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Thebian Script:

ABCDEF

GHI/JKLM

NOPQRS

T U / V / W X Y Z End
of
sentence
Alphabet of the Magi
Origin
The Alphabet of the Magi was invented by Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim (also known
as Paracelsus) in the 16th century. He used it to engrave the names of angels on talismans which he
claimed could treat illnesses and provide protection. It was probably influenced by the various
other magical alphabets that were around at the time and also by the Hebrew script.

The Alphabet of the Magi


Angelic alphabet
Origin
The Angelic alphabet, which is also known as the Celestial alphabet, is derived from the Hebrew
and Greek alphabets. It was created by Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa during the 16th Century and
was used for communication with angels.

Notable features
• Type of writing system: alphabet
• Direction of writing: left to right in horizontal lines

The Angelic alphabet


Daggers alphabet
Origin
The Daggers alphabet or Alphabet of Daggers, is cypher based on the Latin alphabet and used for
magical purposes. It appears in Aleister Crowley's The Vision and the Voice.

Notable features
• Type of writing system: alphabet
• Direction of writing: left to right in horizontal lines

The Daggers alphabet


Enochian alphabet
Origin
The Enochian alphabet first appeared during the 16th century. The Court Astrologer and Magician,
Dr. John Dee (1527-1608) and his associate, Sir Edward Kelly (1555-1597) claimed that the
alphabet and the Enochian language was transmitted to them by angels.

The alphabet is used in the practice of Enochian Magic on Enochian Calls or Keys, which are used
to call angels.

The Enochian alphabet


Malachim alphabet
Origin
The Malachim alphabet is derived from the Hebrew and Greek alphabets. It was created by
Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa during the 16th Century and is still used by Freemasons to a limited
extent. This version is from Bartolozzi's Biblioteca Magna Rabbinica, 1675.

Notable features
• Type of writing system: alphabet
• Direction of writing: left to right in horizontal lines

The Malachim alphabet


Passing the River alphabet
Origin
The Passing the River or Passage du Fleuve alphabet is derived from the Hebrew alphabet and was
created by Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa during the 16th Century.

Notable features
• Type of writing system: abjad
• Direction of writing: left to right in horizontal lines

The Passing the River / Passage du Fleuve alphabet


Aramaic/Proto-Hebrew alphabet
Origins
The Early Aramaic or Proto-Hebrew alphabet was developed sometime during the late 10th or
early 9th century BC and replaced Assyrian cuneiform as the main writing system of the Assyrian
empire. This alphabet is thought to be the ancestor of a number of Semitic alphabets as well as the
Kharosthi alphabet. At the end of the 6th century BC the Early Aramaic alphabet was replaced by
the Hebrew square script which is also known as the Aramaic alphabet.

Notable features
• This is a consonant alphabet with no vowel indication.
• Written from right to left in horizontal lines.

Used to write
Aramaic, a language which was the lingua franca of much of the Near East from about 7th century
BC until the 7th century AD, when it was largely replaced by Arabic. Classical or Imperial
Aramaic was the main language of the Persian, Babylonian and Assyrian empires and spread as far
as Greece and the Indus valley.

After Alexander the Great destroyed the Persian Empire, Aramaic ceased to be the official
language of any major state, though continued to be spoken widely. It was during this period that
Aramaic split into western and eastern dialects.

Aramaic was once the main language of the Jews and appears in some of the Dead Sea Scrolls. It
is still used as a liturgical language by Christian communities in Syria, Lebanon and Iraq, and is
still spoken by small numbers of people in Iraq, Turkey, Iran, Armenia, Georgia and Syria.

Aramaic has also been written in versions of the Latin, Hebrew and Cyrillic alphabets, though the
Syriac is the most widely used script to write Aramaic.

Proto-Hebrew/Early Aramaic alphabet


"Half of man's wisdom is knowing where it ends" (Golem Script)