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SPE 24630

Evaluation of Horizontal, Radial, and Vertical Injection Wells


Sorktyof PatrobwnEnglneer8
1
in a Pilot Steamflood
S-M. Bulier, Unocai Corp.
SPE Member r
Copyright 1992, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc.

Thta paper was prepared for preaantatlon at the 67th Annual Taohnlcal ConIafenoa and Exhibition of the Society of Petroleum Engineers held In Washington, 00, Or20bar 4-7, 1S62,

This papar was W1OCM for presentation by an SPE Program Committee following review of lnforrnatlon confained in an abatraaf aubmltfed by the author(s). Contenls of the prqwr,
aa preaenled, hava not been reviewed by the Soolety of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to corraotlon by the author(s). The material, aa preaantad, doaa not naceaaarlly reflaot
BITYW@tkrn of the S@@ Of PetrolaumEn91neare, It$ Offlcere, w M@WS. Pawfa Pfaaantadat SpE meetings are aublaot to publication review by Editorial Committees of the SOC!ety
of PeWAaum En@nears, Parrnia$ion to copy la reatricfad to an abafraot of not more than S09 wc+ds. Matratlonfr may not be cop!ed. The abatraat shoufd contain oonapkwua aoknowtadgmant
o! where and by whom tha papar is presented. Write Llbrarkm, SPE, P.O. Sox 833636, Richardson, TX 76023-SS36 U.S.A. Telex, 724920 SPEDAL,

ABSTRACT ioca!lzed,previouslyunswept,portion of the thick, sub-


homogeneousreservoirbeing steamflooded, To date,
A unique pilot steamfio~dIncorporatesone horizontal, the radiaiweii has been Usedas a huff-n-puffproducer.
one radiai, and three vert!cai steam injection weils, Despite the short steam injection periods, producers
The horizontal and radiai weiis were designed to surrounding the weii have responded dramatlcaiiy.
aiievlatesteam overrideand improve sweepefficiency. Observationweii data, ratesfrom offset producers,and
The horizontal injector is a medium radius weii with temperatures in the offset producers confirm that the
400 of completion In the horizontalsection. The radiai verticai injectors are distributing heat and affecting oii
weii has four compieted, near-horizontal, uitra-silort production iess effectively than the horizontal and
radius Iaterais driiled within a short verticai section. radia! methods.
The verticai injectors are conventional completions,
with perforationsin one or two sand iobes. Production lNTROLXJCTiON
data from offset producers, injection profiie data,
produced fluid and downhoie temperaturedata, and a UnocalsBremerFee is iocated in the northern portion
comprehensive iog suite conducted on three of the Midway Sunset Fieid, approximately 35 miies
temperature observation weiis.were used to compare west of Bakersfield,California(Figtire 1). The property
the three injection strategies. Whiie a significant consists of 360 acres entireiywithin Section 16,T31S,
increase in oii production has not yet been seen, R22E, MDB&M, Approximately 180 acres are
changes in water production, cut and flowiine productive, Current production averages5,000 BOPf3
temperature provide ciear indicationsthat many of the from 247 producing weiis, Aithough the fvlafvic, Dn
offsets are being affected by steam injection, Channei and Speilacy horizons have been produced
sporadically,aii production from the iease is currentiy
Tt,e piiot steamflood is located in a 5.acre area in the from the Potter formation,
southwest portion of Unocals Bremer lease, Midway
Sunset Field. The steamfloodtargets the Mio-Pliocene Primarydevelopment began in 1966, Cyclic steaming
age Potter formation, a highly permeabie sand in the southwestern area of the lease was Initiated in
comprisedof massivedebris and grainflows deposited 1976, Up until initiation of the pitot steamflood in l=,
as proximalsubmarinefans. The piiot and surrounding the area hadbeen successfullyproduced under cyclic
areas have been cyclically steamedfor over 10 years, stimulation oniy. Steamffooding in the northeast
The pilot steamflood has been in place for just under portion of the leasewas initiatedin the late 1970s,with
2 years. In addition to comparisons within the piiot a major expansion in 1980-1983. At the start of the
area, comparisons are afso made wfth the eastern piiot steamflood project, Iogderived oif saturations in :
portion of the lease which has been successfully unswept areas were ciose to initial, imptyfng that
stearnffoodedfor over 10 years, significant steam channeling had occurred during
CyCiiC operations. This, aiong with comparisons wfth,

The horizontal injector has efficiently heated a ve~ ths successful steamflood in the northeast, provided
-- . ......... .. . ....... .................................. .... the incentive for ststamffooding in the southwest.
Referencesand illustrationsat end of paper. Verticaldiscontinuities in the sands were recognbmd, .
45 ,., ,.
..
. . .. ,!
-, *.,

EVALUATIONOF HORIZONTAL,RADIAL AND VERTICAL INJECTION WELLS


2 IN A PILOT STEAMFLOOD SPE24630
., [

provldlngfurther evidencethat injectingthe steam into temperature range of 150F to 250 F, viscosityvaries
unswept zones could provide Incrementalreserves. from 520 cp to 25 cp. Current reservoir pressure in
the southwestarea of the iease ranges from 50 to 150 .
The pilot steamflood consists of six inverted five-spot PSI.Table 1 providesa summaryof pertinent reservoir
patternson approximately5/8-acre spacing (Figure2). data.
Two of the patterns are affected by horizontal injector
1-49. Three vertical Injectors (!-50, I-51, and 1-52) PILC)TDESCRIPTION
impact three connecting patterns. Radial well RI-53
affects four producers separated from the other The location of the pilot was chosen to (1) provide
patterns by one well spacing, similarstructuralposition among the injectors,thereby
facilitating comparisons between injection methods,
RESERVOIR,CHARACTERISTICS and (2) maximizefuture development potential. Four
new injectors, one radial cycilc producer, and three
Q@Q9Y obsetvatlon wells were drilled in May and June 1990.
Detailed information on the drilling of these wells can
The Mio-Plioceneage Potter formation Is a massive be found in Reference1., The seventeendirect offsets
sand sequence deposited in a shallow water (producers)were drilled between 1977and 1984;eight
environmentas grain and debris flow turbiciites. The were dd!led in 1984.
Potterunconformablyoverliesthe Antelope Shale. The
Tulare formation truncates the top of the Potter, Well I-49, is ~ medium radius horizontal well. Tots! .
causing the Potter to pinch out in a northeast- measured depth is 1,480 at a vertical depth of 937.
southwest direction approximately 800 north of the The well is completed in the Potter C zone with 400
pilot area. A typical induction/GR log is shown in of slotted iiner in the horizontal section (Figure 5),
Figure 3. Although it was drilled as a continuous injector, an ,
~fiernpt Wasmade to produce the well. After several
Structure on the property is a southeast trending pwnp changes required due to sand production, s
homocline with a dip of 10, increasing to 30 at the 5,000 MMBTU steam aycle and a foam cfeanout,
base of the productive interval. There are no econom!c rates were not achieved. The well was
recognized faults, Top Potter in the pilot area is at placed on continuous injection In Ju!y 1990 at rates
approximately +1,500 s,s., 250 TYD. consistent with the other new injectors but at a lower
tubhg pressure,
The Potter averages650 in thickness in the pilot area,
of which approximately 400 are currently productive, W,?ll Ri.53 was dri[l~ as a joint lfnocai/
The remainingPotter sand is steam/air saturated, The Petrolphyslcs/DOE project.2a Eight ultra-short radius
Potteris separatedbydiatomaceous claysor siltstones radialswere drilled in the vertical sectiori between881
into the B and C zones. The existenceof separate and 885 MD (Figure6). The radiais ranged in length
steamchestsbelow !hese Individualsilts suggests that from 14 to 103. Four of the radials were completed,
these zones serve.as permeabilitybarriers. one witha flexible sand barrier (FSB)4,two with gravel
packs and one with a gravel pack around coiled tubing
Rock and Fluid Pro~erties which was cut and left In place. While odglnally
intended to be a continuous injector, productkm
The base of the productive interval contains following the wells first steam cycle was encouraging
conglomeratlc, poorly-sorted, coarse-gralned sands. enough to warrant an extended production test. The
Upper Potter sands tend to be better sorted and well.was subsequently cycled a second time and has
contain less conglomeratlc materiaL Average produced a total of 22,00080 to date.
overburden-correcte@porosity across the interval is
28%. Air permeabilitlesrangefrom 1,000to 6,000 md. Conventionalvertical injectors 1-50,i-51, and 1-52were
Leaseaverage initial ofl saturation is 61%. completed with 5-1/# aasingc6mentedto surfaceand
perforated in one or two intervalswith one shot every
The 11.4API gravity oil, typicai of the northern end of 2 feet (Figure7). Observationwei!s 0-2,0-3, and O-5
the Midway Sunset Field, shows significant were completed with 5-1/2 casing cemented to
biodegradation, Viscosity variation with temperature surface.
(Figure 4) indicates that at the current resewolr

.,,
,,...
SPE 24$30 S. M. BULLER

PILOT EVALUATION patterns seem to have responded to continuous


injection. For instance,Bremer 102 (Figure 12) shows
Producers a fahly constant net rate since 1-50and I-51 went on
iine. The well has not been cycied for almost three
Production response was evaluated using data yearsand still exhibitsa flowline temperature of 17SF.
acquired on a daily basis (measured totai fluid rate, However,just downdip from 102, Bremer 189 (Figure
oakulated oii rate, measured cut and measured 13) has shown a negative responsq water cuts are
flowlinetemperature),calculatedmonthly averagedata approaching 100%,unaccompanied by an Increasein
(gross,net and cut), and annulartemperaturesurveys. gross production. This type of response is a classic
Pilot production is also compared to production from indicaticm of steam channeling and premature
the existing steamflood, breakthrough at the producer. Since this wet! is
downdip from the injectors, a Iocaiized steamchest
.. i)ailv Production Data might have been present in the area around the well,
Based on daily production data, sevetd welis have enabiing the steam to travel against the natural updip
exhibited an obvious response to continuous steam preference.
injection in i-49. For instance,Bremer 183sgross rate
has remained steady since horizontal well 1-49 was Thistype of analysisis admittedly vei-~subjebtfve,and
placed on injeotion (Figure8). Oii production is on an is aiways clouded by interference from steam cycles,
incline. Flowfine temperature is 50F higher than mechanical problems, inaccurate well tests, etc. ~ ,
before injection began in 1-49,and has remained high. Keepingthis subjectivityin mind, an attemptwas made
Cloudingthe anaiysis,however,is the fact that the well to graphicallysummarizethe effects of steam injection
was cyofed two months after i-49 went on iine. on each producer (Figure 14). Changes In oil
Despite that fact, it is obvious that the well is not production, oii rate decline, flowtine temperature,and
showing the response typical of cyclic steam; it is cut are depicted in four quadrants of a circle
thereforeassumedthat the responseis due to injection surrounding the wail. A plus sign (+) indioates a
in i-49. positive response, e.g. oil production higher than
before steam injection started, deciine rate shaflower,
Analysis of other wells is not as ciear cut, For flowfine temperature up, cut down. in sores cases,
instance, Brerner 103 (Figure 9) appeared to be decline rate is lower ~+ for decline), but oif
responding to injection in i-49 just prior to being production is not actuaffy higher than before
steamed In January ~991. Gross prwiuction then continuous injection started (production quadrant left
dropped in a typicai cyclic fashion. The well was blank). A minus sign (-) indicates a negative
steamedagain in January 1992and [s showing a good response,e.g. cut higher. A zero (O)indicates no
initial response. discernible impact, whiie a question mark (?) is used
when the effects of steam injection are masked by
Two wells in RI-53spattern responded dramaticallyto interference from a steam cycle or mechanical
the radial wells second steam cycle. Whether this problems.
responsewas not seen until the second cycle is due to
Ihe unusually large volume of heat injected (10,000 Pattern averageflowline temperaturesare also shown
MMBTU compared to a typica} verticai we!! cycle of in Figure 14. The southern horizontal wail pattern
5,000 MMBTU)or simply beckuse it would take more exhibitsthe highesttemperature;the radialwell pattarn
than the first cycies 5,4oO MMBTU to estab!ish exhibits the !owest temperature, consistent with that
communicationwith the offsets, is unciear. Bremer42 weiis status as a cyclic producer.
(Figu?e10), downdip of the radial weil, responded to
RI-53ssecond cycle as if~ was the weflthat had been Analysis of this daily data indioates that while several
steamed. Bremer 190, basically on strike with RI-53, wells have exhibited an obvious response to
responded similarfy. 6remer 106 (Figure 11), updip continuous steam Injection,the data does not support
from RI-53,showed only a vety brief spike in the gross any conclusions regarding the effectiveness of one
aryf net rate, fottow@ by a characteristk response to injeotlon scheme over the others. Even though two of
fts November 1990 cycie. The fourth weft in the the wefls in RI-53spattern responded dramaticallyto
pattern, Bremer 191, slightly updip from RI-53, also the radial wefts second cycle, injection perkds were
. showed very little impact from cycles in RI-53. short and the effects once continuous Injeotion Is
started cannot be inferred. In all Mterns th9re are
Several of the eiaht weiis in the vertioal inieotor wells that have shown resoonse as-well as those that
EVALUATIONOF HORIZONTAL,RADIAL AND VERTICAL INJECTION WELLS
4 IN A PILOTSTEAMFLOOD SPE 24830

havenot. Ingeneral, updipproducers arerespondlng The spike is almost non-existent in the well furthest
no better or worse than downdip producers. south in the pattern (Bremer 151), and peak
temperature in that wel! Is 13F lower. This trend
Indicatesthat heat injection Isdecreasingwith distance
Monthlv Production Data along the horizontal completion. To confirm these
Monthlyproduction datawas analyzedin three groups: results, a direct measurement of the steam injection
1) the horizontal Injector with its SIX surrounding profilethrough coiled tubing production logging will be
producers,2) the three vertical Injectionwellswith their attempted in the near future.
eight immediate offsets, and 3) the radial well with its
four surrounding producers, Figures 15 through 17 A similarcross section Incorporatingthe downd!p wells
Include production rates, steam injection rates, and the out-of-pattern producer,(Bremer261) reveals
instantaneoussteam oil ratio (SOR)and water cuts for a much less pronounced heated zone in the horizontal
each group. $lnce the radial well has to date been patterns (Figure 19). Peak temperatures are 25 to
used only as a cyclic producer, that groups
production is not Indicativeof responseto continuous
Injectlort. The three vertical well patterns were
30F less than in the updip wells,

Temperaturedata for the wells in the vertical patterns


I
grouped together to facilitate comparisons between is sparse (two wells could not be suweyed) and
injection strategies. Attemptsto quantify the response difficuit to interpret, On the updlp side (Figure 18),
of individual vertical well patterns are not inc!uded in Bremer 150A shows a temperature rise in the same
this report. stratlgraphic Interval that is 10OFcolder in well O-3,
just 150 to the north. On the downdip side (Figure
The monthly data suggests that none of the groups 19), Bremer 189 shows an anomalous temperature
have shbwn a sustained Increase in oil production as increase at the botlom of the weli, peaking at 260*F,
a result of continuous steam injection, ~ Water the highest recorded temperature of any of the wells.
production on the other hand, has increasedmarkedly Just one location south, however, 13remer193 shows
in both the horizontal group and the vertical group. It no evidence of continuous injection. Bremer 64, the ,
is significant to note that while both of these groups next well to the south, shows some evidence of
have seen a similar increase In gross production @OO Injection in 1-52.
BPD),,the instantaneousSORfor the horizontal group
is much lower (3 to 4) than the vetiical group (4 to 8). The shape of the temperature profiles In wells 187and
This would Indicate that the same response in gross 261, the out-of-pattern producer, are similar. It is
production is being effected in the horizont~lgroup by significantto note, however,that the peak temperature
a smaller amount of steam. If Increased water in the affected intewal is 25F lower in the out-oh
production is a precursor to increased oil production pattern producer.
(as it was in the northeast portion of the lease), the
lower !30R in the horizontal pattern could signify that Com~arlsonWith Existina Steamflood
the goal of a more efficient, vertically focused drive is The production responseseen to date in the pilot area
being accomplished. is very consiste~t with steamflood response In the
northeast portion of the lease, Figure 20 shows
DownholeTem~eratureData production data for the I-14 and I-15 patterns, typical
Downhotetemperature profileswere recentlyacquired patterns in the existing steamflood. Here production
on thirteen of the seventeendirect offsetsand one out- rates were allocated among injector patterns, thus
of-pattern producer near the horizontal injector. Figure 20 inciudes one-fourth of the production from
Profiles were run after shuttlngin the wells for 48 each of the offset producers, As in the pilot area, In
hours. For the most pqrt, the wells had qot been the i-14 and 1-15patterns, gross production increased
cycled for at least six months, very rapidlyfollowing the beginning of steam injection.
The pronounced increase In oii production that
A north-south cross section incorporating the updip foliowed began approximately28 months fcitiowingthe
producers of the horiicmtal and vertical patterns start of steam injection and peaked roughiy 1$ months
(Figure18)showsa pronouncedtemperatureelevation iater.
in the well closest to the top of 1-49scompletion.
Traveling sduth down the course of 1-49swell path, While it.is difficuit to predict when oil production wili
the temperature spike flattens and spreads upward. increasein the pilot area,applying simpleratios of pilot

48
SPE 24630 S. M. BllLLER 5

to steamflood pattern area, pay and injection rate to steam cycie dissipates over time, the temperature
the time required for response in the existing differentiationis iost and the heat distribution appears
steamflood suggests that oil production in the piiot homogeneous, Here again, the impact is ciear: when
verticai patterns shouid begin to increase sometime injecting steam, the radiai weil is focusing the heat in
around June 1992,two yearsafterthe start of injection. two very distinct verticai intefvais.
Afthough the actuai mechanics of steam zone growth
are obviously more complicated than simpie ratios GST and C/O Leas ,
wouid suggest, in this case they provide a rough A Gamma Spectroscopy Tool (GST), run in capture
estimateof when to expect response. mode and ineiastic mode (to obtain carbon/oxygen
data), was run in each of the three observation weils
Observation Welis on completion. The first, and to date only,
carbcm/oxygen monitor pass was conducted on O-2,
Temperatureand Duai S~aced Neutron LOCIS the weli where temperature and neutron iogs showed
Figures 21 through 23 show the foilowing data: 1) significant anomaiies. Figure 24 shows the computed
resistivity logs for both the observation weii and the log, inciuding iithology and saturations, around the
nearestinjector, 2) the temperature profiies that have intefvaiwhere i-49 is compieted, Beiow 900 MD,very
been obtained, and 3) an overlay of the far sensor iittie =turation change has occurred, considering the
reading of a duai spaced neutron iog. The overlay of toois statistical resolution of &5 saturation units.
the current (4/92) vs. the initial neutron data provides Above 900 there are s~verai intervais that have
a qualitative evacuationof current gas saturation vs. exhibited measurable oil saturation increases,
initial gas saturation, Aii observationweiis are iocated particularly the intervai 855 to 890. This intewal is
upstructurefrom the correspondinginjector, or injector approximately50 above the projected course of 1-49s
weii path in the case of the horizontal weil, The weii path, but !s weii within the depth intewai that has
observationweii for the horizontal injector is downdip exhibited the dramatic temperature increase.
of the vertical (iogged) portion of the horizontal weli
(asdepicted in the N-Scross section in Figure21), but !nklQ!3
updip of the horizcmtaiweii path, Distancesfrom the
injectors range from 55 to 100. Monthiv iniection Data
Figure25 shows each injection weiis monthly average
Figure 22 shows that up until a short time ago, injection rate and tubing pressure. Also shown are
injection in!o weii i-51 had not significantlyaffected O- pseudo injectivities: IBWPD injected + tubing
3. In stark contrast is the major temperature elevation pressure. Note that injection rates in the horizontal
which occurrsd very rapidly in O-2, the observation weii are very. simiiar to the verticai weiis. Pseudo
well opposite the horizontal injector (Figure 21). The injectivity, however,is higher in 1-49than In two of the
temperature in the sand iobe where the horizontal verticai welis, Assuming specific injectivity
injector is completed has risen 160F, and the (BWPD/psi/ft) wouid be constant, this would indicate
temperature rise has been fairly confined verticaiiy, that i-49 is injecting steam into a iarger (ionger)
The far data overlay aiso shows a significant increase intervai, not surprising when one considers that with
in gas saturation in the same area, These results are the desaturated intervais and gravity override, the
significantfor two reasons: 1) the observationweli is verticai injectors are probabiy effectively injecting
iocated approximately 160 down the horizontal steam in a relatively short intewai, ,plus the obvious
completion, indicating that heat is pmbabiy exiting at impact of injecting into the iong horizontal section.
least that far down the weii path; and 2) the heated
intervalappears to be vertically bounded. iniection Profiie D@@
injection profile surveysrun in August 1991 show that
Temperature profiies taken in the observation weii in aii three cases steam was exiting the weiibore
ciosestto the radiai well are shown in Figure 23. Oniy deeper than during a previous suwey, and the profiies
two of the eight radiaisdriiied are depicted -- Radiai3, were fairly uniform.
which was 102 in length and was gravel packed, and .,.,,
radial 1D, which was compieted with 68 of coiied
tubing and yzvel packed. Obsewation weii
No attempt was made to correlate producer response
with depth of steam injection, or to quantify production
.:
,:I
temperature data shows ciearly that when Ri-53 is resuitsbased on amount of steam injected per foot of ~
~
steamed, heat is segregated Into two distinct iobes ~ intewai, etc. i
(see6/1 1/90 ar,d 2/25/91 curves). As heat from the
v
+

Evaluation OF HOR!ZONTAL,RADIALAND VERTICAL lNJECTION WELLS


6 IN A PILOT STEAMFLOOD SPE24630
1

I
CONCLUSlONS Is consistent with the time required before seeing ~
incremental oil In the older steamflood area of the
1. Ccmtlnuoussteam Injection into the horizontal lease,
vJeli has effected a rapid, localized
temperature rise in the intewal being targeted ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
for sweep improvement. 1
The a~hor would like to thank the management of
2. The horizontalwell patterns have exhibitedthe Unocalfor permissionto publish this paper. A speciai
sameIncreaseinwater production, considered thank you goes to Jennifer Mattison and Ray Nemetz
a precursor to incremental oi!, as the three who prepared this manuscript for publication.
vertical well patterns. Steam oil ratio in the
horizontal group is half that in the verticalwell REFERENCES
group, indicating that Injection in the {
horizontal well is more effjclent. 1. Llvlngston, N. D., Qulntana, J, M., and Buller,
S. M,: Unocals Horizontal and Radial Pilot
3. Cyclic steam injection in the radial well has injectors In the Midway Sunset Fieldt paper
resultedin pronounced temperatureincreases presented at the San Joaquln .Geologi@
In a nearby observation well, matching the Societys Symposium on Ap@lcations of
shape of the observatiori welis resistlvity log Horizontal Drilling Techniques, Sakersfleld, ,
and indicating that the radiais are effectively June 9, 1992,
focusing steam in distinct vertical intewals. 2. Nees, J., et al.: An Innovative Drilling
Consistent with the small amount of steam System, Final Repoti for Contract No. DE-
injected,thlstemperaturecharacterdisappears
with time. DOE/BC/14203-4, May 1991.
3. Dickinson, W,, et al.: Horizontal Radiais
4. Two of the four offsetting producers have Enhance Oil Production from a Therm~
respondedveryfavorabiyto the second cycles Project,Oil &Gas Journal (May4, 1992),116-
in the radial well, 124.
4. Dickinson, W,, et al,: Fiexible Sand Barrier
5. While severalwelis have shown increased oil (FSB): A Novef Sand Controi System,paper
production due to steam injection, pattern- SPE 18787 presented at the 1989 SPE
wide production lrtcreas~s in the pilot area CaliforniaRegional Meetinq, Bakersfield,APrii
have not yet been seen. The lack of response
,

Table1- ReservoirData
Intewal Potter
1

AverageThickness(G/N) [ 650/400
II /
Area 160 acres .]
, II

I ReservoirVohme

Porosity
72,000 ac-ft

28%
1
j
I
I Initial Oil Satiation ~ 61%
1 II
.;

Permeability(Air) I 1,000-6,000 md Ii 4

Oii Gravity I 11.4 APi II


TypicalMineralogy: 8,5%blotite
8.5%detritus
* ~, 83.0%quartz
~ &

60
i
:.
-,..

F&
,. ..., ,
,..
,,
.
,,. ,
> ,. ~ .:~-
..:
..:,
.,
/l 4

/ *
I

..:
*,
. ***
#-- T-n
.

I(if!l


. :).

+..
+ *

+ ,*: +..

+
// s.

{7/ I A+W%?%B

:1

Figure 1 - BREMER FEE LOCATiON MAP

1
DIP CNRECTION ~
i
I ? ~,
/4
W mn[n
t-,cf
OAsc?mlm
r
8
II*J L .,. ? PLIO.\ ~
1)

I
il, -

: j- - ?M4 P
9 =*,-:- - L

%61 .
* E MlO.,, LIO.
I t.



w-

w-

1 1
1

-r
* i)-
--0
I L
dr e
F ?-
/
MARVIC

i!
SAND
ANT )PE
MIO
SI E
-J
SPELLACY
Legend SAND

PRODUCER (BHL) 1

# NWECTO? (B,)
/
1

FIWO 2- PkOT PROJECT A*A


F19w03- C(IMWITETYPELOG

. .
I Sf% 24630!~ ,,~

1 0000
5000

500
200
100
500
O_
v 200
I 00 ~
5.0 -
.. ,

2.0

0.50
I
, b
I I ,
,
1 ~i
0.20 I
100 150 210 300 400 500 600
TEMPERATURE, F
Figure 4 - ViSCOSiTY vs. TEMPERATURE,POTTER CRUDE

1001
~.-.
~
200
I 942

\
300 I *191 4

400
+ 0
L
1 Oc

S.*I, 1. I-**1
!

GRAVEL
KICKOFF PACK
rnh, CT. 7 ,,,, ,-! ,. .C.,. s ,,.
2UU >! IIKI i3UlLiJ :,, XiU MU RADIAL. RiI~T~ DIR, .- (LfJ- LENGTH.,
_.. TUBULARS
J
1 8SS, N83E ?~~ NONE
600 20.1 DEGREES/100 MAX DOGLEG ./
2 885 N7W 3 76 NONE ..

\ 3 884 S79W 4 102 NONE


1
700
.1
4 sa4 S4E 4 103 97 FSB
/
5LINER TOP @ 1033 lB 882 N78F 14 NONE
800
,f - 48-2-6-50 SLOTS FI 1036-1474 ;/
\ lC 8132 N135E 35 NONE

900,,,,,_,,M
---------- 10 881 ~
N85E 74 68 CT
;
2B 881 N6W 23 21 CT

937 WD 5 15//K-55 L 1480 WI .. ---- - RADIALS ORILLEO BUT NOT COMPLETEO


937 TVD .,
.-== -.=---:-, RAOIALS WITH SOME TUWILARS IN PLACE

Figure 5 - HORIZONTAL INJECTOR 1-49


Figure 6- PLAN VIEW, RADIAL WELL RI-53

52

&,_ ., ~ ,.
. . .. .. ... ,.. . ....%
.
..._. _.. __ ,_ . :.
.
~1 0

;s2

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