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About This Lesson

DESCRIPTION
This lesson will take place during a first grade (students are 6-7 years old) small group pull-out. This pull-out will
take place in the resource room which contains a plethora of low-technology and high-technology tools.
Students will also have their own device (laptop) that will be brought with them to the resource room. These
technology tools include an interactive SmartBoard, specialty pencils and pencil grips, highlighters,
manipulatives, and soft seat cushions. Students will also have access to materials in the classroom (pencils,
markers, scissors, and etcetera).

Daisy
Daisy has been identified as Gifted and Talented. She is performing a whole grade level above her peers in
reading, writing, and mathematics. Daisy often gets bored during classroom instruction and has difficulty with
remaining motivated. Oftentimes, Daisy will not finish her work and instead disrupt her peers with off-topic
conversations. With appropriate, academic challenges, Daisy does enjoy participating in cooperative group
activities, discussions, and sharing her ideas with her peers. Daisy also enjoys doing research projects and
engaging creative writing opportunities.

Mateo

Mateo just moved to the United States with his parents and his little sister. Mateo loves futbol (soccer), music,
and technology, especially his iPad. He speaks Spanish fluently. Mateo has had little education in the English
language and only knows rudimentary English vocabulary and directions. He struggles at reading and writing in
the English language. Mateo attends an ESOL class for an hour every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Mateo is a bright student and has a great understanding of math, and when the textbook and instructions are
translated, has a wonderful understanding of science. When given repeated verbal directions, coupled with
visual supports, he is able to complete tasks. Mateo also excels when activities and assignments are first
modeled through hands-on activities.

Mike
Mike has been identified as having a learning disability. He struggles to read grade level text and is unable to
comprehend what he has read. Data collected by his teacher suggests he is reading three levels below his peers.
When material is read to him, however, he can answer questions with a high degree of accuracy. When asked to
read aloud in class or to respond verbally to written direction, Mike often becomes verbally abusive to the
teacher and his classmates. In the area of expressive oral language, Mike demonstrates the ability to describe
scenes, give directions, and explain steps. However, in written expression, Mike scores significantly below his
peers in his ability to spell words used in everyday writing and to compose and write an organized, complete
letter. His understanding of mathematical concepts seems strong, but his academic progress in math is hindered
by his difficulties with reading and writing.

Jamal

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Jamal, a young boy with cerebral palsy, is an enthusiastic student, well on his way to becoming an expert on
military tanks and submarines. From his home computer he has found and collected hundreds of photos, stories,
and websites devoted to these mobile weapons. Jamal uses a wheelchair for mobility. Jamal speaks quite slowly
and his speech is often unintelligible. With great difficulty, he can write and draw with pen and paper. He is
much more successful using his computer with an expanded keyboard.

Jamal is barely keeping up in the mainstream classroom, in part because of increasing amounts of reading and
writing. Science and social studies particularly engage him, and he uses his strong strategic skills (such as his
ability to seek, locate, and save information) to good effect in these classes. However, because of his motor
difficulties, Jamal must invest tremendous effort just to keep pace, and at times he becomes discouraged.

PREREQUISITES
- Students will need to be able to know numbers 0-20 and the relationship between those numbers and
quantities. Students will need to use their prior knowledge from kindergarten that when counting a set, the last
number represents the total number of objects in the set.
- Students will need to have the ability to represent addition processes in a variety of ways using manipulatives.
- Students will need to have the knowledge that putting together and adding to are processes of addition.

ESTIMATED TIME
45 minutes

Potential Use
PURPOSE:
Small Group

GRADE:
First Grade

CONTENT AREAS:
Math

COMMON CORE:
Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction

1.OA.A.1 Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of
adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all
positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown
number to represent the problem.

Goal
INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL

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Students will demonstrate how to solve word problems using addition and subtraction within 20.

OBJECTIVE(S)
Students will be able to solve addition word problems.

VARIABILITY
Part 1: Variability for All:
Options to Support Engagement:
- Students have the option to choose from a variety of flexible seating options to meet their sensory
needs in order to keep their engagement throughout the lesson. (9.2 facilitate personal coping skills are
strategies)
- Students will have the option to either follow the mathematical story through a paper copy or on the
interactive smartboard. Each child can choose their preferred way. (7.1 optimize individual choice and
autonomy)
- Throughout the story, students will have the opportunity to insert numbers on the smartboard, solve
problems, and highlight important parts of the text. (8.2 vary demands and resources to optimize
challenge)
- Students will be asked throughout the interactive story and activity following, a variety of questions to
ensure students are following along, are engaged, and are comprehending the material. (8.3 foster
collaboration and communication)
- When students are answering questions, peers will be able to respond whether they agree with a
thumb up or down. Students will also be able to use the variety of cards on a ring provided for them
(labeled from 0-20) to answer questions asked. (8.3 foster collaboration and communication)

Options to Support Representation:


- The interactive book will also be in paper format. Students have the option to follow along through the
paper copy, on their device, or through the smartboard where the story will be displayed. (1.3 offer
alternatives for visual information)
- When questions about the word problems are asked, students can use a pencil or pen to write their
numbers on their book, or use their number cards provided to answer each question. (2.5 illustrate
through multiple media)
- Addition posters will be displayed around the classroom that show two parts making a whole. There
will be posters in English and in Spanish. (2.4 promote understanding across languages)
- Verbal directions will be given to students, along with written directions with pictures. Each student
will be given their own schedule that has pictures of what they will be doing to have a visual
representation. For students who need directions in Spanish, they will receive a schedule that is in
Spanish with visuals. (2.4 promote understanding across languages) (1.1 offer ways of customizing the
display of information)
- Students have the option to complete the tube math activity that involves physical involvement, use a
math graphic organizer with manipulatives, or use an app on their device to solve the word problems.
(2.5 illustrate through multiple media)
- Word problems will be displayed to students, but will also be read. Students may use their devices to
translate the word problems from text to speech. (1.2 offer alternatives for auditory information) (2.3
support decoding text, mathematical notion, and symbols)

Options to Support Action and Expression:

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- Students have the option to display their answers during the story through writing their answers in
their book, using their device, or showing a number card on their ring set. (4.1 vary the methods for
response and navigation)
- Students will be able to use manipulatives to assist them in solving their word problems. Students can
use stacking cubes, chips, bears, drawings, etc. (5.2 use multiple tools for construction and composition)
- Students have the opportunity to write or stamp their answers to record their answers on their
worksheets. Students who have devices, will also have access to the worksheet from their device. . (4.1
vary the methods for response and navigation)
- Students will be able to draw a picture, use a communication device, or manipulatives to explain their
reasoning for solving each word problem. (5.1 use multiple media for communication)

Part 2: Accommodations/Modifications for Specific Students:


Jamal:
- During this activity, Jamal can use an AAC device to assist him in communicating to adults and peers.
- He will have access to his computer and will be able to access the interactive story through his computer or an
iPad.
- Jamal has the choice to complete the worksheet for the activity on his computer, or with a slant board and
adaptive pencil.
- The activity will be made so it is accessible to him by wheelchair, if he chooses to do the activity using the tubes
and basket. If he does not wish to choose the traditional method, then he can complete the activity with
manipulatives.

Mike:
- Mike will have the directions verbally explained to him, along with written directions that have pictures
explaining them.
- He will have the word problems read to him by a text-to-speech software called Claro PDF Pro Reader
- Mike will have the opportunity to draw a picture on his worksheet of how he solved different word problems
to show his understanding, but will be encouraged to write numbers. He will also have the opportunity to stamp
numbers to show his answers.
- He will have access to highlighters and graphic organizers to assist him in organizing important information in
each word problem.
- He will also be able to use a text to speech app to help him process what each word problem is saying.

Assessments

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENTS
Objectives: Students will be able to solve addition word problems.

Throughout the story, students will be asked what the important numbers are in each word problem. The
students can either go up to the board and highlight the numbers, write the numbers, or show me on their
number ring what the numbers are. This will show me students are able to pull out the important information in
the text. If students are not able to show this understanding, I will highlight the important numbers and
information and model how I knew they were important. I will ask questions of how we will take that
information and apply it to producing a problem. Students will be able to drag numbers in their appropriate
boxes on the smartboard, write it in their booklet, or use their device to answer. If students do not show an

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understanding of this I will continue to model how to set up addition problems and have students use
manipulatives with me to solve these problems. When students are working together in the activity following
the book, I will be asking students why they set up their problems the way they did, or what they did to solve
the problem to assess their knowledge on solving addition word problems. If students are having difficulty
working with one another to solve these problems, students will come back to the carpet, and we will solve the
problems together as a whole group.

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENTS
Students will be completing a worksheet that has each word problem the students will be working on, along
with boxes to set up their addition problems. Students will come back to the carpet towards the end of the
lesson and reflect on the activity they just completed. Questions asked may be, how did you choose to solve
each problem, if you chose different methods which worked the best for you, how did you solve number one
(two, three, etc.), how did you set up your problem for number one (two, three, etc.), how did you know to set
your problem up like that, can you show us how you solved this problem. Students can answer verbally, show
their worksheet on the document camera, demonstrate how they solved using manipulatives, or use their
communication device. These questions along with the completed worksheet will help me in assessing my
students knowledge on solving addition word problems. If it is evident the students are struggling, I will reteach
the lesson and find where students are having their difficulties. If the problems are too wordy, I will shorten
them. If the worksheet is too complicated, I will reformat the worksheet, or go around to each student
individually and assess them or choose another method to complete a summative assessment.

Instructional Methods
Options to Support Engagement:
- Students have the option to choose from a variety of seating options to meet their sensory needs in
order to keep their engagement throughout the lesson. (9.2 facilitate personal coping skills are
strategies)
- Students will have the option to either follow the mathematical story through a paper copy or on the
interactive smartboard. Each child can choose their preferred way. (7.1 optimize individual choice and
autonomy)
- Throughout the story, students will have the opportunity to insert numbers on the smartboard, solve
problems, and highlight important parts of the text. (8.2 vary demands and resources to optimize
challenge)
- Students will be asked throughout the interactive story and activity following, a variety of questions to
ensure students are following along, are engaged, and are comprehending the material. (8.3 foster
collaboration and communication)
- When students are answering questions, peers will be able to respond whether they agree with a
thumb up or down. Students will also be able to use the variety of cards on a ring provided for them
(labeled from 0-20) to answer questions asked. (8.3 foster collaboration and communication)
- Students will be proposed with a problem that the teacher came across with real candy bars. (7.2
optimize relevance, value, and authenticity)

Options to Support Representation:


- The interactive book will also be in paper format. Students have the option to follow along through the
paper copy, on their device, or through the smartboard where the story will be displayed. (1.3 offer
alternatives for visual information)

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- When questions about the word problems are asked, students can use a pencil or pen to write their
numbers on their book, or use their number cards provided to answer each question. (2.5 illustrate
through multiple media)
- Addition posters will be displayed around the classroom that show two parts making a whole. There
will be posters in English and in Spanish. (2.4 promote understanding across languages)
- Verbal directions will be given to students, along with written directions with pictures. Each student
will be given their own schedule that has pictures of what they will be doing to have a visual
representation. For students who need directions in Spanish, they will receive a schedule that is in both
Spanish with visuals. (2.4 promote understanding across languages) (1.1 offer ways of customizing the
display of information)
- Students have the option to complete the tube math activity that involves physical involvement, use a
math graphic organizer with manipulatives, or use an app on their device to solve the word problems.
(2.5 illustrate through multiple media)
- Word problems will be displayed to students, but will also be read. Students may use their devices to
translate the word problems from text to speech. (1.2 offer alternatives for auditory information) (2.3
support decoding text, mathematical notion, and symbols)

Options to Support Action and Expression:


- Students have the option to display their answers during the story through writing their answers in
their book, using their device, or showing a number card on their ring set. (4.1 vary the methods for
response and navigation)
- Students will be able to use manipulatives to assist them in solving their word problems. Students can
use stacking cubes, chips, bears, drawings, etc. (5.2 use multiple tools for construction and composition)
- Students have the opportunity to write or stamp their answers to record their answers on their
worksheets. Students who have devices, will also have access to the worksheet from their device. . (4.1
vary the methods for response and navigation)
- Students will be able to draw a picture, use a communication device, or manipulatives to explain their
reasoning for solving each word problem. (5.1 use multiple media for communication)

Jamal:
- During this activity, Jamal can use an AAC device to assist him in communicating to adults and his
peers.
- He will have access to his computer and will be able to access the interactive story through his
computer or an iPad.
- Jamal has the choice to complete the worksheet for the activity on his computer, or with a slant board
and adaptive pencil.
- The activity will be made so it is accessible to him by wheelchair, if he chooses to do the activity using
the tubes and basket. If he does not wish to choose the traditional method, then he can complete the
activity with manipulatives.

Mike:
- Mike will have the directions verbally explained to him, along with written directions that have pictures
explaining them.
- He will have the word problems read to him or read by a peer.

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- Mike will have the opportunity to draw a picture on his worksheet of how he solved different word
problems to show his understanding, but will be encouraged to write numbers. He will also have the
opportunity to stamp numbers to show his answers.
- He will have access to highlighters and graphic organizers to assist him in organizing important
information in each word problem.
- He will also be able to use a text to speech app to help him process what each word problem is saying.

OPENING
Introduction:
Throughout this lesson I will using hand gestures, visuals, and simple English to assist Mateo throughout this
lesson.

Students will come into the resource room after being pulled out of their general education classroom. When
students come in, I will greet the students and say I am so happy to see you all today. Come in and look at your
schedule to see what our first thing is that we will be doing. I will wave and gesture to the schedules as Mateo
comes in. I may even say hola to Mateo to greet him. Students will have their own schedules in a
designated area of the room that is in their first language. Students are expected to look at the schedules
when they come in to identify what we will first be doing. (Representation 2.4) (Representation 1.1) Choose a
seat cushion or rocking chair and find your designated spot on the carpet. (Engagement 9.2) Once students are
seated I will begin to sing the five things ready song with the students to convey to them that they are in
learning mode. Five things ready, five things ready (students turn). Eyes are looking, eyes are looking (students
turn), ears are for listening, ears are for listening (students turn), body still, body still (students turn). I will
show all five fingers, point to my eyes, point to my ears, and move my hand from the top to the bottom of my
body for Mateo.

Anticipatory Set:
I will then ask a student volunteer to state the objective to their peers. The objective will be written. As a class
we will highlight what we will be doing. I will ask a student to come up and highlight important information. In
the sentence, we are going to be solving addition word problems. I would expect students to come up and
underline solving, addition, and word problems. I will say, I know that weve solved word problems before,
who can tell me what a word problem is? A math problem that is communicated in words.

Hook:
I will then say, over the weekend I went to a candy store with my friend. I wanted 5 candy bars and she wanted 6
candy bars. Each candy bar was one dollar, but we had to figure out how many candy bars we had altogether so
that we could pay for them. How could we have figured out how many candy bars my friend and I had together?
11 candy bars will be brought in to show the students and to be used as a visual. I will say, Wow these are some
really big numbers. I might not be able to count them without using objects to help me count. I brought in the
candy bars we bought together. Here are my 5 candy bars. (I will point and slide 5 candy bars to one side) Here
are the 6 candy bars my friend got. (I will slide 6 candy bars to the other side). Hmm I know weve been
practicing addition problems, and addition is when we count numbers together to make a bigger number. Lets
count all of the candy bars to figure out how many we have altogether! (1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11) Wow my friend
and I grabbed 11 candy bars! (Engagement 7.2)

DURING
Introduce New Knowledge:

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I will transition into the introducing new knowledge section. After modeling how to solve an addition word
problem I will introduce a foldable to students. This foldable will include key words to assist students in
identifying that they are adding in word problems. This foldable will be on Jamals device so that he has this
option. I will ask students, how can we tell if we have to add in word problems? I will encourage students shout
out answers and I will write them on the board. Mateo will be able to use iTranslate during this part of the
lesson. I will model how to make the foldable. We will add words that the students provided and I will add
words that werent said like total, sum, plus, in all, add, join, altogether, etc. Mike will be able to use stamps
during this activity.

Model New Skills and Knowledge:


Today, we are going to look at Jodie and Nathans adventure to the candy store. They need some help figuring
out how many candies they pick up together while they are there. I know you all, my mathematicians, can help
them solve their problems!

I will explain to the students their options while we look at the math story together. I will put the cover of the
math story on the SmartBoard and pull out the paper copies of the book. You all have two options for how you
would like to follow along with our math story. You can either follow along on the SmartBoard or you can
have your own paper copy. Mateo will have his story translated in his native language. Mike will have the
option to use a device to use a text to speech app. I will ask each student what their preference is and give
them their option. (Engagement 7.1) I will walk over to Jamal and explain to him that the story is on his device
and that he has the option to follow along and interact on his device, or he can use the other options provided
to him. (Representation 1.3)

I will explain and show to the students how they can respond to questions about the problems. I will pull up the
first problem and tell the students this is our practice problem and I will show them the different ways they are
able to respond. I will go to the first problem that says, Jodie saw twizzlers and grabbed 4 of them, Nathan
grabbed 6 twizzlers. How many do they have altogether? You know what Im going to do first? I am going to
highlight the important information in the word problem. This way I know what numbers in my problem I will be
using. I will highlight the numbers in yellow. I am also going to highlight the word altogether, because I know
altogether means we are adding the numbers together. This will remind me that I will be adding the numbers
together. When we are solving our word problems together, I may ask what number goes into each of the three
boxes. To answer these questions, you can either come up to the board and write the number that belongs in
the box, show me a number card that I will give to you, or write the number on your paper copy. I will pull out
a ring with numbers on them 1-20. I will show them how to use it. I know that 4 belongs into the first box
because thats our first number. If I ask, what number goes into the first box then you can find the number 4 on
your number ring and put it up in the air to answer. Or you can go up to the board and write the number 4 in the
first box just like this. Jamal can also use his device. (Representation 2.5) (Action and Expression 4.1) I will model
this. I will do the same thing for plugging in the number 6. I have a box in the front of the room that has two
tubes that meet diagonally in the center, so any objects that are put in the tubes fall into a box. I will now model
what I will do to solve the problem with manipulatives. I need to figure out how many twizzlers Jodie and Nathan
have altogether. Im going to use my handy dandy addition box to help me figure this out! So in our first box I put
4 so I know I will need to put 4 magic manipulatives in the left tube, then I will put 6 magic manipulatives in our
right tube because I put six in our second box in our equation. Now Im going to count how many manipulatives I
have altogether. Lets count together. (1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10)

Guided Practice

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Lets work on the next one together! Mateo will have a paper that has visuals that show what the directions
are. Directions will also be in his native language. (Representation 1.1)

We will work on each word problem together. I will ask students to highlight the important information in the
text on either the SmartBoard or on their individual paper copy. (Engagement 8.2) Students will also be asked
what number goes into the first box? What number goes into the second box? (Engagement 8.3) Students are
able to use their number cards, write on their paper copy, or go up to the SmartBoard to answer the question.
I will have all of the students put a thumb up or a thumb down to indicate whether they disagree with their
friend or agree. (Engagement 8.3) When students are completing each problem, I will have students come up to
the handy dandy addition box and put the appropriate amount of manipulatives in each tube and count them
out. I will ask students questions like how many magic manipulatives should we put in the left tube? How many
magic manipulatives should we put in the second tube? How do we know this? The addition box will be made so
that Jamal can easily access it if he chooses to volunteer and put manipulatives in.

Independent Practice:
I will transition into our next activity where students will be working together to complete a similar activity as
the whole-group one. I will place the students into pairs (Jamal and Daisy) (Mateo and Mike). I will pull out a
worksheet and explain to students what they will be doing with their pairs. Great job helping Jodie and Nathan
solve their word problems! We will now break off into groups to complete a similar activity! Each of you will have
a worksheet or a worksheet on your device that has word problems on them. You will work with your partner to
either use manipulatives with the handy dandy addition box, draw a picture, or use stacking cubes, or bears to
help you solve the problems. Before students break off into groups, I may model the use of these manipulatives
to refresh the students brain. (Action and Expression 5.2) When solving your word problems there will be boxes
to help us set up our equations just like how it was in our story! You can either write the number with a pencil or
stamp the number with a stamper. I will pick up the pencil when I say pencil and stampers when I say stamper.
I will also model how to use the stamper for Mateo. (Action and Expression 4.1) The word problems will be
read aloud, but students with devices may use the Claro PDF Pro to use the text-to-speech feature to help
them read the word problems (Jamal and Mike). (Representation 1.2) (Representation 1.2) Mateo will have
access to iTranslate to have the word problems converted to Mateos native language. (Representation 2.4) I
will dismiss students to separate areas in the room to work on the word problems. I will go up to Jamal and
show him how he can have access to the worksheet from his device if he chooses to. (Action and Expression
4.1) If Jamal chooses to write with a pencil and paper then I will encourage him to use a slant board and
adaptive pencil. All students will have access to highlighters to assist them in identifying important
information.

While students are completing the independent activity, students have access to addition posters around the
room to look at to help them build their addition problems. There will be posters in English and Spanish so all
students have access to the resources. (Representation 2.4)

During this independent practice, I will be asking students a variety of questions to assess their understanding.
These questions will be, How did you set up your equation? How did you know to do this? What are you using to
help you solve your problem? How did you get your answer?

For Daisy I may ask, How would you solve a problem if you have 10 pieces of candy and your friend has 10
pieces of candy too? How many would you have altogether? If she is breezing through the problems that
make 1-20 I will have another word problem worksheet that has sums between 20-29. I may also ask her to
create her own addition word problems as an extension.

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CLOSING
I will transition the students back to the carpet. Students will know when the timer goes off, it is time to come
back to the carpet.
Wow, you all did such a fabulous job solving your word problems! Can anyone share with me how they solved
problem number one? I will have students share what they did to solve specific word problems. I will ask
students if anyone solved the problem differently. I will also ask students to put a thumb up or down if they
agree or disagree. Students can show their problems with pictures, manipulatives, and their devices. I will
repeat what students responses are to help organize the information each student conveys. (Multiple Means of
Representation 3.4)

I will tell students to go look at their schedules to see where they are going next. (Their general education
classrooms)

Authors Reflection
How does applying the UDL guidelines to lesson plans allow teachers to meet the needs of a diverse group of
students?
By looking at and applying UDL guidelines to lesson plans, teachers are able to meet the needs of a
diverse population of students. The UDL guidelines assist teachers and students in optimizing teaching and
learning for all students based off of how diverse learners learn. Once teachers get to know their students
needs, interests, and abilities, the teacher is then able to take a step back and evaluate their lessons to
incorporate these UDL guidelines to maximize the students learning. The teacher is able to integrate
appropriate resources, technologies, and tools to assist individual students throughout a lesson by using these
guidelines. This supports InTASC standard 4(g), The teacher uses supplementary resources and technologies
effectively to ensure accessibility and relevance for all learners. By including a variety of tools, technologies,
and resources, the teacher allows greater opportunity for equity to be made in the classroom. If students are
given what they need, to be successful during lessons, barriers are reduced and all students have the capability
to prosper. In addition, the UDL guidelines connect to CEC standard 3, Beginning special education
professionals use knowledge of general and specialized curricula to individualize learning for individuals with
exceptionalities. Teachers are able to use these UDl guidelines to specialize lesson plans for exceptional
students to make it individualized to their needs.
Under the UDL guidelines, there are specific principles and checkpoints that address learners from
different cultures and backgrounds. For example, checkpoint 2.4 under multiple means of representation, the
teacher is expected to alter lessons that meet the needs of students who may be English Language Learners. The
teacher could provide directions in their native language and English, use visuals, etcetera to ensure the student
is able to complete the lesson and gain new knowledge. There is also a specific principle that addresses students
with Executive Functioning disorder and students who need assistance with self-regulation. When a teacher
identifies these differences in his/her students, he/she creates a close-knit environment among his/her
students. This supports InTASC standard 2, The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and
diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet
high standards. If a student notices another student has directions in a different language, or if a student needs
a highlighter to assist them in identifying important information, the teacher can use this opportunity to explain
and show to students how we all learn differently and it is okay to need different tools to learn.

Explain why the two students with special needs in your description required additional supports and provide
a rationale for how you made appropriate choices about assistive technology and augmentative and
alternative communication?

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The two low-incidence students that I chose were Jamal and Mike. They both required additional
supports to help meet their needs to successfully complete the task given to them. To meet the objectives of the
lesson, the students were given a combination of low tech and high tech assistive technologies to assist them in
being able to gain knowledge in the content area. This supports the InTASC standard 7, The teacher plans
instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of
content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the
community context. The additional supports being used during the lesson help the students meet the needs of
the learning objective and activity. This also supports InTASC standard 4, The teacher understands the central
concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences
that make these aspects of the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the
content. I was able to read the students background information to make note of their strengths and needs, I
then took into consideration of what the students were expected to do during the lesson in relation to their
strengths and needs. If a students need would hinder their ability to have a meaningful educational experience,
then I found a tool that the student could use to deplete this from happening. I wanted them to be able to work
alongside their peers and not be looked down upon because their disability is hindering the activity; I wanted my
students to feel comfortable to work with their peers and not left out because their disability makes it difficult
to complete the same task.
For Jamal I provided him with the proloquo2go software to help him communicate with his peers and
adults. Since he has difficulty coherently speaking, this software would be used so he can collaborate with peers
and participate in the classroom discussion, along as stating his wants and needs. I also included a slant board
and adapted pencil since Jamal has difficulty writing. These low tech tools would assist him in writing numbers
during the math lesson. If he did not want to use those writing tools, he would have the option to complete the
worksheet and whole group activity on his computer with an extended keyboard. For Mike, I included letter and
number stamps for him to use as an alternative to writing the numbers on his worksheet during the activity.
Mike struggles in the area of writing with composing letters and ideas onto paper; the stamps will be an inviting
way to write the numbers on the worksheet. I also included the Claro PDF Pro Reader for Mike to use
throughout the lesson. This is a text-to-speech app that can be used on a device. Mike struggles with reading
texts, and he performs best when material is read to him. This high tech tool will help Mike understand the
directions and the word problems that he needs to complete.

How does this artifact demonstrate your ability to plan instruction for diverse learners, including English
Language Learners and students who are identified as gifted and talented?
By creating this lesson plan, my ability to plan instruction for diverse learners has definitely been shown.
I not only planned instruction for two students with low-incidence disabilities, but also for a student who is an
English Language Learner and a student who is gifted and talented. It is vital that I understand that every
student who comes into my classroom is going to be unique in his or her own way and will come with his or own
learning challenges. It is my job to identify those barriers and to create opportunities for those students to be
successful in my classroom. This aligns with the InTASC standard 7(n), The teacher respects learners diverse
strengths and needs and is committed to using this information to plan effective instruction. I sought out each
students strengths and needs and used this information to assist me in identifying what some of the barriers in
my lesson were going to be and how I could create modifications and accommodations to help my students
reach their full potential. For Mateo who is an ELL learner, I modified the instructions and directions to be in his
native language, used visuals, and used iTranslate to assist him in successfully completing the activity. For Daisy
who is identified as a gifted and talented learner, I provided a writing extension that matched her interests, and
provided opportunities for her to use difficult numbers outside of the objective to challenge her mathematical
skills. This supports CEC standard 3, Beginning special education professionals use knowledge of general and
specialized curricula to individualize learning for individuals with exceptionalities. Daisy is being cognitively
challenged to work at an advanced level compared to other students. Mateos language barrier is being

11
recognized and is being used in his benefit to assist him in giving his best effort. These are both ways the
curriculum is being individualized for students with different needs to match CEC standard three.

Materials
MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES
SmartBoard
Story in electronic form and paper form
Manipulatives (stacking cubes, bears)
Number cards
Posters around the room (English and Spanish)
Pencils
Highlighters
Addition Boxes
Worksheets (electronic form and paper copy)
Devices (4) with access to apps
Jamals extended keyboard
Slant board
Adaptive pencil
Number and Letter Stamps
Ink
Schedules
Visuals for directions

RESOURCES INCLUDED
Claro PDF Pro
iTranslate
Proloquo2Go software

Authors Reflection
Explain how your ability to meet the needs of diverse learners has developed.
My ability to meet the needs of diverse learners has developed tremendously through learning about
Universal Design for Learning and the UDL principles. My knowledge has been extended by learning about
different accommodations, modifications, and tools to use for students to allow for diverse learners needs to be
met. I have discovered a vast amount of tools, websites, and a variety of high and low technologies to meet the
needs of diverse students. This correlates with InTASC standard 4(g), The teacher uses supplementary
resources and technologies effectively to ensure accessibility and relevance for all learners. Since I have
become familiar with these resources, I have gained the knowledge to identify meaningful resources based off
of students needs. By completing this UDL lesson assignment, I was able to identify specific student needs and
what strategies or tools needed to be implemented in my lesson in order to provide an appropriate learning
experience for those students.

How does this positively impact student learning?


By teaching students through multiple means, all students needs are being met. Students should be in a
classroom where equity is being met, not equality. Every student should feel empowered and comfortable in

12
their learning environment with no barriers. By implementing UDL guidelines into a lesson, I feel as though I am
becoming more comfortable with identifying strategies or tools that could be used in the current placement I
am in with lessons I am implementing. In addition, by implementing UDL in the classroom, many different
cultures, languages, and differences are being accepted. This correlates with InTASC standard two, The teacher
uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning
environments that enable each learner to meet high standards. By using the UDL framework, all differences are
identified and accepted in the classroom. It creates a positive environment for every student if they feel
accepted and noticed. If students feel included, they are likely to meet their expectations and be more
successful.
How will you use the knowledge and skills developed in this class in your future teaching?
Throughout this semester I have learned a plethora of tools, resources, high and low technology, and
skills to use in my future teaching. I have gained knowledge on identifying my students needs and interests and
aligning it with the Universal Design for Learning Principles to ensure they are receiving the most appropriate
education. This aligns with InTASC standard 7(n), The teacher respects learners diverse strengths and needs
and is committed to using this information to plan effective instruction. I will be able to take what I have
learned and use it in future lessons for my students. I will continue to grow as a firm UDL believer, and will build
on my new knowledge as I gain more experience. I will also make sure I am staying up to date with new high and
low assistive technologies to ensure I am providing my students with the best possible tools that allow them to
become as independent as possible alongside their peers. This relates to InTASC standard two, The teacher
uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning
environments that enable each learner to meet high standards. My students will be expected to complete
activities that their peers are completing to encourage them to meet the appropriate standards. Overall, I am
amazed with the excess of tools for students with disabilities, and I want to give my future students the best
education possible without restricting them.

13
About the Lesson and Potential Use Graphic Organizer
Brief Description of Technology (hardware and software) Available in the Classroom:

Age and AT Needs


UDL LP (minimum of 1 low and 1 high tech tool for
No. Student Name Grade Strengths Needs
Requirements each of the two students identified as
Level having disabilities)
Student with - Struggles with grade
HI disability level text and unable to
- Orally Mike is able to comprehend what he
Low Tech: highlighting, math describe scenes, given reads.
graphic organizers, adaptive directions, and explain - Reading three levels
pencil steps below his peers.
1 Mike 1
High Tech: text to speech, - Strong understanding - Needs materials read
electronic speller or of mathematical to him, can answer
dictionary concepts, but hindered questions with high
with reading and writing degree of accuracy.
difficulties. - Low in ability to spell
words and writing.
Student with LI - Enthusiastic - Speaks slowly.
disability and - Can write with pen - Speech is often
Low Tech: adaptive pencil,
Communication and paper. unintelligible.
slant board
Need - Successful using his - Difficulty writing.
High Tech: voice
2 Jamal 1 computer with the - Motor difficulties
amplification or aac device,
expanded keyboard. cause him to be
wheel chair, computer,
- Strong strategic skills discouraged with
expanded keyboard
(ability to seek, locate, keeping up with the
and save information) pace.
Student - Knows basic - Struggles with
3 Identified as an Mateo 1 X vocabulary and reading and writing in
English directions English.
Language - Great understanding - Needs translation for
Learner (ELL) of math instructions.
Mateo - When textbook and - Needs repeated
instructions are verbal directions with
translated, has great visual supports for
understanding of tasks.
science. - Needs modeling and
hands on activities.
Student - Gets bored during
identified as instruction and has
Gifted and - Likes cooperative difficulty staying
Talented (GT) group activities, motivated
4 Daisy Daisy K X discussions, and - Doesnt always finish
sharing ideas with her work and will
peers. disrupt peers
- Likes creative writing
opportunities
Content Area:
Maryland College and Career-Ready Standards:
Describe any Prerequisite Information, Skills, or Resources Students Would Need in Place in order to Successfully Approach the Lesson:
The SETT Framework Developed by Joy Zabala

Student Environment Task Tools


Mike Physical Environment:
General Information/ Interests: This lesson will take
Mike has been identified place in the resource
as having a learning room.
disability. There are four, circular
Does not enjoy reading tables designed for
aloud or responding group-work in the room.
verbally to written The teacher desk is in
directions. the back of the room. Expectations:
Student Strengths: There are cabinets on Listen to the math story
When material is read to
WHAT WE KNOW

the left side of the book.


him he is able to answer classroom. Interact and answer Low Tech AT:
questions with a high There are windows on questions related to the Highlighter
degree of accuracy. the right side of the math story book and Letter and number
In the area of expressive classroom. addition. stamps
oral language he is able A big carpet space is in Highlight important High Tech AT:
to describe scenes, give the front of the information in math Claro PDF Pro Reader
directions, and explain classroom by the story problems. (text-to-speech app)
steps. interactive SmartBoard. Use the addition box to
Understanding of Instructional Environment: solve addition word
mathematical concepts. Students will first be problems.
Student Needs: working at the carpet.
He struggles reading Students will break off
grade level text. He is into pairs at the work
reading three levels tables which are
below his peers. wheelchair accessible.
Difficulty The work tables has
comprehending what he caddies that have
reads. pencils, highlighters,
Spelling words used in crayons, markers, and
everyday writing. erasers.
Composing and writing The classroom has an
and organized letter. interactive SmartBoard
in the front of the
classroom.
Four students will be
present during this
lesson.
Each student has their
own advice.
A variety of seats are
available for students to
choose from.
Schedules of the days
activities are available
for the students.
Access Issues:
Because Mike has
difficulty reading and
writing, his math
progress is being
hindered.
Mike reads below grade
level which hinders his
ability in reading class
directions and content.
Physical Environment:
This lesson will take
place in the resource
Jamal
room.
General Information/ Interests:
There are four, circular
Jamal is diagnosed with
tables designed for
cerebral palsy.
group-work in the room.
He is an enthusiastic
The teacher desk is in
student.
the back of the room.
He has an interest in
There are cabinets on
military tanks and
the left side of the
submarines.
classroom. Expectations:
He uses a wheelchair for
There are windows on Listen to the math story
mobility.
the right side of the book.
He is interested in Low Tech AT:
classroom. Interact and answer
science and social Highlighters
A big carpet space is in questions related to the
studies. Slant board
the front of the math story book and
Student Strengths: Adaptive pencil
classroom by the addition.
He is successful with High Tech AT:
interactive SmartBoard. Highlight important
using his computer with Instructional Environment: Proloquo2Go software
information in math
an expanded keyboard. Computer with
Students will first be story problems.
Has strong strategic skills expanded keyboard
working at the carpet. Use the addition box to
(ability to seek, locate,
Students will break off solve addition word
and save information).
into pairs at the work problems.
Student Needs:
tables which are
He speaks slowly and his
wheelchair accessible.
speech is often
The work tables has
incoherent.
caddies that have
He has difficulty writing
pencils, highlighters,
and drawing with pen
crayons, markers, and
and paper.
erasers.
He has motor difficulties.
The classroom has an
interactive SmartBoard
in the front of the
classroom.
Four students will be
present during this
lesson.
Each student has their
own advice.
A variety of seats are
available for students to
choose from.
Schedules of the days
activities are available
for the students.
Access Issues:
Jamal has mobility
difficulties because he
uses a wheelchair.
He has difficulty
communicating with
peers and adults due to
his speech delay.
Due to his motor
difficulties, Jamal has
trouble writing and
drawing with pen and
paper.