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Instructional Planning: Unit Plan (K-12) Template

Unit
Transformations Subject/Course: Math 2
Title:
Name: Ms. A
Grade/s: 10th, 11th
Martin

Stage 1: Desired Results

Standards/Goals:
Students will understand that Transformations and Symmetry are used to analyze real-world situations (e.g., art, nature, construction,
and scientific exploration).
- Goals are broken down into individual lesson objectives so my students and I will have a clear vision of what skills we need
to master and whether or not we are on track to meet these goals. Please see under each CC standard where I have a
bulleted list of Key Objectives/Concepts and Skills to Master
Reflection: I make sure I take the time to break down each standard based on skill and daily objective. As
Teach for America, 2011, suggests, When you write a lesson objective, ask yourself, What are my students
going to learn and achieve by the end of the lesson? Some teachers fall into the trap of designing activities,
creating worksheets, and giving lectures that merely cover material and do not focus on what students learn,
achieve, and accomplish (p. 62). I have to pay close attention to the alignment of my activities and my daily
objectives. Often times I think I have natural tendency to cover material instead of focusing on the
important parts of the objective. Developing clear daily goals helps me narrow my focus for each lesson and
ensure students successful outcomes.

Congruence
Experiment with transformations in the plane.
NC.M2.G-CO.2 Experiment with transformations in the plane.
Represent transformations in the plane.
Compare rigid motions that preserve distance and angle measure
(translations, reflections, rotations) to transformations that do not preserve
both distance and angle measure (e.g. stretches, dilations).
Understand that rigid motions produce congruent figures while dilations
produce similar figures.

Key Objectives/ Concepts and Skills to Master:


Compare transformations that preserve distance and angle
measurements to those that do not.
Represent reflections, rotations and translations using a variety of
media.
Compare and contrast rigid and non-rigid transformations.
Understand transformations as functions that take points in the plane
as inputs and give other points as outputs
NC.M2.G-CO.3 Given a triangle, quadrilateral, or regular polygon, describe any reflection or
rotation symmetry i.e., actions that carry the figure onto itself. Identify center and
angle(s) of rotation symmetry. Identify line(s) of reflection symmetry.

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 1
Key Objectives/ Concepts and Skills to Master:
Describe the rotations and reflections of a rectangle, parallelogram, trapezoid,
or regular polygon that maps each figure onto itself.
Describe and identify lines and points of symmetry.
Identify the sequence of transformations that will carry a given figure to another.
NC.M2.G-CO.4 Verify experimentally properties of rotations, reflections, and translations in terms
of angles, circles, perpendicular lines, parallel lines, and line segments.

Key Objectives/ Concepts and Skills to Master:


Through observations and conjectures develop definitions of rotations,
reflections, and translations
Students use terms fluently in written and verbal discussions
Using previous comparisons and descriptions of transformations, develop and
understand the meaning of rotations, reflections, and translations based on
angles, circles, perpendicular lines, parallel lines, and line segments.
Define rotations, reflections, and translations using angles, circles,
perpendicular lines, parallel lines, and line segments.
NC.M2.G-CO.5 Given a geometric figure and a rigid motion, find the image of the figure. Given a
geometric figure and its image, specify a rigid motion or sequence of rigid motions
that will transform the pre-image to its image.

Key Objectives/ Concepts and Skills to Master:


Experiment with transformations in the plane
Perform rotations, reflections and translations using a variety of methods.
Create sequences of transformations that map a geometric figure on to
itself and another geometric figure.
Understand that the composition of transformations is not commutative.
Transform a geometric figure given a rotation, reflection, or translation
using graph paper, tracing paper, or geometric software.
Create sequences of transformations that map a geometric figure on to
itself and another geometric figure.
Understand that the composition of transformations is not commutative.

Congruence
Understand congruence in terms of rigid motions.
NC.M2.G-CO.6 Determine whether two figures are congruent by specifying a rigid motion or
sequence of rigid motions that will transform one figure onto the other.

Key Objectives/ Concepts and Skills to Master:


Knowing that rigid transformations preserve size and shape or distance and
angle, use this fact to connect the idea of congruency and develop the definition
of congruent.
Transform figures using geometric descriptions of rigid motions.
Predict the effect of rotating, reflecting or translating a given figure.
Justify the congruence of two figures using properties of rigid motions.

Similarity, Right Triangles, and Trigonometry


Understand similarity in terms of similarity transformations.

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 2
NC.M2.G-SRT.1 Verify experimentally the properties of dilations with given center and scale
factor:
NC.M2.G-SRT.1a
a. When a line segment passes through the center of dilation, the line segment
and its image lie on the same line. When a line segment does not pass through the
center of dilation, the line segment and its image are parallel.

Key Objectives/ Concepts and Skills to Master:


Given a center and a scale factor, verify experimentally, that when performing
dilations of a line segment, the pre-image, the segment which becomes the
image is longer or shorter based on the ratio given by the scale factor.
Given a line segment, a point not on the line segment, and a dilation factor,
construct a dilation of the original segment.
Recognize that the length of the resulting image is the length of the original
segment multiplied by the scale factor and that the original and dilated image
are parallel to each other.

Interpreting Functions
Understand the concept of a function and use function notation.
NC.M2.F-IF.1 Extend the concept of a function to include geometric transformations in the
plane by recognizing that:
the domain and range of a transformation function f are sets of points
in the plane;
the image of a transformation is a function of its pre-image.

NC.M2.F-IF.2 Extend the use of function notation to express the image of a geometric figure in the
plane resulting from a translation, rotation by multiples of 90 degrees about the
origin, reflection across an axis, or dilation as a function of its pre-image.

Supporting/Repeating Standards:
Understandings: Essential Questions:
Students will understand that How can you change a figures position without changing
its size or shape?
Students will develop a better understanding of How do you recognize symmetry in a figure?
how to use composite transformations including How can transformations be use to show congruence in
translations, reflections, and/or rotations to create figures?
congruent figures. Students will develop a better How can you represent transformations with function
understanding of how to use geometric properties notation
to locate points on a coordinate grid.
*Students will use transformations and other These questions will be assessed on the formative/
geometric properties to begin making connections
summative assessment. All classroom instruction should
with graphs of algebraic functions in order to
transition into Quadratics next unit. align to these questions
Students will know
Students will be able to
The four basic types of transformations Identify symmetry in a figure
The properties and theorems of Reflections. Perform transformations of figures
Identify transformations on a coordinate plane
Vocabulary: Classify Isometries
angle of rotation, compression, congruence Find compositions of isometries
transformation, congruent, corresponding angles,
corresponding sides, dilation, domain, image, I can statements

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 3
isometric, line, line of reflection, non-rigid motion, 1. Represent transformations in the plane
point, point of rotation, pre-image, quadrants, 2. Compare rigid motions that preserve distance and
range, ray, reflection, regular polygons, relation, angle measure
rigid motion, rotation, scale, factor, transformation
Common Misconceptions: 3. Understand that rigid motions produce congruent
figures while dilations produce similar figures
Common Issues Suggestions Questions/ 4. Verify experimentally the properties of dilations
Prompts with given center and scale factors
Student confuses terms Look at the start of the
horizontally and word horizontally. What 5. Extend the concept of a function to include
vertically are we referring to when geometric transformations in the plane by recognizing
we talk about the that:
horizon? Which way is The domain and range of a transformation
this?
Student translates rather If you were to place a function f are sets of points in the plane
than reflect the shape mirror on the x-axis, what The image of a transformation is a function of
would the reflected image its pre-image
look like?
6. Extend the use of function notation
Student confuses the Think about the direction
terms clockwise and of the hands on a clock.
counterclockwise This direction is
clockwise.

Student ignores the oWhere is the center of


center of rotation and rotation?
rotates from a corner of oMark the center of
the shaded triangle rotation and draw a line
to a corner of the shape.
Where will this line be
once it has been rotated?
Student uses an oIs there a single
inefficient combination of transformation that will
transformations take the shaded triangle
directly to the triangle
labeled E?
Student masters all Find a combination of two
objectives and needs an transformations that
extension task could be replaced by a
single one.

How do these desired results align with your class vision?


1) Students will build confidence and creativity: This unit allows students to build on skills they already have. Even if
students are not familiar with the geometric vocabulary yet, they already have a basic understanding of translations,
rotations, dilations and reflections. This unit is a great place to start for students to feel confident in their skills and
success in this course.

2) Real World Applications: Students are able to use real world applications in order to solve problems and master
standards. We will introduce and discuss each new concept through the lens of real-world applications. (i.e. selfie
pictures and reflections, hands of a clock and rotations, car motions and translations, Willie Wonka and the Chocolate
Factory and dilations, etc.)
Reflection: Connecting each of my objectives and lessons to our classroom vision/ big goal has really
helped motivate my students and give them a clear road map to follow. Students see the connection between
what we are learning in class and what is expected of them at the end of this course. Focusing on my two big
vision-aligned goals has also helped build student investment and has strengthened my relationship with my
students. As Teach for America, 2011, points out, Tying objectives to the big goal not only provides clarity

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 4
of purpose, but can also help focus and motivate students (p. 64).

Stage 2a: Assessment/Evidence

Explain any performance tasks you will use (major projects and core task, i.e., common assessments):
1. Common Assessment (District-wide) See attached summative below
Unit 1 Common Assessment will be given at the end of the unit. This test is created by the district, and is made of
questions that cover each standard. Each question is multiple choice and has students interpret transformations
graphically and algebraically.

2. Performance Tasks given throughout the unit based on major standards: These performance tasks/formative
assessments will be used throughout lessons to demonstrate students mastery of objectives. See below for specific
performance tasks for each standard.

G-CO-2. Problem Task Example


Let the points W, T, U and V be the domain of function f(x) that represents a translation 3 units to the left.
A) Sketch the results of applying this transformation and list the coordinates of the points in the range.
B) What is the relationship between the perimeter of the original figure and the new one?

Explanation for Problem task:


- This question requires students to make the connection between algebraic function notation (domain/range)
and geometric transformations. It also tests students abilities to plot points on a coordinate plane and
perform a translation. Lastly, it requires students to expand knowledge by comparing the two images based
on their perimeters.

G-CO-3. Problem Task Example


Describe all the rotations and reflections that carry each figure below onto itself.

Explanation for Problem task:


- This question requires students to demonstrate their understanding of basic rotions (both clockwise and counterclockwise). In
addition, students have to apply their undersnding by using the identity property. In addition, students will discuss new coordinates,
and symmetry.

G-CO-4. Problem Task Example


1. Given a polygon and its transformation, identify the angle of rotation or the distance of translation.
2. Perform a rotation, reflection, and translation with a given polygon and give a written explanation of how each step meets the
definitions of each transformation using correct mathematical terms.

Explanation for Problem task:


- With this problem, students have an open-ended question where they can explore their critical

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 5
thinking and problem solving skills. I can also have a better understanding of where their
understanding is.

G-CO-5. Problem Task Example


1. Prove that every rotation is a composition of two reflections.
2. Skill based task: Reflect the quadrilateral over the x-axis.

Explanation for Problem task:


Students have the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding by reflecting the object. Students can then take this
understanding further by proving the connection between rotations and reflections. This is a good question to scaffold problems to
the ultimate goal of composing functions using composition notation.

G-CO-6. Problem Task Example


1. Create frieze patterns and tessellations using transformations that preserve congruence.
2. Skill based task: Describe a series of transformations that would generate the figure A from figure Z.

Explanation for Problem task:


Students have the opportunity to illustrate their creativity through designing their own patterns and tessellations. This will also
strengthen their transformation skills. We will discuss the role of congruence in this assignment. Question 2 allows students to
express their thoughts in an open-ended manor. Students have the flexibility to choose their own transformations using correct
notation.

Reflection: Based on my students pre-test data, I know there are many gaps in their understanding coming
into this unit. I will work to build students up to master these tasks and objectives; however, I also want to
make sure the tasks help us get closer to our vision (i.e. building confidence in students). As Teach for
America, 2011, notes, It is therefore important to consider your students current achievement levels and all
of the pre-requisite skills and knowledge that your goals assume when fashioning your list of lesson
objectives (p. 65). Because of this, I have included 2 questions for each objective/task so students have an
opportunity to provide open-ended responses that reflect their understanding and also are exposed to a higher
level application problem.

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 6
Explain other assessment evidence you will use: (quizzes, tests, prompts, work samples and observations):
1. Quiz 1 Students will have a 10 question multiple choice quiz that will be modeled after their summative common
assessment. This will provide important classroom data that will let me know what interventions need to take place
before the summative assessment.

2. Error Analysis Assessment Students will analyze students work from the previous quiz and classroom performance
tasks. They will be asked to identify the error in students work, correct the mistake, and provide step-by-step directions
for the student to fix their errors.

3. Quiz 2 Students will have another 10 question assessment check-in that will provide data that will shape any
necessary interventions for the common assessment.

4. Group/ Stations Assessment Students will work in groups on problems separated by standards. They will rotate
around to different stations based on their answers. This will provide an engaging way for students to demonstrate their
understanding and build confidence by working with peers.

5. White Board Formative Assessment Students will be asked to demonstrate their understanding by recording their
answers on white boards. This will hold students accountable for their answers and provide me with instant feedback
that will help me form my lessons.
How do these assessments measure your students progress toward your classes big goal(s)?
- Assessments are scaffolded in order to build confidence in students and help them think about the objectives
creatively and carefully. The assessments also provide important feedback that will help me shape my lesson plans
and interventions. Several of the assessments will hold students accountable for the work they are doing in class, and
students will be able to express themselves and their understanding freely without feeling like they are taking a formal
assessment.

Stage 2b: Summative Assessment for this Unit


Create and/or copy/paste the summative assessment that accompanies this unit here. Note if you have created the
summative assessment for this unit in another file, you may zip the two files together to submit to the gradebook.

Explain how you have designed your assessment, so you can easily track mastery by objective. You may
explain this here or if its easiest to track changes in your assessment and explain why you organized it as you
have, please feel free to do so.

- The district created this assessment, and each standard is listed along with the question. Questions are multiple
choice so they can quickly be checked and sorted based on mastery. I was not able to rearrange or re-group questions.
Please look at the summative assessment for comments on the order of the assessment.

- See page 11 18 for summative assessment


Reflection: While I do not have the flexibility to create my own summative assessment, I did have access to
the district-wide test before I began my unit plan. This is an important piece because I will be able to know if
my students are able to master the objectives, and I can let students know where they are going and the skills
they should master. As Teach for America, 2011, sayssuccessful teachers create their summative
assessments before they begin teaching their lessons . Doing so will greatly enhance your teaching and raise
your students achievement levels. Teachers who clearly articulate how students will demonstrate mastery
upfront have a clearer sense of where their students need to end up (p. 59).

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 7
Stage 3: Learning Plan

Learning Plan (Activities and Resources):


**Activities and Resources are posted below. I keep all of my activities in folders on google drive.
Day 1: 1.1 Translations: Students will be introduced to transformations and will define all 4 types. Today,
students will explore translations both graphically and by using the algebraic arrow rule. Students will
discuss how order matters and the relationship between translations on the x-axis and y-axis.

Day 2: 1.2 Reflections: Students will explore reflections both graphically and by using the algebraic arrow
rule. Students will discuss how order matters and the relationship between reflections on the x-axis, y-axis,
and y=x. Students will use real world examples of reflections to shape their understanding.

Day 3: 1.3 Rotations: Students will explore rotations both graphically and by using the algebraic arrow rule.
Students will discuss how order matters and the relationship between clockwise and counterclockwise
rotations. Students will also understand the importance of notation. As students are exploring rotations,
they will use a clear transparency and expo markers in order to develop their understandings of rotations.

Reflection: When designing these lessons, I carefully considered how to incorporate real-world applications.
Because my students are invested in topics they are familiar with and can relate to things in their own lives, I
looked for ways to strengthen their understanding. Teach for America, 2011, echoes this sentiment, saying,
When you design your unit plan, consider what content will engage your students given their interests and
backgrounds (p. 54).
Day 4: Assessment Quiz/Review: Students will be given a 10 question summative quiz that will provide
important data that will shape my lesson plans and instructions. The questions will address translations,
reflections, and rotations.

Day 5: 1.4 Dilations: Students will explore dilations both graphically and by using the algebraic arrow rule.
Students will discuss how order matters and the relationship between each side of the object they are
dilating. Students will emphasize how the new transformed object is not congruent to the pre-image.
Students will be introduced to this skill by watching a quick clip from Willie Wonka and the Chocolate
Factory.

Day 6: 1.5 Composition of Motion: Students will explore ways to perform multiple transformations through
Louis Carrolls story, Alice in Wonderland. Students will start by transforming Alice in wonderland and then
move to transforming points. Students will learn the proper notation for compositions.

Day 7: 1.6 Additional Transformation Info/Flex day: Students will participate in a white board
activity/assessment to practice the skills they have learned this unit. Teacher will use this activity to hold
students accountable for their work and to check their understanding. We will build in remediation this day
to address learning gaps

Day 8: Review Day/Game Students will take a practice mini quiz and trade and grade to do an error
analysis. This will give students a chance to review their own understanding and to give feedback to
classmates.

Day 9: Assessment Quiz on Lesson 1.1 - 1.6 10 question quiz to check students understanding

Day 10: 1.7 Function Notation and Transformations students will look at transformations and describe
them using function notation. Students will review domain and range and how to find a function using the
vertical line test

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 8
Day 11: 1.8 Performing Transformations and Composition of Transformations using the identity property:
Students will use their knowledge of transformations to work backwards to map images back onto their pre-
image.

Day 12: 1.9 Symmetry and Congruence in Polygons: Students will expand their understanding of symmetry
and congruence with transformations to regular polygons. Students will look at polygons and find lines of
symmetry

Day 13: Review for Test: Students will use their white boards and an error analysis to review for the Unit 1
Common Assessment

Day 14: Assessment/ Unit Common Assessment See below for the district made exam

Reflection: Pacing the unit is one of the areas I struggle with most in terms of lesson planning. When I see
students struggling or needing re-enforcement, I sometimes bring in lessons or resources that are not
necessary for success in this unit. As, Teach for America, 2011, stated, A unit plan forces you to make
difficult decisions about what to teach and how to teach it. After taking the time to develop a unit plan, you
are less likely to be side-tracked by objectives, lessons, or activities that do not advance your ultimate quest
for academic achievement (p. 53).

Other Notes/Handouts/Rubrics:

Lesson 1.1 Notes:

Lesson 1.1 Student Practice:

Lesson 1.2 Notes:

Lesson 1.2 Student Practice:

Lesson 1.3 Notes:

Lesson 1.3 Practice:

Lesson 1.4 Notes:


Lesson 1.4 Practice: (PDF cant attach. See Google Drive)

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 9
Lesson 1.6 Notes:

Lesson 1.6 Practice:

Lesson 1.7 Notes: (See Google Drive)

Lesson 1.7 Practice:

Lesson 1.8 Practice/Notes:

Lesson 1.9 Practice/Notes:

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 10
Unit 1 Common Assessment

Name _________________________________________
Common Assessment Unit 1, Math 2

NC.M2.G-CO.2

1. A translation is a transformation 2. Rotation transformations move all


that moves each point of a figure the points:
same ________ in the same
direction. A. the same distance in a circular
direction
A. arc length B. the same distance in different
B. rotation directions
C. angle measure C. a different distance in a circular
D. distance direction
D. the same distance and direction

3. The point J (8, -8) undergoes the 4. The point S (x, y) = (-x, y). What
translation T2, 1. What are the transformation is S?
coordinates of J ?
A. R270
A. (6, -9) B. R90
B. (8, -8) C. rx-axis
C. (10, -7) D. R180
D. (-2, -1)

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 11
5. What illustration predicts the effect(s) of reflecting the given triangle over
the line x = 3?

A. B.

C. D.

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 12
NC.M2.G-CO.3

6. What type of function maps an 7. How many lines of symmetry


input onto itself? does a regular hexagon have?

A. reflective function A. 2
B. negative function B. 3
C. identity function C. 6
D. opposite function D. 1

8. If W (-7, -6) and R270 (W) = W. What are the coordinates of W?

A. (6, 7)
B. (6, -7)
C. (-7, 6)
D. (-6, -7)

NC.M2.G-CO.4

9. What type of lines do translations move all points in a set along?

A. parallel
B. independent
C. skew
D. perpendicular

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 13
NC.M2.G-CO.5
10. What illustration predicts the effect(s) of translating the given triangle to
the right 5 units and up 6 units?

A. B.

C. D.

11. What translation moves the point


Q (-7, 5) to (-8, 5)?

A. T15, 10
B. T1, 0
C. T15, 10
D. T1, 0

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 14
12. What illustration predicts the effect(s) of rotating the given triangle 70o
counterclockwise about R?

A. B.

C. D.

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 15
NC.M2.G-CO.6

13. The image of a reflection will be 14. Are the two figures below
_________ the preimage. congruent? Why or why not?

A. smaller than
B. larger than
C. not congruent but the mirror image
of
D. congruent and the mirror image of

A. Congruent, ABCD has undergone a


rigid motion of a reflection

B. Not congruent; ABCD has undergone


a rigid motion of a reflection

C. Not congruent; ABCD has undergone


a non-rigid motion of a rotation

D. Congruent; ABCD has undergone a


rigid motion of a rotation

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 16
NC.M2.G-SRT.1

15. Are the two figures below 16. Determine the scale factor of the
congruent? Why or why not? dilation below.

A. Not congruent; ABC has undergone a


non-rigid motion of a vertical stretch.
A.
B. Congruent; ABC has undergone a
rigid motion of a reflection. B.

C. Congruent; ABC has undergone a C.


non-rigid motion of a dilation.

D. Not congruent; ABC has undergone a D.


non-rigid motion of a vertical
compression.

17. Given that with vertices A = (1, 4), B= (3, 7), and C = (4, 1) has
been transformed to with vertices = (1.5, 6), = (4.5, 10.5),
and = (6, 1.5) via a dilation centered at the origin, which function
represents the transformation?

A.
B.
C.
D.

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 17
NC.M2.F-IF.1

18. Given the graph below, what is ?

A. =2
B. =0
C. =2
D. =1

NC.M2.F-IF.2

19. If f(x, y) = (x, y) and 20. What are the coordinates of


g(x, y) = (x + 2, y), R180(R90(x, y)) if (x, y) = (8, 4)?
then what is f(g(8, 3))?

A. (8, 4)
A. (-10, 3) B. (-4, 8)
B. (3, 10) C. (4, -8)
C. (10, -3) D. (-8, -4)
D. (-3, -10)

Reflection: While I do feel this test does a good job of covering all of the objectives at different levels, I do
not believe it is the best measure of student success. As Laureate Education, Inc., 2012, states, assessments
should Provide opportunities for students to demonstrate mastery in an authentic way (2012). This
assessment only consists of multiple-choice questions and there are no opportunities for students to discuss

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 18
their learning. To supplement this, once students have completed this common assessment, I will look at the
data and provide them with an opportunity in class to demonstrate their understanding in an authentic way by
having them create tessellations that require them to be creative and recall all of the skills used this unit.

Works Cited

Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2012). Summative assessment. Baltimore, MD: Author.
(approximate length: 19 minutes)

Teach For America. (2011). Instructional planning & delivery.


Retrieved from https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9aKdxaTnscyZmZ4aVh5Wnd4aG8/view?pli=1

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Unit Plan (K-12) Template 19