Energy Reduction and Sustainability through Total Energy Management (TEM

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Santiago Archila sarchila@husky.ca Sean Golzarian sgolzarian@husky.ca November 2009

Agenda
• Energy reduction and sustainability through •
implementation of “Total Energy Management” program Assisting our injection molders to achieve sustainability through “TEM” program

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Manufacturing Advisory Services
Provide operational consulting, design and project management services to support our existing and prospective customers
1. Consulting and Advisory Services
• • • • Comprehensive plant & operational assessment Operational performance improvement & implementation Facility planning and optimization Total Energy Management Program

2. Building and Infrastructure Planning and Design 3. Project Management and Turnkey services

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83% of total emissions is CO2 related

1900

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1980

1990

2000

2008

40% of CO2 emissions is due to producing electricity

forecasted global CO2 is expected to increase by 36% over 1990 levels by 2010

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Source: US Energy Information Administration

CO2 Emission due to Electricity Production

6.300 MW reduction in peak demand by 2025 (most ambitious target in North America) 5 Legislated Actions to Reduce Carbon Footprint .Carbon Cap-and-Trade United States: • New carbon cap-and-trade program calls for 14% below 2005 levels by 2020 and 83% below by 2050 • Energy intensive manufacturers would be forced to identify energy reduction opportunities (compliant with ISO 50001) Canada: • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% from 2006 levels by 2020 • In Ontario.

.. number of machines. geographical location.Bottle manufacturer in US 6 * Costs vary based on markets.Consumer manufacturer in US . etc.Costs Breakdown in Typical Molding Plants • “Energy” could be the same or more than “Direct labor” * • Approximately 70% of cost savings are focused on direct labor Other controllable expenses 2% Energy 6% Maintenance 2% Payroll benefits 7% Occupancy 4% Depreciation 5% Energy 5% Labor 3% Building & Infrastructure 3% Maitenance 1% Primary Equipment 10% Material 59% Indirect labor 9% Direct labor 6% Material 78% .

Two Approaches to Reduce Cost 1. Reduce the amount of energy used (KW/lb): • Certain utility companies offer programs that provide molders rebates towards the purchase and installation of qualified equipment that improves their facility’s energy efficiency The two approaches alone without an “Energy Management 7 Program” is not sustainable . Reduce the cost of energy used through acquisition to reduce the $/ kWh • • Numerous consulting firms provide “Negotiation and risk mitigation” services Alternative Energy generation 2.

and monitor energy related KPIs to continuously reduce and sustain energy consumption 8 .Total Energy Management • Implementation of policies and procedures to measure. set targets.

Low-cost.Magnitude of Savings • Energy cost can be reduced by up to 30% for most plastics • processing plants Savings can be achieved through a combination of No-cost. and Investment actions 30% Energy cost savings Organizational / Management Maintenance Capital Investment 9 .

and Prioritize opportunities 7 .Conduct internal and external benchmarking 9 .Husky Total Energy Management Program Estimate and verify site energy profile Understand your “Base” and “Process” loads Understand when and how much energy is used Monitoring and Targeting – Understand Where energy is used 5 .Data analysis and reporting energy KPIs (Energy dashboard) by department 6 .Repeat the steps – Continuous improvement 10 1234- .Eliminate waste and reduce consumption through Implementation of selected energy reduction projects 8 .Identify. Quantify.

2% Feed Systems 1.9% Process Water system 16.7% Measured consumption break down Cranes 0.6% Compressed air 8.5% Film Extruder 4.0% Handle Machines 1.3% Thermoformer 2.4% Feed Systems 1.3% Injection Molding Machine 51.9% Wrapping Machines 0.7% Printers 4.0% Handle Machines 1.5% 11 .1% Plant Lighting 9.1% Injection Molding Machine 56.1% Plant Lighting 8.5% Thermoformer 2.3% Film Extruder 2.1.5% Wrapping Machines 0.6% Cranes 0.8% Printers 4.1% Process Water system 16.Estimate and Verify Site Energy Profile • • Estimated site energy profile based on audited equipment Verify estimated energy profile through actual on-site measurements Estimated consumption break down Compressed air 5.

000 250.000 400.000 300.000 200.000 100.000 350.000 700.Identify Base & Process Loads • Energy has variable and fixed costs and both can be affected • Performance Characteristic Line (PCL) provides an operational signature of the plant that is closely related to the way the plant management runs the plant 800.000 150.000 50.2 .000 400.000 200.000 500.000 100.000 Energy usage (KWh) 600.000 12 Production volume (Kg or Lb) .000 300.

The less the better Base loads energy usage reduction are generally easy to make. and have rapid payback (low hanging fruits) 13 Performance Characteristic Line (PCL) .000 50.000 200.000 700.000 Base load Production volume (Kg or Lb) • Base load is effectively your “Energy overhead” and is the energy • • consumption with No production output Base loads are typically 10% to 40% of the average total load .000 Energy usage (K h) W 600.000 100.000 150.000 400.000 300. low in cost.000 350.000 250.000 300.000 100.000 500.000 200.800.000 400.

57 Base load 50.000 250.000 200.000 350.000 150.000 - Slope = 1.6 Kwh/Kg (0.72 KWh/ Lb) production volume – High R2 (low scatter) means good correlation between energy usage and production volume 14 • Correlation coefficient (R2) indicates linearity between energy usage and Performance Characteristic Line (PCL) .000 100.000 100.000 200. • The less the better Plant process loads are typically in the region of 0.000 500.000 Production volume (Kg or Lb) • Slope of the line indicates the average plant process load (Kwh/ Kg or Lb).000 400.6 to 1.000 300.000 700.96 Energy usage (K h) W 600.36 to 0.000 R2 = 0.800.000 400.000 300.

3 – Understand “When” and “How much” Average PF of 0.9 Peak at 1.84 Goal to be above 0.700KW Base load at 300KW (25% of average load) Goal to be @ 10% of average load 15 .

Understand “Where” • Monitoring & Targeting .Sub-metering to understand Where energy is used – Husky’s installed three main meters and fifteen sub-meters in one building 16 .4 – Monitoring & Targeting .

000 Month 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 -50000 -100000 17 Month .000 -30.000 -40.000 0 -10.000 D e v ia tio n fro m p re d ic te d (K W h ) 30.5 – Data Analysis and Energy KPIs – – – – – SPC analysis for energy usage Energy profile Cost allocation and budgeting Forecasting energy consumption per department Variance analysis (Deviation between actual and predicted energy) 400000 350000 300000 CUSUM (KWh) 250000 200000 150000 100000 50000 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Target CUSUM Original CUSUM 40.000 20.000 -20.000 10.

deviation from predicted and target energy usage Electricity cost and production volume by month 18 .Energy on Management Agenda Reporting energy KPIs (Energy dashboard) by department – – – – – Electrical cost as % of production cost Monthly deviation from predicted and target energy usage Cumulative deviation from predicted and target energy usage Electricity cost and production volume by month Status of energy reduction projects Electrical cost as % of production cost Monthly deviation from predicted and target energy usage Cum.

Data analysis and reporting energy KPIs (Energy dashboard) by department 6 .Identify.Repeat the steps – Continuous improvement 19 1234- .Husky Total Energy Management Program Estimate and verify site energy profile Understand your “Base” and “Process” loads Understand when and how much energy is used Monitoring and Targeting – Understand Where energy is used 5 . Quantify.Conduct internal and external benchmarking 9 . and Prioritize opportunities 7 .Eliminate waste and reduce consumption through Implementation of selected energy reduction projects 8 .

Typical Part Cost Break Down ENERGY HVAC 8% Lighting 3% Air compressors 6% Others 1% Mold cooling 12% Machines 50% Dryers 20% Energy 3% 3%5% to Equipment 5% Labour 2% Infrastructure 2% Maintenance 2% Resin 86% 20 .

00 Screw % increase in Chillers' COP 15.00 Reciprocating 5.00 Absorption 0.5% reduction in energy 1oF Lighting 3% Mold cooling 12% HVAC 8% Air compressors 6% Others 1% Machines 50% Dryers 20% 20.00 Centrifugal 10.00 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 Leaving chilled water temperature (F) 21 Mold Cooling .• Typically every increase in leaving water temperature from chillers results to 1% to 1.Chiller Types .

22 Free Cooling .

compared to 4. 50oF vs.5° C 20 Temperature (degC) 15 10 5 40F 33F 1/3/2008 2/22/2008 4/12/2008 6/1/2008 Date 7/21/2008 9/9/2008 10/29/2008 12/18/2008 2/6/2009 23 0 11/14/2007 Free Cooling – Case Study – Middlesex. $11K / year Temperature vs. UK .5° C.Middlesex UK 25 15% of the year is colder than 4.5C) (including dry cooler and heat exchanger approach) • Estimated savings around $40k / year vs. 43oF LWT: • 15% of the year with 40oF (4. Time .5C) (including dry cooler and heat exchanger approach) • 4% of the year with 33oF (0.26% of the year colder than 0.Effect of Chilled Water Temperature on free Cooling: PET mold.

Time . 50oF vs. UK .Effect of Chilled Water Temperature on mold dehumidification: PET mold.Middlesex. year below 6° C 10 50F 43F 5 0 -5 24 -10 Dehumidification – Case Study . 43oF LWT: • 72% of the year dew point is less than 50oF • 42% of the year dew point is less than 43oF Dew Point vs.Middlesex UK 11/14/2007 20 1/3/2008 2/22/2008 4/12/2008 6/1/2008 Date 7/21/2008 9/9/2008 10/29/2008 12/18/2008 2/6/2009 15 Temperature (degC) 72% of the year the dew point is less than 10° compared to 42% of the C.

55 kwh/Ton).000KW + (250 Ton+) – COP (KWth/ KWe) of 6 to 10 or (0. controls or downtime costs – Improved heat transfer efficiency • Uses centrifugal compression technology. variable speed drive compressor – No oil management hardware. previously limited to large chillers 2. Better energy consumption than scroll compressors – Similar capital costs to a regular air cooled chiller • Quiet operation – 70dBA sound with virtually no vibration • Compact – 50% less footprint and 1/4 to 1/5 the weight of traditional compressors 25 .Turbocor – Micro Centrifugal Compressors • New compressor technology • Oil-free.

Machine Cooling Options Cooling Towers Dry Coolers Clean water to process No scale or corrosion Minimal maintenance Reduced energy consumption • No water disposal • No water treatment chemical consumption • • pipes • • High water and chemical • • Contamination in water • Scale and oxidation in consumption • Cost of water disposal 26 .

DC Variable Speed Fans – Extremely low energy consumption Less than 20 times less water than tower kW / fan 2. Self-Draining . 3.00 0. ( C ) 40 60 80 100 27 Dry Coolers .50 0 20 OUT DOOR T E M P . 4. little maintenance.50 1. 2. Works in all climates. Adiabatic Cooling – Maintains ability to deliver cool water even in HOT ambient conditions with minimal water consumption.00 1.Freeze protection without requirement for Antifreeze/Glycols.1.

28 Cascading Use of Energy .

Traditional systems – Roof top DX units – Central chillers and air handling units 2.HVAC 8% Lighting 3% Mold cooling 12% Dryers 20% Air Others compressors 1% 6% Machines 50% 1. Displacement ventilation 29 Air Conditioning .

400 Cooling Size (kW) Displacement Ventilation 1.Displacement Ventilation Traditional Ventilation 0 200 879 315 26% less Up to 26% less capital cost 1.200 1.000 1.194 400 600 800 1.118 49% less Up to 49% less operational cost Traditional Ventilation 0 500 2.500 C hiller Thermal Energy Use / Year (M W H/Yr) 30 Traditional air conditioning Displacement Ventilation Air Conditioning .154 1.500 2.272 1.000 2.000 1.

04 Estimated Savings $28.08kWh/kg all electric 2200Lb/hr Energy Traditional (kWh/Lb) 0. 8000hrs/yr Advanced Technology Resin Dryer .063 New (kWh/Lb) 0.Lighting 3% HVAC 8% Air compressors Others 6% 1% • Variable throughput feature – Controlled residence time – Optimized air flow Mold cooling 12% Machines 50% Dryers 20% • Energy recovery system – Up to 25% of the required temperature rise for free • Energy efficient – < 0.000/ Year 31 $0.07/kWh .

Air compressors 6% HVAC 8% Others 1% • Compressors are only 5-15% • efficient Compressed air is expensive energy – At point of use compressed air costs 10 times more than equivalent quantity of electrical power Lighting 3% Mold cooling 12% Machines 50% Dryers 20% • Most of the cost of a compressor is in the energy it uses Maintenance. 15% Energy cost. 75% 32 Compressed Air . 10% Capital cost.

300 33 One 1/4" leak is equal to 300 60-watt lamps! .Operating Conditions Influence Energy Costs • Part load operation – 40–80% of full kW at part load • System pressure – each 5psi = up to 5% more power • Air inlet temperature – each 7oF lower = 1% more air • Pipe sizing – Each 5psi drop = 2% more energy • Leaks commonly constitute 25% of total compressed air use Size 1/4” CFM 104 HP 26 $/Yr $15.

4 KW) Functioning MH Consumes 400W Light level: 400 LUX Dirty MH Consumes 400W Light level: 150 LUX 80% burnt MH Consumes 400W Light level: 100 LUX Burnt MH Consumes 60W Light level: 0 LUX 34 Lighting .2 KW) Metal Halide (0.Lighting 3% HVAC 8% Air compressors 6% Others 1% Mold cooling 12% Dryers 20% Machines 50% Fluoresce T5 (0.

Lighting 3% Mold cooling 12% HVAC 8% Air compressors 6% Others 1% Dryers 20% Machines 50% Base Line Exit Temperature Faster Cycle Exit Temperature35 Effect of Cycle Time on Energy .

76 Husky-HL160RS55/50 30.440 0.Effect of Cycle Time on Energy • 6% overall reduction in cycle times and energy consumption (KW/ Kg) Equipment Description Measured Power Factor Power (kW) 480V Cycle Time (sec) 13.811 0.76 12.4 Part Weight (g) 174 Number of Parts per Cycle 1 Machine Process Load (kW/kgHr) 0.651 Before After Husky-HL160RS55/50 30.613 Percent improvement 6% 6% 36 .6 174 1 0.

Power Conditioning Corrects power quality problems: • Balances voltage across all three phases • Balances current across all three phases • Decrease voltage fluctuations • Mitigates harmonics • Corrects power factor • Suppresses surges and transient to reduce • • the chance of equipment damage Protects equipment from brownouts (option) Protects equipment from intermittent supply failure 37 .

Examples of Contributors to Base Load • • • • • Thermolators • • • Raising chilled water above ambient wet bulb temperature Un-optimized water temperature Leakage Setting temperature too low Leaving doors open Chillers Air compressors A/C • • Grinders 38 .

Action Plan • Start with auditing your plant – Most utility providers offer financial incentives to cover portions or all of the audit cost – Some utility providers offer programs that provide rebates towards the purchase and installation of qualified equipment that improves their facility’s energy efficiency • Implement an “Energy Management Program” • Husky’s “Manufacturing Advisory Services” team can assist you in developing and implementing a TEM program for your facility 39 .

Contacts • Santiago Archila. Ext. 3810 • Sean Golzarian. – sgolzarian@husky.ca – 905-951-5000. – sarchila@husky. Ext.husky.ca 40 .ca – 905-951-5000. 3550 • Husky website: www.

ca Sean Golzarian sgolzarian@husky.ca November 2009 .Energy Reduction and Sustainability through Total Energy Management (TEM) Santiago Archila sarchila@husky.

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