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Published by the Tahoma Audubon Society: Connecting people with nature since 1969.

Vol. 40 No. 10 December 2009/January 2010

It’s here! It’s here! Our 2010 Membership


Banquet is almost here
and we need your help!
The 110th Christmas Bird Count!  Saturday, February 6, 2010 is Tahoma
Audubon's biggest event of the year and
By Faye McAdams Hands chapters around the world organize their own we need lots of help from our members

oy
 
CBC to continue this longest running citizen- to make this a success!
Saturday, December 19, 2009 will be the Please see details on page 2.
scientist project. Counters count every bird that is
Christmas Bird Count for our Tahoma Audubon

J
seen or heard on the designated day, within their
Chapter. You are welcome to join in the fun of this
annual holiday tradition! Every year Audubon See "CBC” on page 2

THE
OF BIRDING CLASSES
Story and
photos by
Diane Yorgason-Quinn

Tahoma
Audubon is
currently fielding three different classes for
adult birders (not to mention all the resources
made available to children and youth!), which
have been wildly popular! The intermediate Gathering of the Intermediate Birding Class at The Nature Center at Snake Lake. Instructor Ken Brown is
birding class this year had to move from the seated just to the left of the Swan sculpture in the corner.
Audubon Center at Adriana Hess Park to the
Nature Center at Snake Lake because it has
grown so much in size, actually having to turn and wet. Ken decided we’d head out anyway, headed up to the Kingston area to look for the
people away. Rumor has it that it will split next as there was a chance of breaks in the weather. Rusty Blackbird! This blackbird normally
year and become two classes – Intermediate Turns out the break was all day! Perfect fall winters in the American Southeast (breeding in
and Advanced! It looks like birding is no lon- birding weather! the northeast and Canada) and has been report-
ger an undiscovered joy! In this unusually rich season for rare birds ed usually once or twice each winter in
Ken Brown’s intermediate class at press time (see the report from Ruth Sullivan on page 7, as Washington in recent years, but I can tell you
had just taken its second field trip of the fall/ well as last month’s issue), we took our cue it’s a hard bird to pick out of a flock of several
winter season November 14 , the first week-
th
from Tweeters internet reports (Brad Waggoner
end since the weather took a turn for the cold of Bainbridge Island on November 10th) and See "Classes” on page 6

Donate to the Tahoma Audubon Society In this issue:


Common birds at risk, sharp decline of sea
birds in Puget Sound, Global warming ef- 25 Years Ago page 8
fects on habitat, and near extinction for the BirdSongs page 8
Spotted Owl. These are some of the recent Calendar page 12
headlines that add urgency to our work to
Education page 4
preserve habitat for wildlife and humans.
Your donation is critical to the success of Environment Matters page 3
our important work. Donate today! Field trips page 5
New Members page 11
Your donation is tax deductible. Click here Quizzical Owl page 8
to go to our donation webpage. Photo/Robert Kelton
2010 Membership Banquet is approaching quickly!
Our annual membership banquet is coming up TAS office for more ideas or to make a donation.
on Saturday, February 6th, 2010! Last year’s 40th 2) We need party planners! This is the biggest
Anniversary celebration was a huge success and single event of the TAS calendar year and it takes
we want to repeat the fun for this year’s event. To lots of people to make it run smoothly. If you are
make it great, we need your help: interested in helping out with the banquet in any
1) We need auction items! Please consider way, please contact Melissa at (253)306-0037 or
donating something to this year’s silent auction. mjnpaulson79@gmail.com We’ll need people to
Most donations are tax deductible and all proceeds help with the program, decorations, materials and
go to support our endowment. Donations large day-of logistics.
and small are appreciated. Ideas from past auc- With your help, we can put together a great
Photo/Diane Yorgason-Quinn tions include art, books, tickets to museums or event to celebrate Tahoma Audubon’s fantastic
Here are a few photos of the fun we had last year,
including the auction and several award presentations. sporting events, homemade goodies, guided bird- members and activities. We look forward to see-
We need your help for more of the same this year! ing trips and other fun experiences. Please call the ing you at the 2010 banquet!

Photos/Margie Shea

The Pierce County Chapter of The National Audubon Society


Located in University Place's Adriana Hess Wetland Park
2917 Morrison Rd W University Place, WA 98466
Office hours 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Front desk 253-565-9278

Tahoma Audubon Staff


Flint, Bryan Executive Director                        


bryanflint@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129
Kyer, Krystal Conservation Coordinator
kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org 253-232-9978                    
Swaim, Stephanie Education Coordinator
... CBC
from page 1
Area 1: Art Wang
752-1714 artnancy@harbornet.com

Area 2: Faye McAdamsHand


StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org 253-327-9480

942-9233 zest4parus@hotmail.com Kesinger, Cami Development Coordinator


designated Count Circle.  Our ckesinger@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-9129                      
Circle contains 8 different Areas. Area 3: Diane Yorgason-Quinn 
In the map at right you will see 857-3367 avosetta@hotmail.com Taylor, Graham Volunteer 253-565-1884
the Areas, along with the Area Area 4: Roxy & Bill Giddings 537-3075 Kerrigan, Julie Coordinators 253-223-0039
Coordinators. You can contact the gtaylor@tahomaaudubon.org jkerrigan@tahomaaudubon.org
Area 5: Rolan Nelson
Coordinator of the Area that you
292-0160 rnbuffle@yahoo.com Benton, Ken Education Intern
would like to count in, or contact
the Count Coordinator directly if Area 6: Marcus Roening 756-0215 kbenton@tahomaaudubon.org 253-565-1884
you are not sure, or would like to Area 7: Ed Pullen Tahoma Audubon Board Officers
offer you help in an Area that 848-5951 edwardpullen@gmail.com John Garner President
might need extra birders: Faye
McAdams Hands – 253-942- Area 8: Ruth Sullivan Marjorie Shea Vice President
564-7419 godwit513@msn.com
9233, zest4parus@hotmail.com Jane Brosius Secretary
Kathleen Nelson Treasurer
Exciting news from last year’s for us! Keep your fingers crossed…..
CBC: out of 1,624 Counts in the US,   The Tally Dinner directly
Tahoma Audubon Board Members 2009
our very own Count Circle had top after the Count is always a fun event, Thelma Gilmur Ione Clagett
numbers for Red-necked Grebe and a great way to meet the other
(253) ! This is our second year in a birders and share stories from the Dick Carkner
Melissa Paulson
row to come out on top with this day, while eating a tasty meal!  Come Marcus Roening
Bill Smith
bird. In 2007 we had the nation’s join us at The Nature Center at Snake
high count also (331) . Now, if only Lake - 1919 S. Tyler St, Tacoma - Peggy L. Kopf Tanja Scott
that Black-tailed Gull will stick around from 5:00 – 6:30. See you there! Darby Veeck Charles Griffin

The Towhee is a publication of the Tahoma Audubon Society. The Towhee is published monthly, ten times a year, with and may be sent by e-mail, disk, or typed. E-mail submissions
The Tahoma Audubon Society was chartered in 1969. TAS combined Jul/Aug and Dec/Jan issues. Submissions of articles to editor@tahomaaudubon.org. Editor: David Lev
advocates for the protection of wildlife and promotes conserva- and photographs of birds, bird lore, natural history, conserva- Mailing: Vera & John Cragin and Winfield Giddings
tion through education and activities that enrich its member’s tion, and environmental education are reviewed and considered Design & Layout: Robert Kelton: robert_kelton@ mac.com
experiences in and with the natural world. for inclusion by the editor. Copy is due by the 15th of the month Printing: Consolidated Press

Page 2 www.tahomaaudubon.org December 2009/January 2010


ENVIRONMENT Matters
Saving lands across Pierce County
The future of open space in Pierce County is up to us.  forests, farms, other open spaces and trails are conserved succeeded at doing
What we collectively envision and, crucially, fund – will in a thoughtful and planned way that looks holistically at this summer), and
shape the livability and culture of this scenic region. all of the issues and options.  Funding is a crucial piece making recycling
Will we still have working forests surrounding Mt. of the conservation puzzle.  No plan, as good as it may options more
Rainier National Park in 30 years? Or will we have be, will ever be implemented without funding.  available to
sprawling 10-acre estates that destroy forest and river So, here is some good news to end 2009 on a positive downtown Tacoma
habitat and produce urban flooding downstream?  note, and start 2010 with the future in mind: on October businesses.  The
Will we have access to healthy locally grown foods? 27, 2009 the Pierce County Council voted in favor of PCSC is a coalition
Or will farmland and farmers be extinct, because they Resolution No.R2009-97s, establishing an Open Space formed in 2008, of
couldn’t compete with industrial agriculture or rising Task Force beginning in January 2010 that will study local non-profit
land prices or too many roads, warehouses, and suburban and provide recommendations on how open space lands groups working
sprawl? will be acquired over the next decade. together to improve Contact Krystal at 253-232-9978.
Or kkyer@tahomaaudubon.org
Will we have a trails system to recreate, exercise, The task force will coordinate with watershed councils, the quality of life in
provide an alternative to driving, or view birds and land trusts, and environmental groups involved with Tacoma and Pierce County by utilizing our grassroots
wildlife? Or will we continue to build more roads only open space to create a long-range acquisition plan. memberships and collective voice to advocate for
to be stuck in traffic, which leads to more sprawl, worse Creating an acquisition plan for open space is a key regulatory and policy changes. 
air quality, and contributes to climate change? component that needs occur before a sales tax for trails, Tahoma Audubon Society took a lead in advocating
Each of us has our own answers to these questions, parks, and open space can be put before the public for a for the creation of a task force, and we will continue to
and indeed other important questions to raise. There is vote.   play a key role in the task force when it commences in
no right or wrong answer, but there is a choice to be We applaud the Pierce County Council for planning January, ensuring that open spaces such as working
made.  Our future is ours, and it is our children’s.  for the future today! forests and farms, rivers, wetlands, parks, trails, and
In these difficult economic times, we, as a society and Tahoma Audubon did not do this alone.  Members of more are conserved and funded across Pierce County,
as taxpayers, must make hard decisions on how and the Pierce County Sustainability Coalition (PCSC) and so that we create a community that we continue to
when and where to spend our money.  That is why identified the creation of this task force as one of three want to live in, that our grandchildren will enjoy living
Tahoma Audubon has been working to ensure that tax local priorities for 2009.  The other two being getting a in, and where wildlife can find a home, a rest stop, or a
dollars are spent wisely and efficiently, and that working Mixed-Use Centers Update in Tacoma (which we bite to eat, too. 

intern Bio Environmental Priorities Lobby Day 2010


Lindsay Raab By Kat Crowley-York Where: United Churches of Olympia, 110th
East 11th Ave
Lindsay Raab grew up in Apple Valley,
The words “government of the people, by the Additionally: Unveiling of the sixth and newest
Minnesota. She received a Bachelor of
people, for the people” have always stuck in my map of the Great Washington State Birding Trail
Science degree in Biology, and a minor
focus in Psychology, from the University mind – from the days long past of studying hosted by Audubon Washington, with special
of Wisconsin – Eau Claire. Lindsay is Abraham Lincoln and the Gettysburg Address. It guest, Senator Lisa Brown.
currently in her second year of the always seemed like excellent rhetoric – incredibly Registration fee $15. Bus transportation $15
Masters of Environmental Studies inspiring, but somewhat vague and (Tacoma Bus $10).
Program at The Evergreen State College Lindsay Raab impalpable. How could the On line registration opens soon at
in Olympia, Washington. Her upcoming government be BY the people? I http://pugetsound.org/forms/
thesis work will focus on nearshore birds on and near vote – is that what it means? Or can lobbydayreg10.
Anderson Island in the South Puget Sound. The goal of the an ordinary citizen have a bigger say 2010 Environmental Priorities:
research is to provide justification to expand the current in the process of government? 1.    The Working for Clean Water
Important Bird Area boundary in the Nisqually Delta to Three years ago, when I attended bill is about creating jobs, rebuilding
include the cliffs and shores of Anderson Island. my first Environmental Priorities our local economies, and cleaning up
Lindsay will be coordinating and participating in a Lobby Day, it all became clear to me. polluted waterways like the Puget
Christmas Bird Count and Puget Sound Seabird Surveys on Yes, absolutely, I could be part of the Sound and Spokane River.
Anderson Island. She will be amassing bird data from numer-
process, and yes, absolutely, my 2.    Safe Baby Bottles to protect
ous sources such as “E-Bird” notes and past survey data.
single voice could make a difference. children’s health and the environment
Lindsay also plans to interview locals to the island, as well as
It was an eye-opening and educating by phasing out the harmful chemical
seabird experts working in the Puget Sound.
experience, and one I plan to repeat bisphenol A (BPA) from baby bottles,

intern Bio
many, many more times in my life. food and beverage cans, and other
For 18 years, People For Puget Sound and the consumer products.
environmental community have been 3.    Budget for our Environment to ensure
Greg Cook spearheading the annual Environmental Lobby
Day in Olympia, and the event has grown by
adequate funding for the core environmental
protections that make Washington State a
Greg Cook, a second-year student in leaps and bounds. Last year’s event had over healthy place to live.
the Master’s of Public Administration
500 attendees, 125 legislative appointments, 25 During Lobby Day you will hear from legislators
program at The Evergreen State Col-
co-sponsors, and 42 of 49 Legislative Districts that are championing the Environmental
lege, is undertaking an internship with
represented. Priorities legislation, receive a training on how to
Tahoma Audubon from October
Last year, Representative Tom Campbell (an lobby from top environmental lobbyists, and
through December. During this intern-
ship,
  Greg is working with Conservation environmental Republican) spoke to attendees to have a chance to meet face-to-face with your
Coordinator Krystal Kyer on the Roy Greg Cook inspire them and acknowledge the power of elected officials.  And don’t forget the party in
community open house, the TAS five- citizen advocacy. In his words, “When I see an the evening!
year plan, and Pierce County’s Open Space Task Force. army of real people, I love it. I absolutely love it.” Our goal is to have 600 participants, 130
Greg, a native of rural northern New York, has worked for I was surprised my first year by how willing legislative appointments, and have 45 of 49
the Pierce County Library System since 2002. He is also a the legislators were to listen, and how informed Legislative Districts represented.
writer whose work has appeared in various regional and they are on the issues. Their constituents are My husband and I will be there – will you?
national publications. This year he is one of six reader- their top priority, and I came away from the day Online registration for the 2010 Environmental
columnists for The News Tribune. He hopes to graduate really feeling like my concerns had been listened Lobby Day will begin in December.
from Evergreen in June, 2010. to and my opinions would be considered when http://pugetsound.org/forms/lobbydayreg10.
“Interning with Tahoma Audubon has shown me some of the time came to vote on the issues. For more information contact Rein Attemann,
the struggles and rewards of life in a non-profit,” he says. Be Heard, Be Seen, Be Green! rattemann@pugetsound.org,  or (206) 382-
“Tahoma Audubon’s vision and work make an impact in When: Tue. Jan. 26th,  8:30 AM – 6:00 PM 7007.
the Pierce County region and it is exciting to be a small part
of that.”

December 2009/January 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 3


Education Matters
Announcing Volunteer Naturalist training
The educators at outreach or on-site presentations.
Tahoma Audubon Training consists of six workshops held at Tacoma
Society and Tacoma Nature Center and taught by specialists and staff. The
Nature Center are workshops will give you a broad knowledge of each
excited to announce subject area, and the tools to create an atmosphere of
the new Volunteer exploration and excitement for the natural world.
Naturalist Training Required workshops:
Program which ✔ Introduction to Interpretation – Tue. Jan. 12, 6:30-
begins in 2010!  8:45pm  or  Sat. Jan. 16, 9:30-11:45am
From January to ✔ Feathered Friends (Birds) – Tue. Jan. 26, 6-9pm 
stephanieSWAIM March, active and or  Sat. Jan 30, 9-noon
Education Coordinator informative ✔ Washington Wildlife (Mammals) – Tue. Feb. 9,
workshops will 6-9pm Volunteer Naturalists share the wonder of nature.
Call Steph @ 253-327-9480. Or teach participants ✔ Forest Fun (Forest Ecology) – Tue. Feb. 23, 6-9pm 
StephSwaim@tahomaaudubon.org about the ecology of or  Sat. Feb. 27, 9-noon The fee for a workshop is $10.  The Introduction to
our region, and how ✔ Wetland Wonders (Wetland Ecology) – Tue. Mar. 9, Interpretation workshop is a prerequisite and is free of
to inspire a sense of wonder in those who seek to 6-9pm  or  Sat. Mar. 13, 9-noonTide pools (Intertidal charge.  Receive a $20 discount if you register for all
explore it. Ecology) – Tue. Mar. 23, 4:30-7:30pm at Titlow Beach six workshops at once!  Call Tacoma Nature Center at
  Volunteer Naturalists are the backbone of our In addition to the six required workshops, Volunteer 253-591-6439 to sign up.  Space is limited.
strategic goal of expanding nature education across Naturalists will have the opportunity to participate in To be a Volunteer Naturalist you must be age16 or
Pierce County.  With only one educator on staff at “elective” workshops.  These will be open to the older, and available to lead programs during the school
Tahoma Audubon, we rely on a corps of trained, public, but preference will be given to those who day, on weekends, and/or in the evenings depending on
enthusiastic volunteers to bring environmental complete the training. Elective workshops may include: the requests from teachers and community groups.
education into the community and into school Animal Tracking, Nature by Kayak, Marine Mammals, If you have any questions, give me a call at 253-327-
classrooms.  After receiving training, Volunteer Geology of Puget Sound, Neotropical Birds, Butterflies 9480 or email StephSwaim@TahomaAudubon.org.
Naturalists are asked to commit to at least five hours of and Dragonflies. Join us and help connect others with nature!

schedule of recurring classes


Budding Scientists Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select small scissors, Scotch Brand Magic tape (green
Ages 5-7, $9.00 per student. Young homeschoolers and class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and dispenser), and a small craft mat (if you have one). Call
other children begin science and nature exploration abilities. Older homeschool students will continue their Adriana Hess Audubon Center @ 565-9278 to reserve
through games, hikes, and crafts. science studies with challenging and engaging your spot.  For more details, call Rosanne Becker @
experiments and activities. To participate in this class, 564-7115.
Beginning Homeschool Science students should be able to calculate averages,  
Ages 8-10, $12 per student. Homeschool students percentages, and solve simple equations. Intermediate Birder’s Class
explore science through hands-on experiments and Tues Dec 8 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
activities. Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Nature Storytime Continuation of class.
Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select Ages 2-6, $6 per child, $3 Audubon member, free to
class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and adults and U.P residents. Join us as we explore the park Snake Lake Science club
abilities. Beginning science students should be able to at the Adriana Hess Audubon center in University Tues Dec 15 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM.
add and subtract numbers. Place with nature stories based on the current theme. Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ages 10-14, no
Adults are welcome with the children. This a wonderful charge for club meetings, $10 per student to join the
Intermediate Homeschool Science grandparent/ grandchild activity! Space is limited to the club. Snake Lake Science Club for homeschool and
Ages 10-12, $12 per student. Homeschool students first 20 registered guests (adults and children). other students age 10-14 years old who want to learn
explore science through hands-on experiments and more about science and the natural world. Students pay
activities. Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Note Nature Alphabet a once per school year fee of $10 to join the club and
- topics are repeated during the month, so select class Ages 3-6, $6 per child. Preschoolers explore different are then free to participate in any program offerings,
appropriate for your child’s knowledge and abilities. nature topics through stories, hands-on activities, including the 2010 Snake Lake Science Fair. The
Intermediate Science Students should be able to multiply nature walks and crafts at the Tacoma Nature Center. following programs are designed to help students learn
and divide numbers, add and subtract fractions. Adult participation is recommended, children under more about science and the scientific process through
four require an adult present. Please note alternating hands-on discovery. Pre-registration for each program
Advanced Homeschool Science times. Register by the Saturday before the program. is required as space is limited. Call The Nature Center
Ages 12-15, $15 per student. Homeschool students to register 591-6439.
explore science through hands-on experiments and Adriana Hess Park Photography Class
activities. Register Early - these classes fill quickly! Mon Dec 7 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM Adriana Hess Park Photography class
Note - topics are repeated during the month, so select Location: Adriana Hess Park. An adult program Mon Jan 4 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM
class appropriate for your child’s knowledge and encouraging people to appreciate nature and how they Location: Adriana Hess Park. An adult program
abilities. Older homeschool students will continue their can incorporate it into their photography. Call Dixie encouraging people to appreciate nature and how they
science studies with challenging and engaging Harris for details 564-6373. can incorporate it into their photography. Call Dixie
experiments and activities. To participate in this class, Harris for details 564-6373.
students should be able to calculate averages, Christmas Irisfolding Card Class
percentages, and solve simple equations. Mon Dec 7 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM Adriana Hess Park Photography class
Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center. Cost $12 per Mon Feb 1 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Advanced Homeschool Science Lab person to be paid at class. You will leave class with at Location: Adriana Hess Park. An adult program
Ages 12-15, $15 per student. Homeschool students least two cards and patterns to make your own.  Other encouraging people to appreciate nature and how they
explore science through hands-on experiments and techniques such as Teabag Folding and Spirelli may be can incorporate it into their photography. Call Dixie
activities. Register Early - these classes fill quickly! included along with the Irisfolding. Supplies needed:  a Harris for details 564-6373.

1919 South Tyler Street, 2917 Morrison Road W.,


Tacoma WA 98338 University Pl. WA 98466
253-591-6439 www.metroparkstacoma.org 253-565-9278
Open Tues. – Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. www.TahomaAudubon.org
& Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Open Mon – Sat. 10a.m.-1p.m.

Check our websites for the latest updates on classes and schedules.

Page 4 www.tahomaaudubon.org December 2009/January 2010


field trips and Events
Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually Plant Walk at Adriana Hess Park
Wed. Dec 2. 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM rules Mon Jan 18, 2010 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Wed. Dec 9. 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Location: Adriana Hess Wetland Park.
Wed. Dec 23. 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Call TAS to register (253-565-9278). Some trips are
Wed. Dec 30. 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM people limited out of necessity. Explore the Skagit Flats
Location: Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge Saturday, January 23rd, 2010, 7:30 am - 4:00 pm
Notify TAS 24 hours in advance if you cannot come.
Leader: Phil Kelley Leaders: Marcus Roening & Heather Ballash; Limit 14
Birdwalk hikes changed in spring, 2009.  The boardwalk Field trip leaders put in a lot of time and planning and participants. Join Marcus & Heather in an exploration
loop, including the twin barns and riparian overlook, no-shows disrupt field trips. More than 3 no-shows a of the rich farmland of the Skagit & Sammamish Flats.
are now the only areas open to the public due to One of Washington’s nature spectacles is seeing up to
construction related to dike removal. Even so, bird year can result in revoking opportunity to participate. 10,000 Snow Geese, along with a mix of Trumpeter
watching has been good. Arrive at the meeting place early. and Tundra Swans. The area is also magnet for raptors,
Join Phil on his weekly bird walks as he counts the with Bald Eagles, Red-tailed & Rough-legged Hawks,
birds at Nisqually NWR. The group takes the boardwalk/ No pets are allowed. Short-eared Owls and up to 5 falcons. Bring lunch,
trail loop out to the Twin Barns, the Nisqually overlook  Be prepared for seasonal weather. warm clothes & full rain gear. MUST carpool! Limit of
area, and the riparian area, totaling about 2 miles. 4 cars, holding 4 people each (14 + 2 leaders).
Bring: Good walking shoes or boots, raingear, water, Bring lunch, drinks and snacks if the field trip is MEET: at 7:30 am at Tacoma Dome P&R off of
snacks, and $3   for entry fee unless you have a scheduled past mid-day. Puyallup Ave, at the East G. St entrance, 1st floor, SE
pass.  Scopes are welcome. Meet: at Visitor’s Center. corner inside. Call 253-565-9278 to sign up.
Directions:  Take I-5 south from Tacoma and exit to All passengers divide total carpooling expenses.
Nisqually NWR at exit 114.  Take a right at the light. Current guidelines are 20 cents a mile per car, not Family Walk at Adriana Hess Park
Sign-up:   Call or email Phil Kelley to confirm including driver. Sun Jan 24 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
details.   Phil Kelley, Lacey, (360) 459-1499, A family program to encourage families to appreciate
scrubjay323@aol.com. Beginners are always welcome. the park by providing information and opportunities
Nisqually NWR has started a 3-4 year estuary Have fun. with a guided walking tour. Call Dixie Harris for
reconstruction project.   For more information about details 564-6373.
trail closures, go to ttp://www.fws.gov/nisqually/ and
click on Events and News. During the reconstruction, plant walk through the park! Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually
some trails have been closed. Family Walk at Adriana Hess Park Weds Feb 3 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
  Sun Dec 27 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Wed Feb 10 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Winter Birding in Roy Location: Adriana Hess Park. A family program to Wed Feb 17 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Sat Dec 5 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM encourage families to appreciate the park by providing Wed Feb 24 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Location: Roy, WA - Head of the University of Puget information and opportunities with a guided walking Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge. Leader: Phil
Sound’s Slater Museum of Natural History, Gary tour.  Call Dixie Harris for details 564-6373 Kelley. See earlier description for details
Shugart, will lead a Nature Mapping field trip along  
the rail tracks, city park, and oak woodland prairie Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually Bird Walk at Adriana Hess Park
areas in Roy, WA. Join his winter bird watching trip to Weds Jan 6 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Mon Feb 8 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
get a taste of what was seen during our recent BioBlitz! Weds Jan 13 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
We will be carpooling from University of Puget Weds Jan 20 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Plant Walk at Adriana Hess Park
Sound’s Thompson parking lot off of Union & N. 14th Weds Jan 27 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Mon Feb 15 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
at 7:15am - we will depart at that time. If not carpooling, Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge. Leader: Phil Enjoy a guided plant walk through the park!
meet at Roy City Park at 8:00am. Kelley. See earlier description for details.
Call 565-9278 to sign up or for driving directions.
Family Walk at Adriana Hess Park
Bird Walk at Adriana Hess Park Sun Feb 28, 2010 from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Plant Walk at Adriana Hess Park Mon Jan 11 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM A family program to encourage families to appreciate
Mon Dec 21 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM Location: Adriana Hess Park. Enjoy a guided bird walk the park by providing information and opportunities
Location: Adriana Hess Wetland Park. Enjoy a guided through the park! with a guided walking tour. Call 564-6373.

ENVIRONMENT Matters
Work party reflections
By
Julie Kerrigan
On October 24th, 2009 the Tahoma Audubon
Society, University Place Parks and Recreation, and
the University Place Volunteer Center came together
to host the Together Green Volunteer Days in compost bins and rain barrels.
University Place. This event was a great example of At the 67th Street property volun-
organizations in the community coming together to teers filled two large dumpsters
encourage and support the preservation of local full of invasive species such as
urban open space. Scotch Broom, English Ivy,
Over 35 volunteers celebrated Make a Difference Himalayan Blackberries and
Day on Saturday October 24th Knot-Weed. Combined, the volunteers work sites selected were Adriana Hess Wetland Park
at Adriana Hess Wetland Park contributed over 160 hours to improve and City of University Place property on 67th Street.
and City of UP property on 67th and restore their community! Currently four of the six work parties are complete.
Street. At Adriana Hess These events were made possible Together Green has engaged 10,657 volunteers with
Wetland Park, volunteers through the National Audubon Society over 52,837 volunteer hours nationwide.
helped plant over 318 native and Toyota Together Green Volunteer
plants and spread wood chips Days grants. Each year, 40 Audubon Together Green volunteer events are designed to
for trails at the Thelma Gilmur Centers and Chapters receive a $7,000 connect people to local conservation efforts. By
Outdoor Education Shelter grant that pays for six volunteer events. building stronger alliances with the many local
area. This area is designed to This year Tahoma Audubon partnered organizations in Piece County, Audubon hopes to
be a demonstration site for the with the University Place Volunteer attract a new and diverse group of volunteers to help
public to learn about how to Center to host the six work parties in address the many ongoing environmental issues of
grow native plants and utilize the city of University Place. The two our region.

December 2009/January 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 5


... CLASSES
antidote to darker and wetter days! Just look out
on the winter waters of Puget Sound!
Just about everything we looked for, we found,
from page 1 with the exception of rockpipers, but that was
undoubtedly due to the high tides. The small
hundred Blackbirds! I myself had chased this bird Pacific and Red-Throated Loons were scarce,
for years before Patrick and Ruth Sullivan put me though there were many large Common Loons in
on one at Carnation about three years ago! This all plumages. All the expected Grebes were
particular individual, however, was more coopera- around, with Horned Grebes catching fish just a
tive than most, separating himself apart from any few feet from us at the Waterville pier. We were
flock and staying loyal to a particular farmyard, short on Alcids, however, with only Pigeon
making our job much easier. When our group Top: Scoping Manchester State Park. Above: The group Guillemots representing that Murre/Auklet family.
arrived on the scene, he was making himself (Ken Brown, front and center) at the Waterman pier. Large and small Gulls, particularly Olympic Gulls
scarce, but buoyed by reports from birders already (Glaucous-Winged/Western hybrids) and Mew
present (Marv Breece and Evan Houston) who Gulls, patrolled the skies everywhere along the
had seen him earlier that morning, we put our 50 waterfront.
eyes to work, and eventually he walked out and In non-bird news, a
took his bow! As more birders from around the fisherman must have
state had arrived, a single Swan had warmed up hauled out that huge
the audience prior to the star turn. If we hadn’t 24-tentacled Sunflower
been concerned about scaring away the bird, there Seastar that we almost
would definitely have been applause! Good looks stepped on at Waterville
were had by all! (thanks for the ID,
Incidentally, the class’ first field trip in October Shelley!), but it was alive, so Shelley and Faye put
Rarity Rusty Blackbird near Kingston.
to the coast had yielded up the Bar-Tailed Godwit it back in the sea to live another day.
at Tokeland, so now we’ll be expecting a rarity on Of course, we saw Harbor Seals, but there was
every outing! This amazing year might deliver on a long rippling something coursing rapidly through
that promise, courtesy of El Nino and so many the water near Harper, which turned out to be
searching eyeballs. three or four huge Sea Lions in an undulating line.
We then birding the Bremerton and Port Orchard Or maybe it really was a giant sea serpent...
areas, finding all kinds of other goodies! A raft of We finished up our day at Mace Lake just north
30 Long-Tailed Ducks at Bremerton! Harlequins! of the Pierce County line, where the amazing sight
Scoters! Loons! More Swans! Eagles! Both of 40+ Wood Ducks amid hundreds of Green-
Goldeneyes and Buffleheads everywhere! Winged Teal and other freshwater ducks gave a
American and Eurasian Wigeons! Yes, the winter fitting finish to a fine day, fine in birds, fine in
birds had definitely arrived! What a wonderful The city of Seattle, visible across the sound from Harper. weather, and fine in companionship.

Georgia Ramsey is a resource person for the class,


pictured here at the Nature Center at Snake Lake
Photos/Diane Yorgason-Quinn under the sign designating the name of the lab after
Hooded Mergansers patrolled the Port Orchard waterfront at our lunch spot. her late husband, Bob Ramsey

Page 6 www.tahomaaudubon.org December 2009/January 2010


Photo/Ruth Sullivan Photo/Ruth Sullivan
Orchard Oriole. Clay-Colored Sparrow.

Field trip Bonanza!


By Ruth Sullivan a Northern Shrike that sat and
  posed for us.  Another highlight
October 24th was a special day was on Damon Point where we
to pick for a field trip for a walked out and witnessed 4
combined trip for Tahoma and large groups of small peeps,
Black Hills Audubons to Ocean mostly all Western Sandpipers. 
Shores. We had 10 eager birders We were wondering why they
who all participated in finding were flying with such speed
the four rare birds at Bowerman and never trying to land, when
Basin (Grays Harbor National we discovered a dark Falcon
Wildlife Refuge). We all agreed that appeared to be a young
to spending extra time here until Merlin since he came up empty
everyone  saw these birds.  We even with so many shorebirds.
all had good looks at the A lone single Dunlin was
Chestnut-Collared Longspur, discovered standing all alone
Orchard Oriole, Palm Warbler, and looked suspicious.  We
and the Clay-Colored Sparrow.  spent some time looking at this
On the way home we got a tip bird, but in the end it was a
from one of the parties who had lone Dunlin. 
to leave early that there had Group shot at the ocean. Ruth is on the far right. We also had high counts on
been a Tropical Kingbird also at Common and Red-Throated
Bowerman Basin.  In all the years that Patrick and ponds in Ocean Shores to grab a small  bird.  This Loons and returning Bufflehead ducks. We also
I birded, we never had 5 RARE BIRDS in one place.  happened so fast as we were busy studying a found all three Scoters, with the Black Scoter being
We ended the day with 72 Species.  We also were group of Short-Billed Dowitchers, but we were all kind of early, since they usually come back in early
lucky to have had good weather with plenty of thinking that the prey was the tiny female Green- November, but this
sunshine, so everything was in our favor. Winged Teal that we all adored, and the Teal was can vary from The elusive
  Here are some highlights  from our trip:  We not seen again.  In the ponds also was a Pectoral year to Tropical
saw a Peregrine Falcon dive down on the sewage Sandpiper.  Near the marina we had a good look at year.  King-
  We bird.
did not do
m u c h
around the
jetty since
the tide was
coming in, and
staying close to the
jetty we kind of got
swamped by the waves. 
There were a few Surfbirds
and a big flock of Black
Turnstones.  It was after 5
PM when we hit Bowerman
again looking for the Tropical
Photo/Ruth
Kingbird that was on Paulson Sullivan
Road.  Again this bird was not
found the next morning or
thereafter.  But still, it was a
record-breaking weekend for
rare birds that we will likely
Photo/Ruth Sullivan not experience again. 
Chestnut-Collared Longspur.

December 2009/January 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 7


Just the other day... Tahoma Audubon in November 1984
By Helen Engle up the bay and the role of individual Tabbutt of the League of Women Voters.

25
members of the public.  Thais Bock’s “Word on Birds” reported great
Tahoma Audubon’s 1984 Christmas We were scheduled to hear David winter birding. Ken Brown’s birding class went to
Bird Count was on December 15, Wurzbach tell of the recovery the Ocean Shores/Tokeland and saw Rough-legged
with our traditional count circle Years Ago Osprey, this interesting bird that exists Hawks, Brown Pelicans, Golden Plovers, Merlin,
divided in the traditional 8 areas.  almost solely on fish.  Elimination of the Long-billed Curlews, Marbled Godwits, and
Ken Brown was Chairman with the use of DDT has halted the ospreys’ Whimbrels.  At Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge
following count Leaders:  Joe Quinn, Thais decline and birders can see them again in their there were lots of raptors including Peregrine
Bock, Ken Batker/Fred Tobiason, Mary Jane nests along our rivers and lake shores. Falcons, Northern Harriers, Rough-legged and Red-
Cooper, Chris & Nate Chappell, Burt Ostenson, Our winter birding field trips were to Spanaway tailed Hawks; plus a Barn Owl and 6 Short-eared
Stan Johnson, and Betty Heitman.  The tally of North Woods with Jim Scearce; Bald Eagle survey Owls.  Many of us saw the Snowy Owl that sat on
the  bird lists was at a chili dinner, hosted by Stan with Kelly Mc Allister of the WA Game Dept. (now the roof of Nordstrom’s at the Tacoma Mall. 
& Helen Engle. Fish & Wildlife Dept.); nature study and games at Hummingbirds were seen in Spanaway and
The monthly meeting’s program was “Who is Titlow park with Thelma Gilmur; Bainbridge Island Steilacoom – some of the earliest to begin wintering
Watching Commencement Bay?” by Dr. Sheri with Thais Bock; and Wally Wilkins led a trip to in this area.
Tonn.  We realized this was the kickoff of Tahoma the Skagit river valley for eagles, swans and Snow Walt Adams’ boat trip gave TASers a great view
Audubon’s involvement in the cleanup of Geese. of marbled Murrelets, Common Murres, Rhinoceros
Commencement Bay, our very own Superfund site.  Jim Scearce kicked off his six-weeks course on Auklets, and Harlequin Ducks.
Dr. Tonn, a fellow Auduboner and Associate “The mammals of the Pacific Northwest” at James The December 1984/January 1985 Towhee was
Professor  of Chemistry at Pacific Lutheran University, Sales School. the work of the new editor,
presented a Our members attended an open forum co- Paul Webster.  We are
history of sponsored by the League of Women Voters and the familiar with his wonderful
conservation in Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department.  The articles as he worked
Commencement Forum’s theme was devoted to problems  influencing assisting Chuck Bergman,
Bay, including the health, economy and environment of our longtime Towhee editor. 
chemical and community.  You will remember them: The delightful line-drawings
biological studies, Ernesta Barnes, Region X Administrator the US of birds by Paul Porter
government EPA; Kim Lowry, UW, Ruston-Vashon Pathways continues to grace the pages
Helen Engle
a g e n c y Study; James Krull, Project Manager, of our excellent newsletter. from days of yore.
involvements, the Commencement Bay cleanup, WA Dept. of Ecology; 
Superfund as Christine Luboff, Regional Coordinator for Western Feedback, comments and reminiscences welcome,
Sheri Tonn, PhD. means to clean WA Toxics Coalition.  The moderator was Betty 253-564-3112, Hengle@iinet.com.

the
quizzical 1. Especially in winter what thrush is known for its solitary habits?

wl
2. The feathered "thumb" of a bird's wing is called an ________.

3. What name is given to a group of hawks with similar characteristics?

4. Only one of our small owls has dark eyes; which one is it?
By 5. What shorebirds gather food by flipping over shells, seaweed, and other small bits on the beach?
Thais Bock
(Answers below cartoon.)

BIRDSONGS
"We surveyed an even dozen
by Phil Buly full-sized birding scopes sent
to us by manufacturers as
their top-of-the-line scopes….
Perusing the prices, you may
catch yourself blinking. Can
you now really spend $4,000
on a spotting scope? Indeed
you can, and more than half
of those in our survey cost
more than $2,000….Are the
top scopes worth their price
tags? If you’ve got the mon-
ey, yes, of course! To be able
to see the vein detail in a ci-
cada’s wings, held in the bill
of a kingbird at 80 yards, is
an experience worth every
penny you’d pay for it."

From Bird Watchers Digest,


“High End Scopes,”
Michael and Diane Porter,
Nov/Dec 2009
ANSWERS: 1. Hermit Thrush 2. Alula 3. Buteo 4. Flammulated Owl 5. Turnstones

Page 8 www.tahomaaudubon.org December 2009/January 2010


Feathering the nest of the Tahoma Audubon Society
Feathered Nest Circle
Charter Members
As of 11/13/09
B irds instinctively know how to care for their young.  a beneficiary in his or her revocable estate plans (bequest,
They carefully line their nests with feathers to prepare insurance, retirement plan, etc.) or has made an irrevocable
warm and safe places for the next generation.  A well- “estate-type” gift (remainder or lead trust, charitable gift
feathered nest provides an ideal foundation for the young annuity, gift with retained life tenancy, etc.), either directly with
chicks to grow and develop.  Similarly, a growing Tahoma Audubon or through The Greater Tacoma
  (updated right before deadline)
number of Audubon members are Community Foundation for the Society’s
Anonymous (3) Members
preparing the foundation for our next benefit.  All those who notify Tahoma
Jane Brosius
generation of conservation leaders.  of the Feathered Audubon by December 31st, 2014 that
Helen Engle They are doing so by leaving a Nest Circle look be- they have done so will be perpetually
Bryan Flint
John Garner/Caroline Harris
planned gift to Tahoma Audubon.  yond the here and listed as Charter Members of this
To honor these visionaries we ongoing group. 
Thelma and Chuck Gilmur have created the Feathered Nest
now to the work of If you have designated Tahoma
Marjorie Griffin* Circle. Previously, Tahoma connecting future Audubon for a planned gift and we
Noel and Bill Hagens Audubon’s Endowment Club generations are not aware of it, or if you are
Frances Heidner* honored those who planned to give with nature. interested in doing so please contact
David R. Hirst to the Society’s endowment in their Bryan Flint at (253) 565-9129 or
Jean McCord estate plans.  This new group incorporates bryanflint@TahomaAudubon.org. We would
Guy and Cecile Montgomery Endowment Club members and also honors all love to give you the recognition you deserve.  Or
Gary and Sharon Nestegard
those who will be helping Tahoma Audubon through their your commitment can remain anonymous. Those not
estate plans, whether for endowment or other purposes. choosing anonymity will be listed in the Feathered Nest Circle
Melissa and Jamie Paulson
Members of the Feathered Nest Circle look beyond the here section of the annual report in perpetuity and will be
Donna Cooper Pepos*
and now to the work of connecting future generations with recognized at fundraising events and annual membership
Sarah C. Sloat
nature.  Members will receive a beautiful color print of an banquet.
Beatrice E. Thompson* original watercolor by noted wildlife artist Dale Thompson.  We are grateful to those who have joined us as Charter
Darby Veeck/Kristin Lynett The sole criterion for membership is notification in writing Members of the Feathered Nest Circle. Together we are building
*Deceased 
to Tahoma Audubon that the person has included the Society as the next generation of conservation leaders.

Photo Illustration/Robert Kelton

December 2009/January 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 9


Coming full circle at
Photo/Allen Frazier

Nisqually
Story and photos by Heather Roskelley

A
s if on cue for the ceremony, estuary was restored, and then work-
an eagle circled overhead as ing diligently with the community and
Nisqually tribal members various groups to see it happen.
drummed and sang on this Takekawa told the attendees that in
brisk but sunny November day. the short time since October, when the
Both speakers and attendees gazed tides were allowed to flow freely, it’s
up at the great bird, and I’m sure each amazing to see that “the estuary is
person was thinking the same as me: already evolving and the land is heal-
can it be more perfect? Nisqually tribal ing.”
elder, Zelma McCloud, noted just before Nisqually Tribal Chair, Cynthia Iyall,
she gave the tribal blessing that eagles spoke about how her people believe
are important to her people, and today that all rocks, plants and animals have
the eagles were flying over us, giving us spirits, so it is fitting that the longest
their blessing. historical slough will now bear the
So began the ribbon-cutting ceremony name Leschi Slough, in honor of Chief
that took place on November 12 marking Leschi of the Nisqually Indian Tribe.
the restoration of the Nisqually estuary. Over 300 was dazzled by the illuminated image of a Pileated The slough will be officially registered as a geo-
people came to celebrate the return of the tides Woodpecker through Phil’s Swarovski scope. I real- graphic feature in the State of Washington.
and to hear speeches from representatives of the ized that Nisqually still has treasures to witness, After the ribbon was cut, we walked the new half
Nisqually Tribe, Ducks Unlimited, the U.S. Fish and albeit in a smaller area. mile Nisqually Estuary Trail. More area, Phil noted,
Wildlife Service, Congressman Norm Dicks and his For the ceremony, Phil and several other Audubon for the weekly Audubon walks. I came to the end
son David Dicks, the Executive Director of Puget members set up their scopes on the new exterior marked by a gate and looked out over the flooded
Sound Partnership, and representatives of the dike just past the Twin Barns. The area to the north- fields dotted here and there with stranded apple
Governor and Congressman Adam Smith. east of the dike is largely bare at present except for trees, the old dike trail nowhere to be seen in the
I felt like I had come full circle since April, when snags set up for raptors, but it will be replanted with distance.
I had walked the 5-1/2 mile Brown Farm Dike Trail native bushes and trees to provide a riparian surge As I turned back, I saw Michelle Tirhi, the district
for the last time before it closed permanently on plain forest – a great habitat for songbirds. biologist for Pierce and Thurston Counties with the
May 4, 2009. It was hard to say goodbye. I was pleased to see Cheri, a Nisqually volunteer Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. I had
Like many birders and naturalists, I loved the old with whom I had commiserated while walking the spoken with Michelle and several other biologists at
loop trail and was deeply saddened when I learned last days of the loop trail. Today, Cheri was forward the BioBlitz held in May and was finally convinced
it was to be demolished. Walking the loop and see- looking. “They’ll start building the mile-long board- that the estuary restoration was the right thing to
ing a river otter, a flock of shovelers and wigeons, or walk to the mouth of McAllister Creek next year,” do.
a heron gracefully walking through the reeds never she said, “and there’s supposed to be a gazebo at “This is a big day for all of us,” said Michelle.
failed to clear my head and lighten my spirit. the end, which will be a nice addition.” And it was a big day for Nisqually. I could imag-
I didn’t return to Nisqually until the beginning of Many of the speakers during the ceremony cred- ine the delta waiting to exhale for over a hundred
November, when I attended the weekly Audubon ited Jean Takekawa, the Nisqually NWR Refuge years, and now it finally happened. Nisqually had
walk led by Phil Kelley. A new Audubon member, I Manager, with asking 10 years ago “what if” the come full circle.

Top photo: Nisqually tribal drummers lead the ceremony. Above left: Jean Takekawa, Nisqually NWR Refuge Manager, addresses over 300 attendees at the ceremony
celebrating the restoration of the Nisqually estuary. Front row from left: Congressman Norm Dicks; Jay Manning, Chief of Staff for Governor Gregoire; and Cynthia Iyall,
Tribal Chair for the Nisqually Indian Tribe. Above right: Nisqually tribal elder Zelma McCloud gives the tribal blessing while Jay Manning and Cynthia Iyall look on.

Page 10 www.tahomaaudubon.org December 2009/January 2010


The amazingly self-reliant people of Graham
By Wayne Cooke quadricycle out of PVC pipe… and on and on
 
and on… amazing people!
“The Self Reliant Community promotes
Gail Tverberg, writing in The Oil Drum,
knowledge of skills that will add to
says “Many people have started making

Image from group's website, scallopswa.org


people’s self-reliance for basic needs, both
preparation for the time when food needs to
for their own satisfaction and if there is a
be produced locally and electricity is often
breakdown in the dependable supply of
not available.”
food and fuel.”
  The Self Reliant Community of Graham
This is the mission statement of a group suggests “Seven Things” people can do to
of citizens in Graham who take seriously prepare: 1) Build a greenhouse, 2) Know
the challenge of providing for themselves neighbors well, 3) Grow Food, 4) Preserve
and their families without depending on food for winter, 5) Prepare a “warm room,”
outside resources. They grow as much of 6) Install a rain barrel, 7) Have a good
their own food as they can, have a bicycle.
backup water supply, have a bicycle to The Self Reliant Community provides
use for emergency transportation, and workshops to teach these things, and more,
can take care of their family in a lengthy to the public. They realize that many of
electricity outage. They believe in living these skills were commonly known a century
sustainably as much as possible. In fact, the group ago, but now are largely replaced by the dependence
is one of seventy groups in the Puget Sound area on stores and utilities.
loosely connected to SCALLOPS (Sustainable Yet many people today recognize the long-term
Communities ALL Over Puget Sound). William show us their permaculture-designed unsustainable reality of our highly organized food and
These people wouldn’t describe themselves as garden, their farm animals, and the non-electric power networks and seek pride and comfort in being
amazing, but when Jerry shows off his home-built workshop, one is amazed at their practical self- able to fend for themselves if necessary. That, and
biodiesel generator and solar energy designs, one sufficiency. Deej has become an expert on growing the enjoyment of knowing each other as friends, is
can only say, “amazing.” When Anuttama and mushrooms and Roy can build you a street-legal what the Self Reliant Community is all about.

welcome to New and Returning Members


October 16, 2009 to November 15, 2009
Chapter New and Renewing: Kristy Gledhill, Jim Halmo, Maralise Hood,
Julie Anderson, Karen & Stan Bloustine, Micki Roger Hunt, Monty Mahan, Pat MCarty, Jim
Boyle, Laurie Bruineis, L Delamaza, Andrew Merritt, Owen Miller MD, Ian Morrison, Dan-
Ebersole, Ernest L Karlstrom, David Kemp, Annie iel Muir, Linda Nielsen, Mark Rettmann,
Meyer, Kathleen Olson, Ron & Helen Robinson, Skye Schell, Luke Smiraldo, Nancy Smith,
Tom Skjyerweld, Linda Zehnder. Edie Sperling & Chris Gilliard, Bruce
Stirling, Kay Townsend, Lauren Walker,
Chapter Joint with National, Marilyn Westervelt, Sarah Wilcox.
Recruited through Tahoma Audubon Society: Towhee Subscribers:
Ken Batker, Susan Behrns, Patricia Berger, Nels & Introductory, Glenn Savitz, Frank & Adeline Ehle.
Winnie Bjarke, Kathleen Callahan, Louise Kazda Recruited through National Audubon Society:
Carson, Philip & Karen Craven, Eric Davis, Bob Jennie Allen, Cindy Bailey, Rob & Michelle Baird, Time to Renew?! Remember when renewal time
Flint & Letha Schwiesow, Bryan Flint, Burt & Do- Laura Barnes, Kathy Best, Barb Bourscheidt, Jor- comes, you must renew through TAS. We will send
ris Johnson, Pam McGee & Dale Leggett, Annie dan Bowerman, Erida Bowles, Carolyn Chapman, you a renewal form a month before your member-
Meyer, Mary Pat Minor, Robin S Conway, Kay Kallal, George Dolley, The Dunlap ship expires. You may get several renewal forms
Partington, Wilma Rosenow, Ruth Stevick, David Family, Eric & Lisa Ellis, Cathy Farr & Kids, War- from NAS that we ask you to ignore because re-
& Julie Veeck, Debbie Young. ren N Finch, Loretta Franks, Nadine Fuller, Bryan newing through NAS will not give you our Towhee
Habeck, Avis Jobrack, Lila Keller, Mary Kenney, newsletter. NAS does not share renewal dues with
Introductory, Candace L Kerr, George Kier, Joni Leiding, Frank us and hence we can not maintain a membership.
Recruited through Tahoma Audubon Society: Longano, Patricia C Lynch, Robert & Irene Mills,
Bill Anderson, Andrew Austin, Judy Berry, Bryan Mathew & Andrea Murakami, Suzanne Olson, Christmas and other Holidays are Coming!
Bissell, Stacey Cachules, Lisa Campos, Michelle Leslie Pearson, Debbie Pope, Clifford H. Quisen- An Audubon membership is a good gift idea! Call
Cardinaux, Maggie Corbin, Philip Cowan, Nancy berry, Jennifer Radley, Cecilia Roebuck, Dannie and ask for materials to put together for a gift pack-
Davis, Beth Elliott, Andy Estep, Kit Evans, Joe, Lee Sayers, Lance & Sally Stark, Daniel Suckow, age. Call: Thelma Gilmur, Membership Chair,
Flora, Katelyn & Ryan Galloway, Sarah Garitone, Bob Wells, Betty Weynick. 253-564-8210
Checks payable to: Tahoma Audubon 2917 Morrison
Rd. W. University Place, 98466 Tahoma Audubon
Society, established in 1969, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit

Membership Fee:
___ Introductory (first year) $20
___ Joint National/Tahoma Audubon $50
organization. Donations are tax deductible.

Membership

___
___
Chapter member renewal
Other Contributions _____________
$30

Tahoma Audubon is the Pierce County chapter of National Audubon. As


an Introductory member of Tahoma Audubon you also receive a National Member(s) Name: _______________________________________
Audubon membership and Audubon Magazine for one year. Renewing Address: _______________________________________________
your Chapter Membership ensures that we can continue to do our work in
Pierce County. Chapter membership includes: Towhee newsletter sub- City______________________________ Zip__________________
scription, free family events, birding trip invitations, class & book dis- Phone: home ___________________business _________________
counts, conservation activities, annual celebrations and more. Joint TAS/
e-mail: ________________________________________________
National Audubon membership includes: Chapter membership, National
C9ZY020Z

membership, annual Audubon Magazine subscription, and support of


Member #: _______________________________ (office use only)
Important Bird Areas (IBA) and state and national conservation agendas.

December 2009/January 2010 www.tahomaaudubon.org Page 1


Calendar
Unless otherwise stated - Adriana Hess Wetland Park. Come enjoy the outdoors and help
beautify the grounds at Adriana Hess Wetland Park! december program
To register for field trips can (253) 565-9129  
To register for all education classes call (253) 591-6439 Membership Meeting Fri Dec 11 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
See further descriptions inside the Towhee Fri Dec 11 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Location: Tacoma Nature Center, 1919 S. Tyler
Check out our calendar at www.TahomaAudubon.org Location: Tacoma Nature Center, 1919 S. Tyler Street. Monthly
Street. Monthly membership meeting of Tahoma
membership meeting of Tahoma Audubon.  All welcome. 
for more information and updates Audubon.  All welcome.  Kathryn Kravit-Smith,
Kathryn Kravit-Smith, Director Pierce County Parks and Rec.
Department, will talk about the vision of Parks in Pierce County Director Pierce County Parks and Rec. Department,

december 2009 and the services they provide along with the challenges that lay
ahead.  Call (253) 565-9278.
 
will talk about the vision of Parks in Pierce County
and the services they provide along with the
challenges that lay ahead.  Call (253) 565-9278
Intermediate Birder's Class Bird Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park
Tues Dec 1 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM Mon Dec 14, 2009 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM. Enjoy a guided
Continuation of class. bird walk through the park! Adriana Hess Wetland Park. Come enjoy the outdoors and help
    beautify the grounds at Adriana Hess Wetland Park!
Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually Snake Lake Science club  
Weds Dec 2 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM Tues Dec 15 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM. Adriana Hess Park Photography class
Location: Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ages 10-14, no charge for club Mon Jan 4 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Leader: Phil Kelley meetings, $10 per student to join the club. Pre-registration for Location: Adriana Hess Park. Call Dixie Harris 564-6373.
 
 Bring: Good walking shoes or boots, raingear, water, snacks, and each program is required as space is limited. Call The Nature Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually
$3   for entry fee unless you have a pass.  Scopes are welcome. Center to register 591-6439.
  Weds Jan 6 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Meet: At the Visitor's Center.
Weekly Bird Walk at Nisqually Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge. Leader: Phil Kelley.
Directions:  Take I-5 south from Tacoma and exit to Nisqually  
NWR at exit 114.  Take a right at the light. Sign-up:  Call or email Weds Dec 16 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM TGIF Restoration Activity.
Phil Kelley to confirm details.   Phil Kelley, Lacey, (360) 459- Location: Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge. Leader: Phil Fri Jan 8 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM. 
1499, scrubjay323@aol.com. Kelley. See above for details. Adriana Hess Wetland Park. Come enjoy the outdoors and help
   
Homeschool Advanced Science «The Ecosphere» beautify the grounds at Adriana Hess Wetland Park!
Beginning Homeschool Science «Planet Earth»  
Thu Dec 3 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM Thu Dec 17 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM Membership Meeting
Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ages 8-10, $12 per student. Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Contact Margie with questions Fri Jan 8 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Register early! Note - topics are repeated during the month, so or for more information at 591-6439 or marjories@tacomaparks. Location: Tacoma Nature Center, 1919 S. Tylor Street. Monthly
select class appropriate for your child's knowledge and abilities. com. Ages 12-15, $15 per student. Older homeschool students membership meeting of Tahoma Audubon.  All welcome.  This
Contact Margie with questions or for more info: 591-6439 or will continue science studies with challenging experiments and month David Knibb will be speaking about his book, «Grizzly
marjories@tacomaparks.com. Students should be able to add and activities. To participate in this class, students should be able to Wars: The Public Fight Over the Great Bear» that highlights the
subtract numbers. calculate averages, percentages, and simple equations. efforts to preserve the remaining grizzly bears that range through
   
TGIF Restoration Activity. the North Cascades. 
TGIF Restoration Activity.  
Fri Dec 4 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM.  Fri Dec 18 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM.  Environmental Legislative Workshop
Adriana Hess Wetland Park. Come enjoy the outdoors and help Adriana Hess Wetland Park. Come enjoy the outdoors and help Sat Jan 9 9:30 AM to 2:30 PM
beautify the grounds at Adriana Hess Wetland Park! beautify the grounds at Adriana Hess Wetland Park! Location: Seattle Pacific University. Attend the annual
   
Nature Storytime «Let's go to Africa!» Environmental Priorities Coalition Legislative Workshop as the
Nature Alphabet «Q is for Queens»
Fri Dec 18 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM state’s leading conservation groups prepare for the upcoming
Fri Dec 4 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM
Location: Adriana Hess Center, U.P. Ages 2-6, $6 per child, $3 legislative session. We'll hear from legislators, environmental
Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ages 3-6, $6 per child. Adult
Audubon member, free to adults and U.P residents. Adults are lobbyists, members of the media and others regarding the
participation is recommended, children under four require an
welcome with the children. Space is limited to the first 20 community's four legislative priorities.
adult present. Please note alternating times.
registered guests (adults and children). call 253-591-6439. The legislative workshop is hosted by Washington Environmental
Register by Saturday before program. Call 591-6439.  
  Council. Space is limited, so register online: http://www.
Winter Birding in Roy Homeschool Advanced Science LAB «The Ecosphere» wecprotects.org/events/legislative-workshop. Contact Kerri
Sat Dec 5 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM Fri Dec 18, 2009 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM Cechovic, WEC Organizer, at 206-622-8103 x 212 or kerri@
Location: Roy, WA Carpooling from University of Puget Sound's Location: Tacoma Nature Center.Register early! Note - topics are wecprotects.org with any questions.
repeated during the month, so select class appropriate for your  
Thompson parking lot off Union & N. 14th at 7:15am. If not
child's knowledge and abilities. Contact Margie with questions or Bird Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park
carpooling, meet at Roy City Park at 8:00am. Call 565-9278 to
for more info at 591-6439 or marjories@tacomaparks.com. Mon Jan 11 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
sign up or for driving directions.  
  Ages 12-15, $15 per student. Older homeschool students will Conservation Committee
Adriana Hess Park Photography Class continue their science studies with challenging experiments and Tues Jan 12 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM
Mon Dec 7 12:00 PM to 3:00 PM activities. To participate in this class, students should be able to Location: Pacific Lutheran University, Reike 112, Parkland WA.
Location: Adriana Hess Park. An adult program encouraging calculate averages, percentages, and solve simple equations.  
people to appreciate nature and how to incorporate it into their   Volunteer Naturalists: Intro to Interpretation
photography. Call Dixie Harris for details 564-6373. Nature Alphabet «R is for Reindeer» Tues Jan 12 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
  Fri Dec 18 1:30 PM to 2:30 PM.  
Christmas Irisfolding Card Class Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Ages 3-6, $6 per child Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually
Mon Dec 7 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM  Adult participation is recommended, children under four require Weds Jan 13 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM
Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center. Cost $12 per person to an adult present. Please note alternating times. Register by Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge. Leader: Phil Kelley.
be paid at class. Supplies needed:  a small scissors, Scotch Brand  
Saturday before program. Call 591-6439. Budding Scientists «I am a Scientist»
Magic tape (green dispenser), and a small craft mat (if you have  
one). Call Adriana Hess Audubon Center @ 565-9278 to reserve Plant Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park Weds Jan 13 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM, 3:15 PM to 4:45 PM
your spot.  For more details, call Rosanne Becker @ 564-7115. Mon Dec 21 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM Location: Adriana Hess. Location: Adriana Hess Center. Ages 5-7, $9.00 per student.
    Register at least two days prior to session -253-591-6439.
Conservation Committee  
Christmas Bird Count Beginning Homeschool Science «Let's Talk Science»
Tues Dec 8 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM Sat December 19, 2009 Contact Faye McAdams Hands,  253-
Location: Pacific Lutheran U. Reike 112, Parkland WA. Thu Jan 14 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM
  942-9233,  or zest4parus@hotmail.com for details. Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Register early! Contact Margie
Intermediate Birder's Class with questions or for more information at 591-6439 or marjories@
Tues Dec 8 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM. Continuation of class. Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually tacomaparks.com. Beginning science students should be able to
  Weds Dec 23 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM. Location: Nisqually add and subtract numbers.
Weekly Bird Walk at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge. Leader: Phil Kelley.  
Weds Dec 9 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM. Location: Nisqually   TAS Board Meeting
National Wildlife Refuge. Leader: Phil Kelley. Vashon Island Christmas Bird Count Thu Jan 14 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM
  Sun December 27. Contact Diane Yorgason-Quinn at  253-857- Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center. Monthly Meeting of the
Budding Scientists «World of Wonder» 3367  or email avosetta@hotmail.com for further information
  Tahoma Audubon Board.  Guest Welcome, please call ahead at
Weds Dec 9 10:30 AM to 12:00 PM, 3:15 PM to 4:45 PM
Family Walk at Adriana Hess Park (253) 565-9278.
Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center. Ages 5-7, $9.00 per  
student. Register at least two days prior to the session by calling Sun Dec 27 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM. Location: Adriana Hess Park. TGIF Restoration Activity.
253-591-6439. Call Dixie Harris for details 564-6373 Fri Jan 15 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM. 
   
Weekly Bird Walks at Nisqually Adriana Hess Wetland Park. Come enjoy the outdoors and help
Intermediate Homeschool Science
Weds Dec 30 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM. Location: Nisqually beautify the grounds at Adriana Hess Wetland Park!
«Think Globally, Act Locally»  
Thu Dec 10 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM  National Wildlife Refuge. Leader: Phil Kelley.   Volunteer Naturalists: Intro To Interpretation
 
Location: Tacoma Nature Center. Register early! Contact Margie Sat Jan 16 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM.
Morse WinterFest  
with questions or for more information at 591-6439 or marjories@
Weds  Dec 30 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM Plant Walk at Adriana Hess Wetland Park
tacomaparks.com. Ages 10-12, $12 per student. Intermediate
Location: Morse Wildlife Preserve Mon Jan 18, 2010 from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Science Students should be able to multiply and divide numbers,
Join us to celebrate the natural beauty and wonder of the winter Location: Adriana Hess Wetland Park.
add and subtract fractions.
  season at the Morse Wildlife Preserve in Graham. Families can
TAS Board Meeting enjoy nature hikes, games, crafts, storytellers, wildlife discovery
Thu Dec 10 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM and hot cocoa! Call 253-565-9278 for more details
 
Mark your calendars now!
january 2010
Location: Adriana Hess Audubon Center. Monthly Meeting of the What: Annual Membership Meeting and Banquet
Tahoma Audubon Board.  Guest Welcome, please call ahead at
(253) 565-9278. When: Saturday, February 6th, 2010
 
TGIF Restoration Activity.
Where: McGavick Student Center at CPTC
TGIF Restoration Activity.
Fri Dec 11 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM.  Fri Jan 1 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM.  (See page 2 for more details!)

For additional information:Tahoma Audubon - 253-565-9278; or www.tahomaaudubon.org Or The Tacoma Nature Center:253-591-6439 or www.metroparkstacoma.org