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Large Landowners in British Colonial America

Grade Level: 3rd Content Area: Social Studies and Language Arts
Anticipated Length of Time:

Number of Students: 27 Instructional Location: Classroom

Date: 2 November 2017

Context for Learning


Description of the learning environment(s) where the learning experience will take place:
When you walk into the door towards the front of the room, there is the white board and SMART board directly
on the left. The teachers desk is next to the SMARTboard, facing the same front door.
Next to the teachers desk is one student desk facing the wall. This student has trouble staying on task
and constantly talks to his peers when he sits with the rest of the class. The rest of the desks are
located in the middle of the room in a U shape. There are six desks located within the U shape. Those students
face the front of the room, although their desks are on the edges of the U-shape where the other students are
facing the middle of the room. Behind the desks, in the back of the room, is a kidney table where the teacher
can engage in guided reading. There are cabinets and a sink on the wall directly behind this. The students
usually place their lunch boxes back here so they are easy to grab for snacks or lunch. There are doors located
on either side of the back of the classroom that lead to bathrooms. To the left of the kidney table is a desk with
two computers. Next to these are two big cabinets with black curtains where the students put their
book bags, jackets and anything else they bring from home. On the other side of the room is the
reading area. There is a rug surrounded by three bookshelves. The books do not seem to be organized
in any certain way on the bookshelf, so students can pick them randomly. There are posters placed throughout
the room of various encouraging messages to motivate students.

Learner Description: Total Students 27 Males 16 Females: 11

Students with special needs Number of students Accommodations and/or


pertinent IEP Objectives
Students with IEPs 1 This student will be able to use
accommodating writing utensils,
whether it be special tools or
technology.

This student will write less or can


draw pictures and explain them
aloud if needed.
English language learners 4 These students will have extended
vocabulary practice in small group,
include pictures with vocabulary,
picture walk of book, less writing
but include pictures.
Gifted 3 These students will be placed in a
small group together along with
other higher reading level
students. They will be expected to
write at a higher level and will
write more than on-level or
below-level students.
504 1 This student will be able to use
accommodating writing utensils,
whether it be special tools or
technology.
Students with other learning 3 Small groups will be beneficial as
needs it allows for scaffolding. All other
accommodations also support
students with other learning
needs.

Personal, Cultural, and Community Assets:


What students personal, cultural, and community assets will you connect with during the lesson?
Students will connect personally and with the community by discussing what they already know about present-
day farmers and if they know any farmers. They will discuss what the farmers they know are like, what types of
produce they grow, and how that impacts the community. The teacher will show a short video on YouTube
about small farmers daily life https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHCbTJW3zls. Students will connect
personally and with the community by discussing what they already know about present-day farmers and if they
know any farmers. They will discuss what the farmers they know are like, what types of produce they grow, and
how that impacts the community. The teacher will help the students make connections to their own daily lives.
Students will connect culturally by comparing colonial large landowners to present day farmers of their culture,
highlighting what types of produce they grow, how much land they have, and the types of workers that farm the
land. They will draw from personal background knowledge or the background knowledge that the teacher
introduced them to.

Central Focus
Central Focus of Lesson:
Students will discover what life was like in colonial times. In this lesson they will specifically focus on large
landowners and what their lives were like, including but not limited to how much land they typically had, what
kind of workers they had, and what types of produce were grown.

Essential Literacy Strategies (or Mathematical Understandings):


Students will work on the reading strategy of comparing and contrasting during this lesson. They will start the
lesson thinking about farmers they know and they will compare and contrast that to this lesson over large
landowners. Comparing and contrasting will help the students pay closer attention to the details they learn
about the large landowner as it requires further analysis and exploration of the topic.

Related Skills:
Students will read Colonial Life by Bobbie Kalman.

Reading/Writing Connections:
This lesson helps students make reading and writing connections by helping them get an immersed
understanding into the type of people large landowners were. By comparing and contrasting large landowners
to farmers in the beginning of the lesson, it helps give them background knowledge and prepare them for the
concept of a large landowner. Comparing and contrasting also helps students notice details that they may have
otherwise missed because it requires students to take a closer look at the subject.

Lesson Objectives and Demands


Standard(s) Addressed:
SS3H3c Describe colonial life in America from the perspectives of various people: large landowners, farmers,
artisans, women, children, indentured servants, slaves, and American Indians.

Content Objective(s) (also known as Learning Targets):


Students will sketch an example of what a large landowner in British Colonial times would look like.
(Psychomotor)

Students will hold a conversation about the differences in small farmers and large landowners. (Affective)

Students will define large landowners in their writing, including but not limited to how much land they typically
had, what kind of workers they had, and what types of produce were grown. (Cognitive)

Identify a Language Function:


Students will compare/contrast large landowners from colonial times to large landowners or farmers in today's
society, including but not limited to how much land they typically have, what kind of workers they have, what types
of produce they grow as well as how much produce they grow.

Key Learning Task:


Students will compare/contrast large landowners and farmers at the beginning of the lesson during the hook.
Students will be asked if they know any farmers and what they are like. They will then watch a video from the
perspective of a large landowner from colonial times and will brainstorm over the differences and similarities
while watching.

Additional Language Demands:

Students will understand vocabulary including landowner, crops, harvest, produce, acre, farmhouse, orchard,
pasture, vegetable, and fertilizer. Students will also work on discourse and syntax while they are writing their
papers and even more so when writing their scripts in the extension activity.

Language Supports:
Teacher will go over all the words at the beginning of the lesson. Holding each word up, showing a picture of
each word, giving and example, and then using it in a sentence. The words will then be placed on a word wall
where the students can see them throughout the lesson.

Utilizing Knowledge about Students to Plan and Implement Effective Instruction


Prior Academic Learning and Prerequisite Skills:

Students should already be familiar with the three regions of colonies and should be able to tell the
characteristics of each region including but not limited to agriculture, weather patterns, and religion.
Building on Prior Learning and Assets:
Students will take what they have already learned about colonial times and those characteristics and apply that
to what they know about farmers today.

Grouping Strategies:
Two groups will be made with one teacher leading each group. One group would be students with IEP's,
students who are in a lower reading level group, and also ELL students if they do not already fall into this
category. The second group would be the gifted students and all other students who range from on-level to
above level reading. This way the teacher with the lower reading level group can spend more time on
vocabulary, and can use different instruction techniques than the teacher with the students who perform on-
level or above-level may require. This will allow for both peer to peer scaffolding as well as teacher led
scaffolding, which influences and increases their learning according to Vygotsky.

Planned Supports (Accommodations and Differentiation Strategies):


The vocabulary words are being shown in different ways to help ELL students. The teacher will show pictures to
go along with the words and put the words on the Word Wall for the students to see and refer to when writing.

Lesson Considerations
Materials (Teacher and Student):
Projector (for YouTube video): Teacher responsibility
Colonial Life by Bobbie Kalman: Teacher responsibility
Paper: Student responsibility
Pencils: Student responsibility

Theoretical Principles and/or Research-Based Best Practices:


This lesson is appropriate because it is written in a way that gives students the responsibility for their work.
According to Bloom's Taxonomy, this lesson and extension would be classified as a stage six, which is Create.
This is because they are creating when they are writing their papers and even more so when performing their
skits for their peers. We also refer to Vygotsky's idea of scaffolding when having the students work with their
peers, especially in the extension activity, as the comparing of the students' papers is extremely beneficial in
this way.

Misconceptions:
People often assume that Large landowners were very mean. They are associated with owning slaves and were
against freeing slaves. Some were very nice to their slaves and other help. For them owning slaves and having
servants was their culture and was the only thing that they knew.

Evidence and Formative Assessment of Student


Learning: How will you know whether students are
making progress toward your learning goal(s)
and/or how will you assess the extent to which they
have met your goal(s)? Use the chart below to
describe and justify at least 2 formal or informal
assessment strategies that occur in your detailed
plan above.
Assessment Strategy #1: Alignment with Objectives:
Writing assessment: The students will each write a Objective:
short piece. The student can pick who their audience Students will define large landowners, including but
is (a friend, another role from colonial times, a family not limited to how much land they typically had, what
member, or themselves). They will then choose which
format their piece will be written in (journal entry, kind of workers they had, and what types of produce
letter, poem, or newspaper piece). were grown.

In this lesson the students will have to assume the


role of a large landowner therefore in order to write
this piece, they must know what it means to be a
large landowner and all of the characteristics that go
along with it.
Adaptations:
ELL students would be allowed to write less and
instead include pictures to show what they are
talking about. Pictures should be labeled.
Gifted students would be expected to write on a 4th
grade writing level instead of 3rd grade.
Evaluation Criteria (Evidence of Student
Understanding):
This assessment would have a rubric. The rubric would
include creativity, accuracy, how much detail about
the role is included, and format. All of which would be
graded on a scale of 1-3 where 3 means excellent, 2
means satisfactory, and 1 means needs improvement.
Student Feedback:
Under the rubric would be a small box where the
teacher could give feedback to the students.
Feedback would need to be constructive and
detailed.

Alignment with Objectives:


Objective: Students will sketch an example of what a
Assessment Strategy #2: large landowner in British Colonial times would look
Students will sketch an illustration of their character like.
that is appropriate to the format they chose for their
paper. This lesson meets this objective when students draw
an illustration to go with their papers over colonial
large landowners. This shows that they have a mental
image of what a large landowner is, which means they
grasp the concept fully.

Adaptations:
If students are unable to physically draw, they may
use any other means of depicting their character, such
as different writing tools or technology.

Evaluation Criteria (Evidence of Student


Understanding):
This assessment would have a rubric. The rubric
would include color, appropriate to the writing
format, and accuracy. All of which would be graded
on a scale of 1-4 where 4 means excellent, 3 means
above satisfactory, 2 means satisfactory, and 1 means
needs improvement
Student Feedback:
The teacher would provide feedback within the rubric
that would be given back during a student teacher
conference so the teacger could go over anything the
student really seemed to miss and students could ask
questions.
Note: Add more assessment strategy boxes here if needed.

Lesson Plan Details: Write a detailed outline of your class session including instructional strategies, learning
tasks, key questions, key transitions, student supports, assessment strategies, and conclusion. Your outline
should be detailed enough that another teacher could understand them well enough to use them. Include
what you will do as a teacher and what your students will be doing during each lesson phase. Include a few
key time guidelines. Note: The italicized statements and scaffolding questions are meant to guide your
thinking and planning. You do not need to answer them explicitly or address each one in your plan. Delete
them before typing your lesson outline.

Co-teaching Strategies to be used:

One Teach Parallel Station Parallel


Alternative/Differentiated Team

Roles/Responsibilities:
Teacher #1 (Lindsey): This teacher will work with the lower level group.
Teacher #2 (Abby): This teacher will work with the higher-level group.

Space (classroom set-up) considerations:


All students from both groups will need to be able to see the board for the video.

Materials necessary and who will be responsible:


Projector (for YouTube video): Teacher responsibility
Colonial Life by Bobbie Kalman: Teacher responsibility
Paper: Student responsibility
Pencils: Student responsibility

Lesson Introduction - Before:


"Does anyone know any farmers?"
"What are they like?"
Teacher will play video of small famers daily life
"Imagine that we travelled back in time to where there were no more cars, no phones, no computers, iPads,
TVs, or even radio. What do you think farmers would have been like then?"
"What about you? How do you think you would be if you didnt have any technology or anything today?"
"Would you be able to get to school from your house without a car?"
"What would you do for fun?"
"What kind of jobs do you think your parents would have, or other people in your community?"

"Well today, we are going to learn about one kind of person that was most common in Southern Colonial
America, and that is the Large Landowner and his family. They were kind of like farmers back then, but I want
you to listen to this person from Colonial America and see if he sounds any different than the farmers we know
today."

Learning Activities - During:

Teacher 1: Watch video found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80UdREpHGSI.


After the video is over, discuss with the group about what information the video gave us about large
landowners and how they compare to the farmers we know today.
*Stop video at 1 minute and 45 seconds.
Land is passed down through the males in the family and they are very rich.
The houses are big because the entire extended family lives in the house.
They grow crops to feed family, and send everything they do not use back to England to make a profit.
This person grows Tobacco. What are some other cash crops large landowners might grow?
Indentured servants and slaves do most of the work on the plantation.
Teacher 2: Will go through vocabulary such as landowner, crops, harvest, produce, acre, farmhouse, orchard,
pasture, vegetable, and fertilizer.

The class will come together as a whole and read the large landowners section from the book The Farm by
James E Knight.
Closure - "After":
After the lesson the students will work individually on a piece written from the point of view a large landowner.
The students will pick who their audience is- either themselves (as the large landowner), family member (of the
large landowner), or another role from colonial times that was affected by the large landowner (I.e. slaves,
merchants, Europeans who bought their product, etc). They will also pick what format their written piece will be
in, choosing from journal entry, letter, poem, or newspaper piece. All pieces must also have an appropriate
illustration sketched of their character.
Extension: How could you extend this lesson if time permits?

What specific extension activity might the students do to continue practicing and building meaning?
To extend this activity, after students finish their papers about the large landowners, students could
partner up to create a script for a play based on ideas from both students' papers. After completing the
script, students will prepare to perform their skits for the class. The teacher will provide choices of
costumes for students to use in their performance. Students will then perform their skit in front of the
class, dressed as their individual characters.

NOTE: Attach any Relevant handouts, activities, templates, PPT slides, etc. that are referenced and utilized in
this lesson.
Video from the perspective of a present day farmer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHCbTJW3zls
Video from the perspective of a large landowner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80UdREpHGSI