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19

Student: ___________________________________________________________________________

1. ________ content standards require that all materials-using products manufactured or sold contain some
specified percentage of ________.
A. Maximum; recycled material
B. Minimum; recycled material
C. Maximum; virgin material
D. Minimum; virgin material
2. ________ make up the largest percentage of all materials recycled in Canada at close to 29 percent.
A. Cardboard and boxboard
B. Newsprint
C. Organics
D. Glass
3. The fact that ________ is an argument against requiring the government to compensate private parties for
an environmental taking.
A. compensation based on the prospective value of the property in private hands could be hard to
determine
B. governments would be more careful in designing environmental policies if they had to compensate for
takings
C the government would be reluctant to pass any environmental legislation, since it could often be
. interpreted as taking some private party's property rights
D. environmental takings amount to expropriation of an individual's land
4. The technology available for the separation, transportation, and reprocessing of recycled materials affect
their costs and thus their ability to displace virgin materials in the production of total materials.
True False
5. The ability of a municipality to send solid waste to a landfill is affected by the scarcity of sites willing to
accept these wastes.
True False
The following figure depicts the market for a waste-generating good. Supply equals marginal private cost
and demand equals marginal social benefit. The marginal social cost is equal to marginal private cost plus
the marginal external cost (i.e., the marginal social cost of waste disposal).

6. When the social cost of waste disposal is not considered, consumption of a waste generating good will
equal Q2.
True False
7. Under social cost pricing of the good, consumer will pay price P1 to consume Q2 units of a waste-
generating good.
True False
8. A waste disposal fee is one way to get consumers to recycle household waste at the socially efficient
level.
True False
9. Consumers would increase their rate of recycling if there was a financial incentive for them to reduce the
weight of the garbage they are allowed to dispose of every week.
True False
10. Under social cost pricing, producers receive price P1.
True False
11. When the social cost of waste disposal is not considered, production of a waste-generating good will
equal Q1.
True False
12. A per unit tax equal to P1 - P3 would result in firms producing the socially efficient level of a waste-
generating good.
True False
13. Taxing production is one way to get firms to produce the socially efficient level of a waste-generating
good.
True False
14. A tax on virgin materials would lead firms to increase their recycling ratios.
True False
15. Although people generally receive no financial reward for their recycling efforts, it has become a widely
accepted part of Canadian culture.
True False
16. One potential problem with charging a fee per bag of waste is illegal dumping.
True False
17. When the Nature Conservancy preserves sensitive land by purchasing it this is an example of an
environmental taking.
True False
18. List the two ways that total materials can be reduced.

19. List two ways that material intensity can be reduced and give an example of each.
20. Define the reuse ratio and list three ways it can be increased.

21. List three recycling policy options and discuss their effectiveness.

22. Give four examples of various solid waste reduction and recycling activities undertaken by Canadian
provinces and municipalities.

23. Many contemporary land-use issues are related to the human use of land that substantially reduces or
destroys its environmental value. List four examples of Canadian natural capital threatened by land-use
changes.

24. List three policy options that could be employed to incorporate ecological values into land use and give
an example of each.

25. ________ content standards require that all materials-using products manufactured or sold contain some
specified percentage of ________.
A. Maximum; recycled material
B. Minimum; recycled material
C. Maximum; virgin material
D. Minimum; virgin material
26. ________ make up the largest percentage of all materials recycled in Canada at close to 29 percent.
A. Cardboard and boxboard
B. Newsprint
C. Organics
D. Glass
27. The fact that ________ is an argument against requiring the government to compensate private parties for
an environmental taking.
A. compensation based on the prospective value of the property in private hands could be hard to
determine
B. governments would be more careful in designing environmental policies if they had to compensate for
takings
C the government would be reluctant to pass any environmental legislation, since it could often be
. interpreted as taking some private party's property rights
D. environmental takings amount to expropriation of an individual's land
28. The technology available for the separation, transportation, and reprocessing of recycled materials affect
their costs and thus their ability to displace virgin materials in the production of total materials.
True False
29. The ability of a municipality to send solid waste to a landfill is affected by the scarcity of sites willing to
accept these wastes.
True False
30. When the social cost of waste disposal is not considered, consumption of a waste generating good will
equal Q2.
True False
31. Under social cost pricing of the good, consumer will pay price P1 to consume Q2 units of a waste-
generating good.
True False
32. A waste disposal fee is one way to get consumers to recycle household waste at the socially efficient
level.
True False
33. Consumers would increase their rate of recycling if there was a financial incentive for them to reduce the
weight of the garbage they are allowed to dispose of every week.
True False
34. Under social cost pricing, producers receive price P1.
True False
35. When the social cost of waste disposal is not considered, production of a waste-generating good will
equal Q1.
True False
36. A per unit tax equal to P1 - P3 would result in firms producing the socially efficient level of a waste-
generating good.
True False
37. Taxing production is one way to get firms to produce the socially efficient level of a waste-generating
good.
True False
38. A tax on virgin materials would lead firms to increase their recycling ratios.
True False
39. Although people generally receive no financial reward for their recycling efforts, it has become a widely
accepted part of Canadian culture.
True False
40. One potential problem with charging a fee per bag of waste is illegal dumping.
True False
41. When the Nature Conservancy preserves sensitive land by purchasing it this is an example of an
environmental taking.
True False
42. List the two ways that total materials can be reduced.

43. List two ways that material intensity can be reduced and give an example of each.

44. Define the reuse ratio and list three ways it can be increased.

45. List three recycling policy options and discuss their effectiveness.

46. Give four examples of various solid waste reduction and recycling activities undertaken by Canadian
provinces and municipalities.
47. Many contemporary land-use issues are related to the human use of land that substantially reduces or
destroys its environmental value. List four examples of Canadian natural capital threatened by land-use
changes.

48. List three policy options that could be employed to incorporate ecological values into land use and give
an example of each.
19 Key
1. ________ content standards require that all materials-using products manufactured or sold contain
some specified percentage of ________.
A. Maximum; recycled material
B. Minimum; recycled material
C. Maximum; virgin material
D. Minimum; virgin material
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #1
Learning Objective: 19-04 Describe ways policy actions can increase the reuse ratio.
2. ________ make up the largest percentage of all materials recycled in Canada at close to 29
percent.
A. Cardboard and boxboard
B. Newsprint
C. Organics
D. Glass
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #2
Learning Objective: 19-05 Explain the major issues municipalities face in waste disposal.
3. The fact that ________ is an argument against requiring the government to compensate private parties
for an environmental taking.
A. compensation based on the prospective value of the property in private hands could be hard to
determine
B. governments would be more careful in designing environmental policies if they had to compensate
for takings
C the government would be reluctant to pass any environmental legislation, since it could often be
. interpreted as taking some private party's property rights
D. environmental takings amount to expropriation of an individual's land
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #3
Learning Objective: 19-06 Describe policies that governments can use to incorporate ecological attributes into land use decision making.
4. The technology available for the separation, transportation, and reprocessing of recycled materials
affect their costs and thus their ability to displace virgin materials in the production of total
materials.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #4
Learning Objective: 19-01 Explain how materials use can be reduced and contrast that with reductions in materials intensity.
5. The ability of a municipality to send solid waste to a landfill is affected by the scarcity of sites willing
to accept these wastes.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #5
Learning Objective: 19-01 Explain how materials use can be reduced and contrast that with reductions in materials intensity.
The following figure depicts the market for a waste-generating good. Supply equals marginal private
cost and demand equals marginal social benefit. The marginal social cost is equal to marginal private
cost plus the marginal external cost (i.e., the marginal social cost of waste disposal).

Field - Chapter 19
6. When the social cost of waste disposal is not considered, consumption of a waste generating good will
equal Q2.
FALSE

Consumption will equal Q1 when the social costs are not considered.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #6
Learning Objective: 19-02 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient recycling of household waste.
7. Under social cost pricing of the good, consumer will pay price P1 to consume Q2 units of a waste-
generating good.
TRUE
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #7
Learning Objective: 19-02 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient recycling of household waste.
8. A waste disposal fee is one way to get consumers to recycle household waste at the socially efficient
level.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #8
Learning Objective: 19-02 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient recycling of household waste.
9. Consumers would increase their rate of recycling if there was a financial incentive for them to reduce
the weight of the garbage they are allowed to dispose of every week.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #9
Learning Objective: 19-02 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient recycling of household waste.
10. Under social cost pricing, producers receive price P1.
FALSE

Producers will receive price P3.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #10
Learning Objective: 19-03 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient pricing and production of goods.
11. When the social cost of waste disposal is not considered, production of a waste-generating good will
equal Q1.
TRUE
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #11
Learning Objective: 19-03 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient pricing and production of goods.
12. A per unit tax equal to P1 - P3 would result in firms producing the socially efficient level of a waste-
generating good.
TRUE
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #12
Learning Objective: 19-03 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient pricing and production of goods.
13. Taxing production is one way to get firms to produce the socially efficient level of a waste-generating
good.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #13
Learning Objective: 19-03 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient pricing and production of goods.
14. A tax on virgin materials would lead firms to increase their recycling ratios.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #14
Learning Objective: 19-04 Describe ways policy actions can increase the reuse ratio.
15. Although people generally receive no financial reward for their recycling efforts, it has become a
widely accepted part of Canadian culture.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #15
Learning Objective: 19-05 Explain the major issues municipalities face in waste disposal.
16. One potential problem with charging a fee per bag of waste is illegal dumping.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #16
Learning Objective: 19-05 Explain the major issues municipalities face in waste disposal.
17. When the Nature Conservancy preserves sensitive land by purchasing it this is an example of an
environmental taking.
FALSE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Moderate
Field - Chapter 19 #17
Learning Objective: 19-06 Describe policies that governments can use to incorporate ecological attributes into land use decision making.
18. List the two ways that total materials can be reduced.

Total materials equals virgin materials used plus recycled materials used. Total materials can be
reduced by: 1) reducing the rate of economic activity; and 2) reducing the quantity of materials used
per unit of production or consumption.

Difficulty: Moderate
Field - Chapter 19 #18
Learning Objective: 19-01 Explain how materials use can be reduced and contrast that with reductions in materials intensity.
19. List two ways that material intensity can be reduced and give an example of each.

Material intensity can be reduced by: 1) shifting the composition of output and consumption away
from products that use relatively large amounts of materials and toward those that use less; and 2)
decreasing the materials intensity of particular products. An example of the first method of reducing
material intensity is shifting from tangible goods to services. An example of the second method
of reducing material intensity is reducing the amount of packaging material used for goods like
electronics or food products.

Difficulty: Moderate
Field - Chapter 19 #19
Learning Objective: 19-01 Explain how materials use can be reduced and contrast that with reductions in materials intensity.
20. Define the reuse ratio and list three ways it can be increased.

The reuse ratio is the proportion of total materials that comes from recycled material so it equals
the quantity of recycled material divided by the quantity of total material. Three ways to increase
this include: 1) increase the quantity of recycled materials used while holding the quantity of total
material constant; 2) decrease the quantity of total material while holding the quantity of recycled
material constant; or 3) increase the quantity of recycled materials while simultaneously decreasing
the quantity of total material.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #20
Learning Objective: 19-04 Describe ways policy actions can increase the reuse ratio.
21. List three recycling policy options and discuss their effectiveness.

Three recycling policy options include: 1) mandatory recycling; 2) charging consumers a disposal
charge per item based on its social costs of disposal; and 3) a deposit-refund program. Mandatory
recycling has the effect of shifting consumers' purchases away from recyclable products to non-
recyclable ones, undermining the intent of the law. A disposal charge based on the social costs of
disposal for each item is not feasible in the real world given the complexities of establishing tax rates
and administering the program. A simpler alternative is to charge a fee per bag of waste disposed of
while taking recycled goods away for free. In this case the fee needs to be sufficiently high to ensure
consumers are willing to take the time to separate recyclables from their regular trash. Deposit-refund
programs can have the effect of shifting purchases away from goods with a deposit fee unless all
goods charge a deposit (ideally one equal to the costs of disposal).

Difficulty: Moderate
Field - Chapter 19 #21
Learning Objective: 19-04 Describe ways policy actions can increase the reuse ratio.
22. Give four examples of various solid waste reduction and recycling activities undertaken by Canadian
provinces and municipalities.

The answer could include any four of the following list: returnable disposal fees (e.g., returnable
deposits on beverage containers); taxes on tires, beverage containers, high-energy consuming motor
vehicles car batteries; mandatory bottle deposits; consumer fees on municipal solid waste; prohibitions
on landfilling certain products (e.g., tires); voluntary material separation and curbside recycling;
organics collection and large scale composting; recycled or recyclable labels on products; technical
assistance for recycling programs; grants and loans to municipalities for recycling programs; public
construction of waste separation and reprocessing plants; public construction of waste-to-energy
plants; tax credits and exemptions for waste-control investment by private businesses.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #22
Learning Objective: 19-05 Explain the major issues municipalities face in waste disposal.
23. Many contemporary land-use issues are related to the human use of land that substantially reduces or
destroys its environmental value. List four examples of Canadian natural capital threatened by land-
use changes.

At risk are: 1) wetlands; 2) coastal lands; 3) critical habitats such as wildlife corridors; and 4) scenic
and open land.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #23
Learning Objective: 19-06 Describe policies that governments can use to incorporate ecological attributes into land use decision making.
24. List three policy options that could be employed to incorporate ecological values into land use and
give an example of each.

Policy measures that could be employed include: 1) prohibition of specific land uses; 2) development
controls; and 3) economic incentives. An example of the first policy would be zoning bylaws
that prevent development on at-risk land. An example of the second policy would be allowing
development but requiring the installation of a public sewer system. An example of the third policy
would be giving landowners tax credits to reward conservation efforts.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #24
Learning Objective: 19-06 Describe policies that governments can use to incorporate ecological attributes into land use decision making.
25. ________ content standards require that all materials-using products manufactured or sold contain
some specified percentage of ________.
A. Maximum; recycled material
B. Minimum; recycled material
C. Maximum; virgin material
D. Minimum; virgin material
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #1
Learning Objective: 19-04 Describe ways policy actions can increase the reuse ratio.
26. ________ make up the largest percentage of all materials recycled in Canada at close to 29
percent.
A. Cardboard and boxboard
B. Newsprint
C. Organics
D. Glass
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #2
Learning Objective: 19-05 Explain the major issues municipalities face in waste disposal.
27. The fact that ________ is an argument against requiring the government to compensate private parties
for an environmental taking.
A. compensation based on the prospective value of the property in private hands could be hard to
determine
B. governments would be more careful in designing environmental policies if they had to compensate
for takings
C the government would be reluctant to pass any environmental legislation, since it could often be
. interpreted as taking some private party's property rights
D. environmental takings amount to expropriation of an individual's land
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #3
Learning Objective: 19-06 Describe policies that governments can use to incorporate ecological attributes into land use decision making.
28. The technology available for the separation, transportation, and reprocessing of recycled materials
affect their costs and thus their ability to displace virgin materials in the production of total
materials.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #4
Learning Objective: 19-01 Explain how materials use can be reduced and contrast that with reductions in materials intensity.
29. The ability of a municipality to send solid waste to a landfill is affected by the scarcity of sites willing
to accept these wastes.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #5
Learning Objective: 19-01 Explain how materials use can be reduced and contrast that with reductions in materials intensity.
30. When the social cost of waste disposal is not considered, consumption of a waste generating good will
equal Q2.
FALSE

Consumption will equal Q1 when the social costs are not considered.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #6
Learning Objective: 19-02 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient recycling of household waste.
31. Under social cost pricing of the good, consumer will pay price P1 to consume Q2 units of a waste-
generating good.
TRUE
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #7
Learning Objective: 19-02 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient recycling of household waste.
32. A waste disposal fee is one way to get consumers to recycle household waste at the socially efficient
level.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #8
Learning Objective: 19-02 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient recycling of household waste.
33. Consumers would increase their rate of recycling if there was a financial incentive for them to reduce
the weight of the garbage they are allowed to dispose of every week.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #9
Learning Objective: 19-02 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient recycling of household waste.
34. Under social cost pricing, producers receive price P1.
FALSE

Producers will receive price P3.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #10
Learning Objective: 19-03 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient pricing and production of goods.
35. When the social cost of waste disposal is not considered, production of a waste-generating good will
equal Q1.
TRUE
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #11
Learning Objective: 19-03 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient pricing and production of goods.
36. A per unit tax equal to P1 - P3 would result in firms producing the socially efficient level of a waste-
generating good.
TRUE
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #12
Learning Objective: 19-03 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient pricing and production of goods.
37. Taxing production is one way to get firms to produce the socially efficient level of a waste-generating
good.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #13
Learning Objective: 19-03 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient pricing and production of goods.
38. A tax on virgin materials would lead firms to increase their recycling ratios.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #14
Learning Objective: 19-04 Describe ways policy actions can increase the reuse ratio.
39. Although people generally receive no financial reward for their recycling efforts, it has become a
widely accepted part of Canadian culture.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #15
Learning Objective: 19-05 Explain the major issues municipalities face in waste disposal.
40. One potential problem with charging a fee per bag of waste is illegal dumping.
TRUE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #16
Learning Objective: 19-05 Explain the major issues municipalities face in waste disposal.
41. When the Nature Conservancy preserves sensitive land by purchasing it this is an example of an
environmental taking.
FALSE
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Difficulty: Moderate
Field - Chapter 19 #17
Learning Objective: 19-06 Describe policies that governments can use to incorporate ecological attributes into land use decision making.
42. List the two ways that total materials can be reduced.

Total materials equals virgin materials used plus recycled materials used. Total materials can be
reduced by: 1) reducing the rate of economic activity; and 2) reducing the quantity of materials used
per unit of production or consumption.

Difficulty: Moderate
Field - Chapter 19 #18
Learning Objective: 19-01 Explain how materials use can be reduced and contrast that with reductions in materials intensity.
43. List two ways that material intensity can be reduced and give an example of each.

Material intensity can be reduced by: 1) shifting the composition of output and consumption away
from products that use relatively large amounts of materials and toward those that use less; and 2)
decreasing the materials intensity of particular products. An example of the first method of reducing
material intensity is shifting from tangible goods to services. An example of the second method
of reducing material intensity is reducing the amount of packaging material used for goods like
electronics or food products.

Difficulty: Moderate
Field - Chapter 19 #19
Learning Objective: 19-01 Explain how materials use can be reduced and contrast that with reductions in materials intensity.
44. Define the reuse ratio and list three ways it can be increased.

The reuse ratio is the proportion of total materials that comes from recycled material so it equals
the quantity of recycled material divided by the quantity of total material. Three ways to increase
this include: 1) increase the quantity of recycled materials used while holding the quantity of total
material constant; 2) decrease the quantity of total material while holding the quantity of recycled
material constant; or 3) increase the quantity of recycled materials while simultaneously decreasing
the quantity of total material.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #20
Learning Objective: 19-04 Describe ways policy actions can increase the reuse ratio.
45. List three recycling policy options and discuss their effectiveness.

Three recycling policy options include: 1) mandatory recycling; 2) charging consumers a disposal
charge per item based on its social costs of disposal; and 3) a deposit-refund program. Mandatory
recycling has the effect of shifting consumers' purchases away from recyclable products to non-
recyclable ones, undermining the intent of the law. A disposal charge based on the social costs of
disposal for each item is not feasible in the real world given the complexities of establishing tax rates
and administering the program. A simpler alternative is to charge a fee per bag of waste disposed of
while taking recycled goods away for free. In this case the fee needs to be sufficiently high to ensure
consumers are willing to take the time to separate recyclables from their regular trash. Deposit-refund
programs can have the effect of shifting purchases away from goods with a deposit fee unless all
goods charge a deposit (ideally one equal to the costs of disposal).

Difficulty: Moderate
Field - Chapter 19 #21
Learning Objective: 19-04 Describe ways policy actions can increase the reuse ratio.
46. Give four examples of various solid waste reduction and recycling activities undertaken by Canadian
provinces and municipalities.

The answer could include any four of the following list: returnable disposal fees (e.g., returnable
deposits on beverage containers); taxes on tires, beverage containers, high-energy consuming motor
vehicles car batteries; mandatory bottle deposits; consumer fees on municipal solid waste; prohibitions
on landfilling certain products (e.g., tires); voluntary material separation and curbside recycling;
organics collection and large scale composting; recycled or recyclable labels on products; technical
assistance for recycling programs; grants and loans to municipalities for recycling programs; public
construction of waste separation and reprocessing plants; public construction of waste-to-energy
plants; tax credits and exemptions for waste-control investment by private businesses.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #22
Learning Objective: 19-05 Explain the major issues municipalities face in waste disposal.
47. Many contemporary land-use issues are related to the human use of land that substantially reduces or
destroys its environmental value. List four examples of Canadian natural capital threatened by land-
use changes.

At risk are: 1) wetlands; 2) coastal lands; 3) critical habitats such as wildlife corridors; and 4) scenic
and open land.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #23
Learning Objective: 19-06 Describe policies that governments can use to incorporate ecological attributes into land use decision making.
48. List three policy options that could be employed to incorporate ecological values into land use and
give an example of each.

Policy measures that could be employed include: 1) prohibition of specific land uses; 2) development
controls; and 3) economic incentives. An example of the first policy would be zoning bylaws
that prevent development on at-risk land. An example of the second policy would be allowing
development but requiring the installation of a public sewer system. An example of the third policy
would be giving landowners tax credits to reward conservation efforts.

Difficulty: Easy
Field - Chapter 19 #24
Learning Objective: 19-06 Describe policies that governments can use to incorporate ecological attributes into land use decision making.
19 Summary
Category # of Questions
Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation 24
Difficulty: Easy 40
Difficulty: Moderate 8
Field - Chapter 19 49
Learning Objective: 19-01 Explain how materials use can be reduced and contrast that with reductions in materials intensity. 8
Learning Objective: 19-02 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient recycling of household waste. 8
Learning Objective: 19-03 Explain and illustrate graphically efficient versus inefficient pricing and production of goods. 8
Learning Objective: 19-04 Describe ways policy actions can increase the reuse ratio. 8
Learning Objective: 19-05 Explain the major issues municipalities face in waste disposal. 8
Learning Objective: 19- 8
06 Describe policies that governments can use to incorporate ecological attributes into land use decision making.