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NAME: CHRISTIAN PATRICE

SCHOOL: POINT FORTIN WEST SECONDARY

CLASS: 5.1

SUBJECT: ENGLISH A

TOPIC: PAPA BOIS


TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

Introduction/Plan of Investigation.....1

Article One.2-3

Article Two4

Article Three..5

Reflection One...6

Reflection Two...7

Reflection Three.8

Written report..9
INTRODUCTION/PLAN OF INVESTIGATION

The topic for my English SBA is Papa Bois. I became interested in this topic because I love to read
folklore books and I am intrigue by local folklore and its mysteries. In order to successfully
accomplish this project, I have to complete the following tasks:

Select three pieces of material that deal with this topic.


Meet with group to discuss materials and share information.
Complete reflection 1, 2 and 3
Plan and present an oral presentation.
Meet with teacher for Individual Participation.
Meet with teacher (and group) for group activity.

In order for me to find more information on this topic, I will check the library for books; use the
internet on the computer and newspaper clippings on Papa Bois. I also expect to develop my ability to
identify main ideas, analyse writers techniques, use of language and the best English student in my
school. As I research this topic, I am concerned that I might not be able to find different perspectives
on the topic and I might not find accurate information. I am also concerned that some group members
may not contribute in the discussion. However, I plan to ensure that I find a range of relevant material
by searching both at the library and on the internet.

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ARTICLE ONE

PAPA BOIS AND MONKEY TROUBLE

Once upon a time a woman called Tee Tee, who was known for her delicious baked goods, prepared
26 loaves of manioc bread and placed them inside a bag to take to market, where she planned to sell
them for a pretty price.

Tee Tee decided she would take the shortcut through the forest, though many people warned her
against it. Off she trundled, and she was nearing the far side of the forest when suddenly a figure
dashed past her and into the dense brush to her right.

The figure ran so fast, she barely saw him, but she was certain she spotted the hooves, and yes, she
was sure. He'd had a scraggly beard strewn with leaves. That was it, then. She had seen Papa Bois, the
legendary protector of the forest, whose feet resembled the hooves of the deer.

"Help!" Tee Tee screamed, "I'm not here to hunt, Papa Bois," for Papa Bois despised hunters, and
everyone knew he would chase them out of the forest and harm them if he must.

But Tee Tee did not stop with her screams for help. She didn't care to wait to see if Papa Bois was
satisfied. No, indeed. Instead she ran as fast as her little legs would carry her, and from the highest
treetop, Monkey watched her run.

"Help!" Tee Tee cried again, "I have trouble."

Now Monkey was curious. He wondered what this trouble was, for he had not seen Papa Bois. In fact,
no one else had. It isn't certain he was there at all.

"Trouble!" Tee Tee cried again as she tripped on a big root in her path. She fell and scraped her knees
and hands and nose, and her bag of breads spilled onto the ground.

Just as she was reaching to pick them up, she saw a flash of hooves.

"Trouble!" she cried again, and leaving the breads behind, she fled for home.

When the forest was quiet again, Monkey scrambled out of his tree and crept carefully toward the
breads. He nibbled a little piece. And then he sighed deeply. "Sooo good," he crooned. "Sooo good."
And of course he had to taste some more.

By sundown Monkey had eaten every last crumb and his belly was full, but the next morning he woke
up feeling hungry for more. "I must have more trouble," he said, and he scampered toward the village,
for that was the direction he saw Tee Tee going the day before.

He skipped into the first bake shop he saw. "Please, give me some trouble," Monkey said. 2
"It's trouble you want, is it?" asked the shopkeeper. He had never liked monkeys one bit. And so he
went to the back of his shop, and when he returned, he handed Monkey a great big bag. "Here you
go," he said.

Monkey had no idea that in that bag was one angry wild dog.

"This trouble is very heavy," Monkey said to himself as he dragged the bag along the road. Now the
dog did not like being dragged along a bumpy path, and before long he began to yelp and whine, and
then to bark and howl.

You can be sure that when Papa Bois heard those howls, he came out of hiding, for Papa Bois cannot
bear to hear the sound of angry or hurt creatures.

When he spotted Monkey, he quick as lightning ripped open the bag, and out leaped the hot, snarling
dog. That dog looked Monkey right in the eye as if to say, "I'll get you now." And then the dog sprang
at him.

Monkey jumped out of the way so quickly that he lost his balance and went tumbling, head over
heels, into the brush, the dog in yelping pursuit. Monkey decided in an instant that he had no more use
for trouble, so he dashed as fast as he could to the top of the tallest tree in the forest, and there he has
remained ever since.

Papa Bois just lets him stay up there, and everybody knows that's why Monkey is always chattering
away. He's discussing all the trouble he has seen, and now we know why Monkey likes to eat
bananas, which grow up high, way up where wild dogs do not roam.

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ARTICLE TWO

TI-JEAN AND HIS BROTHERS

In folk-lore Papa Bois is beneficent. Traditionally Papa Bois is an old man who protects the animals
of the forest from hunters. The refrain Bai Diable-la manger un ti mamaille ! (give the Devil a
child for dinner) occurs in a traditional masquerade performed in St. Lucia at Christmas and New
year; the devils ('Jabs, 'diables') threaten the crowd, receive small gifts of money and put on short
performances in the street. However, it is not easy to distinguish good from evil, and evil may
disguise it-self as good. Ti-Jean recognizing that To know evil early, life will be simpler, does not
take it for granted that the old man is what he seems to be ; So he examines him thoroughly and , then,
defeats him in the game.

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ARTICLE THREE

FOLKLORE AND LEGENDS OF TRINIDAD & TOBAGO PAPA BOIS

Papa Bois is the most likely known of all our folklore characters. He is old man of the High Woods
and is known by many names, including Maitre Bois or Master of the Woods, and Daddy Bouchon
or Hairy Man of the Woods, and Daddy Bouchon or Hairy Man, and serious belief in his existence
extends throughout the entire island.

Alfred Codallo, the great artist and folklorist, had this to say: Physically Papa Bois appears in so
many different forms and fashions sometimes as a deer, or in old ragged clothes, sometimes hairy
and though very old ragged clothes, sometimes hairy and thought very old, extremely strong and
muscular with cloven hoofs and leaves growing out of his beard.

As the guardian of the animals and the custodian of the Great Trees, he is known to sound a cows
horn to warn his friends of the approach of hunters, although he does not usually object to a
reasonable bag, he does take exception to killing for killing sake, and to the wanton destruction of
the forested heartland of our Island.

There are many stories of Papa Bois appearing to hunters, sometimes as a deer who would lead them
into the deep forest and then suddenly resume his true shape, to issue a stern warning and then to
vanish, leaving the hunters lost or perhaps compelling them to pay a fine of some sort, such as to
marry Mama Dlo. If you should meet with Papa Bois be very polite Bon jour, vieux Papa or Bon
Matin, Maitre should be your greeting. If he pauses to pass the time with you, stay cool, and do not
look at his feet.

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REFLECTION 1

ARTICLE 1

ENTRY 1

This article help me to understand what the story was about, it was about a woman who called Tee
Tee made 26 loaves of manioc bread to sell it in the market, she decided to take a shortcut through the
forest but many people warn but she didnt listen. When Tee Tee wonder off in the forest she saw a
figure dashed past her and into the dense brush to her right, she ran away as fast as she could and yell
for help that she was in trouble while she was running she trip on a big root, she fell and scraped her
knees and hands and nose, and her bag of breads spilled onto the ground. The monkey saw what
happen and took the bag of bread and ate it and he refer the meal as trouble. The morning he woke up
the monkey decided to look for some more trouble so he went into the village and stop by a bake shop
and ask the shopkeeper that he wanted trouble the shopkeeper gave him a bag and the monkey left.
Monkey didnt know that inside the bag was a dog and he was torturing it that made Papa Bois upset
and he ran quickly and rip the bag open and the dog ran after him the monkey ran up a tall tree and
hid there.

ENTRY 2

The use of language in this article is to express Trinidadian dialect. Many elements of Caribbean
folklore (the orally transmitted beliefs, myths, tales, and practices of a people) are African in origin,
given that slaves brought from Africa's West (or Gold) Coast made up a large majority of those
brought to the region.

ENTRY 3

Learning English is, in itself, solving a big problem. I start with scattered pieces grammatical rules,
vocab words, parts of speech and little by little I have to figure out how they fit together to create
something that is understood by others. Learning a new language often prompts an interest in the
countries where the language is spoken. I will be more connected to global news if I can even read (or
skim) in the language I am learning, and will have more unbiased sources to inform Myself with
telecommunication. This is important, because I will more easily relate to people who share my
language, and become conscious of how my actions can have international consequences.

It really goes beyond simple communication. Learning languages is the first step to gaining new
perspective opening a window of sorts of other world views and cultures.

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REFLECTION 2

ARTICLE 2

ENTRY 1

Papa Bois (otherwise known as "Matre Bois," meaning master of the woods or "Daddy Bouchon"
meaning hairy man), a French patios word for "father wood" or "father of the forest" is a popular
fictional folklore character of St.Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago. Often called the "keeper of the
forest", he is thought of as the protector of the forests and their flora and fauna.

He is married to the Mama Dlo also known as Mama DLeau

His appearance is thought to be that of a short, old man of African descent with cloven hooves (or at
least his left leg ends in a large hoof) and a beard of leaves, who, despite his age sports strong muscles
and can run faster than a deer. His body is completely covered with hair like that of a donkey and
small horns sprout from his forehead. He is also known to carry a hollowed-out bull's horn, which he
uses to warn animals of huntersapproach. He is also known to have the power of metamorphosis and
is commonly thought to transform himself into a deer, luring hunters deep into the forest and getting
them lost. Much like his female counterpart, Mama Dlo.

It is believed that if one meets Papa Bois, one must be polite and refrain from staring at his hooves,
and say a polite greeting to him. For example, "Bon jour, vieux Papa" meaning, "Good day, old
father." Papa Bois is also found in Grenadian folklore. He is usually represented as a huge Manicou
(Opossum). Hunters of the forest are always afraid of him because of his appearing and disappearing
trick.

ENTRY 2

The use of language in this article is to express Trinidadian dialect. Trinidadian English Creole is a
creole language commonly spoken throughout the island of Trinidad in Trinidad and Tobago. It is
distinct from Tobagonian Creole particularly at the basilectal level [3] and from other Lesser
Antillean English creoles.

ENTRY 3

I think that English helps me understand people of other nationalities.Especially when I go to other
countries. English language helps to understand foreign music.Also,English helps me to learn in the
school very well. I think that English helps me get good education and a job in the future.Sometimes I
use English when I am speaking with my parents and friends. 7
REFLECTION 3

ENTRY 1

Papa Bois is a popular fictional folklore character of Trinidad and Tobago. The name Papa Bois is
of French patois origin. In English, it means father of the forest. Papa Bois is thought of as the
protector of the forests and its flora and fauna. His appearance is thought to be that of a short, old man
with cloven hooves and a beard of leaves. Despite his age, Papa Bois has strong muscles and can run
faster than a deer. His body is completely covered with hair like that of a donkey and small horns
sprout from his forehead. He is also said to carry a hollowed-out bulls horn, which he uses to warn
animals when hunters are approaching. Papa Bois is believed to have the power of metamorphosis and
it is commonly thought that he transforms himself into a deer, luring hunters deep into the forest and
getting them lost. It is believed that if one meets Papa Bois, one must be polite, refrain from staring at
his hooves, and say a polite greeting to him. For example, Bonjour, vieux Papa meaning Good day,
old father.

ENTRY 2

This is a Creole dialect that is spoken in the whole of Trinidad. Trinidadian Creole has been
influenced largely by the diverse population in Trinidad. The population is made up of people of
Chinese origin, East Indian descent, African decent, Mid-Eastern and European descent (mostly
Spanish, Portuguese, Lebanese, French and Syrian descent) and also people of mixed race. Most of
these groups of people came to the island as slaves, labourers, or immigrants thus having an influence
on the language. Trinidadian Creole has borrowed a few words from different languages such as
Hindi, Spanish, Chinese, French, and English.

ENTRY 3

I think that English, for me, is a very important language and has many advantages. Such as
improving our knowledge, more job opportunities, ad good interaction with local people when
travelling to other countries.

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WRITTEN REPORT