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Brandi Burgin

Professor. Pearce
Intercultural Communication
7th, December 2017

Final Paper

Ireland is a country that is not mentioned very much in the United States. Ireland is a

whole different culture with a different breed of people. There are many stereotypes about how

the Irish are all alcoholics and celebrate holidays with a lot of alcohol and booze. However, that

is really the only thing we ever hear about the Irish culture. Ireland is a culture of much more

than that. The culture of Ireland includes customs and traditions. It also includes a different

language, music, art, literature, sports and etc. For most of Ireland, their culture is primarily

Gaelic.

On the record, most of Ireland identifies themselves as Gaelic. In Ireland, they speak two

different languages. They either speak Irish, which is more calm and more relaxed type of

language or Gaelic. Gaelic is a little bit more ambitious and loud. Although, majority of people

from Ireland speak Gaelic, it is related to the Celtic language spoken in parts of Scotland (Eoin.

Bitesize.irish.com. October 19 2011). With that being said, there is a type of Irish Gaelic and a

Scottish Gaelic. Irish Gaelic is more specific than the Scottish; it is softer than the Scottish

Gaelic (Eoin. Bitesize.irish.com. October 19 2011). The reason that many of the Irish people

speak Gaelic is because Ireland is a part of the European Union. Gaelic is a Celtic language and

comes from a section of a language family. The Celtic languages are Indo-European, like

Romance and Germanic languages (McEwan, Emily., Gealic Revitalization., Gealic.com. 28,
March, 2015). Many people call Irish a sister language to the Scottish Gaelic. However, the

Scottish hate the language of Gaelic and want to see it disappear altogether. (McEwan, Emily.,

Gealic Revitalization., Gealic.com. 28, March, 2015). Once the Irish community adopted the

language, it kept it alive even though the Scottish do not claim it as their first language.

The Irish people hold their public architecture to a high standard. The public architecture

of Ireland once highly reflected the country’s past role in the British Empire (Curtin, Chris.,

Hastings, Donnan., Wilson, M. Thomas. Irish Urban Cultures. 1993). Ireland once was fully

connected with the British; but since their independence, much of the architectural iconography

and symbolism started to reflect those who fought against the British for their freedom (Curtin,

Chris., Hastings, Donnan., Wilson, M. Thomas. Irish Urban Cultures. 1993). Once the Irish

finally gained their freedom, the government really started to push that the formality of their land

is independent residences. With the normal families of the mother and father own the residence

and government cannot intervene (Curtin, Chris., Hastings, Donnan., Wilson, M. Thomas. Irish

Urban Cultures. 1993). With the suburbanization of Dublin, it started to become super packed

leaving Dublin with not much room (Curtin, Chris., Hastings, Donnan., Wilson, M. Thomas.

Irish Urban Cultures. 1993). The informality that the Irish culture obtains is that the Irish

facilitates an open and fluid approach between people in public and private spaces (Curtin,

Chris., Hastings, Donnan., Wilson, M. Thomas. Irish Urban Cultures. 1993). With the country of

Ireland growing, there is not much space unless it is in the country side. With that being said,

personal space is very small and negotiable.

The Irish people may lack a sense of personal space but it is not common for Irish people

to touch each other when walking or talking (Curtin, Chris., Hastings, Donnan., Wilson, M.

Thomas. Irish Urban Cultures. 1993). Many of the Irish people show a lot of public displays of
emotion, affection and attachment, even to strangers. Humor, literacy and verbal acuity are

valued within the culture (Curtin, Chris., Hastings, Donnan., Wilson, M. Thomas. Irish Urban

Cultures. 1993). Humor and sarcasm is a normal que of communication within Irish people. In

fact, it is preferred sanctions if a person transgresses the rules of public social interaction (Curtin,

Chris., Hastings, Donnan., Wilson, M. Thomas. Irish Urban Cultures. 1993). Because the Irish

people are very verbal and make connections through humor and joking around, they are

believed to be very welcoming. Irish people are known for their hospitality despite the old

superstitions (Gall, Timothy., Gall, Susan. Junior Worldmark Encyclopedia of the Nations.

Everyculture.com.1996). Back in the old days, the Irish people commonly found strangers

entering the house as bad luck and would bring a bad name to the household (Gall, Timothy.,

Gall, Susan. Junior Worldmark Encyclopedia of the Nations. Everyculture.com. 1996). Usually,

at dinner time the doors of the houses were left open. As time continued, the doors were starting

to be left open for anyone who passed by to come in and eat with the families. Since drinking at

pubs is a very common thing to do in Ireland, anyone joining a group of drinker at the local pub

buys a round of drinks for everyone at the table (Gall, Timothy., Gall, Susan. Junior Worldmark

Encyclopedia of the Nations. Everyculture.com. 1996). Drinking brings the Irish community

together in celebration and in their everyday lives.

As we travel through the cultures of Ireland, you can see that it is very different then the

United States. Even though they do celebrate majority of the same holidays, it is on a completely

different spectrum of the United States. Majority of their traditions highlight their freedom from

the British. They live off of trust and love; inviting strangers into their homes and having an

outrageous amount of hospitality is how the Irish people live.