquise.ca Fax:
604-214-8526
156 SALES
0852061 B.C Ltd O/A Dead
Sea Spa - Richmond Center,
Richmond is looking for 5 retail
sales reps, $14.60 hr. Email
resume: mk.tb@hotmail.com
PREMIER DEAD Sea is seeking
4 energetic Retail Sales Reps.
for skin care kiosks and carts
in Oakridge Mall, $12.50/hr
drwvancouver@gmail.com
PREMIER DEAD Sea Skin Care
retailer is seeking 4 energetic Retail
Sales Reps. for our locations in
Richmond. $12.50/hr. Please mail
to: drwrichmond@hotmail.com
160 TRADES, TECHNICAL
CT/HD MECHANICS - Amix Sal-
vage & Sales - Openings in Surrey
& Chilliwack - Work for an industry
leader & help save the planet by
being a part of the largest scrap
metal recycling co. in BC. Must be
able to work well independently &
possess a strong sense of safety
awareness. Resumes to
jobs@amix.ca or fax 1-866-812-
2478. Full details at www.amix.ca
EXP. SALVAGE Burners/Cutters -
Amix Salvage, Surrey, BC - Must
be comfortable working outside &
must have exp. Seasonal & perma-
nent work avail. with benefits after 3
months. Apply at www. amix.ca or
fax 1-866-812-2478
JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN 4th
year and Inst. Tech. Wanted SE
Sask. Provincial parks, lakes, golf-
ing, fishing, etc. South East Electric
Ltd., Box 1238, Carlyle, SK, S0C
0R0 Fax: 306-453-2022 south-
eastelectric#1@sasktel.net.
PLUMBING ESTIMATOR
Daryl-Evans Mechanical Ltd.,
has a career opportunity for a
Project Estimator. Our dynamic
company offers an excellent
wage and benefit package for the
successful candidate.
Please send your resume in
confidence to
Fax: 604-525-4744
Email:
info@daryl-evans.com.
130 HELP WANTED
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
130 HELP WANTED
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
Exceptional Career
Opportunity in Sales
and Marketing.
Excellent Opportunity to earn above-average income
and to develop a rewarding career.
One of Canada’s largest private media companies,
Black Press, has an opening for an Assistant Sales
Manager with The Richmond Review.
The ideal candidate will have strong interpersonal
skills and a superior knowledge of sales and
marketing. While experience in community
newspapers is an asset, it is not a prerequisite.
Prerequisites include a minimum four years sales and
marketing experience, a willingness to learn and
embrace change and a desire to succeed.
Black press is a multi-platform media organization
that encompasses community-based newspapers and
websites as well as flyerland.ca and used.com.
To apply, please forward your resume with a cover
letter by August 31, 2010 to:
Mary Kemmis
publisher@richmondreview.com
The Richmond Review
#140-5671 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC
V6X 2C7
REVIEW
the richmond
www.blackpress.ca
156 SALES 156 SALES
P a g e A 3 0 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either!
Deliver 2x week, Thursdays and Saturdays, right in your
neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.
Call Brian 604-247-3710
or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com
Kids and Adults Needed
Route Boundaries Number of Papers
15101024 9000 blk Cambie, 4000-4600 Garden City, 8700 blk Odlin 56
15101030 Beckwith Rd, Charles St, Douglas St, Sexsmith Rd, Smith St 47
15101110 Brown, Browndale, Brownell, Browngate, Brownlea 65
15101021 Cambie Rd, Patterson Rd, Sexsmith Rd 65
15102647 Harrison Ave, Jensen Dr/ Gate, McNeely Dr 116
14701365 7000 blk No 4 Rd, Keefer Ave 105
14701362 Bridge St, General Currie, Shields Ave 87
14703662 Jones Rd (8051-8560), No 3 Rd (7000 blk) 46
14500432 McBurney Crt, Dr 78
15101023 Bryson Bay, Crt, Dr, Pl, Cambie Rd, Hall Ave, Pl 220
14500434 8000 blk No 4 Rd
15101011 Garden City Rd, Patterson Rd 64
14703318 Acheson, Bennett, No 3 Rd 74
14500483 Ash St (8500-8960), Boyd Crt, Dolphin Ave, Crt 90
14001624 McLean Ave,Westminster Hwy (Hamilton area) 92
Exceptional Career
Opportunity in Sales
and Marketing.
Excellent Opportunity to earn above-average income
and to develop a rewarding career.
One of Canada’s largest private media companies,
Black Press, has an opening for an Assistant Sales
Manager with The Richmond Review.
The ideal candidate will have strong interpersonal
skills and a superior knowledge of sales and
marketing. While experience in community
newspapers is an asset, it is not a prerequisite.
Prerequisites include a minimum four years sales and
marketing experience, a willingness to learn and
embrace change and a desire to succeed.
Black press is a multi-platform media organization
that encompasses community-based newspapers and
websites as well as flyerland.ca and used.com.
To apply, please forward your resume with a cover
letter by August 31, 2010 to:
Mary Kemmis
publisher@richmondreview.com
The Richmond Review
#140-5671 No. 3 Road, Richmond, BC
V6X 2C7
REVIEW
the richmond
www.blackpress.ca
Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers
either! Deliver 2x week, Thursdays and Saturdays, right in your
neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.
Call Roya 604-247-3710
or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com
Kids and Adults Needed
14401714 9500-10800BlockShell 64
14600550 AnahimDr,AragonRd 90
14302277 8000Blkof RailwayAve 24
14600810 6000-8000Blkof No5Rd 126
14002278 AndrewsRd,12000BlkNo2Rd(bundledrop) 180
14401542 Gower St,MilfordDr,SevernDr,SnowdonAV,SwanseaDr 127
14002284 Plover Crt,Plover Dr 36
Route Boundaries Number of Papers
PROUD TO SUPPORT THE LOCAL SPCA
REVIEW
the richmond
PET WEEK
OF
THE
SPCA
Thriftmart
5400 MINORU BLVD • 604-276-2477
TO ADOPT CALL 604-277-3100
“PRINCE HARRY” NEEDS A GOOD HOME WITH YOU
5431 NO. 3 RD. 604-276-2254
#202465, 6 mos, M, guinea pig
Prince Harry is just the cutest with his orange fur and pink
eyes! This lovely boy’s previous owners were moving and
couldn’t take him with them. Now he is looking for a perma-
nent home where he can eat lots of fresh veggies, get some
out-of-cage exercise time, and be pampered with lots
of cuddles for the rest of his days....
REINFORCING PLACERS
Experienced Reinforcing
Steel Installers Required.
We are now hiring for
various jobs in the
Greater Vancouver District
*Competitive Rates dependant on
experience. *Medical Benefits.
Please visit: www.lmsgroup.ca
and fill out the online application
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
160 TRADES, TECHNICAL

PLUMBING FOREMAN
& SUPERVISORS
Daryl-Evans Mechanical Ltd.
has expanded our
operation to the Interior of
British Columbia.
This development is very
exciting to us and we trust that it
will be beneficial for you as well.
If you are interested in relocating
to the interior and being part of
our Supervisory team, please
forward your resume to:
info@daryl-evans.com
604-525-4744 (fax)
PERSONAL SERVICES
171 ALTERNATIVE HEALTH
180 EDUCATION/TUTORING
AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.Fi-
nancial aid if qualified- Housing
available. CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (877)818-0783
130 HELP WANTED
WE’RE ON THE WEB
www.bcclassified.com
PERSONAL SERVICES
180 EDUCATION/TUTORING
DOG LOVERS! Enjoy a healthy,
profitable career as a professional
dog trainer. Government accredited
program - student loans and grants.
Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs.
www.wonderdogs.bc.ca
1-800-961-6616
MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION is
rated #2 for at-home jobs. Train
from home with the only industry
approved school in Canada.
Contact CanScribe today!
1-800-466-1535
www.canscribe.com
info@canscribe.com
ONLINE, ACCREDITED, WEB-
DESIGN TRAINING, available for
persons facing challenges to
employment, administered by the
Canadian Society for Social Devel-
opment. Visit: www.ibde.ca. Space
is limited - Apply today!
182 FINANCIAL SERVICES
$500$ LOAN SERVICE, by phone,
no credit refused, quick and easy,
payable over 6 or 12 installments.
Toll Free: 1-877-776-1660
www.moneyprovider.com.
AVOID BANKRUPTCY - SAVE UP
TO 70% Of Your Debt. One af-
fordable monthly payment, interest
free. For debt restructuring on
YOUR terms, not your creditors.
Call 1-866-690-3328 or see web
site: www.4pillars.ca
DEBT CONSOLIDATION
PROGRAM Helping Canadians
repay debts, reduce or eliminate
interest, regardless of your credit.
Steady Income? You may qualify
for instant help. Considering
Bankruptcy? Call 1-877-220-3328
FREE Consultation Government
Approved, BBB Member
GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad cred-
it? Bills? Unemployed? Need Mon-
ey? We Lend! If you own your own
home - you qualify. Pioneer Accep-
tance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-
987-1420.
www.pioneerwest.com
If you own a home or real estate,
ALPINE CREDITS will lend you
money: It’s That Simple. Your
Credit / Age / Income is NOT an
issue. 1.800.587.2161.
188 LEGAL SERVICES
#1 IN PARDONS Remove your
criminal record. Express Pardons
offers the FASTEST pardons,
LOWEST prices, and it’s
GUARANTEED. BBB Accredited.
FREE Consultation Toll-free
1-866-416-6772
www.ExpressPardons.com
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
236 CLEANING SERVICES
BEST HOUSE CLEANERS. Prof.
touch. Move in/out. Spring Cleaning
Special. Ref’s. Call 604-727-2955
CAROLINE’S CLEANING
Mother/daughter team. Non toxic
products. Bonded. 778-233-7712
242 CONCRETE & PLACING

PLACING & Finishing * Forming
* Site Prep, old concrete removal
* Excavation & Reinforcing
* Re-Re Specialists
30 Years Exp. Free Estimates.
Call: Rick (604) 202-5184
260 ELECTRICAL
AAA SIHOTA ELECTRICAL
Comm., Industrial & Res. Services.
Licensed/bonded. 604-999-4573
YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service
Call Lic #89402 Same day guarn’td
We love small jobs! 604-568-1899
269 FENCING
S & S CEDAR FENCING
Factory Direct Cedar Fence Panels
for Sale & Installation. 8291 No. 5
Road, Richmond. 604 275-3158
281 GARDENING
Gardening Services 21 yrs exp.
Tree topping, pruning, trimming,
power raking, aeration, clean-up.
Free est. Michael 604-240-2881
Soil, bark, Sand, Gravel etc. $25/yd
+ $50 del. Also, Property Maint.
Services avail.Simon 604-230-0627
287 HOME IMPROVEMENTS
ADD YOUR business on
www.BCLocalBiz.com directo-
ry for province wide exposure!
Call 1-877-645-7704
CLS&D CONTRACTING SERVIC-
ES, Carpentry, Renovations, Addi-
tions, Decks & Patios, Concrete
work, Landscaping, Irrigation &
Lighting, Complete Pressure
Washing Service, Free Estimates,
20 years experience WCB &
INSURED 604.726.7585 or e-mail
clsd_contracting@yahoo.ca
COMPLETE HOME
RENOVATIONS
Interior / Exterior repairs,
kitchens, bathrooms, suites
upgraded. Carpentry,
plumbing, electrical & tiling.
All work guaranteed!
6 0 4 - 2 0 9 - 8 2 6 5
NEW & REPAIR. Bath & KItch, flrs,
tiles, moulding, dry-wall, painting,
plumbing, wiring. Job guaranteed.
WCB ins. Patrick 778-863-7100.
PAINTING, HOME RENOVA-
TIONS, tile setting, sundecks,
stairs. Free est. 778-686-0866.
320 MOVING & STORAGE
2guyswithatruck.ca
Moving & Storage
Visa OK. 604-628-7136
156 SALES
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
320 MOVING & STORAGE
AAA ADVANCE MOVING
Experts in all kinds of moving/pack-
ing. Excellent Service. Reas. rates!
Different from the rest. 604-861-8885
www.advancemovingbc.com
AFFORDABLE MOVING
Local & Long Distance
From $45/Hr
1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10 Ton Trucks
Insured ~ Licenced ~ 1 to 3 Men
Free estimate/Seniors discount
Residential~Commercial~Pianos
604-537-4140
SPARTAN Moving Ltd.
Fast & Reliable. Insured
Competitive rates. Wknd Specials.
Call Frank: (604) 435-8240
329 PAINTING & DECORATING
A-TECH Services 604-230-3539
PAINT SPECIAL
3 rooms for $269, 2 coats
(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls
Cloverdale Premium quality paint.
NO PAYMENT until Job is
completed. Ask us about our
Laminate Flooring &
Maid Service!
www.paintspecial.com
MILANO PAINTING
604 - 551- 6510
Interior & Exterior
S Professional Painters
S Free Estimates
S Written Guaranteed
S Bonded & Insured
332 PAVING/SEAL COATING
ALLAN CONST. & Asphalt. Brick,
concrete, drainage, foundation &
membrane repair. (604)618-2304 ~
604-820-2187.
338 PLUMBING
10% OFF if you Mention this AD!
AMAN’S PLUMBING SERVICES
Lic.gas fitter. Reas $. 778-895-2005
1ST CALL Plumbing, heating, gas,
licensed, insured, bonded. Local,
Prompt and Prof. 604-868-7062
MIN. EXPRESS PAGING
SYSTEM
Reasonable Rates
604-270-6338
156 SALES
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
341 PRESSURE WASHING
POWER WASHING
GUTTER CLEANING
Same day serv. avail 604-724-6373
353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS
A & G ROOFING Ltd., all kinds of
new and re-roofing. Fully insured.
Free estimate. 604-537-3841
EAST WEST ROOFING & SIDING
CO. Roofs & re-roofs. BBB &
WCB. 10% Discount, Insured.
Call 604-812-9721, 604-783-6437
JASON’S ROOFING
All kinds of re-roofing & repairs.
Free est. Reasonable rates.
(604)961-7505, 278-0375
356 RUBBISH REMOVAL
#1 AAA Rubbish
Removal
21 Years Serving Rmd.
Residential & Commercial
Clean Courteous Service
FREE ESTIMATES
Joe 604-250-5481
DISPOSAL BINS. 4 - 40 yards.
From $179 - $565 incl’s dump fees.
Call Disposal King. 604-306-8599.
RECYCLE-IT!
#1 EARTH FRIENDLY
JUNK REMOVAL
Make us your first call!
Reasonable Rates. Fast,
Friendly & Uniformed Staff.
604.587.5865
www.recycle-it-now.com
HAUL - AWAY
Rubbish Removal
House-Garden-Garage
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimate or Appointment
Mike: 604-241-7141
373A TELEPHONE SERVICES
A FREE TELEPHONE SERVICE -
Get Your First Month Free. Bad
Credit, Don’t Sweat It. No Deposits.
No Credit Checks. Call Freedom
Phone Lines Today Toll-Free
1-866-884-7464.
DISCONNECTED? Need cheap,
reliable phone service? Great low
rates? High-speed internet, calling
features & long distance available.
First month $24.95 + connection
fee. Phone Factory Reconnect
1-877-336-2274;
www.phonefactory.ca
**HOME PHONE RECONNECT**
Call 1-866-287-1348. Prepaid Long
Distance Specials! Feature Pack-
age Specials! Referral Program!
Don’t be without a home phone!
Call to Connect! 1-866-287-1348.
PETS
477 PETS
BABY BUDGIES: $15. each.
Various colours. (604)535-1262.
BICHON/YORKIE-X 10wks vry cute
vet ✔ 1st shots, dewormed, 1 male
1 fem. $550/ea (Sry) 604-580-2186
Blue Nose Pitbulls, Razor’s Edge/
Gotti bloodlines, Seal blue coats
with blue eyes, 1st shots & de-
wormed. Call 604-825-6918
CATS & KITTENS GALORE, TLC
has for adoption spayed & neutered
adult cats.604-309-5388 / 856-4866
CHIHUAHUA, pb, F, 3yrs old, all
shots, vet ✔ very affectionate, ideal
companion $300. (778)549-3646.
CKC reg lab pups guart’d first shots
vet ✓ microchipped, exc temp. de-
claws. $750, 604-533-8992.
GERMAN SHEPHERD Reg’d pup-
pies, top quality German & Czech
working bloodlines. Excellent for
pets & protection. 604-856-8161.
GERMAN SHEPHERDS, 2 fem.
p/b, 4 mo. black & tan, long-haired,
shots & vet ✔ $600 (604)820-4644
GREAT DANE X ENGLISH
MASTIFF PUPPIES $500. Call
604-826-5285 or 604-556-9095.
JACK RUSSEL PUPPIES tri-colour
tails docked 1st shots, vet checked
(604)820-5225
LAB Pups CKC Reg’d Champ.lines
2 females (1blk/1yellow), 1st shots,
de-wormed, tattooed, vet ✓ $800.
604-857-9192
PETS
477 PETS
LAB Retriever pups, yellow/blck,
$650; chocolate, $750. Vet check,
quality lineage, dew claws, 1st
shots, dewormed. (604)702-0217
LOVE BIRDS babies/adults/breed-
ing pairs. Opalines, Peach &Orange
face. $50 & up. Alex 778-294-2883
MIN Schnauzer 4F/1M, tails
docked, 1st shots, dewormed,
hypo-allergic. $550. (604) 761-1994
NEED A GOOD HOME for a good
dog or a good dog for a good
home? We adopt dogs!
www.856-dogs.com or call: 604-
856-3647.
POMERANIAN TOY PUP:
Male, 5 months. $600.
Pls call (604)794-7347.
PRESA puppies, family farm raised.
Great temperment. Great guard
dog. $700. 604-855-6929.
ROTTWEILER PUPPIES, CKC
reg. 10 weeks. Preferred pedi-
gree from Germany. Pet & show
stock to approved home.
www.regenesisrottweilers.com
604 - 287 - 7688
SHELTIE PUPPY FOR SALE. One
female, 9 weeks old, Call for more
information (604)826-6311
St Bernard pups, m/f, unreg., gentle
giants, 1st shots, puppy pack, can
email pics, $1000. 1 (604)462-8605
YELLOW LAB pups. 2 males left.
Smaller size. Ready to go. Parents
on site $500. 604-852-6176 Abtsfrd
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
520 BURIAL PLOTS
SINGLE PLOT in beautiful Ocean
View Burial Park, Burnaby. Superior
section. $12,000. 604-533-8363
548 FURNITURE
DINING set 10 pc Cherrywood table
with leaf, 6 chairs, buffet & hutch.
Exc.cond. $1000 obo 604-448-0785
★ ANIZCO LIQUIDATION SALE
USED HOTEL FURNITURE
Arrived from
Westin Bayshore & Radisson
100’s of mattresses, Desks,
Lamps, Banquet Chairs, Sofa
Beds, Armoires, Headboards...
Visit “ANIZCO” Furniture
250 Terminal Ave. @ Main, Van
Monday - Fri 10 - 5 & Sat. 10 - 2
www.anizcofurniture.com
604-682-2528
477 PETS
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
560 MISC. FOR SALE
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
CAN’T GET UP YOUR Stairs?
Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn
Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and
get 10% off your new Stairlift. Call
1-866-981-6591.
Can’t Get Up Your Stairs? Acorn
Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stair-
lifts now! Mention this ad and get
10% off your new Stairlift! Call
1-866-981-6591
HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best
price. Best quality. All shapes &
colours available. 1-866-652-6837
www.thecoverguy.com
NEW Norwood SAWMILLS - Lum-
berMate-Pro handles logs 34”
diameter, mills boards 28” wide.
Automated quick-cycle-sawing
increases efficiency up to 40%.
www. Nor woodSawmi l l s . c om/
400OT - FREE Information:
1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT.
STEEL BUILDING SALE... SPE-
CIALS from $4 to $11/sq.ft. Great
pricing on ABSOLUTELY every
model, width and length. Example:
30x40x14 NOW $8995.00. Pioneer
Steel Manufacturers 1-800-668-
5422.
566 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
Canadian made Willis. Walnut up-
right piano. New in 1972. Exc cond.
well tuned. $1,250. 604-266-7353.
SAXOPHONE: Yamaha Jr in excel-
lent condition; nice case; fully
serviced. $650. Call 604-853-5060.
UPRIGHT PIANO, antique, Hart-
man & Co., oak case, great cond.,
must see, $700. Call (604)860-0222
578 SPORTING GOODS
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
REAL ESTATE
603 ACREAGE
20 Acre Ranches ONLY $99
per/mo. $0 Down, $12,900 Near
Growing El Paso, Texas. Owner Fi-
nancing, No Credit Checks. Money
Back Guarantee. Free Map/Pic-
tures. 800-755-8953
www.sunsetranches.com
612 BUSINESSES FOR SALE
EUROPEAN bakery shop in
Cambie Plaza (Cambie and No. 5
Rd.), same location for 28 yrs. with
lots of regular clientele, reasonable
rent and owner will train. Call
Alex Chan, Macdonald Realty
at 604-230-5722 or email:
chanalex@telus.net for details.
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
EAST CAMBIE INCREDIBLE de-
tached house, 2500 Fl area, 9,613
Lote size, hardwood flooring new!
recently painted! Beautiful back
yard! Fully finished bsmt suite.
Open House on Aug 29 & Sep 05
from 1 to 3:30 pm. Mazuma Star
Realty Ltd. Call Ofelia Flores Cell.
778-239-1655 (MLS# V846096)
ofloresalvarado@yahoo.com
627 HOMES WANTED
* SELL YOUR HOME FAST *
Buying Any Price, Cond., Location.
NO COMMISSIONS ~ NO FEES ~
No Risk Home Buying Centre
(604)435-5555
WE BUY HOUSES
Older Home? Damaged Home?
Need Repairs? Behind on
Payments? Quick CASH!
Call Us First! 604.657.9422
WE’RE ON THE WEB
www.bcclassified.com
bcclassified.com 604-575-5555
551 GARAGE SALES
RICHMOND
GARAGE SALE
Sunday Only.
Aug 29th, 9am-4pm.
7411 - #5 Road
DONT MISS THIS ONE!
Tools, Suit Cases, Boy’s Clothes
(med-large), Fitness, Garden
Stuff, Sewing Machine, Carpets,
Kitchen Stuff (incl small appli’s).
RICHMOND
MULTI FAMILY
GARAGE SALE
Sunday Aug. 29 ~ 10 to 3
#9 - 13160 Princess St.
(End No. 2 Road - South end)
551 GARAGE SALES
10680 TREPASSEY Dr, Richmond,
Saturday Aug 28 10 am - 1 pm
Home decor, books, clothes, small
appliances. Rain or shine.
MULTI FAMILY Yard Sale Sat Aug
28 10am-4pm 777 200th Street,
SW Corner of 8th Ave & 200th
Langley
Richmond
Garage/Moving Sale
13091 Bathgate Place
Sat & Sun, Aug. 28 & 29
9am - 3pm
Bookcases, office furniture, appl,
knick knacks and much more
RICHMOND
Garage Sale for **ALS**
( LOU GEHRIG DISEASE )
Sat., Aug., 28th,
- 9am to sundown -
9411 Arvida Drive
( #4 and FRANCIS )
Furniture, cooking and
French books, etc.
RICHMOND. Multi Family Garage
Sale. 9571 Glenthorn Dr. Sat, Aug.
28, 9am-? Something for everyone

CHECK CLASSIFIEDS
bcclassified.com 604-575-5555
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
The Award-Winning North Shore Outlook newspaper has
an outstanding opportunity for a full-time Advertising Sales
Consultant.
The candidate must have the ability to build relationships
with clients and ofer superior customer service. The winning
candidate will be a team player and will be called upon to
aggressively grow an existing account list. The ability to
work in an extremely fast-paced environment with a positive
attitude is a must.
The successful candidate will have sales experience -
preferably in the advertising or retail industry. The position
ofers a great work environment with a competitive salary,
commission plan and strong benefts package.
The Outlook is part of Black Press, Canada’s largest
independent print media company with more than 170
community, daily and urban newspapers across Canada
and the United States.
Please submit your resume with cover letter by
Friday August 27th, 2010.
To: Ad Manager, North Shore Outlook
admanager@northshoreoutlook.com
fax 604 903-1001
#104 – 980 West 1st Street
North Vancouver, B.C.
V7P 3N4
Advertising Sales Consultant Advertising Sales Consultant
P a g e A 3 2 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e A 3 1
PLUMBING
5 MINUTE EXPRESS PAGING SYSTEM
PLUMBING SERVICES AT REASONABLE RATES
CALL 604-270-6338
RJ’S PLUMBING
& HOME SERVICE
** COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL **
KITCHEN & BATHROOM SPECIALIST PLUS TIDDLEY THINGS
604-272-2809 or cell: 604-841-2479
RENOVATIONS
BILL GILLESPIE
CONSTRUCTION • RENOVATIONS
604-263-7502
PAINTING
X Residential X Commercial
X Interior • Exterior
X Condo/Townhouse Specials
X Free Estimates X Insured
X Clean, Professional Service
Cedargreen Painting
HANDYMAN
New fence installation • Gates & repair
Roofing repairs • Powerwashing
• Odd jobs • Renos • Gutters etc.
Painting interior & exterior
STEVESTON HOME SERVICES
Free estimates (fully insured)
Call Darryn 604-339-5532
CONCRETE SERVICE
WEST CONCRETE
We specialize in driveway, sidewalk, patio,
foundation and retaining wall, all kinds of concrete jobs.
We also do fencing jobs.
Free estimate and free design.
CALL WEST: 778-895-0968 RMD
LANDSCAPE & GARDENING SERVICE
• Pressure Washing • Paving stones
• Irrigation• New lawn installations
• Lawn & garden maintenance
• Tree and hedge planting
• Painting, Res. & Com.
18 YEARS EXPERIENCE
604-771-6894 • 604-318-8805
FREE
ESTIMATES
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
BUILD NEW HOMES
2 - 5 - 10 Warranties
General Contractor
Total Renovations & Additions
•Licensed • Insured
604-985-8270
www.a-diamondhome.com
•Kitchens • Baths
•Drywall •Painting
•Garage •Roofs •Decks
•Driveways •Asphalt
•Concrete •Drain tiles
•Landscaping •Excavating
•Contracting
LAWN SERVICE
A+ LAWN & GARDEN
• Fertilization (packages available)
• Hedge trimming & Pruning
• Yard clean-up • Pressure washing • Gutters
Fully insured. Free Estimates.
Andy 604-908-3596
HOME SERVICE GUIDE
REVIEW
the richmond
PLUMBING & HEATING
604-868-7062
Licensed, Insured & Bonded
Local Plumbers
• Plumbing Repairs
• Boilers & Furnaces
• Gas
Water heater Special
Installed From $735
RENOVATIONS
AA CONTRACTOR
COMPLETE HOME RENOVATIONS
• Home Repair
• Bathroom, Kitchen Remodeling
• Fence, Deck Renewing
• Free Estimate and Low Cost
CALL ALLAN 778-229-7880
RENOVATIONS
M.S. MAINTENANCE
& RENOVATIONS
Insured / WCB
Mike Favel • 604-341-2681
Plumbing • Electrical • Woodwork • Drywall • Bathrooms
Door Repairs: Patio • Pocket • Bifolds • Shower • Mirror
and I’m a
Nice Guy!
ECO-FRIENDLY HOUSECLEANING
Enviro-Green Clean
Eco-friendly housecleaning by professional experienced
bonded staff. Solid references and 100% guaranteed.
A few spaces left.
Please call 604-928-2984 to book your appointment.
630 LOTS
LARGE ARIZONA BUILDING
LOTS FULL ACRES AND MORE!
Guaranteed Owner Financing No
credit check $0 down - 0 interest
Starting @ just $89/mo. USD Close
to Tucson’s Intl. Airport For Record-
ed Message 800-631-8164 Code
4001 or visit
www. sunsi t esl andr ush. comOf fer
ends 9/30/10!
LARGE ARIZONA BUILDING
LOTS FULL ACRES AND MORE!
Guaranteed Owner Financing No
credit check $0 down - 0 interest
Starting @ just $89/mo. USD Close
to Tucson’s Intl. Airport For Record-
ed Message 800-631-8164 Code
4001 or visit
www.sunsiteslandrush.com
Offer ends 9/30/10!
636 MORTGAGES
BANK ON US! Mortgages for
purchases, renos, debt con-
solidation, foreclosure. Bank
rates. Many alternative lending
programs.Let Dave Fitzpatrick,
your Mortgage Warrior, simpli-
fy the process!1-888-711-8818
dave@mountaincitymort-
gage.ca
660 LANGLEY/ALDERGROVE
HOMES FOR SALE-SUPER BUYS
www.dannyevans.ca
Homelife Benchmark Realty Corp. Langley
RENTALS
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
7280 LINDSAY RD. 1 Bdrm apt.
$780/mo incls heat & H/W, 1 prkg,
604-321-9095 or 778-822-2660
RICHMOND
1 & 2 Bdrms
Available Immediately
Located in central
Richmond, close to all
amenities & Kwantlen
College. Rent includes heat
and hot water.Sorry no pets.
Call 604-830-4002 or
604-830-8246
Visit our website:
www.aptrentals.net
RICHMOND. Ackroyd Rd. 1 Bdrm
apt prkg, inste lndry, beaut decor,
Sept 15, $900. np/ns 604-277-9018
RICHMOND, CENTRAL. 1 bdrm,
clean & spacious, insuite lndry,
NS/NP, $950/mth. Avail. Sept 1st.
C 21 Prudential. Call 604-232-3022.
WEST RICHMOND Spacious 2
bed. Along major transit routes.
Close to dike, shopping. Backs onto
greenbelt. Porch. N/S. Pets ok.
Refs reqd. Avail. Sept 1st. 1400/mo
604 218 0979
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
Richmond
Ocean Residences
11671 7th Avenue
Condo-like bldg with great
views a must see. Modern
living, beaut grounds incl’d
ponds & fountains. Close to
Steveston and markets;
Many stes with ocean views.
Indoor/outdoor pkg, lockers,
party rm, fitness rm, sauna,
outdoor pool, games rm,
social rm, BBQ Area. Bach,
1 & 2 bdrm stes from $800.
For more info & viewing call
Irina 778-788-1872
Email:
rentoceanresidences
@gmail.com
Professionally managed by
Gateway Property Management
RICHMOND
QUEENSGATE GARDENS
11020 Williams Rd.
Spacious 2 & 3 bedroom town-
houses. 6 Appl’s., balcony, 2 car
garage, 2 full bath, gas f/p. 1
Year lease required. No Pets.
Professionally Managed by
Colliers International
Call 604-841-2665
715 DUPLEXES/4PLEXES
RICHMOND 2 bdrm grnd flr duplex.
Walk to schools. 4931 McLure Ave.
Sh/Lndry. F/S, DW. $1140 inc utils.
N/P. N/S. Ref. req. 604-274-2222.
RICHMOND. 2 bdrm. upper duplex.
10113 No. 5 Rd. $1000/mo. + utils.
Ref’s. Sept 1. Np/ns. 604-277-2858
736 HOMES FOR RENT
COBBLESTONE Lane 3BR Exec
Home in WW Plat. 2000sf on 2 Upr
Flrs,2 ? Bath. Grt Rm Design w/Gas
FP, Gourmet Kitch w/Gas Rnge.
$2200/Mo + 2/3 Util. N/S, N/P.
NOW! 604-377-4475
SEAFAIR Rancher. 3Br house on
large lot in quiet, excellent neigh-
bourhood. Clean, well kept home.
Close to shopping, bus, schools.
Available Sept 1. $1700/mo. 604-
723-4114. mfu@shaw.ca
741 OFFICE/RETAIL
ON CANADA LINE
6700 #3 ROAD, RICHMOND
800 sq. ft. Ideal for Travel, Insu-
rance etc. Parking available. 604-
277-0966 or 604-273-1126
746 ROOMS FOR RENT
RICHMOND. #5Rd. 5 bdrm in luxu-
ry house Own bathrm. $700/mo.
incl utils. Avail now. 604-716-2621
748 SHARED ACCOMMODATION
TSAWWASSEN. Room available in
comfortable home. Suit mature or
prof. person. $550 incl delicious
meals. 604-943-6130, 603-7210.
750 SUITES, LOWER
4th & Granville, 2 br. grnd lvl, N/P.
N/S. No ldry. Refs. $775/mo. incl
heat/hydro. Sept 1. Suit single,
couple neg. Priv Ent 604-244-7862
BRAND NEW 1 BEDROOM/1
BATHROOM suite located near
Shell Rd. and Bridgeport. No pets,
no smoking. Available on Septem-
ber 1st. Rent: $800. Contact: Harvi
@ 604-644-5274
GARDENCITY/Saunders Area.
Reno’d 1Bdrm Suite Avail Asap.
$700 Inc Utils. No Pets/Smoking.
604-279-1855 or after 6pm 778-
840-1855.
NEAR TERRA Nova. Avail. immedi-
ately. Washer/dryer,wireless inter-
net access,fireplace. $1250/mo.
Utilities included. No pets. Call 604-
512-2944 or 604-272-4504.
RICHMOND #2/Moncton 1 lrg bdrm
& lrg liv/rm. Reno’d. $875 Incl utils,
cbl. Ns/np. Now. 604-671-0178
RICHMOND: Beautiful Reno’d 1
bdrm g/lvl, kitch, nice lrg b/yard, nr
amens/bus; W/D, suit 1 person,
NS/NP. $850/mo inclds utils/cable.
Avail now. Call eves 604-272-3033.
RICHMOND, Shellmont area. 2
bdrm suite. N/S. N/P. Avail now.
$950/mo. incl heat, light, shared
laundry. Call 604-617-1794
751 SUITES, UPPER
RICHMOND: New 3 bdrm, 2 full
baths. Nr bus & schools. Williams,
btwn Garden City & No 4 Rd. N/P.
$1600/mo. incl utils.778-237-7700.
752 TOWNHOUSES
✰ RENTAL ✰
✰ INCENTIVES ✰
Richmond, East / New
Westminster: 3 storey
Townhouses with 5/appls,
2/bath, garage, f/p.
From $1440/mo.
Call 604-522-1050
RICHMOND CENTRAL. 2 bdrm., 2
bath, 1100 sf, 2 cov. parking, min.
1 year lease. Ns/np. $1290/mo
Avail. Sept 1. Phone 604-729-9672.
752 TOWNHOUSES
RICHMOND
Briargate & Paddock
Townhouses
2 Bedrm + Den
& 3 Bedrms Available
Private yard, carport or
double garage. Located on
No. 1 & Steveston, No. 3 &
Steveston. Landscape and
maintenance included.
Call 604-830-4002
or 604-830-8246
Website www.aptrentals.net
TRANSPORTATION
806 ANTIQUES/CLASSICS
1975 TRANS AM, Original miles
60,000. Everything original.
$16,995. Exc cond. (604)220-1764
810 AUTO FINANCING
$0 DOWN & we make your 1st
payment at auto credit fast. Need
a vehicle? Good or Bad credit
call Stephanie 1-877-792-0599.
www.autocreditfast.ca. DLN 30309.
810 AUTO FINANCING 821 CARS - SPORTS & IMPORTS
2006 BMW Z-4- convertible, mint.
48K, auto, blk. no accident, all pow-
er options, heated seats, must see,
beauty $23,995obo (604)328-1883
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
#1 FREE SCRAP VEHICLE
REMOVAL
ASK ABOUT $500 CREDIT
$$$ PAID FOR SOME
604.683.2200
AAA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
Minimum $100 cash for full size
vehicles, any cond. 604-518-3673
Scra
The Scrapper
847 SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
WAREHOUSEMAN’S
LIEN ACT
Under the Warehouse Lien
Act, Marvel Auctions Ltd. @
4080 Vanguard Rd., Rich-
mond, BC, will sell by Auction
Thurs. Sept. 9th, 5:30 pm
the stored goods belonging to
1.) Ms. Lillian Roberts,
arrears owing $1181.60
2.) Rose Meyers,
arrears owing $1914.43
3.) Yrinda Berger,
arrears owing $3395.89
Plus costs of sale, all
outstanding money owing to
Laporte Moving & Storage
Systems Ltd.
3-10F A12
1-888-431-4468
tax receipt issued
Donate Your Car - Share A Little Magic
Big Brothers
Big Sisters of Canada
DonateACar
ROTARY
www.rotarydonateacar.ca
1-888-431-4466
TAX RECEIPT ISSUED
A Program of White Rock Millennium Rotary Club
$100 TAX RECEIPT $100 TAX RECEIPT $100 TAX RECEIPT
$100 TAX RECEIPT $100 TAX RECEIPT $100 TAX RECEIPT
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845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL 845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e B 1
paying homage
to the past:
Basil Restorations Ltd. brings history back to
life with a heritage home reno > INSIDE
August 2010
PRODUCTSkk
QUALIFIED TRADES kk
EXPERT ADVICE kk
11868 216th Street, Maple Ridge 604-467-6474
Heating & Sheet Metal Ltd. Heating & Sheet Metal Ltd.

B
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SHOWROOM HOURS: Mon. to Fri. 8:00 am to 4:30 pm Sat. 9:00 am to 3:00 pm
SHEET METAL SHOP HOURS: Mon. to Fri. 7:30 am to 4:30 pm
Have your natural gas
furnace serviced by a
registered gas contractor
and receive a $25 Save
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from Terasen Gas.
Offer expires Sept. 30/10
It’s Hard To Stop A Trane
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Reliable
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Comfort Control
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First-Rate
Warranties
FEDERAL
REBATES
AVAILABLE
UP TO
$1420
Just say
NO to a
cash ‘deal’
Industry leaders are concerned
about how the HST will impact
the underground cash economy
in the home renovation market.
Homeowners who think they’ll
save money on a cash deal
instead of hiring a reputable
contractor may fnd out the hard
way that it can cost much more.
“Nobody likes to pay tax but it
is just not worth it,” says GVHBA
president and CEO Peter Simp-
son. “If somebody gets injured
on the job on your property, you
are responsible.” ›› p.4
TRICIA LESLIE
First impressions are often the
most important.
And that doesn’t just apply to hu-
mans – homes give frst impressions,
too. Especially the front of the house,
which is usually what passers-by see
from the street.
“Your front door is one of the
most important features of your
home,” says Walker Door and Win-
dow’s man-
ager of business
development
Michelle Essery,
who is also RHP,
RRP and CAPS
certifed.
“Your front
door should
be warm and
inviting. It is the frst and last thing
we see when coming or going, and
leave a lasting impression – good
or bad.”
Many materials are popular right
now, and energy ef ciency is also at
the top of homeowners’ lists when
they renovate, Essery says.
The combination of wood and
metal, custom glass and fbreglass
are au courant among today’s cli-
entele, while some customers have
started inquiring which materials
have better insulation factors, if it is
eco-friendly, what the warranty cov-
ers, and if it is made locally, she adds.
Doors:
dress up
your home
MAGGIE CALLOWAY
Sam and Elizabeth FitzZaland, owners
of Burrard Green City Builders Inc., make
a great point when they say renovating a
house is the ultimate ecological act.
Instead of tearing down a house and re-
building, renovating saves literally tons of
material from the landfll – and a renova-
tion done with sensitivity to the environ-
ment gives great satisfaction and a healthy
setting for your family. Both FitzZalands
agree that a renovation can be done in a
green fashion which, when fnished, feels
like a new home.
Te couple always listens to their clients
to fnd out exactly what the homeowners
want to incorporate into their home, then
fnd a way to do it with the least impact on
the earth. Both also delight in educating
clients about eco-friendly or sustainable
building methods and products they may
not know about.
Elizabeth says people really want to
reduce their carbon footprint these days,
and are looking for ways to either produce
their own energy or fnd as many ways as
possible to cut down on consumption.
Most people seem to know about solar
energy, which doesn’t necessarily work for
everyone, but there are also heat pumps
for both heating and cooling the home
that many may not know about, she says.
Give your
home an
eco-friendly
makeover
Burrard Green City Builders Inc. owner
Sam FitzZaland, left, with carpenters Doug
Pearcey amd Owen Crane in front of a Metro
Vancouver home they renovated – with the
environment in mind. MartinKnowlesphoto
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CONTINUED ON P.2
Knock, knock ...
CONTINUED INSIDE
P a g e B 2 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
Publisher: Fiona Harris • 604-575-5822 • publisher@newlocalhome.com
Editor: Tricia Leslie • 604-575-5346 • editor@newlocalhome.com
Advertising Sales - Black Press National Sales • Adrian Saunders • 604-575-5812 • adrians@blackpress.ca
Online Advertising • 604-575-5822
Contributingphotographers • Martin Knowles, www.mkphotomedia.com; RobNewell, www.robnewellphotography.ca
RenoNation is published by Black Press Group Ltd., (Suite 309 - 5460 152 Street, Surrey, B.C. V3S 5J9)
350,000 copies are distributed free across Metro Vancouver. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited.
PRODUCTSkk
QUALIFIED TRADES kk
EXPERT ADVICE kk
dsfbujoh!cfbvujgvm!
ljudifot!xjui
Dpodfqu!up!Dpnqmfujpo
sfopwbujpot!'!
dvtupn!ipnft
My House Design Build Team is known
for its dedication to Workmanship,
Quality & Customer Satisfaction.
Work with our Award Winning Team today!
www.myhousedesignbuild.com
before
after
Call or visit us
online today!
phone: (604) My-House
(604) 694-6873
info@myhousedesignbuild.com
Professional Renovations Since 1990
info@basilrestorationltd.ca
604-324-9364
www.basilrestorationltd.ca
A
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“As part of the Olympics, there were
temporary houses showcasing things
like living walls and people got the idea
that it is necessary to live green, but
there are so many other things that can
be easily incorporated (into the
home),” FitzZaland says.
Low-VOC paint is such an
example, which she says is easy
to apply and does not give of
gas fumes. A wide variety of
fooring made from sustainable
materials is available and features
long life spans, plus there are energy-
ef cient appliances as well as low-fow
or dual-fush toilets.
Taking several smaller steps can add
up to a signifcant sustainable impact,
FitzZaland notes.
When contracted to complete a reno-
vation, Burrard Green City Builders
looks at every part of the build.
“Kitchen and bathroom countertops
are a perfect example,” she says.
“Tere are huge choices today but
what should be taken into consider-
Renovating
with nature
in mind
CONTINUED FROM P.1
Burrard Green City Builders uses eco-friendly, sustainable measures in every home renovation, such as low-VOC paint. Martin Knowles photo CONTINUED NEXT PAGE
AFTER
T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e B 3
ation is how long will it last?
How far are the materials being
transported? What happens when
the countertop is torn out? Is it bio-
degradable?”
A great solution is concrete, she
says.
“(Concrete is) as equally durable
as granite, and you can make them
unique by incorporating other materi-
als such as glass or aggregate, staining
and polishing ... concrete is also being
used more and more for fooring,” says
FitzZaland.
Tings like insulation, windows and
roofng materials can also help make a
home more environmentally friendly.
FitzZaland says blown-in insulation
is ofen recommended, “because it gets
into all the nooks and crannies.”
But with every project, she notes,
the company always fnds ways to
reduce waste.
“Tere are diferent ways of re-
cycling building material. One is to
salvage as much as possible – maybe
there are doors that don’t work in the
new area but can be used in the
basement,” she says.
“Sometimes there are
windows that won’t work in
the new home but can be put
aside, re-fnished, and used
in another job. More and more
ways are being found to keep
materials away from the landfll.”
Going green
can start
at home
CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
Before and after photos
show how Burrard
Green City Builders
turned this Metro
Vancouver home into
a spectacular master-
piece. The company
uses environmentally
friendly materials and
practices wherever
possible.
“More and more ways
are being found to keep
materials away from
the landfll,”says Eliza-
beth FitzZaland, who
owns the company with
her husband, Sam.
Martin Knowles and Green City
Builders photos
BEFORE
AFTER
SPECTRUMSTONE
SHOP INFORMATION
120-12440 VULCAN WAY
RICHMOND, BC, CANADA
V6V 1J8
Spectrum
Stone
Vulcan Way
Bridgeport Rd
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Affordable & Reliable • Over 15 Years of Experience
Open to the Public Monday - Saturday 9am-6pm
Office: 604-278-7764 • Fax: 604-278-6449
Sales: 604-725-5959 • 604-725-5997
www.spectrumstone.ca
120-12440 VULCAN WAY, RICHMOND
Granite, Marble, Quartz, Design, Fabrication and Installation
P a g e B 4 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
TRICIA LESLIE
In this world, nothing is certain
but death and taxes.
Benjamin Franklin is attributed
with coining this of-used phrase,
which has likely been used a lot
more throughout B.C. lately.
Te Harmonized Sales Tax, which
combines the seven-per-cent sales
tax with the fve-per-cent GST
(Goods and Services Tax) for a
single sales tax rate of 12 per cent,
came into efect July 1.
Te provincial government
maintains the HST will be good for
British Columbians and the B.C.
economy, as “it’s the best thing we
can do to encourage investment and
jobs in our province.”
Now, the new tax appears on most
receipts associated with consuming
goods and services, including on
new homes priced above $525,000
(homes below this threshold will
bear no more tax than under the
PST system; homes priced higher
will receive a fat rebate of $26,250,
according to the government).
Home renovation is another area
where the HST will apply, when it
comes time to pay for the goods and
services involved.
And that’s bad news on top of
already bad news, says Greater Van-
couver Home Builders’ Association
president and CEO Peter Simpson.
“It’s going to raise the cost of reno-
vations,” he says, and notes the HST
will drive more homeowners toward
what may seem a cheaper alterna-
tive: the cash-only, no-paperwork
deal.
“Te underground cash economy
was already there under the GST.
Now, the HST will fuel an already
burgeoning underground cash
economy in home renovations.”
MJ Whitemarsh, CEO of the Ca-
nadian Home Builders’ Association
of B.C., agrees, and says the HST
will just make that illegal economy
stronger.
Home renovations generate about
$7 billion in B.C., Whitemarsh says,
but only about $4.5 billion of that is
generated by legitimate contractors.
CHBA B.C. is working on a paper
that outlines the job creation and the
tax dollars that home renovations
generate in the province, in order
to highlight the importance of the
residential renovation market to all
levels of government.
“Every million dollars in renovations
creates 12 person years of employment,”
Whitemarsh notes. “Te underground
cash economy stifes growth.”
Both Whitemarsh and Simpson stress
the need for a permanent home reno-
vation rebate, similar to the extremely
successful HRTC, or federal Home
Renovation Tax Credit; both organiza-
tions are working to lobby all levels of
government in order to get a permanent
rebate in place.
“What we need is a permanent tax
credit system – similar to HRTC – in
place,” Simpson says, and adds that
government needs to put money
into resources to actively fght
the underground cash
economy.
“Tat way, homeowners get
the rebate dollars back.”
Whitemarsh agrees.
“People love to get money
back ... they loved the HRTC,” she
says.
“It was quite small, but people
embraced that like there’s no tomorrow
because they got money back from the
government.”
Both Whitemarsh and Simpson
wonder why the government is not more
interested in the billions in unremitted
taxes it is not receiving, thanks to the
illicit cash renovation market.
In Ontario in 2001, the Ontario
Construction Secretariat determined that
during just one year, there was $1.3 bil-
lion in unremitted tax revenue – only in
Ontario and only in home renos – due to
the underground residential renovation
cash economy.
“Tere needs to be a realization that it’s
a huge problem and it will not go away. It
will only increase. Homeowners need to
say ‘no’ to the cash deal,” Simpson says.
He and Whitemarsh both note that
homeowners can easily be the ones to
sufer – or even get sued – if they opt to
pay cash instead of hiring a reputable
contractor, such as a RenoMark-approved
contractor.
Both emphasize the need to “get it
in writing,” to ensure there is a written
contract in place – before any work be-
gins – that clearly spells out the rules and
responsibilities of both the contractor and
the homeowner.
If there is no contract, there is no re-
course for the homeowner should some-
thing go wrong, such as an incomplete or
incompetent reno – the legal system won’t
recognize an illegal cash transaction if an
owner is trying to skip on paying taxes,
Whitemarsh and Simpson note.
“You can’t go to court. Te
frst thing the judge will ask
is, ‘Where’s the contract?’”
Simpson says.
“Nobody likes to pay tax
but it is just not worth it ... if
somebody gets injured on the
job on your property, you are
responsible,” he adds.
If an injury occurs during a cash reno,
Whitemarsh says, the homeowners may
fnd themselves in trouble.
“If something goes wrong and some-
one gets hurt, it’s your fault,” she says.
“Tey can sue your pants of.”
She and Simpson stress it is the hom-
eowner’s responsibility to conduct due
diligence on any contractor before hiring
them to do home renovation work.
All contractors must be WorkSafe BC-
compliant, for example, and all applicable
permits, licences and insurance must be
in place before work is started.
About $3.7 billion will be spent on
home renovations and improvement this
year in Metro Vancouver alone, Simpson
says.
“We believe between 30 to 35 per cent
of that will be done under the radar in a
cash economy,” he says.
“Homeowners should always do their
homework and make sure they’re abso-
lutely protected.”
Cash: more
harmful
than helpful
Peter Simpson MJ Whitemarsh
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MAGGIE CALLOWAY
Being sustainable is huge lately, with
people in every industry and sector
focusing on environmentally friendly
options wherever possible.
Second Wind Timber is one such
company. Te Metro Vancouver
business provides architectural wood
products manufactured entirely from
recycled antique timber.
Second Wind sales manager Jason
Rook notes the company obtains its tim-
ber from dismantling old commercial
and industrial structures that are slated
for demolition, such as an old Vancou-
ver sawmill, granaries, wharfs, canneries
and warehouses.
“Much of the timber in these struc-
tures was originally harvested in the
1800s and early 1900s and was cut from
huge, old-growth forests along the West
Coast of British Columbia,” Rook says.
Tere are many great reasons for
using reclaimed wood, the biggest being
that it is ecologically responsible and
creates less impact on the environment.
Te aesthetic and physical character-
istics of ancient, old-growth timber is
appealing to many people. Te natural
process of aging over many decades
produces timber that is dry and stable;
thus, there is no further shrinkage.
Te natural aging and drying process
also brings out beautiful colours unique
to each species of wood.
Another advantage of using reclaimed
wood is it reduces the pressure to har-
vest remaining old-growth forest.
“We co-ordinate with (demolition)
crews taking down old buildings,” Rook
says.
“When the buildings come down, we
go in and retrieve the old timbers. Most
of the timber is Douglas Fir, Western
Red Cedar, Yellow Cedar and Hemlock.”
When the old structures are dis-
mantled, according to WorkSafe BC
procedures, all visible metals must be
removed, which is slow, intensive work.
Special tools such as prying bars, nail
pullers and sledgehammers are used
with great care to preserve the integrity
of the timber. A metal detector is used
to locate hidden metal in the wood
before any remedial work is started.
“People are really interested, both
residential and commercial, in the beau-
tiful timber you just can’t fnd anymore,”
Rook says.
“Tese timbers look great in homes
in places such as Whistler, where big
beams and wide timber foors lend great
beauty to ski resort homes. Some of our
customers want the hardware, which is
also usually over a hundred years old,
lef on the beams. Old mounting brack-
ets look fantastic.”
Reclaimed wood is a sustainable, attractive way to renovate. Second Wind Timbers photo
Wooden it be
nice: wood is
good for renos
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P a g e B 6 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
MAGGIE CALLOWAY
Te weather is starting to feel like
fall, and afer cutting grass all summer,
constantly passing the home’s hard-
scape, it can be hard to face reality: it
is defnitely time to call in the profes-
sionals to deal with the need for new
or replacement retaining walls and a
driveway revamp.
Te frst step is fnding a landscape
contractor who does projects of the
scope the homeowner needs.
Tis is where the Internet re-
ally comes into its own, allow-
ing all homeowners to check
out a variety of diferent
contractors, from testimoni-
als to photos of completed
projects.
Paving stone driveways are
the most common, notes Houston
Landscapes’ Jeremy Miller.
“If a client just wants to replace a
crumbling asphalt driveway, we will
come out, measure, and replace,” he
says.
“But we usually work through land-
scape designers for larger projects.”
When it comes to materials for
retaining walls, the choices are between
synthetic stone, a fabulous array of
natural stone and refned, more realis-
tic looking, man-made boulders.
“My personal preference is for natu-
ral boulders over synthetic projects, but
it depends on the individual installa-
tion and budget,” Miller says.
“Tere are synthetic stone products
now that are tumbled ... this gives a
more rugged edge and that creates a
more natural looking stone.”
Natural boulder retaining walls
require machinery to install properly,
but it’s not just up to the machines – as
Miller notes, there is an art form to
placing just the right boulder in each
spot.
Regardless of which material is
chosen for the home’s retaining wall,
homeowners must have any wall that
is higher than four feet engineered in
order to get a permit from the munici-
pality.
Miller emphasizes the importance of
having correctly engineered retaining
walls.
“A lot goes into building a sustain-
able retaining wall – you have geogrid,
which is squeezed between the stones,
and it goes back eight feet behind
the wall, so you have to excavate
eight feet, then backfll the
wall with engineered fll,” he
says.
“Te weight of the fll
squeezes the geogrid, which
stops the hillside from fall-
ing forward. Drainage and
gravel are installed behind the
wall to make sure no hydrostatic pres-
sure builds up.”
Images of Houston Landscapes’
fnished projects show that it takes an
artistic eye to create beautiful, sustain-
able retaining walls.
And the diference a well-designed
landscape can make to the value of
your home, not to mention its curb ap-
peal, is amazing.
Considering how much time most
families spend outside through the
spring, summer and fall in Metro Van-
couver, it makes sense to make the area
surrounding the home as beautiful and
functional as possible.
Houston Landscapes’ Jeremy Miller says driveways and retaining walls can be beautiful as well as function-
al. Popular materials include a huge variety of both natural and synthetic stone. Rob Newell/Houston Landscapes photos
Hardscape
can be
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P a g e B 8 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
MAGGIE CALLOWAY
A nicely put-together photo
wall in the home can catch the
eye and even make connoisseurs
drool.
Elegant photos of family and
friends displayed just so in family
rooms, stairwells and hallways can
look great in someone else’s home,
but many homeowners, in trying
to re-create a stunning look, may
come up short, or rather, crooked.
Tat’s where the experts can
help.
Bezanson Art Consulting Inc.’s
Denise Bezanson says it can be
simple to produce a great-looking
photo wall, so long as certain
principles are followed.
“Te best look is to have con-
sistent sizes of frames, if possible,”
Bezanson says.
“It doesn’t matter if the photos
are diferent sizes because that can
be interesting.”
If a homeowners uses diferent
sizes of frames, Bezanson suggests
putting the larger frames in the
middle, then placing the other
frames around them.
All 8x10 or 10x12 usually pho-
tos look amazing, Bezanson notes,
and adds that consistent fram-
ing and non-glare glass are also
important.
“Non-glare glass used to be
expensive but is very afordable
now. If you have a room with a lot
of light it will bounce of regular
glass, which defeats the look of the
grouping.”
Te matting – the thick paper
surrounding the photos – should
all be the same, for a uniform
look, with variable cut-outs to
accommodate the diferent sizes of
the photos.
Bezanson suggests going to a
local stationer or drug store with
a photo department and getting
old family snaps, which are usually
quite small, reproduced and en-
larged a little to make them more
consistent.
Once properly framed and mat-
ted, placing the photos on the wall
without hammering several holes
before getting each one perfectly
placed, or to hang straight, can be
daunting.
Bezanson suggests working on
a grid.
“If you work it out on paper be-
forehand and double-check your
measurements, you don’t have a
hundred holes in your wall,” she
says.
“You can also lay the frames out
on the foor ... move them around
until you are happy with the lay-
out, then measure the total width
and length and the spaces between
frames.”
Bezanson also advises starting
in the centre and working outward
when creating a photo wall,
because if a homeowner starts at
one end and is of by a couple of
inches, it will show on the other
side.
Make your
photos
stand out
Art consultant Denise Bezanson gives some great advice for creating
an eye-catching photo wall in the home. Martin Knowles photo
“If you work it out on
paper beforehand and
double-check your
measurements, you
don’t have a hundred
holes in your wall.”
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T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e B 9
“The most common questions are about the diference
in materials versus cost beneft,” Essery says.
Often, clients will come in with a photo of a door taken
from the Internet or a magazine, wanting to know if it can
be replicated in a size that will ft their home or whether
the glass style can be changed or if it can be made in a dif-
ferent kind of wood, she says.
Walker is one of the few places that can accommodate
such requests, Essery says.
“If you can imagine it, we can almost always have it
built.”
While sustainability and energy ef ciency come up a lot,
it mainly boils down to a specifc style the client is looking
for, the price point, and how readily available the product
is.
Before purchasing a door, Essery says it is important to
let the door professional know where the home is located,
if it is in full sun, what type of colour or fnish the home-
owner will be putting on the door, and any other concerns,
such as environmentally conscious options.
“This will ensure you are getting a product that is best
suited for your individual (home), and produced locally if
necessary,” she says.
“You should always discuss the maintenance required
for each material option, and factor that into your fnal
decision.”
The lowest price may not always be the most economi-
cal choice, Essery notes.
Using reputable professionals to have a door installed
is important, she adds, not only for warranty reasons, but
to ensure the door operates properly, is set plumb in the
opening, and adjusted to ensure the locks function as
intended.
There are also (building) code requirements during
installation specifcally related to security that must be
met, she says.
Most front doors should last a minimum of 10 years,
depending on the quality, care and maintenance required,
but an improperly installed door may not seal properly
against the weather stripping, allowing for air leakage, says
Essery.
Damage due to water ingress can also occur if improper
fashings are installed at the head of the door or care is not
taken to maintain a seal around the perimeter of the door
– this has become more crucial with the advent of today’s
rain screen cladding systems, she notes.
MAGGIE CALLOWAY
Protecting the home in the old days
meant buying a solid wood door and
installing a heavy-duty dead bolt – and
that’s only if the homeowners felt the
need to lock their doors at all.
Tose good ’ol days are long gone.
Today, home security has come a long
way and homeowners can, if they
choose, have as much security as presi-
dents and prime ministers enjoy.
Orca Security Corporation general
manager Brian Pozzolo says homeown-
ers are looking for more than just
security these days.
Now, home security usually means
having an alarm, perimeter protection,
interior protection, glass protection
and life safety devices, such as carbon
monoxide and smoke detectors, plus
temperature and food sensors, he says.
“Now clients are integrating other
products with security, such as CCTV
cameras along the perimeter of the
house, so they can view online or
iPhone or (via) security touch screen,”
Pozzolo says.
Homeowners can now
choose to control home
security from their iPhone
or SmartPhone: they can
disarm, view the current
status of the cameras, adjust
audio settings on the sound
system, or even adjust home
temperature in advance of return-
ing home, he says.
“It started with monitoring the high/
low temperature of wine cellars and
now it’s gone one step further ... we are
into energy management and conserva-
tion and monitoring the temperature
of the whole home so you can
adjust zone temperature,” Poz-
zolo says.
“Tis is great if you have a
get-away home, say in Whis-
tler, you can adjust the house
temperature while you are on
the way up from Vancouver.”
An automated system that
turns lights on and of in a random
pattern while homeowners are on
vacation is available, to help discourage
would-be thieves looking for signals
the home is vacant.
Update your front
door with a fresh,
welcoming look
CONTINUED FROM P.1
Walker Door/Window’s Michelle Essery says front
doors give a lasting impression. Rob Newell photo
HOME
SAFE
HOME
High-tech is huge in
home security systems
Home security is high-tech, ofering
lots of choice to homeowners. OrcaSecurity
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P a g e B 1 0 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
MAGGIE CALLOWAY
Tere is a good reason Basil Restoration
Ltd. calls the company ‘restoration’ rather
than a renovation company when it comes to
heritage homes.
Basil is well-known in New Westminster as
a company dedicated to both bringing the me-
chanics of a heritage home up to present-day
standards and preserving the priceless
beauty which, once lost, cannot be
returned.
In the 20 years Basil Restora-
tion Ltd. has been involved in
restoring heritage homes, the
company has gained an exper-
tise second to none.
Tere is no substitute for lon-
gevity for gaining specialized knowl-
edge but also, and equally important,
sourcing crafspeople who are able to repair
or duplicate the many period embellishments
ofen found on these grand dames of the past.
One particular New Westminster project
was unique because the entire house was
moved from a diferent location.
“Our clients have had a passion for years –
they love heritage houses and then they saw
Howay Cottage, which was completely run
down, and looked for an opportunity to save
it,” says Basil’s Mark Wittig.
Te homeowners, living on a 66x132 lot, got
permission from the City of New Westminster
in a Heritage Revitalization Agreement to
sub-divide the lot and move a 1902 Edwardian
or Colonial bungalow heritage home – Howay
Cottage – from another location to the newly
created 33x132 lot.
Te HRA is a voluntary written agreement
negotiated between the property owner and
the municipality outlining the duties, obliga-
tions and responsibilities of both parties with
respect to the development of a property
considered to have heritage merit.
New Westminster heritage planner Julie
Schueck is the go-to person for anyone plan-
ning on restoring a heritage home.
In the 1970s, the city created the frst
conservation act to protect its treasure trove
of irreplaceable homes. In 1994 and 1995, the
province allowed for a much stronger conser-
vation tool and New Westminster’s municipal
staf took advantage of the new rules. Com-
munities had a one-year window to identify
their heritage resources and so city staf took
an accurate inventory of the heritage homes;
all the downtown inventory was rolled into the
now-stronger Heritage Register.
“Tere are no legal obligations for hom-
eowners to be on the registry, but the mu-
Heritage:
restoring
the past
Basil Restoration’s Miles Wittig, left, and Mark Wittig, far right, fank homeowners Chris and Felicity Rudolph in the heritage home that Basil
recently renovated. Renovating a heritage home means adhering to guidelines to help preserve and restore the past. Martin Knowles photo
CONTINUED NEXT PAGE
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nicipality encourages homeowners to
register,” Schueck says.
New Westminster has a policy that any
house built before 1950 – whose owners
apply for a renovation permit – gets re-
viewed for comment by the heritage commis-
sion and by Schueck herself, she notes. But
there is no legal obligation on behalf of the
home owner to follow any suggestions made.
Tat changed if a demolition is wanted,
however.
“If a homeowner wants to demolish a
heritage home on the register, the city has the
legal right to postpone the demolition permit
to discuss the alternatives,” Schueck says.
Te most stringent designation is the Heri-
tage Designation, which is a formal protec-
tion of the building that runs with the land,
so it’s registered on title.
Te long-term designation applies to the
property and typically, the outside of the
building, Schueck says, but adds that if a
homeowners wants to register parts of the
home’s interior – such as a curved staircase
and hallway – then the city will include ele-
ments of the interior.
“We also understand that people have to
live in the home and these buildings still have
to earn their own way,” she says.
With the Basil heritage restoration, Wittig
notes the ultimate goal was to maintain the
defning character elements of the house in
all aspects of the renovation.
Designed by architect Eric Pattison, the
restoration required intensive work, Wittig
says.
“Te project involved rehabilitation of the
structure and roofine, diligent restoration of
the siding, trims, masonry, front porch, win-
dows, doors and painting,” he says.
“Dormers, which had been re-
moved by previous owners, were added
back to maximize usable living space.”
Basil Restorations also incorporated cus-
tom milling trim details and even carefully
disassembled the original front porch, in
order to use it as a template to create an exact
replica.
“Tis house is a true testament to the
passion, dedication and commitment of
everyone involved to maintain the historical
integrity of Howay Cottage,” Wittig says.
Plenty of other work was completed to
make the cottage work for a modern family.
Te entire second foor was dropped one
foot for increased head room on the second
foor, while asphalt siding was stripped of to
reveal the original fr siding.
Windows were repaired and made fully
operable. Authentic paint colours were used
to replicate the original colours of the era
and locally reclaimed fr fooring was sanded
lightly to maintain aged patina.
Everyone involved in this restoration is
flled with pride for not just saving this old
girl, but doing it so well.
Tey are not the only ones impressed
with this restoration: Basil Restoration was
a fnalist as Best Heritage Renovation in the
2010 Greater Vancouver Home Builders’
RenOvation Awards; the company received
a Certifcate of Recognition in the feld of
Heritage Conservation at the 2010 BC Heri-
tage Awards and it is currently nominated for
a 2010 Royal City Builders Award (Heritage
Shield).
Howay Cottage
renovated to
former glory
CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
Basil Restorations
restored this run-down
heritage house in New
Westminster to refect
its former glory. The
company ensured it
met all city-enforced
guidelines regarding
heritage home renova-
tions in order to com-
plete the job.
“Our clients have had a
passion for years – they
love heritage houses
and then they saw Ho-
way Cottage, which was
completely run down,
and looked for an op-
portunity to save it,”
says Basil Restoration’s
Mark Wittig.
‘After’ photos: Keith Henderson
BEFORE
AFTER
AFTER
P a g e B 1 2 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w T h u r s d a y , A u g u s t 2 6 , 2 0 1 0
u3059-152 Street White Rock
Phone: 604-542-4317
u7599 King George Hwy
Surrey (Newton)
Phone: 604-572-3739
u7878 120th Street (Scott Road) Surrey
Phone: 604-591-3914
u6312 200th Street Langley
Phone: 604-532-4411
u13665-102nd Ave Surrey (North)
Phone: 604-583-8473
u7200 Market Crossing Burnaby
Phone: 604-451-5888
u1200 Seguin Drive Coquitlam
Phone: 604-527-8828
u11969 - 200th Street Maple Ridge
Phone: 604-460-4664
u1350 Main Street North Vancouver
Phone: 604-982-9100
u3100-2850 Shaughnessy St. Port Coquitlam
Phone: 604-468-6951
u3500 No.3 Road Richmond
Phone: 604-273-2939
u11388 Steveston Hwy South Richmond
Phone: 604-271-6651
u2290 Cambie St. Vancouver
Phone: 604-707-2290
u2830 Bentall Street Vancouver
Phone: 604-431-3570
u8729 Heather Street Vancouver
Phone: 604-257-6487
u2220 Kingsway
Vancouver Kingsway
Phone: 604-257-6510
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