You are on page 1of 151

Autodesk Map 3D 2005

Tutorials

April 2004
Copyright 2004 Autodesk, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
This publication, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form, by any method, for any purpose.
AUTODESK, INC., MAKES NO WARRANTY, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE REGARDING THESE MATERIALS, AND MAKES SUCH
MATERIALS AVAILABLE SOLELY ON AN "AS-IS" BASIS.
IN NO EVENT SHALL AUTODESK, INC., BE LIABLE TO ANYONE FOR SPECIAL, COLLATERAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES IN CONNECTION WITH OR ARISING OUT OF PURCHASE OR USE OF THESE MATERIALS. THE SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE
LIABILITY TO AUTODESK, INC., REGARDLESS OF THE FORM OF ACTION, SHALL NOT EXCEED THE PURCHASE PRICE OF THE
MATERIALS DESCRIBED HEREIN.
Autodesk, Inc., reserves the right to revise and improve its products as it sees fit. This publication describes the state of this product at the time
of its publication, and may not reflect the product at all times in the future.
Autodesk Trademarks
The following are registered trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., in the USA and/or other countries: 3D Props, 3D Studio, 3D Studio MAX, 3D Studio
VIZ, 3DSurfer, 3ds max, ActiveShapes, ActiveShapes (logo), Actrix, ADI, AEC Authority (logo), AEC-X, Animator Pro, Animator Studio, ATC,
AUGI, AutoCAD, AutoCAD LT, AutoCAD Map, Autodesk, Autodesk Inventor, Autodesk (logo), Autodesk MapGuide, Autodesk Streamline,
Autodesk University (logo), Autodesk View, Autodesk WalkThrough, Autodesk World, AutoLISP, AutoSketch, backdraft, Biped, bringing
information down to earth, Buzzsaw, CAD Overlay, Character Studio, Cinepak, Cinepak (logo), cleaner, Codec Central, combustion, Design
Your World, Design Your World (logo), EditDV, Education by Design, gmax, Heidi, HOOPS, Hyperwire, i-drop, Inside Track, IntroDV, Kinetix,
MaterialSpec, Mechanical Desktop, NAAUG, ObjectARX, PeopleTracker, Physique, Planix, Powered with Autodesk Technology (logo),
ProjectPoint, RadioRay, Reactor, Revit, Softdesk, Texture Universe, The AEC Authority, The Auto Architect, VISION*, Visual, Visual Construction,
Visual Drainage, Visual Hydro, Visual Landscape, Visual Roads, Visual Survey, Visual Toolbox, Visual Tugboat, Visual LISP, Volo, WHIP!, and
WHIP! (logo).

The following are trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., in the USA and/or other countries: AutoCAD Learning Assistance, AutoCAD LT Learning
Assistance, AutoCAD Simulator, AutoCAD SQL Extension, AutoCAD SQL Interface, Autodesk Envision, Autodesk Map, AutoSnap, AutoTrack,
Built with ObjectARX (logo), burn, Buzzsaw.com, CAiCE, Cinestream, Civil 3D, cleaner central, ClearScale, Colour Warper, Content Explorer,
Dancing Baby (image), DesignCenter, Design Doctor, Designer's Toolkit, DesignProf, DesignServer, Design Web Format, DWF, DWFit,
DWFwriter, DWG Linking, DXF, Extending the Design Team, GDX Driver, gmax (logo), gmax ready (logo),Heads-up Design, jobnet, lustre,
ObjectDBX, onscreen onair online, Plans & Specs, Plasma, PolarSnap, Real-time Roto, Render Queue, Visual Bridge, Visual Syllabus, and Where
Design Connects.
Autodesk Canada Inc. Trademarks
The following are registered trademarks of Autodesk Canada Inc. in the USA and/or Canada, and/or other countries: discreet, fire, flame, flint,
flint RT, frost, glass, inferno, MountStone, riot, river, smoke, sparks, stone, stream, vapour, wire.
The following are trademarks of Autodesk Canada Inc., in the USA, Canada, and/or other countries: backburner, Multi-Master Editing.
Third Party Trademarks
All other brand names, product names, or trademarks belong to their respective holders.
Third-Party Copyright Notices
ACIS Copyright 1989-2001 Spatial Corp. Portions Copyright 2002 Autodesk, Inc.
AnswerWorks Copyright 1997-2003 WexTech Systems, Inc. Portions of this software Vantage-Knexys. All rights reserved.
Copyright 1996-2002 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
International CorrectSpell Spelling Correction System 1995 by Lernout & Hauspie Speech Products, N.V. All rights reserved.
InstallShield 3.0. Copyright 1997 InstallShield Software Corporation. All rights reserved.
Macromedia Flash Player Copyright 1995-2003 Macromedia, Inc. All rights reserved. Macromedia and Flash are trademarks of Macromedia,
Inc.
PANTONE Colors displayed in the software application or in the user documentation may not match PANTONE-identified standards. Consult
current PANTONE Color Publications for accurate color.
PANTONE and other Pantone, Inc. trademarks are the property of Pantone, Inc. Pantone, Inc., 2002
Pantone, Inc. is the copyright owner of color data and/or software which are licensed to Autodesk, Inc., to distribute for use only in
combination with certain Autodesk software products. PANTONE Color Data and/or Software shall not be copied onto another disk or into
memory unless as part of the execution of this Autodesk software product.
Portions Copyright 1991-1996 Arthur D. Applegate. All rights reserved.
Portions of this software are based on the work of the Independent JPEG Group.
RAL DESIGN RAL, Sankt Augustin, 2002
RAL CLASSIC RAL, Sankt Augustin, 2002
Representation of the RAL Colors is done with the approval of RAL Deutsches Institut fr Gtesicherung und Kennzeichnung e.V. (RAL German
Institute for Quality Assurance and Certification, re. Assoc.), D-53757 Sankt Augustin."
Copyright Stade de France - Macary, Zublena et Regembal, Costantini - Architectes, ADAGP - Paris - 2003
Typefaces from the Bitstream typeface library copyright 1992.
Typefaces from Payne Loving Trust 1996. All rights reserved.
The Director General of the Geographic Survey Institute has issued the approval for the coordinates exchange numbered TKY2JGD for Japan
Geodetic Datum 2000, also known as technical information No H1-N0.2 of the Geographic Survey Institute, to be installed and used within
this software product (Approval No.: 646 issued by GSI, April 8, 2002).
OSTN97 Crown Copyright 1997. All rights reserved.
Portions of this computer program are copyright 1995-1999 LizardTech, Inc. All rights reserved. MrSID is protected by U.S. Patent No.
5,710,835. Foreign Patents Pending.
Portions of this computer program are Copyright 2000 Earth Resource Mapping, Inc.
AnswerWorks 4.0 1997-2000 WexTech Systems, Inc. Portions of this software Copyright Lernout & Hauspie, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
OSTN02 Crown copyright 2002. All rights reserved.
OSGM02 Crown copyright 2002, Ordnance Survey Ireland, 2002.
GOVERNMENT USE
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in FAR 12.212 (Commercial Computer Software-
Restricted Rights) and DFAR 227.7202 (Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software), as applicable.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Chapter 1 Welcome to the Autodesk Map 3D Tutorials . . . . . . . .1

Chapter 2 Creating and Working with Drawings . . . . . . . . . .3


Defining a Drive Alias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Creating a New Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Displaying the Workspace and Attaching Source Drawings . . . 5
Viewing Source Drawings Using Quick View . . . . . . . . 6
Saving the Drawing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Chapter 3 Working with Object Data . . . . . . . . . . . . .8


Defining an Object Data Table and Entering Values . . . . . . . 9
Creating an Object Data Table . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Attaching Object Data to Objects . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Viewing Attached Object Data . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editing Object Data Tables and Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Chapter 4 Drawing Cleanup and Editing . . . . . . . . . . . 13


Cleaning Up a Street Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Deleting Duplicates and Extending Undershoots . . . . . . 14
Working with Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Creating and saving a profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
To load and edit an existing profile. . . . . . . . . . . 17
Working with Anchors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Chapter 5 Using the Mapping Polygon . . . . . . . . . . . . 20


Displaying the Polygon Toolbar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Creating a Polygon Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Editing the Polygon Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Converting Polylines to a Polygon . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Chapter 6 Using Queries to Analyze Data . . . . . . . . . . . 24


Defining and Viewing a Query . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Create an Object Data Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Retrieve Information using Property Queries . . . . . . . . . 26
Edit an Existing Query and Create Compound Queries . . . . . . 27
Saving a Query . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Use Saved Queries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Contents | iii
Querying with Object Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Edit object data from a previous query . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Chapter 7 Editing Multiple Source Drawings . . . . . . . . . . 33


Editing Objects and Saving Back . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Defining the Query . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Editing Queried Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Highlighting Objects in the Save Set . . . . . . . . . . 37
Creating New Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Saving Back to the Source Drawings . . . . . . . . . . 38
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Chapter 8 Working with External Databases . . . . . . . . . . 40


Using Data View with an External Database . . . . . . . . . 41
Working in the Data View Window . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Defining a Link Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Generating Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Chapter 9 Using Topology and Spatial Analysis . . . . . . . . . 48


Creating a Network Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Calculating a Best Route Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Highlighting Objects in a Selected Topology . . . . . . . . . 53
Viewing Topology Data Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

Chapter 10 Using Feature Classification . . . . . . . . . . . . 55


Creating New Street Centerlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Selecting Objects Using Feature Class Data . . . . . . . . . 57
Classifying and Unclassifying Objects . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Creating a Feature Definition File . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Creating the Street_Centerlines Feature Definition File . . . . . . 60
Defining a Feature Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Chapter 11 Importing and Exporting Data . . . . . . . . . . . 62


Importing ArcInfo Coverages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Step 1: Select the File Type and Coverage Folder . . . . . . 63
Step 2: Set Import Options for Layers, Coordinate Systems, and At-
tribute Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

iv | Contents
Step 3: Import the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Step 4: View the Imported Data . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Importing ArcView Shapefiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Step 1: Select the File Type and the Shapefiles to Import . . . . 67
Step 2: Set Import Options for Area, Layers, Feature Classes, Data, and
Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Step 3: Save Settings in an Import Profile . . . . . . . . . 69
Step 4: Import the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Step 5: View the Imported Data . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Exporting to MapInfo MIF/MID Format . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Step 1: Specify the File Type and Location . . . . . . . . 71
Step 2: Set Export Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Step 3: Export the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Step 4: View the Exported Data . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Chapter 12 Working with Coordinate Systems . . . . . . . . . . 73


Assigning the Coordinate System . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Assigning Coordinate Systems to Source Drawings. . . . . . . . 74
Attaching a Source Drawing with an Assigned Coordinate System . 75
Viewing an Unattached Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Assigning a Coordinate System . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

Chapter 13 Working with Raster Images . . . . . . . . . . . . 78


Inserting Raster Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Changing Display Order and Clipping an Image . . . . . . . . 80
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

Chapter 14 Displaying, Tracking, and Using Coordinates . . . . . . 82


Opening and Displaying Current Coordinates . . . . . . . . . 82
Setting Tracking Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Inserting TANK Blocks and Using Coordinates . . . . . . . . . 83
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

Chapter 15 Annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Defining an Annotation Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Inserting the Annotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Adding a Descriptive Text Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

Contents | v
Chapter 16 Map Plotting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Retrieve Data with an SQL Condition . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Create and View a Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Preparing the Drawing for Plotting . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Define and Save a Query . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Insert a Plot Template Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Define a New Map Plot Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Preview a Map Plot Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Chapter 17 Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100


Creating Point Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Creating Description Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Creating Point Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Importing Points from a Database . . . . . . . . . . 103
Displaying Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Displaying Point Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Displaying an Externally Referenced Drawing . . . . . . . 106
Changing the Style of a Point Group . . . . . . . . . 107
Removing an Externally Referenced Drawing . . . . . . . 108

Chapter 18 Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109


Creating a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Specifying the Project Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Creating a Project in the Project Path . . . . . . . . . 111
Creating and Adding Project Data . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Attaching the Drawing to the Project . . . . . . . . . 112
Adding Data to the Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Accessing and Modifying Project Data . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Getting Project Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Checking Data Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Changing the Point Group Query . . . . . . . . . . 117
Checking Data In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Synchronizing the Drawing Data with the Project Data. . . . 118

Chapter 19 Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119


Creating and Adding Data to a Surface . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Creating a New TIN Surface . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Adding Point Data to a Surface . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Adding an Outer Boundary to a Surface . . . . . . . . . 122
Adding Breaklines to a Surface. . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Changing the Surface Style and Display . . . . . . . . . . 126

vi | Contents
Editing the Surfaces Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Using a Different Style for a Surface . . . . . . . . . 127
Editing Surface Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Swapping TIN Edges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Deleting TIN Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Adding a Hide Boundary . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Smoothing a Surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Creating a Watershed Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Configuring and Viewing the Watershed Analysis . . . . . 136
Modifying the Watershed Analysis . . . . . . . . . . 137
Configuring and Inserting the Watershed Legend . . . . . 137
Generating Surface Volume Information . . . . . . . . . . 138
Creating the Base and Comparison Surfaces . . . . . . . 139
Creating a TIN Volume Surface . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Creating a Composite Volume Calculation . . . . . . . 141
Using the Object Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142

Contents | vii
Welcome to the
Autodesk Map 3D
Tutorials

Using Autodesk Map , you can create, maintain,

analyze, and effectively communicate mapping infor-

mation contained in multiple Autodesk Map drawings

and related external databases.

These tutorials show you how to use Autodesk Map to

complete many of the tasks for creating, maintaining

and analyzing maps.

If you are new to Autodesk Map and need basic drawing

information, refer to the online Getting Started Guide

or the Help.

Tutorial Drawing Files: Locating Your Map-


TutData folder
When you installed Autodesk Map, the drawing
folders and files you need in order to complete
these tutorials were installed in a MapTutData
folder inside your My Documents folder.
Depending on which operating system you
have, follow the instructions below to deter-
mine the correct path to your MapTutData
folder.
For Windows XP users, the location of this
folder is either C:\Documents and Settings\<your
username>\My Documents\MapTutData, or

1
C:\My Documents\MapTutData, which is the My Documents folder located on
your desktop.
If you are using Windows 2000, do the following:
1 Open the Start menu and choose Documents > My Documents.
2 In the Explorer window, right-click an empty area and choose Properties
from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Properties dialog box, note the path displayed in the target box.

Regardless of which operating system you use, the MapTutData folder will be
located inside your My Documents folder.

Tip Make a note of this path; you will refer to it in every exercise.

About the Autodesk Map 3D Tutorials Window


On most systems, the Autodesk Map 3D Tutorials window stays on top of the
Autodesk Map 3D application so that you can always see the tutorials while
you are working through the exercises. If the tutorials window does not stay
on top, you can resize your Autodesk Map 3D window so that both your
drawing and the tutorials window are visible on your screen.
You can shrink the tutorials window to a compact size by clicking the Hide
button (under the Autodesk Map 3D Tutorials title bar) to hide the pane that
contains Contents, Index, Search, and Favorites, tabs. This compact window
is best for displaying the steps while you work. In this view, use the naviga-
tion arrows on the title banner to go to the next and previous pages in the
exercises. Click the home icon to move up a level to the topic containing a
broader scope of information.

| 2
Creating and Working
with Drawings

One of the most important features of Autodesk Map

is the ability to work with data from several source

drawings at one time. The process of selecting source

drawings, making them available, and repeatedly defin-

ing certain parameters is tedious if values have to be

entered every time you want to work with source draw-

ings. Instead, information can be saved in the current

drawing.

Note This tutorial shows you how to create a


drive alias and set up a new drawing. You must
complete both of these exercises first in order
to complete any of the other Autodesk Map
tutorials.

In this tutorial:

Defining a Drive Alias


Creating a New Drawing
Summary

3
Defining a Drive Alias

If you plan to share drawings with other users on a network, you must use
aliases rather than specific drive names to locate attached source drawings.
Autodesk Map provides a default alias called C. If your drawing files are in
a drive other than C, you must define a drive alias to attach drawings.
The drive alias acts as a pointer to specific drawing paths. This feature enables
you to work with drawings on other drives, and is useful when you share
drawings with other users who are unfamiliar with your folder structure.

Note The Drive Alias name must be fewer than 31 characters and must not
contain spaces or other non-alphanumeric characters.

1 In the Workspace, right-click the Drawings folder and choose Attach.


2 In the Select Drawings To Attach dialog box, click the Create/Edit Aliases
button as shown on the right.
3 In the Drive Alias Details area, for Drive Alias, enter TUTOR_FILES.
4 To enter the Actual Path, click Browse and navigate to My Documents\Map-
TutData\!DrawingSetUp folder.
5 Click OK. The path to this folder is displayed under Actual Path.
6 Click Add.
The drive alias is added to the Drive List and a note at the bottom of the
dialog box indicates that the alias was added successfully.
7 In the Drive Alias Administration dialog box, click Close.
8 In the Select Drawings to Attach dialog box, click OK.

Creating a New Drawing

The Workspace displays all the data you need to work with attached source
drawings, queries, feature classes, databases, and topologies, as well as the
links you have set up between objects in the attached drawings and records
in the attached external databases.

Defining a Drive Alias | 4


Note You cannot use the UNDO and REDO commands with any actions
performed in the Workspace.

Exercises:

Displaying the Workspace and Attaching Source Drawings


Viewing Source Drawings Using Quick View
Saving the Drawing

Displaying the Workspace and Attaching Source


Drawings

1 From the file menu, choose New.


2 In the Select Template dialog box, make sure the acad.dwt file is selected,
then click Open.
The Workspace is displayed on the left side of the application window.
3 If the Workspace is not visible, from the Map menu, choose Utilities >
Workspace.
You can drag the Workspace and dock it on the right side or leave it float-
ing and position it anywhere you like.
The list of drawings is referred to as a drawing set. You can use any of the fol-
lowing three methods to attach drawings:

Right-click Drawings on the Workspace and choose Attach.


Right-click Drawings on the Workspace and choose Define/Modify
Drawing Set and choose Attach.
From the Map menu, choose Drawings > Define/Modify Drawing Set
and choose Attach.

For this tutorial, use the first bullet.

4 Right-click Drawings on the Workspace and choose Attach.


5 Click the drop down arrow and select the TUTOR_FILES drive alias you
just created to display the drawing files.
6 Select parcels.dwg.
7 Before you attach the drawing, click the Details button to view the file
details including size, date created, and date modified.

Creating a New Drawing | 5


8 In addition to parcels, select sewer_data, Street Centerlines, and water_data.
Then click Add.

Tip Press CTRL while clicking each drawing name to select multiple drawings.

The drawing names are listed under Selected Drawings, and their icons are
dimmed in the list of available drawings. You can no longer select the
drawings from the upper list, but you can select them in the lower list and
remove them from the set of attached drawings.
9 Click OK.
The drawings are added to the drawing set, and the drawing names are
added to the Drawings list in the Workspace.

Viewing Source Drawings Using Quick View

To view the contents of one or more active source drawings, use Quick View.
Quick View is significantly faster than opening each drawing individually.
You can zoom, pan, and plot with Quick View, but you cannot select and edit
the objects.
1 In the Workspace, right-click Drawings and choose Quick View.
The Quick View Drawings dialog box is displayed with all four drawings
selected.
2 Verify that the Zoom To The Extents Of Selected Drawings check box is
selected and then click OK.
3 On the Command Line, enter REDRAW and then press ENTER.
4 In the Workspace, right-click Drawings and choose Quick View again.
5 In the Quick View drawings dialog box, hold the CTRL key and click
Street_Centerlines.dwg to deselect it.
6 Make sure Zoom To The Extents Of Selected Drawings check box is
selected and then click OK.
All the objects in parcels.dwg, sewer_data.dwg, and water_data.dwg are
shown, as a temporary static snapshot.
7 In the Workspace, right-click Drawings and choose Quick View again.
8 This time, select just Street_Centerlines.dwg and then clear the Zoom To The
Extents Of Selected Drawings check box.
9 Click OK.

Creating a New Drawing | 6


Street_Centerlines.dwg is added to the Quick View of the other three
drawings.
10 From the View menu, choose Redraw.
The quick view image is cleared from your screen.

Saving the Drawing

In this step you save the drawing as you do any DWG file. A saved drawing
contains additional information, including links to the set of source draw-
ings you want to use, saved queries, user options, links to external databases,
and other settings.
1 From the File menu, choose Save.
2 In the Save Drawing As dialog box, under Save In, navigate to MapTut-
Data\!DrawingSetUp.
3 Under File Name, enter Dublin.dwg.
4 Click Save.

Summary

In this tutorial you explored the following concepts:

You created a new drawing, defined a drive alias, and attached source
drawings.
The Workspace is the command center for the drawing, providing
access to your drawings and other elements saved with the drawing.
A drive alias lets you work on a drawing with other people on a network
using the same set of drawings.
You can quickly see the data available in the active, attached source
drawings using Quick View.
Autodesk Map saves a drawing as a standard DWG file.

Summary | 7
Working with Object
Data

Autodesk Map can store text and numeric data, much

like a simple database. This information is called object

data. For example, you can store property ownership,

street names, population figures, and component instal-

lation dates in your map. Object data is more powerful

than block attributes because object data works with

any object, not just blocks. You can run queries based on

object data. You can use object data to create thematic

maps.

In addition, you can use object data to associate docu-

ments or images such as title deeds related to a parcel of

land or digital photographs and movie files related to a

geographical feature. You can also associate a drawing

object with a file at a URL address, such as an intranet or

Internet web site.

In this tutorial:

Defining an Object Data Table and Entering


Values

8
Editing Object Data Tables and Fields
Summary

Defining an Object Data Table and Entering


Values

Exercises:

Creating an Object Data Table


Attaching Object Data to Objects
Viewing Attached Object Data

Creating an Object Data Table

This exercise uses sample data from a subdivision being constructed in the
city of Dublin, California. You will create an object data table and attach it to
three lake objects in Topography.dwg.
You begin by defining an object data table for sewer data used later in this
tutorial. You define the name of the table and the field names and types in
the table.
1 Start Autodesk Map and open MapTutData\ObjectData\Topography.dwg.
2 From the Map menu, choose Object Data > Define Object Data.
3 Click New Table.
4 In the Define New Object Data Table dialog box, under Table Name, enter
Water_Bodies.
5 In the Field Name box, enter Name.
6 From the Type list, select Character.
7 For Description, enter Name of Water Body.
8 In the Define New Object Data Table dialog box, click Add to complete the
field definition.
9 Create another field using the following data:

Defining an Object Data Table and Entering Values | 9


For Field Name, enter Type.
For Type, select Character.
For Description, enter Type of Water Body.

10 Click Add to add the Type field.


11 Create another field using the following data:

For Field Name, enter Access.


For Type, select Character.
For Description, enter Public Access?

12 Click Add to add the Access field.


13 Create another field using the following data:

For Field Name, enter Avg_Depth.


For Type, select Real.
For Description, enter Average Depth.

14 Click Add to add the Avg_Depth field.


15 Click OK to close the Define New Object Data Table dialog box.
16 In the Define Object Data dialog box, click Close.

Attaching Object Data to Objects

Next, you attach the object data to three lake objects.


1 In Topography.dwg. zoom in on the lakes outlined in blue, as shown in the
picture.

2 From the Map menu, choose Object Data > Attach/Detach Object Data.
3 In the Attach/Detach Object Data dialog box, under Table, verify that
Water_Bodies is selected.
4 From the Object Data Fields list, select each of the four object data fields
in turn, and then enter the following values:

Defining an Object Data Table and Entering Values | 10


Note To retain a value setting, you must press ENTER after entering a value.

For Name Of Water Body, enter Nacimiento.


For Type Of Water Body, enter General Use.
For Access, enter Yes.
For Ave_depth, enter 32.6.

5 Under Action, click Attach To Objects.


On the Command Line, you are prompted to select an object.
6 In the drawing, click the lower left lake to select it. Then press ENTER.
The object data is attached to the lake.

7 Repeat steps 2 through 6 to attach object data to the center lake, using the
following values:

For Name Of Water Body, enter Stanley Pond.


For Type Of Water Body, enter Fishing.
For Access, enter Yes.
For Ave_depth, enter 47.3.

8 Repeat steps 2 through 6 to attach object data to the upper right lake,
using the following values:

For Name Of Water Body, enter Public Utility Pond.


For Type Of Water Body, enter Holding Pond.
For Access, enter No.
For Ave_depth, enter 87.3.

9 Save the drawing.

Viewing Attached Object Data

Now, view the object data to verify that it was attached.


1 In the drawing, click to select the lower left lake (Nacimiento).
2 Right-click the lake and select Properties from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Properties palette, on the Design tab, scroll down until the Object
Data section is visible (OD:Water_Bodies).

Defining an Object Data Table and Entering Values | 11


Note The vertical scrollbar is located on the left side of the Properties pal-
ette.

Notice that the object data table name, fields, and field values attached to
the selected lake are displayed.
4 Repeat this procedure to view the object data attached to the other two
lakes.

Editing Object Data Tables and Fields

After attaching object data tables to objects, you can edit the tables. You can
also use queries to retrieve objects with specific values which can be edited
individually. In this exercise, you will change the access setting for Lake
Nacimiento from Yes to No to indicate a temporary closure.

Note You can also use the Properties palette to edit object data.

1 From the Map menu, choose Object Data > Edit Object Data.
You are prompted to select an object.
2 Click the lower left lake, Nacimiento.
3 In the Edit Object Data dialog box, select the Public Access? field.
4 In the Value box, enter NO.
The Public Access? value is updated.
5 Click OK.
6 Save the drawing.

Summary

In this tutorial you learned how to:

Define an object data table and enter values


Attach object data to objects
Use the Properties window to view attached object data

Editing Object Data Tables and Fields | 12


Drawing Cleanup and
Editing

Autodesk Map provides several tools to help you clean

up and edit your maps so that they are accurate and suit-

able for topology, mapping, or plotting. There are sev-

eral ways that errors can be introduced in maps. Some

examples are: surveying, digitizing, and inaccurate scan-

ning.

Note You must address errors using Drawing


Cleanup tools before you can use topology or
perform map analysis. Use drawing editing
tools to modify selected objects in your map.

In this tutorial:

Cleaning Up a Street Map


Working with Profiles
Working with Anchors
Summary

Cleaning Up a Street Map


In this exercise you will use the Drawing
Cleanup tool to locate several types of errors in
a map of the street centerlines for the City of
Dublin, Street_Centerlines.dwg.

13
Deleting Duplicates and Extending Undershoots

1 Choose File > Open and navigate to your MapTutData\DrawingCleanup


folder.
2 Open the Street_Centerlines drawing.
3 From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents to view the whole map.
4 From the Map menu, choose Tools > Drawing Cleanup.
5 In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Objects dialog box, under Objects to
Include In Drawing Cleanup, choose Select All and make sure there is an
asterisk (*) in the Layers box.
6 Click Next.
7 In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Actions dialog box, do the following:

Click Delete Duplicates.


Press CTRL and click Extend Undershoots.
Click Add to add them to the Selected Actions list.

8 In the Selected Actions list, select Delete Duplicates, and under Cleanup
Parameters, enter 2 for Tolerance.
This tolerance value tells Autodesk Map to consider all objects within two
drawing units of each other as duplicates. Autodesk Map does not use a
predefined system of unit measure such as meters or inches. For example,
a distance of one unit may represent one centimeter, one foot, or one mile
in real-world units.

9 In the Selected Actions list, select Extend Undershoots and enter 10 for the
Tolerance.
10 Under Options, select the Interactive check box to review errors one-by-
one.
11 Click Next.
12 In the Drawing Cleanup - Cleanup Methods dialog box, under Cleanup
Method, choose Modify Original Objects.
13 Click Next.
14 In the Drawing Cleanup - Error Markers dialog box, click Finish.
The Drawing Cleanup tool locates the errors in the drawing and displays
the Drawing Cleanup Errors dialog box. The errors found are grouped by
error type.
In the Drawing Cleanup Errors dialog box, the first cleanup action, Delete
Duplicates, is highlighted in the list.

Cleaning Up a Street Map | 14


15 Click the plus (+) next to Delete Duplicates to see how many duplicate
objects were detected: Error 1 of 3.
16 Click Error 1 of 3.
In the map, the first error is displayed with a temporary marker on it so
that you can find it easily.
17 Click the Fix button to correct this error and proceed to the next error.
Continue clicking the Fix button until you've deleted all duplicate objects.

Tip If you want to fix all duplicates at once, click Delete Duplicates in the list
and then click the Fix All button.

When you are done correcting duplicate objects, Extend Undershoots is


highlighted in the list.

Warning! Do not erase Short Polyline Segments. Click the Next Action button
to advance to Extend Undershoots.

18 Click the plus (+) next to Extend Undershoots to see how many short
objects were detected: Error 1 of 2.
19 With Extend Undershoots still highlighted, click the Mark All button to
place markers on all detected short objects.
The errors are not corrected, but markers are placed on them so that you
can find them later and review them more closely.
The Drawing Cleanup Errors dialog box provides a zoom feature so you
can examine errors more closely without leaving the interactive drawing
cleanup process.
To view errors more closely do the following:

Clear the Auto Zoom check box and under Zoom %, enter a higher
value such as 400.
Click Zoom.
When you are finished examining the errors, restore the Zoom % to
100.
Click Zoom.
Select the Auto Zoom check box again.

This way you can see other markers that are not so close together.

Cleaning Up a Street Map | 15


Working with Profiles

Exercises:

Creating and saving a profile


To load and edit an existing profile

Once you have specified the settings you want for drawing cleanup, you can
save those settings in a profile and use them again later. This can save time if
you plan to use the same settings more than once. Profiles are also useful
when you automate the drawing cleanup process with scripts or share set-
tings with other users. Drawing cleanup profiles are saved as *.dpf files.
Drawing cleanup profiles include all the options specified in the drawing
cleanup dialog boxes, including the layer names used for object selection and
anchoring, cleanup actions and settings, cleanup methods, and error marker
settings (if any). Drawing cleanup profiles do not include the actual objects
selected and anchored on the specified layers.
You can load a saved profile to use those settings and make them current. Set-
tings that are loaded include the object selection and anchoring criteria,
cleanup actions and settings, cleanup methods, and error marker settings (if
any).

Creating and saving a profile

1 From the Map menu, choose Tools > Drawing Cleanup.


2 Under Objects to include in drawing cleanup, make sure Select All is
selected.
3 Click Next.
4 In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Actions dialog box, under Cleanup
Actions, select the cleanup settings you want in your profile and click add
to add them to the Selected Actions window.
5 Click Save.

Working with Profiles | 16


6 In the Save Drawing Cleanup Profile dialog box, using the drive alias you
created, navigate to the MapTutData/DrawingCleanup folder, enter a name
for the profile, and click Save.

To load and edit an existing profile

1 From the Map menu, choose Tools > Drawing Cleanup.


2 In the Select Objects - Drawing Cleanup dialog box, click Load. [Icon]
3 Click on the file name of the profile you just created and click Open.
The settings from the profile you created and saved are now current.
4 In the Select Objects - Drawing Cleanup dialog box, click Next.
5 In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Actions dialog box, click Add or Remove
on any settings and click Save.

Note To create a new profile, save the profile to a new name. To update the
existing profile, save the changes back to the same profile name.

Working with Anchors

Anchored objects are used as reference points during cleanup and are not
altered or moved; objects being cleaned will be moved towards anchored
objects.
In this exercise you will detect and mark errors in MapTutData\Drawing-
Cleanup\Street_Centerlines.dwg. You then go back and anchor one of the
objects and perform the drawing cleanup again to view the effect of anchor-
ing an object.
Anchored objects are not altered during a drawing cleanup: their location
(coordinates) and geometry are firm. Use anchors to preserve important ref-
erence objects such as survey points.
1 Navigate to the MapTutData\DrawingCleanup folder and open
Street_Centerlines.dwg.
2 From the View menu, choose Named Views.
3 In the View dialog box, select Anchored Nodes, and then click Set Current.
4 Click OK.

Working with Anchors | 17


The Anchored Nodes named view displays a zoomed-in region of
Street_Centerlines.dwg.
5 From the Map menu, choose Tools > Drawing Cleanup.
6 In the Drawing Cleanup - Select Objects dialog box, under Objects To
Include In Drawing Cleanup, choose Select Manually.

7 Click the Objects to be Included icon (shown on the right).


8 Select objects using a crossing window as shown in the illustration.

9 Then press ENTER


The Drawing Cleanup - Select Objects dialog box reappears. Several
objects have been selected.
10 In the Objects To Anchor In Drawing Cleanup area, click Select Objects To
Be Anchored.
11 Select the two streets segments as shown in the following illustration.

12 Press ENTER.

Working with Anchors | 18


The Drawing Cleanup - Select Objects dialog box reappears. Under Objects
To Anchor In Drawing Cleanup, notice that two objects are selected.
13 Click Next.
14 In the Drawing Cleanup - Cleanup Actions dialog box, remove any actions
from the Selected Actions list. Then add Snap Clustered Nodes to the
Selected Actions list.
15 Under Cleanup Parameters, enter 100 for Tolerance.
16 Under Options, click Interactive.
17 Click Finish.
The Drawing Cleanup Errors dialog box indicates that clustered node
errors were located.
18 Double-click Snap Clustered Nodes to review the errors.
19 In the Drawing Cleanup dialog box, click Fix to correct each error. Then
click Close.
The nodes were corrected by changing other lines, not the lines you
anchored.
20 Save and close the drawing.

Summary

In this tutorial you learned how to:

Use drawing cleanup tools, such as deleting duplicates and extending


short lines or undershoots
Save a profile that can be reused on maps with similar problems
Work with anchors to preserve important reference objects such as sur-
vey points

Summary | 19
Using the Mapping
Polygon

The polygon object (mpolygon) is useful for creating

common map elements such as parcels, city, county,

and state boundaries, and buildings.

Using the mapping polygon, you can create new poly-

gon objects or select existing closed polyline objects and

convert them.

In this tutorial:

Displaying the Polygon Toolbar


Creating a Polygon Object
Editing the Polygon Object
Converting Polylines to a Polygon
Summary

Displaying the Polygon Toolbar

1 Open a new drawing using the acad.dwt tem-


plate.
2 From the View menu, choose Toolbars.
3 In the Customize dialog box, on the Toolbars
tab, under Menu Group, select ACMAP.

20
4 Under Toolbars, select the Polygon check box.
5 Click Close.
The Polygon toolbar tools from left to right are:

Convert Topology to Polygons


Convert Polylines to Polygons
Polygon Fill Settings
Edit Polygon
Create Polygon
Split Polygon
Polygon Display Mode

Creating a Polygon Object

In this exercise you create a polygon object.


1 In the Polygon toolbar, click the Polygon Fill Settings tool.
2 In the Polygon Fill Properties dialog box, under Fill Color, select Green
from the drop-down list, and then click OK.
3 Click the Create Polygon tool.
4 Click a point to start the polygon.
5 Click another point to create a side of the polygon.
6 On the command line, enter A and press ENTER.
The next portion of the polygon is an arc.
7 Click the end of the arc.
8 Click the end of the next arc.
9 On the command line enter CL.
10 Press ENTER to end the polygon creation mode.
The polygon is closed and filled.

Editing the Polygon Object

Creating a Polygon Object | 21


In this exercise you edit the polygon you just created.
1 In the Polygon toolbar, click the Edit Polygon tool.
2 Select the polygon you just created.
The polygon editing options are displayed on the command line.
Enter an option [Add/Delete/Move/Boundary type/Fill/Rebalance/
eXit]<eXit>:
3 On the command line, enter M and press ENTER.
4 When prompted to select a boundary, click the edge of the polygon and
press ENTER.
On the command line, you are prompted to select a basepoint or displace-
ment. This is a basepoint from which the displacement distance and direc-
tion is measured.
5 Click outside of the polygon to specify a basepoint.
Now, as you move your cursor, a shadow image of the polygon moves with
the cursor.
6 Click to define the displacement measurement and move the polygon.
Then press ENTER or ESC to end the command.

Converting Polylines to a Polygon

In this exercise you convert a pline object to a polygon.


1 On the command line, enter PLINE. Then press ENTER.
2 Specify a start point and three other points to create a roughly rectangular
shape.
3 Enter c and press ENTER to close the pline.
4 In the Polygon toolbar, click the Convert Polylines to Polygons tool.
5 Click the pline object you just created and press ENTER.
The pline object is converted to a polygon with the fill color you specified
earlier

Summary

In this tutorial you learned how to:

Converting Polylines to a Polygon | 22


Work with the mapping polygon object
Display the Polygon toolbar
Create and edit a polygon object
Convert polylines to a polygon

Summary | 23
Using Queries to Analyze
Data

A query is a tool used to retrieve objects from source

drawings. The query is defined to select specific infor-

mation from drawings. This tutorial introduces con-

cepts and techniques necessary for working with que-

ried data. You learn to perform simple queries using

conditions, and to display the results of a query in dif-

ferent ways.

You use a 'query' to retrieve information from the mass

of data in your source maps. You can base queries on dif-

ferent types of criteria, such as location or property data.

You can also combine different types of queries, and

save them for later use.

In this tutorial:

Defining and Viewing a Query


Create an Object Data Index
Retrieve Information using Property Queries
Edit an Existing Query and Create Com-
pound Queries
Saving a Query
Use Saved Queries

24
Querying with Object Data
Edit object data from a previous query
Summary

Defining and Viewing a Query

To begin you will open a sample drawing file that has four source drawings
already attached.
1 Click File > Open.
2 In the Select File dialog box, navigate to the MapTutData\Query directory
in the folder where you installed Map and open the maptut2 drawing.
3 Objects in the drawing will not be visible yet.
4 Type PDMODE at the command prompt and press Enter. For new value,
type 3 and press Enter again.
This will make objects in the drawing clearer when they appear in the next
step.
5 To view the contents of the source drawing, from the menu bar, choose
Map > Drawings > Quick View Drawings.
6 The Quick View Drawings dialog box is displayed.
7 In the Quick View Drawings dialog box, be sure that citymap1 is selected.
Make sure that the Zoom To The Extents Of Selected Drawings check box
is selected. Then click OK.
Rather than opening the drawing, Quick View will display the contents of
the drawing without creating any objects.
8 At the command prompt, type REGEN. Then press the Enter key.
The REGEN command will clear the screen after using Quick View.

Create an Object Data Index

Working with the same drawing set, you will create an object data index for
the citymap1 drawing file. Indexes speed up queries. Once you create an
index, Autodesk Map automatically updates it each time you save changes to
a drawing.

Defining and Viewing a Query | 25


1 The first step is to open the Drawing Maintenance dialog box. Choose
Map > Drawings > Drawing Maintenance.
2 In the Drawing Maintenance dialog box, select citymap1, then click Draw-
ing Index.
The Index Maintenance dialog box is displayed.
3 In the Index Maintenance dialog box, make sure all the Generate Index
options except 'EED' are selected.
4 Under Generate Index, click Object Data.
The Generate Object Data Index dialog box is displayed.
5 In the Generate Object Data Index dialog box, click 'Select All' to select all
of the object data fields.
6 Then click OK.
7 In the Index Maintenance dialog box, click OK. When you are prompted
to confirm, click OK.
Autodesk Map creates the indexes.
8 Click Close to close the Drawing Maintenance dialog box.
As you work with your drawings, it is a good idea to periodically use this pro-
cedure to update and recreate the indexes.

Retrieve Information using Property Queries

Now you will use a property query to retrieve information from the citymap1
drawing file. A property query retrieves objects from a drawing based on their
color, linetype, layer, or other standard AutoCAD properties.
The first step in defining a query is to open the Define Query dialog box.
1 From the menu bar, select Map > Query > Define Query.
2 In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Type, click Property.
The Property Condition dialog box is displayed.
3 In the Property Condition dialog box, under Select Property, select Layer.
The equal (=) operator is selected for you.
4 Click Values.
The Select dialog box is displayed.
5 In the Select dialog box, select RAILROAD. Then click OK.

RAILROAD will appear in the Value box.

Retrieve Information using Property Queries | 26


6 In the Property Condition dialog box, click OK.
In the Define Query dialog box, the RAILROAD layer property is now spec-
ified for the current query.
7 In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, make sure Preview is
selected.
Executing the query in Preview mode will quickly show the objects with-
out actually creating them in the drawing.
8 Click Execute Query.
Polylines representing the railroads are displayed. Like Quick View, Pre-
view mode displays objects in read-only mode.

9 At the command prompt, type REDRAW and press the Enter key to clear
the objects.
Like the REGEN command, REDRAW clears the objects.

You have learned how to define a property query. Next you will edit an exist-
ing query and learn how to create a compound query.

Edit an Existing Query and Create


Compound Queries

To retrieve specific information from a drawing, you can refine a query by


combining conditions, such as location and property, to create a 'compound
query.
To begin you will open a sample drawing file that has four source drawings
already attached.
1 Click Map > Query > Define Query.
2 In the Define Query dialog box, under Current Query, select Property:
LAYER = RAILROAD, then click Edit.
The Property Condition dialog box is displayed.
3 In the Property Condition dialog box, click Values.
The Select dialog box is displayed.
4 In the Select dialog box, select the STREAM layer from the list of layers.
You've specified the STREAM layer for the current query.
5 Make sure that RAILROAD is NOT selected. Click OK.

Edit an Existing Query and Create Compound Queries | 27


6 Click OK to close the Property Condition dialog box.
In the Define Query dialog box, the STREAM query will appear in the Cur-
rent Query box.
7 In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Type, make sure the AND
operator is selected.
The AND operator will allow you to combine a location condition with
the property condition so you can create a compound query.
8 Under Query Type, click Location.
9 The Location Condition dialog box is displayed.
10 In the Location Condition dialog box, under Boundary Type, select Circle.
11 This specifies that Autodesk Map will query the drawing for objects that
lie within a specific circle whose radius you will define.
12 Under Selection Type, make sure Crossing is selected.
Objects (streams) that lie within and cross the circular boundary will be
included in the query.
13 Click Define. On the command line, at the CENTER prompt, enter a coor-
dinate of 3085000,1270000. Press ENTER.
This defines the center of the circle.
14 On the command line, at the RADIUS prompt, enter 5000. Press the Enter
key.
This defines the radius of the circle.
15 In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, select Draw.
Draw mode copies objects from the source drawing into the current draw-
ing.
16 Click Execute Query.
Only the objects on the STREAM layer that lie within and cross the circle
appear in the drawing.
17 From the Edit menu, choose Undo to remove the queried objects from the
drawing.

Note You can only undo the results of a query immediately following the
query.

18 From the View menu, choose Redraw.


The query boundary is removed from the screen.

Make sure that you leave the citymap1 drawing file open in order to complete
the next exercise.

Edit an Existing Query and Create Compound Queries | 28


Saving a Query

If you want to use a query again, you can save it in the Query Library with a
description.
1 Click Map > Query > Define Query.
2 In the Define Query dialog box, under Options, click Save.
The Save Current Query dialog box is displayed.
3 In the Save Current Query dialog box, click New Category.
The Define New Category dialog box is displayed.
4 In the Define New Category dialog box, type STREAMS for the new cate-
gory name, then click OK.
5 In the Save Current Query dialog box, type STREAMS in the Name text
box and in the Description text box enter Streams.
6 Select the Save To External File check box.
When you select this option, all drawings can use your saved queries.
7 Under Save Options, make sure the following options are selected:

Save List of Active Drawings


Keep Reference in Library
Auto Execute

Clear the other two check boxes.


8 Click Browse to navigate to the folder in which to save the query.
9 In the Create File dialog box, navigate to the MapTutData\Query directory
located where you installed Autodesk Map.
10 Type maptut2.qry in the File Name text box, then click Save.
Autodesk Map saves the query as maptut2.qry.
11 In the Define Query dialog box, click Clear Query. Then click OK.
Autodesk Map saves the query as an external query. A reference to the
query is stored in the Query Library.
12 On the Workspace, click the plus sign (+) next to the STREAMS category
to see a list that shows the Streams query.
Now you know how to save a query for future use.
Make sure that you leave the citymap1 drawing file open.

Saving a Query | 29
Use Saved Queries

The first step is to open the Run Library Query dialog box.
1 Click Map > Query > Run Query.
2 In the Run Library Query dialog box, make sure 'Streams' is selected for
Category.
3 Under Queries, make sure the description of the query you saved in the
previous exercise is selected.
4 Click Run Query.
5 On the command line, specify a CENTER point of 3085000, 1270000,
then press Enter.
6 Type 5000 for RADIUS and press Enter.
Autodesk Map will retrieve the streams lying within and crossing the area
you specify.
7 On the command line, type UNDO and press the Enter key.
8 Type 1 for the number of operations to undo and press the Enter key.
This will clear the screen of queried objects.

Now you know how to reuse a query that you've previously saved.
Make sure that you leave the citymap1 drawing file open.

Querying with Object Data

After you add object data, you can use it in a query condition to retrieve and
modify objects. Data retrieved from source drawings and modified can be
saved back to the source drawings for later use.
In this exercise you will add object data to a drawing. Later, you can use the
data as a query condition.
1 Click File > Open.
2 Navigate to the MapTutData directory in the folder where you installed
Autodesk Map and open maptut3.dwg.
3 From the menu bar, choose Map > Query > Define Query.
The Define Query dialog box is displayed.

Use Saved Queries | 30


4 In the Define Query dialog box, make sure there is no current query. If
there is, click Clear Query.
5 If the Alter Properties check box is selected, click to deselect it.
6 Under Query Type, click Data.
The Data Condition dialog box is displayed.
7 In the Data Condition dialog box, click Object Data.
8 From the Tables list, select WATER_BODIES.
9 Under Object Data Fields, select ACCESS.
10 For Value, type NO. Click OK.
11 In the Define Query dialog, under Query Mode, select Draw, then click
Execute Query.
12 The two lakes with no public access are displayed.

Tip If you cannot see the two lakes, select Zoom > Extents from the View menu.

Edit object data from a previous query

1 From the menu bar, choose Map > Object Data > Edit Object Data, then
click the larger water body (the reservoir).
The Edit Object Data dialog box is displayed.
2 In the Edit Object Data dialog box, under Object Data Field, select 'Public
Access Allowed?'
3 For Value, type YES, and then press the Enter key.
This updates the object data field.
4 Click OK.
5 When you are prompted to specify whether you want to add the selected
objects to the save set, click No.
The Save Set is a list of new and edited objects that you intend to save back
to the attached drawings.
6 From the File menu, choose Close to close the drawing file. When you are
prompted to save the changes you made, click No.

Edit object data from a previous query | 31


Summary

In this tutorial you explored the following concepts:

Queries retrieve objects from the active source drawings and display
extracted objects in the drawing.
Four types of conditions are used for selecting objects: Location, Prop-
erty, Data, and SQL.
With queries, you can retrieve data and associated information from
source drawings based on query conditions.
Retrieved data can be presented in either Preview mode as a quick view,
Draw mode as a copy of the source data, or Report mode as an ASCII
file.

Summary | 32
Editing Multiple Source
Drawings

With Autodesk Map, multiple users can view and

query objects in the same file on a network at the same

time. When you want to edit objects retrieved by a

query, the objects are locked in the source drawing until

you commit the changes you have made to the source

drawing by a process called save back. Once edited and

saved, the objects are unlocked and are available to all

users again.

In this tutorial:

Editing Objects and Saving Back


Summary

33
Editing Objects and Saving Back

The city of Dublin, California has extended the sewer collection system to
service the new parcel that was added previously. In this exercise, you must
correct two existing lines and manholes that are located incorrectly in rela-
tion to the existing parcel map. You must also add geometry to represent new
sewer lines that have been installed.
Since the sewer data, and the parcel data are in separate drawings, you use a
query to retrieve the existing sewer geometry into the parcel base map, and
use this same base map to create the extension.

Defining the Query


In this step you define a query to retrieve the sewer collection system.
1 Open the Dublin drawing (MapTutData/!DrawingSetUp/dublin.dwg) if it is
not already open.
2 In the Workspace, double-click Current Query to display the Define Query
dialog box.
3 In the Define Query dialog box, click Clear Query to clear the previous
query settings, if any.
4 Under Query Type, click Location.
5 In the Location Condition dialog box, under Boundary Type, click Win-
dow and then under Selection Type, click Crossing.
6 Click Define < and specify a selection window around the new parcel on
the far right of the map.

Tip Scroll the window to view this portion if necessary.

7 In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Type, click And. Then click
Property.
8 In the Property Condition dialog box, under Select Property, click Layer.
9 Make sure that Operator is set to equals (=) and then click Values.
10 In the Select dialog box, press CTRL and select MANHOLES,
SEWER_PIPE_PVC, and SEWER_PIPE_VCP. Then click OK.
11 In the Property Condition dialog box, click OK.
12 In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, click Draw.

Editing Objects and Saving Back | 34


13 Click Execute Query.
14 If a message box appears, close it.
15 Zoom in on the manholes near the corner of the new parcel.

The manholes The manholes must be moved into the center of the road.

Editing Queried Objects


In this step you move the incorrectly placed manholes into the center of the
street.
1 Using Grips, select the manhole nearest the intersection, and move it near
the center of the street as shown Be sure you select the manhole and not

Editing Objects and Saving Back | 35


the sewer line. Youll move the sewer line in the next step. Zoom in closer
if necessary.

When you release the grip, you are prompted to add the modified
manhole to the save set.
2 Click Yes.
3 Now move the upper manhole and adjust the sewer lines until they look
like the following illustration.

Be sure to click Yes when prompted to add objects to the save set.

Editing Objects and Saving Back | 36


Highlighting Objects in the Save Set
You can highlight objects to verify that they are included in the current save
set.
1 From the Map menu, choose Save Back > Show Objects in Save Set.
The two manholes and associated sewer lines are highlighted. These
objects are in the save set.
2 Press ESC.

Creating New Objects


In this step you insert a new manhole and accompanying sewer line. Then,
you add the new objects to the save set.

Note If the Save Objects To Source Drawings dialog box appears during this
step, close it. You must add objects to the save set manually to obtain the cor-
rect results in this step.

1 Set the current layer to MANHOLES.

Tip To do this, from the Format menu, choose Layer. In the Layer Properties
Manager, click the MANHOLES layer. Click Current, and then click OK.

2 From the Insert menu, choose Block.


3 Make sure MANHOLE is displayed in the Name box.
4 Leave all the other settings unchanged.
5 In the Insert dialog box, click OK.
6 Click to insert the new manhole further up the street in the position
shown by the cursor in the following illustration.

Editing Objects and Saving Back | 37


7 Next, change the current layer to SEWER_PIPE_PVC.
8 Using the line command and object snaps, draw a new sewer line from the
lower manhole to the new manhole.
9 Press ENTER to complete the new line.
You now add the new manhole and the new sewer line to the save set
using manual selection.
10 From the Map menu, choose Save Back > Add Objects to Save Set.
The Command Line displays the following prompt:
Add objects to save set Select/<allNew>:
11 Enter s to select objects manually.

Note It is very important that you do not add all new objects to the save set
because all the parcels in the drawing are considered new objects.

12 Click to select the new manhole and sewer line. Then press ENTER.
The Command Line indicates that two objects have been added to the
save set.

Saving Back to the Source Drawings


You now save changed and new objects back to the source drawing.
1 From the Map menu, choose Save Back > Save To Source Drawings.
The Save Objects To Source Drawings dialog box provides status informa-
tion about the save set and a list of source drawings.

Editing Objects and Saving Back | 38


2 In the What To Save area, be sure that the Save Queried Objects and Save
Newly Created Objects check boxes are selected.
3 In the Save Order For Newly Created Objects area, under Drawings To Save
New Objects To, select TUTOR_FILES:\Sewer_Data.dwg.
4 In the first drop-down list, numbered 1, select Layer. Then in the second
drop-down list, select None.
5 Click OK to save back to the source drawing.
The objects in the Save Set disappear from the current drawing as the data
is updated in the source drawings.
6 Close the drawing and do not save.

Summary

In this tutorial you explored the following concepts:

The query process provides an efficient means of modifying or updat-


ing objects from multiple drawings in one session.
Modification can include changing the location or geometry of an
object, erasing the object, or altering the data attached to the object.
These changes can then be saved back to the source drawings using the
Save To Source Drawings feature.
Autodesk Map enables multiple users to work on the same drawings at
the same time by locking individual objects.
Only one user can edit a specific object at a time, and users cannot
open a file while another user is editing the same file.

Summary | 39
Working with External
Databases

While the mapping and presentation of graphical data

is an important part of mapping, your data can be more

effective at presenting information when it is linked to

textual data. Textual data can be used as the basis for

analysis in such diverse applications as municipal man-

agement, oil and mineral exploration, business demo-

graphics, and environmental monitoring. You can

directly link drawing objects to an external data source,

such as a database, spreadsheet, or text file.

A database is an efficient method of storing tables of

information. Using Autodesk Map, a database can be

viewed and linked to a drawing. Linking database data

is one of the steps for using GIS (Geographic Informa-

tion System) as a powerful analysis and presentation

tool, and makes GIS data more accessible and useful to

more people in an organization.

40
Note The databases that you attach are not attached to any source draw-
ings but to the actual drawing itself. When you close the drawing, all data-
base connections to that drawing are closed.

In this tutorial:

Using Data View with an External Database


Working in the Data View Window
Defining a Link Template
Generating Links
Summary

Using Data View with an External Database

Although graphical data is useful for mapping purposes, many mapping and
GIS applications require the viewing, editing, and presenting of tabular data
as an important step for analysis and presentation of information and trends.
The Autodesk Map Data View provides a simple interface to external data-
bases that allows the linking of records in a database to specific drawing
objects.
In these exercises, you establish a connection between the drawing and the
utility database table for the city of Dublin. You set options to establish the
working mode of Data View as Updatable, and then open Data View by click-
ing on an attached database table in the Workspace.

Connecting to the Data Source


First, you connect to a sample database.
1 Start Autodesk Map and open a new drawing using the acad.dwt template.
2 If the Workspace is not displayed, from the Map menu, choose Utilities >
Workspace.
3 Start Windows Explorer, and resize it so you can see both Explorer and the
Workspace.
4 In Explorer, navigate to the MapTutData\ExternalDatabase folder.
5 Drag facilities.mdb to the Workspace.

Using Data View with an External Database | 41


The database is connected, and the table in the database is displayed in
the Workspace.

A UDL file is created. You will use this file in a later exercise when you cre-
ate an SQL query.

Setting Database Options


In this step you set options for the Data View before using it to view a table
in the facilities database. With the Data Source options, you can set the
options associated with the Data View and with other database features.
1 From the Map menu, choose Options.
2 In the Autodesk Map Options dialog box, click the Data Source tab.
3 Under Display Of Multiple Tables, select Show Each Table In A Separate
Data View.
4 Under Data Views, select Save Format And Style Changes With Drawing,
and then clear the other two check boxes.
5 Click OK.

Working in the Data View Window

Opening Data View


Open Data View to view the external database table.
1 In the Workspace, double-click the PARCEL_DATA table entry to start Data
View.
2 Click the Maximize button in the top right corner of the window to fully
view the Data View window.
The database table containing parcel records is displayed in the Data View
window.

Changing the Data View Columns


Resize the APN column width.
1 Click the APN column header to resize the APN column.
The header is black, and the whole column displays an outline.

Working in the Data View Window | 42


2 Move your cursor over the right border of the column header, and when
the cursor shape changes to a bar with two arrows, drag the column to the
left to make the column smaller.

Changing the Column Order


Move the LAND_VALUE column to the left.
1 Click the LAND_VALUE column header.
2 Move the cursor over the middle of the column header.
3 Press and hold the mouse button, and then drag the column to the left of
the OWNER column.

Hiding Columns
Hide an unneeded column.
1 Click the SITELINE2 column header and right-click.
2 From the shortcut menu, click Hide.
The column is removed from the display. You can view all columns in
Data View by choosing Unhide All Columns from the View menu.

Freezing Columns
Freeze Column forces a column to always appear in Data View regardless of
left and right scrolling. Table data is unaffected.
1 Click the APN column header and right-click.
2 From the shortcut menu, click Freeze.
3 Use the horizontal scroll bar to view columns in the table.
Notice that the APN column remains in view on the left as you scroll to
other columns in the table. You can unfreeze all columns by choosing
Unfreeze All Columns from the View menu.

Sorting Records
You can change the order of the records in the table by sorting the data based
on the values in one or more columns. In this exercise, you sort based on the
Assessed Land Value (LAND_VALUE) column values.
1 Locate the LAND_VALUE column.
2 Double-click the column header.
When you sort the first time, the data is put into ascending order. Any
blank (null) entries appear at the top of the database. Its necessary to
scroll down to see the data.

Working in the Data View Window | 43


3 Double-click the column header again.
This time the data is sorted in descending order, and the largest values
appear at the top of the table.

Filtering Records
You can limit the records that appear in the Data View by defining and apply-
ing a filter to the table. This operation does not change the data in the table
but shows only the records matching the condition that you specify.
1 In the Data View window, from the Records menu, choose SQL Filter.
2 In the Table Filter dialog box, in the Where Condition area, select
LAND_VALUE from the Column drop-down list.
3 From the Operator drop-down list, select > (greater than).
4 For Value, enter 0.
5 Click Add, and then click OK.
6 In Data View, sort the LAND_VALUE column again by double-clicking the
column header.
Previously, the blank land values appeared at the top of the table. These
values have been filtered out, so the true low values appear at the top of
the Data View.

Finding and Modifying Records


In this step you find and modify a record.
1 Click any cell in the OWNER column.
2 From the Edit menu, choose Find.
3 In the Find dialog box, for Find What, enter Taube.
4 Click Find Next.
5 When you locate the record, click Cancel to close the Find dialog box.
6 Select Terence N Taube in the OWNER column and change Terence N
Taube to Thomas M Taube. Then press ENTER.
7 In Data View, from the File menu, choose Close to close the window.
8 In Autodesk Map, close the drawing and do not save changes.

Defining a Link Template

Defining a Link Template | 44


In this exercise, you open a drawing of the City of Dublin parcels, attach a
database, and define a Link Template for the PARCEL_DATA table.
1 Open MapTutData\ExternalDatabase\parcels.dwg.
2 Right-click Data Sources in the Workspace and choose Attach from the
shortcut menu.
3 In the Attach Data Source dialog box, select facilities.udl, and then click
Attach.
The facilities.mdb database is attached to the drawing.
4 In the Workspace, right-click the PARCEL_DATA table, and then choose
Define Link Template.
5 In the Define Link Template dialog box, for Link Template, enter
PARCEL_DATA.
6 In the Define Link Template dialog box, in the Key Selection area, locate
the APN row. Then, under Key, select the check box.
7 Click OK.
8 In the Workspace, double-click Link Templates.
The new Link Template is listed in the Workspace.

Generating Links

In this exercise, you use the Generate Links option to link parcel numbers to
the Dublin_Subdiv table. You could do this manually by selecting a specific
record in Data View and then clicking the Link option to link one record to
a selected block and attribute at a time. However, the Generate Links option
can automatically link the parcel numbers to the matching records in the
database table.

Generating Links
1 In the Workspace, under Link Templates, right-click PARCEL_DATA, and
then choose Generate Links from the shortcut menu.
2 In the Generate Data Links dialog box, in the Linkage Type area, select
Blocks.
3 In the Data Links area, select Create Database Links.
Key 1 displays the corresponding APN column name from the database
table. Tag 1 displays the attribute from the drawing. These are the compo-
nents that are linked.

Generating Links | 45
4 Click OK.
The Command Line displays a prompt to specify block objects from which
to generate links. You can select blocks individually or choose all blocks.
5 Press ENTER to select all the blocks in the drawing.
Each valid block is counted as it is linked until all the blocks and records
are linked.

5440 object(s) to process.


Processing 5440...done. 5440 links created.

Using Data View to Show Linked Data


You can use the Data View with the parcels drawing to show records and their
corresponding parcels in the city since the blocks and table records are
linked.
1 In the Workspace, under Link Templates, double-click PARCEL_DATA.
2 If the Data View window is full-sized, resize it so you can see the
Autodesk Map drawing as well.
3 In the Data View window, from the Highlight menu, choose
AutoHighlight and then choose AutoZoom.
4 From the Highlight menu, choose Zoom Scale.
5 In the Zoom Scale dialog box, under Select Value For Zoom Scale, enter 20,
and then click OK.
6 Select one of the records in Data View by clicking one of the gray boxes to
the left of each row.
The parcel corresponding to the record you selected is displayed in the
Autodesk Map window at the zoom magnification you specified.
7 In the Data View window, from the Highlight menu, choose Highlight
Records > Select Objects.
On the Command Line you are prompted to select an object.
8 Select a different APN block in the drawing. Then press ENTER.
The linked record is highlighted in the Data View.
9 In the Data View window, from the File menu, choose Close to close the
Data View window.
10 In Autodesk Map, save and close the drawing.

Summary

Summary | 46
In this tutorial you learned how to:

Attach a database to a drawing and view the records and columns in


the database tables with Data View.
Generate links between drawing objects and selected database records.
Locate drawing geometry based on table record values using the Data
View feature and queries.

Summary | 47
Using Topology and
Spatial Analysis

A topology is a set of objects and the object data that

defines the relationships between those objects. One of

the differences between CAD and GIS has been that

CAD does not represent topology which is a geographic

relationship between drawing objects. Topologies are

the basis of true GIS systems, and let you carry out

advanced analysis of your mapping data with functions

such as network tracing (shortest path traces, best route

analysis, and flood traces) and spatial analysis.

This tutorial introduces you to some of the key aspects

of the topology feature.

In this tutorial:

Creating a Network Topology


Calculating a Best Route Analysis
Highlighting Objects in a Selected Topology
Viewing Topology Data Properties
Summary

48
Creating a Network Topology

In this exercise, you use existing geometry to create a street network topology.

1 Start Autodesk Map and open MapTutData\Topology\Streets.dwg.


2 From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents so you can view the entire
drawing.
3 From the Map menu, choose Topology > Create.
The Create Polygon Topology - Select Topology Type dialog box is dis-
played. The type of map you are using for this exercise requires a Network
topology.
4 Under Topology Type, select Network.
5 Under Topology Name, enter Streets.
6 Under Topology Description, enter Small town street topology.
7 Click Next.
8 In the Create Network Topology - Select Links dialog box, verify that Select
All is selected and there are asterisks (*) in the Layers and Feature Classes
boxes.
All links on all layers of the drawing are included in the topology. Having
an asterisk under Feature Classes tells Autodesk Map to include links from
all feature classes (i.e., not to filter links from certain feature classes out).
9 Click Next.
10 In the Create Network Topology - Select Nodes dialog box, choose Select
All.
Verify that there are asterisks (*) under Layers, Block Names, and Feature
Classes.
All nodes on all layers in the drawing are included in the topology. Nodes
from all feature classes are included as well. Node information is stored as
object data and saved with the map. Each node is given a unique ID num-
ber, which is automatically processed whenever you use a topology com-
mand. By including the asterisk under Block Names, Autodesk Map
searches all the blocks in the drawing for nodes.

11 Click Next.
12 In the Create Network Topology - Create New Nodes dialog box, do the
following tasks:

Creating a Network Topology | 49


Select the Create New Nodes check box.
Under Layer, select Roads.
Under Point Object for Node Creation, leave ACAD_POINT.

Autodesk Map creates new node objects as points at the endpoints of links
and places the new nodes on the Roads layer.

13 Click Finish.
The status of the operation is displayed on the command line.
Creating Network topology: Streets....
Writing topology information to the drawing...
Topology successfully created with 441 links and 325 nodes.
The Streets topology is created and appears in the Workspace under Topol-
ogies.

Calculating a Best Route Analysis

A best-route analysis calculates the optimal route from a start point, to one
or more intermediate points, and back to the start point. In this exercise you
specify a start point and several points along the way to a final point.
Autodesk Map will determine the best route through all specified points.
While this exercise shows a street network, this analysis is valid in power dis-
tribution, sewer collection, and so forth.
1 Make sure MapTutData\Topology\Streets.dwg is still open and contains the
topology you created in the previous exercise.

Note In the Workspace, double-click Topologies to display the Streets topol-


ogy you created in the previous exercise if it is not already displayed.

2 Right-click the Streets topology and choose Analysis > Network Analysis
from the shortcut menu.
3 In the Network Topology Analysis - Select Method dialog box, select Best
Route.
4 Click Next.
5 In the Network Topology Analysis - Choose Locations dialog box, make
sure Start Point is selected.
6 Click the Select Point button.

Calculating a Best Route Analysis | 50


7 In the drawing, click any point as the start point for your Best Route
analysis. Then press ENTER.
The nearest node is selected for the start point. The Network Topology
Analysis - Choose Locations dialog box is redisplayed. The coordinates of
the start point appear in the list.
8 In the Network Topology Analysis - Choose Locations dialog box, select
Visit Point(s). Then click the Select Point button.
In this step you specify some points along the route. When you click
Select Point, you will click specific points in the drawing.
9 Select several points along the route.
To select points, left-click a point. To accept the point and specify another
point, right-click and choose Next Point from the shortcut menu.
10 When you are finished selecting visit points, press ENTER.
The coordinates for the start point and visit points are displayed.

Note You can delete or examine any point by selecting the point in the list
and clicking Delete or Preview, respectively. If you click Preview, the point is
displayed in the drawing. Press ENTER to return to the Network Topology
Analysis - Choose Locations dialog box.

11 Click Next.
The Network Topology Analysis - Resistance and Direction dialog box is
displayed. You can enter values for direction and resistance to consider
when determining a best route. You can also enter a constant or reference
an object data field or external database column.
12 In the Network Topology Analysis - Resistance and Direction dialog box,
under Link Direction, click the Expression Builder For Direction button.
13 In the Expression Chooser, double-click Topologies to display the
Network:Streets topology icon. Double-click Network:Streets, and then
double-click Network Link. Select Flow Direction.
14 Click OK.
The Flow Direction data is added to the Network Topology Analysis - Resis-
tance and Direction dialog box under Link Direction.
:DIRECTION@TPMLINK_Streets
This setting enables Autodesk Map to consider flow direction data when
determining the best route.
15 In the Network Topology Analysis - Resistance and Direction dialog box,
under Link Direct Resistance, click the Expression Builder For Direct Resis-
tance button.

Calculating a Best Route Analysis | 51


16 In the Expression Chooser, double-click Topologies to display the
Network:Streets topology icon. Double-click Network:Streets, and then
double-click Network Link. Select Direct Resistance.
17 Click OK.
The Direct Resistance data is added to the Network Topology Analysis -
Resistance and Direction dialog box under Link Direct Resistance.
:DIRECT_RESISTANCE@TPMLINK_Streets
This setting enables Autodesk Map to consider link direct resistance data
when determining the best route. Link direct resistance is resistance to
travel in the direction that a link was created.
18 In the Network Topology Analysis - Resistance and Direction dialog box,
under Link Reverse Resistance, enter 25.
This sets the resistance in the opposite direction along links. Autodesk
Map will consider this information when determining the best route.
19 In the Network Topology Analysis - Resistance and Direction dialog box,
leave Node Resistance blank.
Node resistance is resistance encountered passing through a node such as
a valve in a pipe network, or a junction in a road network. The default
value is Zero Node Resistance.
20 Leave Minimum Resistance and Maximum Resistance at the default set-
tings.
21 Click Next.
22 In the Network Topology Analysis - Output dialog box, do the following
tasks.

Select the Highlight check box and the Create Topology check box.
Under Color, select Green from the drop-down list.
Under Name, enter BestRoute.
Under Description, enter Route of least resistance.

23 Click Save.
24 Navigate to MapTutData\Topology, enter BestRoute for the filename, and
then click Save.
25 Click Finish.
The best route from the start point through all the visit points you speci-
fied, and back is displayed in green. BestRoute is added to the Topologies
list in the Workspace.
26 On the Command Line, enter REGEN to clear the display.

Calculating a Best Route Analysis | 52


Highlighting Objects in a Selected Topology

In this exercise, you highlight objects in a selected topology.


1 In the Workspace, right-click the BestRoute topology that you created in
the previous exercise and choose Show Geometry.
The BestRoute topology is highlighted in the drawing.
2 Press ENTER or ESC to clear the highlighting and redraw the map.

Viewing Topology Data Properties

Information about each topology you create is stored in an object data table
in the current drawing. You can use this information in a topology query.
Depending on the type of topology, other object data tables are created and
attached to the elements of the topology.
You can view and edit data associated with the objects in a topology using
the Properties palette. For example, for a link in a network topology, you can
view general information about the link, such as the ID of the start and end
nodes, and you can edit specific information such as the link's direction,
direct resistance, and reverse resistance.
1 Double-click any object in Streets.dwg.
All the objects in Streets.dwg are part of the topology so the Topo:Streets
section of the Properties palette looks similar to the following illustration.
If you select an object that is part of the BestRoute analysis, the
Topo:BestRoute information will be displayed. You can modify Flow
Direction, Direct Resistance, and Reverse Resistance for the selected link.
You cannot modify the Type, ID, Start Node, or End Node.

Summary

In this tutorial you learned how to:

Create a network topology

Highlighting Objects in a Selected Topology | 53


Calculate a best route analysis
Save a new topology
Highlight and view objects in a best route topology
Select and view properties in an object topology
Modify topology properties

Summary | 54
Using Feature
Classification

Use feature classification to organize objects in your

drawing based on the real-world features that they rep-

resent, such as roads. When you create an object using

feature classification, the object automatically takes its

properties and values from its feature classification, cre-

ating consistency and establishing standards in your

drawing.

Warning! You must have SuperUser privi-


leges to complete the last two exercises in this
tutorial, where you create a feature definition
file and define a feature class. If you do not
have SuperUser privileges, you will use the pre-
defined Street_Centerlines feature class and
will be able to complete only the first three
exercises. Check with your system administra-
tor if you are not sure which type of access you
have been granted.

In this tutorial:

Creating New Street Centerlines


Selecting Objects Using Feature Class Data
Classifying and Unclassifying Objects
Creating a Feature Definition File

55
Creating the Street_Centerlines Feature Definition File
Defining a Feature Class
Summary

Creating New Street Centerlines

You will use the Street_Centerlines feature class to create two missing street
centerlines.
1 Open MapTutData\Classification\Street_Centerline_su.dwg.
Street_Centerlines_su.dwg has the Street_Centerlines feature class defined
for you.
2 From the View menu, choose Zoom > Window and specify a selection
window around the lower left quarter of the street network as shown in
the illustration.

3 In the Workspace, under Feature Classes, right-click the Street_Centerlines


icon and select Create Feature.
4 Specify start and end points for the first new street object. Press ENTER.
5 Right-click the Street_Centerlines feature class and select Create Feature.
6 Specify start and end points for the second new street object and press
ENTER.

Creating New Street Centerlines | 56


7 Click on a line to select one of the streets you just created.
8 Right-click and choose Properties.
You can now examine the properties of the newly created street.
9 In the Properties window, click the Feature Data tab.
The new streets are drawn using the properties and data values specified
for the Street_Centerlines feature class.
10 Close the Properties window and press ESC to deselect the street.
11 Save the drawing and leave it open for the next exercise.

Selecting Objects Using Feature Class Data

You can select all objects in a particular class or select objects based on feature
class data.

Selecting Objects by Class


In this step you will select all the objects created using the Roads feature class.
1 With the drawing still open from the previous exercise and displaying the
streets you created, right-click Street_Centerlines under Feature Classes in
the Workspace.
2 Click Select Features.
Notice that the two streets you created using the Street_Centerlines fea-
ture class are selected and that the other street objects are not selected.
This is because they have not been added to the Street_Centerlines feature
class. You will classify these object in the next exercise.
3 Press ESC to deselect the roads.

Selecting Objects Based on Object Data


The objects you create using feature classes have consistent properties. You
can select objects quickly based on the properties. In this step you will select
all the roads with SpeedLimit 25 stored in object data.
1 Right-click any empty space in the drawing.
2 Choose Quick Select.
3 In the Quick Select dialog box, under Object Type, select
Street_Centerlines from the drop-down list.
4 Under Properties, select Speed_Limit.

Selecting Objects Using Feature Class Data | 57


5 Under Operator, select = Equals if it is not already selected.
6 Under Value, enter 25.
7 In the How to Apply Area, click Include In New Selection Set if it is not
already selected.
8 Click OK.
Notice that the streets you created using the Street_Centerlines feature
class are selected and that the other street objects are not selected. This is
because they have not been added to the Street_Centerlines feature class.
You will classify these objects in the next exercise.
9 Press ESC to deselect the selected objects.

Classifying and Unclassifying Objects

You can classify one or more existing objects by assigning a feature class to
the objects. When you classify an object, you automatically add the proper-
ties and data of the selected feature class to the object.

Classifying Objects
In this step you will classify all the existing objects in Street_Centerlines.dwg.
1 From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents.
2 From the Workspace, right click the Street_Centerlines feature class and
select Classify Objects.
3 In the Classify Objects dialog box, make sure both check boxes are
selected. Then click OK.
4 When prompted to select objects, enter all on the Command Line to select
all objects in the drawing.

5 Press ENTER twice to complete the operation.


The status of the classify operation is displayed on the Command Line.

Note The new objects are rejected because they are already classified.

Unclassifying a Street
In this step you will unclassify one of the streets.
1 From the Map menu, choose Feature Classification > Unclassify.

Classifying and Unclassifying Objects | 58


1 Select any street and press ENTER.
2 Click OK in the AutoCAD warning message.
The street becomes an unclassified object.
3 Select the unclassified object, right-click and select Properties.
Notice that the object no longer has information on the Feature Data tab.
4 Save and close the drawing.

Creating a Feature Definition File

In this exercise you use Street_Centerlines.dwg to establish a feature class from


existing geometry. In a later exercise you use the feature class to create new
feature objects to complete the drawing.
You must log in as a SuperUser to create a feature definition file.

Warning! As noted at the beginning of this tutorial, you must have SuperUser
privileges to complete the final two exercises: Creating a Feature Definition File
and Defining a Feature Class. You will not be able to complete the final two exer-
cises of this tutorial if you have not been granted SuperUser privileges.

Logging In as a SuperUser
1 Start Autodesk Map and open MapTutData\Classifica-
tion\Street_Centerlines.dwg.
2 From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents.
3 On the Map menu, click Utilities > User Login.
4 In the User Login dialog box, type SuperUser as the Login Name and
SUPERUSER as the password.
5 Click OK.

The login status is displayed on the command line.


Login successful as SUPERUSER.

Creating a Feature Definition File | 59


Creating the Street_Centerlines Feature
Definition File
The feature definition file includes information on how to create each of the
feature classes you might define. In this exercise, you will create just one fea-
ture class, Street_Centerlines. Attributes or properties in the feature defini-
tion file are attached to a drawing and assigned to objects.
1 From the Map menu, choose Feature Classification > New Definition File.
2 In the New Feature Definition File dialog box, under Save In, navigate to
the MapTutData\Classification directory.
3 Under File name, enter Street_Centerlines.
4 Click Save.
You have created a feature definition file.

Defining a Feature Class

Feature classes allow you to create new objects that automatically have the
appropriate properties and values for objects in your drawing.
1 From the Map menu, choose Feature Classification > Define Feature Class.
You are prompted to select the example object.
2 Select any of the street centerline objects in the drawing, and then press
ENTER.
3 In the Define Feature Classification dialog box, under Feature Name, enter
Street_Centerlines.
4 Under Description, enter street centerlines.
5 If it is not already displayed, click the Applies To tab.
Here you specify the type of objects that are valid street centerlines.
6 Select the AcDbPolyline check box.
7 Click the Properties List tab.
Use this tab to select the street centerline properties to be included in the
feature classification definition.
8 Under Available Properties, in the General area, select the Color and Layer
check boxes.

Creating the Street_Centerlines Feature Definition File | 60


9 Under Available Properties, scroll down to view the Object Data area
(OD:Street_Centerlines) and select the Lanes, Speed Limit, and Surface
check boxes.
10 Under Property Attributes, set the following values:

Layer: Enter Street centerlines for Range and Default.


Lanes: Enter 2,4 for Range. Enter 2 for Default. (Use commas to separate
a series of valid values.)
SpeedLimit: Enter [15,65] for Range. Enter 35 for Default. (Use square
brackets to specify a continuous range of valid values.)
Surface: Enter Paved, Dirt, Gravel for Range and Paved for Default.

Note For Color, dont change any attribute values.

These settings enforce standards on objects created using the


Street_Centerlines feature class. If you create a street using the
Street_Centerlines feature class, the street will be created on the Street
Centerlines layer and have the specified object data.
11 Click Save Definition.
The Street_Centerlines feature class icon appears in the Workspace under
Feature Classes.

Summary

In this tutorial you learned how to:

Created some new streets using a defined feature class


Select objects using feature class data
Classify and uncladdify objects using feature data
Log in as SuperUser
Create the Street_Centerlines feature definition file
Create the Street_Centerlines feature class

Summary | 61
Importing and Exporting
Data

The import and export tools in Autodesk Map provide a

powerful means of sharing and acquiring data from

other mapping and GIS products.

In this tutorial, you first learn how to incorporate a map

of major roads in ArcInfo Coverage format into an exist-

ing map containing street centerlines. You learn how to

import vector data while maintaining layer integrity,

import the associated attribute data, and convert coor-

dinate systems during the import process.

Next, you learn more advanced import techniques

while incorporating new development data in ArcView

Shapefile format into an existing drawing. You import

the simple linework, assign incoming objects to Map

feature classes, map attributes to populate an existing

object data table, save your settings in an Import Profile

for future automation, and more.

Finally, you learn to export a map to MapInfo MIF/MID

format.

62
In this tutorial:

Importing ArcInfo Coverages


Importing ArcView Shapefiles
Exporting to MapInfo MIF/MID Format

Importing ArcInfo Coverages


In this exercise you import an ESRI ArcInfo Coverage containing major
roads in the City of Dublin, California into an existing map containing street
centerlines for one of the Citys subdivisions. In addition to the major road
objects, you import the attribute data associated with the roads.
One bit of additional, interesting information is that ArcInfo Coverage is a
folder-based format, which means it exists as a set of files in a unique folder
(referred to as a workspace) and an associated info folder.
The skills you learn in this exercise are:

Selecting the file type and coverage folder


Specifying import options (which layers to place the data on, which coor-
dinate system to use, and how to store the incoming attribute data)
Importing the data
Viewing the imported data

Step 1: Select the File Type and Coverage Folder


Step 2: Set Import Options for Layers, Coordinate Systems, and Attribute
Data
Step 3: Import the Data
Step 4: View the Imported Data

Step 1: Select the File Type and Coverage Folder

First, you specify the type of file to import and where it is located.

Importing ArcInfo Coverages | 63


1 Open MapTutData\ImportExport\Street Centerlines.dwg in Autodesk Map.
2 From the Map menu, choose Tools > Import.
3 In the Import Location dialog box, under Files Of Type, select ESRI ArcInfo
Coverage if it is not already selected.
4 Under Look In, navigate to the MapTutData\ImportExport\mjr_rds folder.
Coverage is a folder-based format. You can tell youve selected the correct
coverage folder when mjr_rds is displayed in the Look In box. Because
you cant select individual files in the folder, files are not listed in the file
list (below the Look In box), and the file list will be empty.
5 Click OK.
The Import dialog box is displayed. Next, you specify the import options
you want to use, for example which layers to place the data on, which
coordinate system you want to use, and how to store incoming attribute
data.

Step 2: Set Import Options for Layers,


Coordinate Systems, and Attribute Data

Next, you use the Import dialog box to specify which layers you want to
import. Then, for each incoming layer youre importing, you specify a target
layer in the current drawing, the coordinate system of the incoming data,
and the attached attribute data you want to store in the Autodesk Map draw-
ing.
First, you specify the layer you want to import.
1 In the Import dialog box, in the Input Layer column, clear the following
check boxes:
MJR_RDS_bounds
MJR_RDS_tic

These layers will not be imported. The remaining layer, MJR_RDS_arc, will
be imported.
Next, specify the target layer in the Autodesk Map drawing on which to put
the incoming objects.
2 For the MJR_RDS_arc input layer, click the cell in the Drawing Layer col-
umn (the cell currently displays MJR_RDS_arc), and then click [...].
The Layer Mapping dialog box is displayed. This dialog box provides three
options for how objects on the MJR_RDS_arc layer are imported.

Importing ArcInfo Coverages | 64


3 In the Layer Mapping dialog box, select Create On Existing Layer and then
select Major Roads from the drop-down list.
4 Click OK.
Next, you specify the input coordinate system of the layer you are importing.
Autodesk Map compares this coordinate system against the coordinate sys-
tem of current Autodesk Map drawing, and if it differs, automatically con-
verts the incoming data to the Autodesk Map coordinate system during the
import process.
Notice that the coordinate system for the current project is NAD83 California
State Plains, Zone III, US Foot. The incoming data uses NAD27.
5 For the MJR_RDS_arc input layer, click the cell in the Input Coordinate
System column (the cell currently displays <None>), and then click [...].
The Select Global Coordinate System dialog box is displayed. Use this dia-
log box to specify the global coordinate system of the layer you are
importing.
6 In the Select Global Coordinate System dialog box, make the following
selections and then click OK.

From the Category drop-down list, Select USA, California.


From the Coordinate Systems In Category list, select NAD27 California
State Plains, Zone III(403), US Foot.

Next, you specify the attribute data you want to import, and where to store
the data in the Autodesk Map drawing.
7 For the MJR_RDS_arc input layer, click the cell in the Data column (the
cell currently displays <None>), and then click [...].
8 In the Attribute Data dialog box, select Create Object Data.
This indicates that you want to bring in the attribute data attached to the
objects and import it into an object data table.
9 In the Object Data area, under Object Data Table To Use, make sure that
MJR_RDS_arc is selected.
10 In the Attribute Data dialog click OK.

Step 3: Import the Data

Now, you import coverage containing the major roads.


In the Import dialog box, click OK to perform the import operation.
The Command Line indicates that the import process was performed.

Importing ArcInfo Coverages | 65


_MAPIMPORT 622 object(s) inserted

Step 4: View the Imported Data

You can now view the data you just imported.


1 From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents to view the entire map.
2 In the drawing, double-click one of the new Major Road objects.
3 In the Properties palette, under OD:MJR_RDS_arc, scroll through the list
of object data fields.
Notice that the Route1 field contains the CALTRANS highway number.
4 Dismiss the Properties palette.
5 Close the drawing without saving your changes.

Importing ArcView Shapefiles


In this exercise, you incorporate ESRI ArcView shapefiles containing parcel
data for a new subdivision into an existing parcel map.
As is often the case when importing shapefiles, several ESRI Shapefiles are
involved and the procedures are more sophisticated. This exercise covers the
advanced techniques required when importing shapefiles and covers most of
the factors you must consider when importing data into an existing file,
including (but not limited to) the following:

Maintaining layer integrity


Specifying the area in which to import objects
Mapping attribute data definitions correctly
Mapping incoming objects to existing Map feature classes
Specifying import parameters for incoming points

This is a multi-step exercise. You perform the following operations:

Select the file type and the shapefiles to import


Set import options for the incoming parcels and parcel numbers for a new
subdivision, including layer options, feature class assignments, object
data mapping, and so on.
Save import settings in an import profile file (.ipf)
Import the data
View imported data

Importing ArcView Shapefiles | 66


Step 1: Select the File Type and the Shapefiles to Import
Step 2: Set Import Options for Area, Layers, Feature Classes, Data, and
Points
Step 3: Save Settings in an Import Profile
Step 4: Import the Data
Step 5: View the Imported Data

Step 1: Select the File Type and the Shapefiles to


Import

First, you open an existing parcel map, specify the type of file you want to
import, and the shapefiles containing the parcels for the new subdivision
that you want to import.
1 Open MapTutData\ImportExport\parcels.dwg in Autodesk Map.
This is the existing city map into which you want to import data.
2 From the View menu, choose Named Views.
3 In the Named Views dialog box, click the Named Views tab if it is not
already displayed.
4 Click NEW_DEVELOPMENT, and then click Set Current.
5 Click OK.
The NEW_DEVELOPMENT named view displays an area where new
development information is imported later in this exercise.
6 From the Map menu, choose Tools > Import.
7 In the Import Location dialog box, under Files Of Type, select ESRI Shape
(*.shp).
8 Under Look In, navigate to the MapTutData\ImportEx-
port\New_Development folder.
9 In the Import Location dialog box, select both Parcel_number.shp and Par-
cels.shp, and then click OK.

Importing ArcView Shapefiles | 67


Step 2: Set Import Options for Area, Layers,
Feature Classes, Data, and Points

In this step, limit the import to a specified area, specify the shapefile layers
you want to import, map those incoming layers to target layers in the city
map, assign incoming objects to Map feature classes, and specify where to
store the incoming attribute data. You also specify import parameters for
incoming points representing parcel numbers and convert the points to
blocks, drawing the parcel number values from the data.

Specify the import area


1 In the Import dialog box, under Spatial Filter, click Current Display.
The import will be limited to the current drawing area.

Specify the target layer for incoming objects


2 Under Import Properties For Each Layer Imported, review the list of layers
from the incoming ESRI ArcView shapefiles.
There are two layers available for import in the incoming shapefiles:
Parcel_Numbers and Parcels.
3 Under Input Layer, verify that the Parcels check box is selected.
This indicates that the incoming Parcels layer will be imported.
4 For the Parcels input layer, verify that the Drawing Layer cell is set to Par-
cels.
Imported parcel objects will be placed on the Parcels layer.
5 Verify that the Parcel_Numbers check box is selected.
6 For the Parcel_Numbers input layer, click the cell in the Drawing Layer
column. Then click the down-arrow and select BLOCK_APNS from the
list.

Assign incoming data to Autodesk Map feature classes and map attribute
data
Next, you assign the incoming objects to existing feature classes in the
Autodesk Map drawing. Feature classes are used to standardize the objects in
a drawing so that they have the same properties (such as color and layer) and
the same data structure (location and method of storing important attribute
data).
7 For the Parcels input layer, click the cell in the Feature Class column. Then
click the down-arrow and select Parcel Objects from the list.

Importing ArcView Shapefiles | 68


Data from the incoming Parcels shapefile layer will be assigned to the Par-
cel Objects feature class in the Autodesk Map drawing.
8 Continuing in the Feature Class column for the Parcels layer, click [...] to
map the incoming data to the feature class definition.
9 In the Feature Class Attribute Mapping dialog box, review the Input Fields
(data coming in from the shapefile layer) and the Target Fields (field in the
Feature Class definition that you can map to).
10 Since there arent any Target Fields, you dont need to do any data map-
ping, so just click OK.
11 In the Import dialog box, for the Parcel_Numbers input layer, set the Fea-
ture Class cell to Parcel Numbers.
12 Click [...].
13 In the Feature Class Attribute Mapping dialog box, verify that the APN
Input Field is selected and that the Target Field is OD: parcel_data:apn.
Click OK.
Imported data will be added to the object data in the parcel_data table,
APN field.

Set point options for the parcel numbers


Next, you specify import parameters for points representing the parcel num-
bers. You convert the points to blocks and draw the parcel number values
from the data.
14 For the Parcel_Numbers input layer, click the cell in the Points column,
click the down-arrow and select APN from the list, and then click [...].
15 In the Point Mapping dialog box, click Create As Blocks and verify that
APN is selected in the list directly underneath.
This converts incoming points to APN blocks.
16 Select the Get Attribute Values From Fields check box.
This option imports attribute values attached to the incoming points.
17 Click OK to close the Point Mapping dialog box.

Step 3: Save Settings in an Import Profile

Next, you save the import parameters in an .ipf file.


1 In the Import dialog box, in the Saved Profiles area, click Save.
2 For Save In, navigate to MapTutData\ImportExport.
3 For File Name, enter NewParcel_Import.ipf.

Importing ArcView Shapefiles | 69


4 For Files Of Type, leave the default setting of IPF Files [*.ipf].
5 Click Save.

Step 4: Import the Data

In the Import dialog box, click OK to perform the import operation.


The Command Line indicates that the import process was performed.
_MAPIMPORT 53 object(s) inserted
53 objects classified, 0 rejected

Step 5: View the Imported Data

Now, view the imported data to verify the layers, the feature class assign-
ments, and the object data.
1 Select one of the new parcel number objects.
2 Right-click and choose Properties.
3 On the Design tab of the Properties palette, notice that the object is in the
Parcel Numbers feature class, is on the Block_APNS layer, and has associ-
ated object data in the parcel_data table, APN field.
4 Dismiss the Properties palette.
5 From the File menu, choose Save As. In the Save Drawing As dialog box,
in the File Name box, enter a new name for your new map (for example,
parcels2.dwg), and then click Save.

Exporting to MapInfo MIF/MID Format


In this exercise, you export the parcel map you created in the previous exer-
cise to MapInfo MIF/MID format. You export the parcel objects as well as the
associated object data.
Exporting to other formats such as MapInfo is useful if you have to send your
maps to other people or agencies who are not fortunate enough to have
access to the Autodesk Map application.
The skills you learn in this exercise include:

Specifying the export file type and export location


Setting export options, including objects and data to export, and more

Exporting to MapInfo MIF/MID Format | 70


Exporting and viewing the exported data

Step 1: Specify the File Type and Location


Step 2: Set Export Options
Step 3: Export the Data
Step 4: View the Exported Data

Step 1: Specify the File Type and Location

First, specify the type of file you want to export to and where to save it.
1 From the Map menu, choose Tools > Export.
2 In the Export Location dialog box, under Files Of Type, select MapInfo
MIF/MID (*.mif).
3 Under Save In, navigate to the MapTutData\ImportExport\Export folder.
4 Under File Name, type the name of the MIF file: new_parcel_map
5 Click OK.
The Export dialog box is displayed. Next, you specify the export options
you want to use.

Step 2: Set Export Options

1 In the Export dialog box, on the Selection tab, under Select Objects To
Export, verify that Select All is selected.
2 Under Filter Selection, verify that an asterisk (*) appears in the Layers and
Feature Classes boxes.
With these settings on the Selection tab, all objects will be exported to the
MIF file.
3 Click the Data tab.
4 Click the Select Attributes button.
5 In the Select Attributes dialog box, click the plus sign (+) next to the Prop-
erties category to expand the list of the available properties.

Exporting to MapInfo MIF/MID Format | 71


6 Under Properties, select the Color and Layer check boxes.
This indicates that you want to export color and layer information to the
MapInfo file.
7 Click the minus sign (-) next to Properties category to collapse the list of
properties so that you can view the other categories more easily.
8 Click the Object Data check box to indicate that you want to export all the
object data.
9 Click Ok.

Step 3: Export the Data

In the Export dialog box, click OK to perform the export operation.


The Command Line indicates that the export process was performed.
21255 object(s) of 21255 selected, exported

Step 4: View the Exported Data

1 In Windows Explorer, navigate to the MapTutData\ImportExport\Export


folder. Notice the mif and mid files.
2 If you have MapInfo installed, you can launch it, open the exported map,
and view it in that application.

Exporting to MapInfo MIF/MID Format | 72


Working with
Coordinate Systems

A global coordinate system is the method of represent-

ing part or all of the curved surface of the Earth on a flat

plane. The ability to convert data mapped in different

coordinate systems is a major component of mapping

across large geographic areas. Autodesk Map can con-

vert objects from source drawings to the global coordi-

nate system of the drawing.

The drawing file, with attached source drawings, is the

basis for all coordinates. Any source drawing objects

that are viewed or queried are interpreted in the context

of the coordinate system assigned to the drawing.

In this tutorial:

Assigning the Coordinate System


Assigning Coordinate Systems to Source
Drawings
Summary

73
Assigning the Coordinate System

Because the Dublin drawing is a new drawing, there is no coordinate system


assigned to it. All drawing files must have an assigned coordinate system.
1 In Workspace, right-click the drawing [Dublin.dwg] node and choose
Coordinate System.
2 In the Assign Global Coordinate System dialog box, under Active Draw-
ing, click Select Coordinate System.
3 In the Select Global Coordinate System dialog box, under Category, select
USA, California.
4 From the Coordinate Systems In Category list, select NAD83 California
State Planes, Zone III, US Foot.
5 Click OK to select the system and close the Select Global Coordinate Sys-
tems dialog box.
6 In the Assign Global Coordinate Systems dialog box, click OK.
7 Save the drawing.

Assigning Coordinate Systems to Source


Drawings

Exercises:

Attaching a Source Drawing with an Assigned Coordinate System


Viewing an Unattached Drawing
Assigning a Coordinate System

Now you add two new drawings to the current drawing. Each drawing was
produced using coordinate systems that differ from the one assigned to the
drawing:

Topography.dwg was created using Autodesk Map and already has a coordi-
nate system assigned.

Assigning the Coordinate System | 74


Transportation.dwg was created using another application and does not
have a coordinate system assigned.
You must determine what coordinate system Transportation.dwg was cre-
ated in, and then assign it to the drawing.

Attaching a Source Drawing with an Assigned


Coordinate System

1 Navigate to MapTutData\CoordinateSystems and open Dublin.dwg if it is not


already open.
2 From the Map menu, choose Drawings > Define/Modify Drawing Set.
3 In the Define Modify Drawing Set dialog box, click Attach.
4 In the Select Drawings To Attach dialog box, under Look In, select the
Tutor_Files drive alias if it is not already selected.
5 From the drawing list, select Topography and then click Add.
6 Click OK.
Topography.dwg is attached to the Dublin.dwg drawing.
7 In the Define\Modify Drawing Set dialog box, click Drawing Settings.
Then, scroll through the list of attached drawings to view the coordinate
system assigned to Topography.dwg.
Notice that the drawing is assigned UTM83-10.
8 In the Drawing Settings dialog box, click Close.
9 In the Define/Modify Drawing Set dialog box, click OK.
10 Quick View all five drawings to confirm the coordinates of the topology
drawing are being correctly translated into the drawing.

Tip To Quick View the drawings, right-click Drawings in the Workspace and
then choose Quick View. In the Quick View Drawings dialog box, select all the
drawings and then click OK. On the Command Line, enter REDRAW to clear
the Quick View.

11 Save the Dublin drawing.

Viewing an Unattached Drawing

Assigning Coordinate Systems to Source Drawings | 75


In this step you will examine the coordinates of a drawing prior to attaching
it.
1 Move the cursor around in the Dublin drawing and observe the coordi-
nates displayed below the Command Line.
2 Navigate to MapTutData\CoordinateSystems and open Transportation.dwg.
3 Move the cursor around Transportation.dwg and observe the coordinates
displayed below the Command Line.
4 Close the Transportation Drawing.

Assigning a Coordinate System

In this step you attach a source drawing that does not have an assigned coor-
dinate system. Using Quick View and Zoom Extents you make some observa-
tions about Transportation.dwg relative to the Dublin drawing and other
attached drawings. You then assign the coordinate system.
1 Right-click Drawings in the Workspace and click Attach.
2 In the Select Drawings to Attach dialog box, under Look In, click on the
TUTOR_FILES drive alias you created earlier to locate the Transporta-
tion.dwg drawing.
3 Quick View all six drawings with the Zoom To The Extents Of Selected
Drawings check box selected.
The Transportation drawing has been produced using degrees as the unit
of measure, and occupies what may be a single pixel in the screen. Notice
that the results of the Quick View arent very useful because the drawings
are too small to display any detail.
4 In the Workspace, right-click Transportation.dwg, and choose Zoom
Extents.
The drawing is displayed at the correct coordinates in its native coordinate
system, but these coordinates are not useful in the Dublin drawing. You
must assign the appropriate coordinate system for Transportation.dwg so
Autodesk Map can interpret the drawing correctly in the context of the
drawing.
Before assigning the coordinate system, you must first detach
Transportation.dwg.
5 In the Workspace, right-click Transportation.dwg and choose Detach.
6 From the Map menu, choose Tools > Assign Global Coordinate System.
7 In the Assign Global Coordinate System dialog box, in the Source Draw-
ings area, click Select Drawings.

Assigning Coordinate Systems to Source Drawings | 76


8 Select Transportation.dwg and then click Add.
9 Click OK.
10 In the Assign Global Coordinate System dialog box, in the Source Draw-
ings area, click Select Coordinate System.
11 In the Select Global Coordinate System dialog box, from the Category list,
select Lat Longs if it is not already selected.
12 From the Coordinate Systems In Category list, select No datum, Latitude-
Longitude: Degrees 180 to +180. Then click OK.
13 In the Assign Global Coordinate System dialog box, click OK to assign the
coordinate system to Transportation.dwg.
14 Next, reattach Transportation.dwg to the drawing.
15 Quick View all six drawings.
The Transportation drawing has been translated into the California State
Planes system used by the Dublin drawing. The native coordinates in the
Transportation drawing have not changed, but the objects have been
translated during the Quick View.
16 Save the Dublin drawing.

Summary

In this tutorial you learned how to:

Determine the coordinate systems for attached source drawings


Assign the coordinate system for the current drawing
Assign coordinate systems to source drawings
Attach sources drawings both with and without assigned coordinate
systems
Attach a source drawing with a different assigned coordinate system
from the drawing

Summary | 77
Working with Raster
Images

Autodesk Map has extensive image handling capabil-

ity for greater productivity in a wide variety of applica-

tions. This tutorial demonstrates the main features of

these image handling capabilities.

The Raster Extension in Autodesk Map displays raster

images and lets you plot raster images on printers and

plotters. The Raster Extension is loaded only when

needed for handling raster images. Raster image files are

not inserted as part of a drawing, but are attached to the

drawing and the file data. Raster images can be loaded

and unloaded from memory.

There are many reasons to combine raster images with

vector-based objects in Autodesk Map drawings, includ-

ing:

Scanning legacy drawings and data, docu-


ments, faxes, or microfilm drawings into
Autodesk Map efficiently and accurately.
Adding data to maps by digitizing maps on-
screen.
Using aerial and satellite photographs as
background site information.

78
Using digital photographs to record as-built site conditions.
Constructing collages with multiple images that can be tiled.

In this tutorial:

Inserting Raster Images


Changing Display Order and Clipping an Image
Summary

Inserting Raster Images

In this exercise, you attach an aerial photograph of a district in Dublin, Cal-


ifornia to a drawing of the same district in Dublin, California. Use the infor-
mation in the associated TIFF World file (TWF) to correctly insert and scale
the image.
1 Start Autodesk Map and open MapTutData\RasterImages\parcels.dwg.
2 From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents. Then use the Zoom Win-
dow to zoom in on the center of the map as shown in the following illus-
tration.

Inserting Raster Images | 79


3 From the Map menu, choose Image > Insert.
4 Navigate to MapTutData\RasterImages and select Sh19ud.tif.
5 In the Insert Image dialog box, click Open.
Some image files, such as TIFF and BIL files, have linked files containing
location information, often referred to as georeferencing data. In this
exercise, the Image Correlation dialog box displays values for Insertion
Point and Scale. These values are stored in the TFW file (TIFF World file)
associated with this image.
6 In the Image Correlation dialog box, click OK.
The image file is inserted and displayed in the drawing. Autodesk Map
reads georeferencing information and positions the image correctly in the
drawing.
Do not close the drawing because you use it in the next exercise.

Changing Display Order and Clipping an


Image

This exercise shows how to use display order and clipping in maps. You move
the raster image to the back of the display order, and then clip the image with
a polyline boundary.

Changing the Display Order


1 From the Tools menu, choose Display Order > Send To Back.
2 When prompted, select the boundary of the raster image.
3 Press ENTER to complete the command.

The polylines and parcels numbers in the drawing are now visible on top
of the image.

Clipping the Image


1 From the Modify menu, choose Clip > Image.
2 Select the image boundary and press ENTER to accept the default clip
option, New boundary.
3 At the Command Line, enter p for Polygonal. Then press ENTER.
4 At the Command Line, enter the following points for the polygon
vertices:

Changing Display Order and Clipping an Image | 80


Enter 6147865,2085860.
Enter 6148730,2085665.
Enter 6148560,2084900.
Enter 6148330,2084760.
Enter 6148100,2084880.
Enter 6147750,2085521.

5 At the Command Line, enter c to close the polygon.


The image is clipped to the polygon boundary.
6 Close the drawing and do not save.

Summary

In this tutorial you explored the following concepts:

The primary use of raster images is to enhance visualization.


You can modify the appearance and properties of your images in
Autodesk Map, including setting the display order of images and other
objects in a drawing.
An image can be clipped to show only selected parts of the image.

Summary | 81
Displaying, Tracking, and
Using Coordinates

If your source drawings use one coordinate system and

your current drawing uses another, you can track the

source drawing coordinates as you move the cursor

around in the drawing. You can track the coordinates of

the cursor in any of the coordinates systems supported

by Autodesk Map . The current drawing must have an

assigned coordinate system.

In this tutorial:

Opening and Displaying Current Coordi-


nates
Setting Tracking Coordinates
Inserting TANK Blocks and Using Coordi-
nates
Summary

Opening and Displaying


Current Coordinates
1 Start Autodesk Map and open
MapTutData\TrackingCoordinates\topography.
dwg.

82
2 In the Workspace, right-click Topography.dwg and click Coordinate Sys-
tem.
In the Assign Global Coordinate System dialog box, notice that the coor-
dinate system for the current drawing is UTM83-10 (UTM with NAD83
datum, Zone 10, Meter; Central Meridian).
3 Click Cancel to close the Assign Global Coordinate System dialog box.
Notice that as you move the pointer over topography.dwg, the current coor-
dinates are displayed in the lower-left corner of the Autodesk Map 3D win-
dow.

Setting Tracking Coordinates


1 From the Map menu, choose Tools > Track Coordinate Systems.
2 In the Track Coordinates pane, click the Select Coordinate System icon m.
3 In the Select Global Coordinate System dialog box, under Category, select
Lat Longs .
4 Under Coordinate Systems in Category, select No datum, Latitude-
Longitude; Degrees 180 to +180. Then, click OK to close the Select Global
Coordinate System dialog box.
Notice that the Track Coordinates pane updates so that it tracks coordi-
nates using the Lat Longs coordinate system you selected.
As you move the cursor over the drawing window, the X and Y text boxes
continuously update the cursor's coordinates in the selected coordinate
system.

Tip If the X and Y text boxes remain empty as you move the cursor in the
drawing window, click anywhere in the drawing to provide a starting point
to track.

Inserting TANK Blocks and Using


Coordinates

You will now insert two TANK blocks using the Digitize feature on the Track
Coordinates pane. The Digitize feature inserts the blocks in the UTM83-10

Setting Tracking Coordinates | 83


coordinate system even though they are documented using a Lat Longs coor-
dinate system.
1 From the View menu, choose Zoom > Window.
2 Draw a window around the mountainous region in the upper right corner
of the map as shown in the following illustration.
3 From the Insert menu, choose Block.
4 In the Insert dialog box, from the Name list, select Tank.
5 Leave all other values as shown in the following illustration.
6 Click OK.
7 In the Track Coordinates pane, enter the following values for X and Y.

X: 121.9187
Y: 37.7285

Tip Do not move the cursor off the Track Coordinates pane while entering
values for X and Y. If you do, the Track Coordinates feature updates the X and
Y values based on cursor position.

8 Click Digitize.
The Digitize feature converts the Lat Longs coordinates you entered to the
appropriate UTM83-10 coordinates. The coordinates are displayed on the
Command Line.
595285.6172768757,4176242.4
9 Move the cursor away from the Track Coordinates Pane and then press
Enter to complete the Insert process.
10 To insert the second tank, repeat the preceding steps, using the following
values for X and Y:

X: 121.9152
Y: 37.7222

11 Save and close Topography.dwg.

Summary

In this tutorial you learned how to:

Summary | 84
View the assigned coordinate system for the drawing
Insert two well objects using data from another coordinate system
using the Track Coordinates feature

Summary | 85
Annotations

The annotation feature enables you to associate textual

values with an object. For annotation content you can

use attributes, such as object data; display properties,

such as lineweight; or geometric values, such as line

direction.

To begin working with Annotations, you need to define

an annotation template and create the annotation text.

Use the annotation template to define the kind of infor-

mation you want to display in the annotation as well as

the appearance of that information.

After you have created an annotation template, you can

insert instances of the annotation into your drawing.

In this tutorial:
Defining an Annotation Template
Inserting the Annotation
Adding a Descriptive Text Label
Summary

86
Defining an Annotation Template

In this exercise, you define a new annotation template and create annotation
text based on object data associated with objects that represent lakes.
1 Open MapTutData\Annotation\topography.dwg.
2 From the View menu, choose Zoom > Extents.
3 From the Map menu, choose Annotation > Define Annotation Template.
4 In the Define Annotation Template dialog box, under Annotation Tem-
plate, click New.
5 In the New Annotation Template Name dialog box, enter Lakes and then
click OK.
A new drawing called Map Annotation Template Editor.dwg is opened. You
define the template using this drawing and save it before returning to the
Define Annotation Template dialog box.
6 In the Map Annotation Template Editor window, on the AnnTemplate
toolbar, click Edit Annotation Text, and then press ENTER.
The Annotation Text dialog box is displayed. You use this dialog box to
specify the text to include in the annotation template.
7 In the Annotation Text dialog box, in the Attribute area, under Tag, enter
Depth. Then, under Value, click [...], the Expression Builder button.
8 In the Expression Chooser dialog box, expand Properties and click AREA.
Then click OK.
9 In the Annotation Text dialog box make the following changes.

In the Object Properties area, under Color, select Green from the list.
In the Text Options area, under Height, enter 15.

10 Click OK to close the Annotation Text dialog box.


11 In Map Annotation Template Editor.dwg, click near 0,0 (where the x and y
axis meet).
12 On the View menu, click Zoom > Extents to view the annotation tag.
13 On the AnnTemplate toolbar, click Save Annotation.
14 In the Default Insertion Options area, under Insertion Point, select
.CENTROID from the drop-down list. Then click OK.
Lakes.dwg is redisplayed. Notice that the annotation is not in the drawing.
This is because you have defined the annotation template but you have
not yet inserted any instances of the annotation in the drawing.

Defining an Annotation Template | 87


Inserting the Annotation

You now use the Lakes template you defined in the previous step to insert
three instances of the annotation into the drawing. Insert the annotation on
three objects that represent lakes.
1 Zoom in on the three lakes at the top center of the drawing.
2 From the Map menu, choose Annotation > Insert Annotation.
3 In the Insert Annotation dialog box, under Annotation template, select
the Lakes check box.
If other annotation templates were defined in the drawing, they would be
listed here.
4 Click Insert.
5 In the drawing, hold down the CTRL key, and select the three lakes out-
lined in blue. Then press ENTER.
Depth values in green text have been added at the center of each lake. The
value is drawn from the object data associated with the lake objects.
6 Save the drawing.

Adding a Descriptive Text Label

In this step you add a descriptive text label to your annotation template. The
annotation indicates lake depth so you create the label Depth = and posi-
tion it above the annotation tag.
1 From the Map menu, choose Annotation > Define Annotation Template.
2 In the Define Annotation Template dialog box, in the Annotation Tem-
plate area, under Template Name, select Lakes. Then click Edit Template
Contents.
The Map Annotation Template Editor.dwg is displayed.
3 At the command line, enter STYLE, and then press ENTER.
4 In the Text Style dialog box, in the Font area, under Height, enter 15. Then
click Apply.
5 Click Close to close the Text Style dialog box.
6 At the command line, enter DTEXT, and then press ENTER.

Inserting the Annotation | 88


7 In the Map Annotation Template Editor drawing, click directly above the let-
ter D of the annotation tag.
The following prompt is displayed:
Specify rotation angle of text <0>:
8 Press ENTER to accept the default rotation of 0.
The following prompt is displayed:
Enter text:
9 Enter Depth = and then press ENTER.
10 To exit the command, press ESC.
11 In the AnnTemplate toolbar, click Save Annotation.
12 In the Define Annotation Template dialog box, click OK.
Lakes.dwg is redisplayed. The descriptive text label is displayed above the
annotation in all three instances. If necessary, adjust the zoom settings to
view the annotations in each lake.

13 Save and close the drawing.

Summary

In this tutorial you learned how to:

Create an annotation template using object data associated with the


lake objects
Specify that the annotation would display depth information
Insert one annotation for each lake object
Edit the annotation template to add an explanatory text label

Summary | 89
Map Plotting

Welcome to the Reporting and Plotting Map Data tuto-

rial. This tutorial demonstrates how to retrieve data

with an SQL condition and how to create and view a

report. It also shows you how to prepare a drawing for

plotting, defining and saving a query, inserting a plot

template block, defining a new map plot set and pre-

viewing a map plot set.

In this tutorial:

Retrieve Data with an SQL Condition


Create and View a Report
Preparing the Drawing for Plotting
Define and Save a Query
Insert a Plot Template Block
Define a New Map Plot Set
Preview a Map Plot Set
Summary

90
Retrieve Data with an SQL Condition

In this exercise you will use an SQL condition to retrieve all owners of property

with land values greater than $50,000. In the next exercise you will design a report

for them.

1 From the File menu, choose New. In the Select Template dialog box, make
sure the acad.dwt file is selected, then click Open.
2 In the Workspace, right-click Drawings and choose Attach from the short-
cut menu.
3 Navigate to your MapTutData/MapPlotting folder and open the parcels7
drawing.
4 Click Add, then click OK.
Autodesk Map attaches the parcels7 drawing file to your drawing.
5 From the menu bar, choose Map > Query > Define Query.
6 In the Define Query dialog box, click Clear Query to clear any existing
queries.
7 Under Query Type, click Location.
8 In the Location Condition dialog box, make sure All is selected, then click
OK.
9 In the Define Query dialog box, under Options, click Zoom Ext.
10 In the Zoom Drawing Extents dialog box, click OK.
11 In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, select Draw, then
click Execute Query.
12 Open the Windows Explorer. Position it next to Autodesk Map so you can
see both windows.
13 In Explorer, navigate to the MapTutData/MapPlotting folder, select the own-
ers.mdb database, drag it to the Workspace, and release the mouse button.
Autodesk Map automatically creates a UDL file as a shortcut to the data
source and adds the database to the drawing.
14 From the menu bar, choose Map > Query > Define Query.
15 If a previous query is shown, click Clear Query to clear it.
16 Under Query Type, click SQL.

Retrieve Data with an SQL Condition | 91


17 In the Condition section of the dialog box, select LANDVALUE in the Col-
umn list; select the Greater Than operator (>) in the Operator list, and type
50000 for the Value.
18 Click Add Condition, then click OK.
The SQL condition SELECT * FROM PARCELS WHERE LANDVALUE >
50000 is displayed under Current Query in the Define Query dialog box.

Leave the Define Query dialog box open. You will use it in the next exercise.

Create and View a Report

In this exercise you will create and view a report template. A report template
specifies which information Autodesk Map will include in a report.
Open the Define Query dialog box to specify what to include in the report.
1 Under Query Mode, select report, then click Options.
2 In the Output Report Options dialog box, under Expression, click Expres-
sion.
3 Expand Link Templates by clicking the plus '+' sign. Under PARCID select
SALUTATION, then click OK. You will return to the Output Report
Options dialog box.
4 In the Output Report Options dialog box, under Expression, click Add.
SALUTATION is added to the report template.
5 Click Expression.
6 Expand Link Templates and PARCID by clicking '+'.
7 Select FNAME, then click OK.
You will return to the Output Report Options dialog box.
8 Under Expression, click Add.
FNAME is added to the report template.
We need to add a few more items to the report template before we gener-
ate the report.
9 Click Expression.
10 Expand Link Templates and PARCID again. Select LNAME and click OK.
11 When you return to the Output Report Options dialog box, click Add.
12 Click Expression.

Create and View a Report | 92


13 In the Report Template Expression dialog box, expand Link Templates,
then PARCID. Select STNUM and click OK.
14 Click Add.
15 Click Expression.
16 In the Report Template Expression dialog box, expand Link Templates,
then expand PARCID.
17 Select STNUM and click OK.
18 Select STNAME and click OK.
19 Click Add.
20 Click Expression. In the Report Template Expression dialog box, expand
Link Templates, then expand PARCID. Select STEXTEN and click OK.
21 Click Add.
22 Click Expression. In the Report Template Expression dialog box, expand
Link Templates, then expand PARCID.
23 Select LANDVALUE and click OK.
24 Click Add.
25 Under Output File Name, navigate to the MapPlotting folder, enter ZONE-
OUT for the file name and click Save.
The completed Output Report Options dialog box shows the settings that
will be included in the report template.
26 Click OK.
27 In the Define Query dialog box, click Execute Query.
Autodesk Map executes the query and creates the report ZONEOUT.TXT,
based on the results of the query.
Autodesk Map created an ASCII report based on the information you
requested in the report template. Now you will view the report.
28 Open Windows Explorer. Navigate to the MapTutData/MapPlotting folder
and double-click ZONEOUT.TXT to open the report file.
The report lists all residences with land values greater than $50,000. Each
entry is separated by a comma.
29 Close the Windows Notepad text editor, and close Explorer.

Note You could use a mail merge program to notify all the owners listed in
the report of a development affecting their properties.

30 From the File menu, choose Close. When you are prompted to save the
drawing, click No.

Create and View a Report | 93


Preparing the Drawing for Plotting

In this exercise, you will select a printer and activate attached drawing files.
1 Navigate to the MapTutData/MapPlotting folder and open the mapbook.dwg
drawing file.
Mapbook contains a layout called Map Book, which you will use as part of
the plot set.
2 Click the Map Book tab at the bottom of the drawing window, between
the Model and Layout2 tabs.
3 Right-click the Map Book tab, then choose Page Setup Manager from the
shortcut menu.
4 In the Page Setup Manager dialog box, click New.
5 In the New Page Setup dialog box, enter a name and under Start with: click
<Default output device>.
6 Click OK.
7 In the Page Setup - Map Book dialog box, under Printer/Plotter, select a
printer for your map and any other selections you want and click OK.
8 Click Close to close the Page Setup Manager dialog box.
For more information on setting up your printer, refer to the AutoCAD
Online, Driver and Peripheral Guide reference manual.
9 Click the Model tab at the bottom of the drawing window to return to
Model Space.
10 In the Workspace, right-click Drawings, then click Attach.
11 Navigate to the MapTutData/MapPlotting folder, hold down the CTRL key
and select houses7 and citymap7. Click Add, then click OK.
You wont be able to see the drawings yet.
12 In the Workspace, right-click Drawings and select Quick View.
13 In the Quick View Drawings dialog box, make sure Zoom to the Extents of
Selected Drawings is selected, then click OK.
Using Quick View allows you to see a preview of the objects available in
the two attached drawings, but you still need to select and copy those
objects into your current drawing.
To do that, you need to define the objects you want in your drawing and
save those selections as a query.

Preparing the Drawing for Plotting | 94


Define and Save a Query

In this exercise you will define and save a query that will add specific objects
to the map book.
1 From the Map menu click Query > Define Query.
2 In the Define Query dialog box, click Clear Query to clear any existing
queries.
3 Under Query Type, click Location.
4 In the Location Condition dialog box, make sure ALL is selected, then
click OK.
5 In the Define Query dialog box, under Query Mode, make sure Draw is
selected. Then, under Options, click Save.
6 In the Save Current Query dialog box, click New Category.
7 In the Define New Category dialog box, type city_map for the new cate-
gory name, then click OK.
8 In the Save Current Query dialog box, type streets_and_city for Name, and
allstreetandcity\features for Description, then click OK.
9 In the Define Query dialog box, click OK. On the Project tab in the Project
Workspace, a new category, city_map, contains the saved query,
streets_and_city.

Insert a Plot Template Block

A Plot Template Block defines how each plot in a map book is laid out. This
includes the map's title block or title page. In this exercise you will insert a
predefined plot template block into the project.
1 From the menu bar, click Insert > Block.
2 In the Insert dialog box, click Browse.
3 In the Select Drawing File dialog box, navigate to the MapTutData/Map-
Plotting folder and open the tblock drawing file.
4 In the Insert dialog box, under Insertion Point, make sure Specify On-
Screen is selected, then click OK.
5 At the command line, you are prompted to enter an insertion point. Press
the ESC key.

Define and Save a Query | 95


The title block definition is now part of the project drawing, but the geom-
etry is not visible.

Define a New Map Plot Set

To create a map book, you must define a Plot Set. A plot set specifies which
plot layout block, source drawings, query, boundaries, and plot options
Autodesk Map will use for the map book. In this exercise you will specify plot
set settings for the map book.
To plot a large mapped area, you divide a map into a tiled set of map sheets
or plots. The boundaries of each map are defined in a separate drawing file.
In the exercise, the boundaries are defined in the msbound drawing file.
1 In the Workspace, right-click Drawings and choose Attach from the short-
cut menu.
2 Navigate to the MapTutData/MapPlotting folder and select msbound.dwg.
3 Click Add, then click OK.
Autodesk Map attached the MSBOUND drawing file to your project.
4 From the menu bar, choose Map > Plot Map Set.
5 In the Plot Set dialog box, click New.
6 In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, type CITY_ATLAS for Name and
ATLAS OF CITY FEATURES BY QUADRANT for description.
7 Click Plot Template Block.
8 In the Plot Template Block dialog box, make sure the following options are
selected:

Block Name = TBLOCK


Main Viewport Layer = MAIN_VPORT
Reference Viewport Layer = REF_PORT

9 Click OK.
10 In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, click Source Drawings.
11 Under Attached Drawings, hold down the Ctrl key and select the HOUSE7
and CITYMAP drawing files.
12 Click >>, then click OK.
The drawings are added to the map plot set.
13 In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, click Plot Queries.

Define a New Map Plot Set | 96


14 In the Plot Query Selection dialog box, make sure that CITY_MAP is
selected for Category.
15 Under Queries, select ALL STREET AND CITY FEATURES, click >>, then
click OK.
The query is added to the map plot set.
16 In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, click Boundaries.
17 Under Boundary Drawing, for File Name, select MSBOUND.
18 For Layer Name, select ATLAS1.
19 Under Boundaries Selected, click Boundaries.
A query is executed and the boundaries in the MSBOUND drawing are
retrieved.
Next, you will choose the boundaries you want for the map book.
20 In the Plot Boundary Selection dialog box, under Available Boundaries,
click Select All to select all of the boundaries.
21 Click >>, then click OK
22 In the Plot Boundary Definition dialog box, select the Map Object Data to
Block Attributes checkbox and click Data.
23 Under Object Data: Boundaries, select AREA, and under Block Attributes:
TBLOCK, select TITLE.
24 Click >> to move AREA to the Block Attributes column.
25 Click OK.
26 In the Plot Boundary Definition dialog box, click OK.
The plot set boundaries are defined. Now you will specify the plot options.
27 In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, click Plot Options.
28 In the Plot Set Options dialog box, make sure Map Book is selected for Lay-
out.
29 Under Template Block Settings, click Select Layer.
30 Under Reference View Layers To Display, click Clear All, then select
ATLAS1 from the list.
The ATLAS1 layer contains the boundaries and annotation that will dis-
play in the reference viewport.
31 Under Main View Layers to Freeze, click Clear All, then click OK.
32 In the Plot Set Options dialog box, under Main View Scale, select Plot To
Scale.
33 For Main Scale, type 1:2500.
34 Under Boundary Edge Options, select Trim Object at Boundaries.

Define a New Map Plot Set | 97


This controls the way objects are drawn where they cross a plotted bound-
ary.
35 Click OK.
36 In the Plot Set Definition dialog box, click OK.
37 In the Plot Map Set dialog box, click Plot Set.
The map set is plotted and displayed according to your specifications.
You've defined all of the information for the map book's plot set. In the
next exercise you will preview the map plot set.

Preview a Map Plot Set

You have completed all the information necessary to create a map book. Now
you will preview the map book's map plot set.
1 From the Map menu, click Plot Map Set.
2 In the Plot Map Set dialog box, make sure Atlas of City Features by Quad-
rant is selected, then click View Map Sheet.
3 In the View Map Sheet dialog box, select one of the boundaries, then click
OK.
Autodesk Map will create a preview of the boundary area you chose, dis-
playing the queried objects in that map quadrant.
4 When the View Layout dialog box is displayed, click Done.
5 In the Plot Map Set dialog box, click Close.
Autodesk Map closes the plot set.
6 From the File menu, choose Close to close the file. When you are
prompted to save your changes, click No.

Summary

In this tutorial you learned how to:

Retrieve data with an SQL condition


Create and view a report
Prepare a drawing for plotting
Define and save a query

Preview a Map Plot Set | 98


Insert a plot template block
Define a new map plot set
Preview a map plot set

Summary | 99
Points

This tutorial will show you how to work with coordinate

geometry (COGO) points, which are the basis for mod-

eling land surfaces. These exercises demonstrate how to

import survey points into a drawing from a database,

and how to classify a large set of points into more man-

ageable groups.

Before you import a large set of points, it is a good idea

to structure your drawing environment so that as the

points are created, they are sorted into meaningful

groups, with appropriate styles and other attributes.

In this tutorial:
Creating Point Data
Displaying Points

Creating Point Data


In this exercise, you will learn about managing
a set of points related to stormwater manholes
and detention ponds. You will create descrip-
tion keys and point groups to sort the points as

100
they are imported into a drawing, and then you will import the points from
an existing file..
Description keys can help you automate a number of tasks for point handling
at the time that points are created or imported. A description key uses the raw
description code of a point to determine how to process the point. For exam-
ple, you can configure a description key to apply different styles or place
points on different drawing layers.
You can classify a set of points into several point groups, based on the type
of point, elevation, date of creation, source, or other criteria. Then various
queries or operations for point display can run against a point group, rather
than the whole set.
Points can be imported from a text file or a Microsoft Access database. Data
created in Autodesk Land Desktop can be used in Autodesk Map by import-
ing points directly from a project database.
While you can create a large point set and organize it later, it is usually more
efficient to classify points into several groups as they are being created.

Exercises:
Creating Description Keys
Creating Point Groups
Importing Points from a Database

Creating Description Keys


In this exercise, youll create description keys to sort the points as they are
imported into a drawing.

To create description keys


1 In the Autodesk Map window, select File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Points), and open the drawing Points-1.dwg.
2 In Toolspace, on the Settings tab, expand the Point collection.
3 Right-click Description Key Sets, and click New.
4 In the Description Key Set dialog box, Name field, enter a meaningful
name for the new set, such as Stormwater Keys.
5 In the Description field, enter a short description, such as Stormwater
manhole and pond points.
6 Click OK. The new description key set is created.

Creating Point Data | 101


7 In Toolspace, on the Settings tab, expand the Description Key Sets collec-
tion, right-click Stormwater Keys, and click Edit Keys. The DescKey Editor
is displayed in a Panorama window.
In the DescKey Editor, you will next enter the raw description codes, and
specify how Autodesk Map will handle new points that have these codes.
All entries in the Code column of the DescKey Editor are case sensitive.
8 In DescKey Editor, in the Code column, click the default entry, and
change it to POND*.
9 In both the Point Style and Point Label Style columns, click the check box
and select the Standard style.

Note The Format column contains the entry $*, which specifies that a
points raw description is copied without changes and used for the full
description. This is an acceptable setting for the POND points.

10 In the Layer column, select the check box, then click the cell to display
the Layer Selection dialog box.
11 In the Layer Selection dialog box, select V-NODE-STRM, then click OK.
This setting means that POND points will reference the V-NODE-STRM
layer for their display attributes. In the next few steps, you create another
description key.
12 In the Code column, right-click the POND* entry and click New.
13 In the new description key, click the default Code entry and change it to
MHST*.
14 Set the same styles and layer for POND* by repeating Steps 9 through 11.
15 In the Format column, enter STORM MH. This setting ensures that points
with a raw description of MHST* (stormwater manholes) are labeled in the
drawing as STORM MH.
16 Click the icon as shown on the right, to save the description keys and
close the editor.

Creating Point Groups


In this exercise, youll create point groups to sort the points as they are
imported into a drawing.

To create point groups


1 Ensure that the drawing Points-1.dwg is open.

Creating Point Data | 102


2 In the Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, right-click the Point Groups col-
lection, and click New.
3 In the Point Group Properties dialog box, on the Information tab, enter
Detention Pond in the Name field, and optionally enter a short descrip-
tion in the Description field.
4 In the Point Group Layer field, ensure that the setting is V-NODE. If it is
not, click to open the Object Layer dialog box, and select V-NODE in
the Base Layer Name field. This is the layer where the points in this group
will be placed when they are created.
5 On the Raw Desc Matching tab, select POND*, and then click Apply. This
specifies that all points with the POND* raw description will be added to
the Detention Pond point group.
Further exploration: See how the description key setting is recorded on
the Include tab and the Query Builder tab. If you know SQL, you can see
how you could add more criteria to the Query Builder tab to select a more
specific set of points for the point group.
6 Click OK to close the Point Group Properties dialog box.
7 Create another point group by repeating Steps 2 through 5, but use the
following values:
Name: Storm Manholes
Layer: V-NODE
Raw Desc Matching: MHST*
Your drawing should now contain the same description keys and point
groups shown in sample drawing Points-2.dwg.

Importing Points from a Database


In this exercise, youll import points from a database to a drawing that uses
description keys to sort points into groups.

To import points from a database


1 Open the sample drawing Points-2.dwg if it is not already open.
2 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, right-click Points and click Create.
3 In the Create Points dialog box, in the Category field, select Import Points.
4 In the Command field, select External Project Point Database.
5 In the Import Points dialog box, ensure that the Advanced Options are
cleared.
6 Click , and browse to the tutorial drawings folder (MapTut-
Data\Points), select points.mdb, then click Open.

Creating Point Data | 103


7 In the Import Points dialog box, click OK. The points are imported.
8 Close the Create Points dialog box.
9 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, right-click the _All Points point group
and select Zoom To.
The points are displayed both in the drawing and in the Toolspace list
view table. In the drawing window, if you move the cursor over a point, a
pop-up window displays basic data about the point. Note that the two
stormwater point groups appear to be empty. This is because they have
not been updated with their new content. In the next few steps you will
see how the application provides several ways to check the point data
before adding it to your drawing.
10 Right-click the Point Groups collection, and click Properties.
The Point Groups dialog box is displayed. Point groups are listed here
according to their display order, with highest priority at the top. Arrows
at the side of the dialog box allow you to change the display order. The
icon indicates that an update is pending for a point group.
11 To show the contents of the update for each point group, click . Here
you can review the list of points that the application is prepared to add to
the Storm Manholes and Detention Pond point groups.
12 In the Point Group Changes dialog box, click Close.
13 To update the point groups, click , and then click OK. Alternatively,
you can right-click the Point Groups collection and select Update.
The point groups are updated, and now you can display their points in the
list view and zoom to them in the drawing.
14 Right-click a point group, and click Edit Points. The points are displayed
in the Point Editor table, where you can review and change their
attributes.
15 To change the width of the columns in the Point Editor, place your cursor
on the line between column headings, click, and drag.
16 To move a column, click its heading and drag it left or right. When a line
between column headings changes color, this indicates that you can insert
the moved column in that location by releasing the mouse button.

Displaying Points
This exercise shows you how to use layers, external references, and styles to
display points.

Displaying Points | 104


Points only exist in point groups; even a single point is always part of a point
group. In Autodesk Map, point groups have two important layer references
that you must understand and manage:

The point group layer is where the points actually reside. To see this, right-
click a point group on the Prospector tab to display the Point Group Prop-
erties dialog box, then note the Point Group Layer specified on the Infor-
mation tab.
The point layer controls the display attributes of the point group. To see
this, open the Point Group Properties dialog box, click the Point List tab,
and look at the Point Layer column. This column also appears in the Pros-
pector list view when the point group is selected. This point layer can be
assigned by using a description key.

If both of these layers are active, the point group is displayed. You can display
a point group in isolation if you use the Layer Properties Manager to freeze
or turn off the layers that are assigned to all other point groups.
An external reference drawing is a useful way to see points in relation to
other surface features without adding these features to your drawing. You can
reference another drawing and make it appear like an underlay in your cur-
rent drawing, then detach the external drawing when you no longer need it.
Changing the style of a point group can help you distinguish these points
more easily from other points in the drawing.

Exercises:
Displaying Point Groups
Displaying an Externally Referenced Drawing
Changing the Style of a Point Group
Removing an Externally Referenced Drawing

Displaying Point Groups


In this exercise, youll learn how to use layers to display point groups.

To display point groups


1 Open the drawing Points-3.dwg.
2 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, right-click the Detention Pond point
group, and click Properties.
3 On the Information tab, note that the Point Group Layer is V-NODE.

Displaying Points | 105


4 On the Point List tab, note that the Point Layer for each point is V-NODE-
STRM.
The other point group, Storm Manholes, uses the same layers. So if you
freeze all drawing layers, but thaw V-NODE and V-NODE-STRM, both
point groups will be displayed.
5 Click OK to close the Point Group Properties dialog box.
6 On the Layers toolbar, click . Note that the current layer is 0.
7 In the Layer Properties Manager, right-click in the table of layers, and
select Select All.
8 In the Freeze column, click any of the thawed icons , and then click OK
in the Cannot freeze current layer warning box. All layers except 0 are
frozen . This means they will not be updated or displayed.
9 Right-click in the table of layers, and select Clear All.
10 Scroll down through the table of layers and thaw the two layers used by
the stormwater point groups: V-NODE and V-NODE-STRM.
This action ensures that points in the point groups Detention Pond and
Storm Manholes will display in the drawing.
11 Click OK in the Layer Properties Manager dialog box.
12 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, right-click the _All Points point group
and click Properties.
13 On the Information tab, click beside the Point Group Layer field.
14 In the Object Layer dialog box, click .
15 In the Layer Selection dialog box, select layer V-NODE-GRND, and then
click OK in each of the three open dialog boxes: Layer Selection, Object
Layer, and Point Group Properties.
This action causes many points to disappear from view. All points that
belong to the _All Points group, but not to Detention Pond or Storm Man-
holes, were set to display on the layer V-NODE-GRND, which is now fro-
zen and therefore not displayed. Members of the points groups Detention
Pond and Storm Manholes are displayed for two reasons: these groups
have a higher display priority than _All Points, and their appearance is
controlled by two thawed layers, V-NODE and V-NODE-STRM.
Note that all points always belong to the _All Points group.

Displaying an Externally Referenced Drawing


In this exercise, youll use a standard AutoCAD operation to display another
drawing of the region around your set of points.

Displaying Points | 106


To display an externally referenced drawing
1 In the drawing Points-3.dwg, click Insert External Reference.
2 In the Select Reference File dialog box, navigate to the tutorial drawings
folder (MapTutData\Points), select Existing Basemap.dwg, and click Open.
3 In the External Reference dialog box, in the Reference Type area, click
Overlay.
4 Clear the check boxes for Insertion Point and Scale.
5 Click OK.
The basemap appears on the screen, allowing you to see the points of
interest in relation to the road design and other contextual features. This
external reference remains separate from your drawing, so there is no risk
of unexpected changes to your drawing. In a later exercise, you will learn
how to detach the external reference.
6 Keep your drawing open and continue to the next exercise.

Changing the Style of a Point Group


In this exercise, youll change the style of a point group. This can help you
distinguish the points more easily from other points in the drawing.

To change the style of a point group


1 Zoom in to the upper left area of the screen where you can clearly see the
labels for several POND points and one or more STORM MH points.
Notice that both types of points use the same marker style (X).
1 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, right-click the point group Storm
Manholes, and click Edit Points.
2 In Panorama, in the Point Editor, scroll to the Point Style column.
3 Click the top row of the table to select it.
4 Scroll to the end of the list, hold down the Shift key, then click the bottom
row to select the whole point group.
5 Right-click the Point Style column heading and select Edit.
6 In the Select Marker Style dialog box, change the point style from <none>
to Catch Basin and click OK. This change is displayed in the table row for
each point in the Point Editor.
7 Click to save the change and close the Point Editor. The stormwater
manhole points are now marked with a different symbol.
8 Keep your drawing open and continue to the next exercise.

Displaying Points | 107


Removing an Externally Referenced Drawing
In this exercise, youll remove the cross-referenced drawing that you added
previously.

To remove a cross-referenced drawing


1 Click any point in the externally referenced drawing to select it.
2 Right-click, and click Xref Manager.
3 In the Xref Manager dialog box, select the reference name Existing
Basemap, then click Detach.
4 Click OK. The reference drawing disappears from view.

Displaying Points | 108


Project Management

The project management tutorial will get you started on

understanding project management in Autodesk Map.

You can use the project management functionality to

manage, organize, and control access to project objects,

which include points, point groups, and surfaces.

In this tutorial:
Creating a Project
Creating and Adding Project Data
Accessing and Modifying Project Data

Creating a Project

This exercise demonstrates how to create a project by

creating the project path and creating the project in the

path.

Before you create a project, you specify the path where

the project will reside.

Each Autodesk Map project is located in a


project folder specified by a project path. All

109
projects in all your specified project paths are displayed in the Projects col-
lection in the Prospector tree.
You can specify the project paths for Autodesk Map projects using the Files
tab of the AutoCAD Options dialog box. On this tab, the Project Files Search
Path collection lists a default project collection named Autodesk Map, which
is created when you install Autodesk Map. By default this path is located in
My Documents\Projects. For this tutorial you will use the default project path
for the tutorial and then create a project in that path.
A project contains project objects (points, surfaces, and point groups) and
references to project drawings. Each project is a collection in the Prospector
tree, and the project collection contains collections for project drawings and
project objects. A project contains a collection for the drawings that are
attached to it, and one collection for each type of project object.

Note If projects are not displayed in the Master View of the Prospector tab, you
may need to do the following:
If you are running Windows 2000, ensure that you have installed the Microsoft
Windows 2000 Updates (including MDAC 2.7 SP1) as well as Service Pack 3
(from the Install tab of the Autodesk Map CD Browser).
If you are running Windows XP, ensure that you have installed Service Pack 1.

Exercises:
Specifying the Project Path
Creating a Project in the Project Path

Specifying the Project Path

In this exercise, youll specify the path where the project will reside.

To specify the project path


1 In Toolspace, click the Prospector tab.
In the Prospector tree you should see the Projects collection.
2 Expand the Projects collection. You will see the default project path that
was established when you installed Autodesk Map.
3 Right click on the Projects collection in the Prospector tree and click Man-
age Project Paths.

Creating a Project | 110


4 In the Options dialog box, click the Files tab, and expand the Project Files
Search Path collection to display the Autodesk Map folder.

Tip Ensure that you have a drawing open and that you have the Master View
selected from the drop-down list at the top of the Prospector tab. In the Pros-
pector tree you should see the Projects collection.

5 Expand the Autodesk Map folder.


The default project path is displayed.
6 Click OK to close the AutoCAD Options dialog box.

To add a new project path


1 In the Options dialog box, with the Project Files Search Path collection
expanded, expand the Autodesk Map folder.
2 Click Add to add a new project path to the folder.
3 Click Browse, and browse to the location where the project will reside:
4 Click OK to add the project path to the folder.
5 Click OK to close the AutoCAD Options dialog box.

Creating a Project in the Project Path

In this exercise, youll create a project, which contains project objects


(points, surfaces, and point groups) and references to project drawings.

To create the project


1 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, select Master View from the drop-
down list at the top of the Prospector tab.
2 Right-click the name of the project path (My Documents\Projects) and click
New Project.
3 In the Project Properties dialog box, enter Tutorial for the project name
and, optionally, enter a description.
4 Click OK.
5 Expand the project path and then expand the Tutorial project.

Creating a Project | 111


Creating and Adding Project Data

In these exercises, youll attach a drawing to the project and start creating
project objects and accessing them from the project. You will use the Surface-
3.dwg drawing as the starting point.

Exercises:
Attaching the Drawing to the Project
Adding Data to the Project

Attaching the Drawing to the Project

In this exercise, youll attach a drawing to your project.

To attach the drawing


1 In Windows Explorer, create a new folder under My Documents\Projects
called Drawings.
2 In the Autodesk Map window, click File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Surfaces), and open the drawing Surface-
3.dwg.
This drawing must be saved before you attach it to the project.
3 Click File Save As.
4 In the Save Drawing As dialog box, browse to the following location:
My Documents\Projects\Drawings
5 Save the file as Project-1.dwg.
You do not have to save the drawing within the project folder. Autodesk
Map automatically keeps track of the drawings that are part of the project.
6 In the Prospector tab, ensure that Master View is selected, expand the
Open Drawings collection, right-click Project-1, and click Attach to
project.
7 In the Select Project dialog box, from the data tree, select Tutorial, and
click OK.
8 Click File Save.

Creating and Adding Project Data | 112


9 In Prospector, under Projects, expand the Tutorial collection and then
expand the Drawings collection.
PROJECT-1 is attached and displayed in the Drawings collection.

Adding Data to the Project

In this exercise, youll share data to a project.


The Project-1 drawing has a surface (XGND), and point group (Existing
Ground Points) as well as a collection of points that you want to share in a
collaborative environment.

Note To add the data to the project, use the Check In operation in the Add To
Project dialog box.

To add data to the project


1 In Prospector, ensure that Master View is selected, expand the Open Draw-
ings collection and then expand the Project-1 collection.
2 To add the points to project, from Prospector, under Project-1, expand the
Point Groups collection, right-click the _All Points point group, and click
Add Points to Project.
3 In the Add to Project dialog box, optionally, enter a comment, select
Check in from the Check in Options drop-down list, and click OK.

Note This operation may take several minutes.

4 To add the point group Existing Ground Points to the project, from Pros-
pector, under Project-1, right-click the Existing Ground Points point
group, and click Add to Project.
5 In the Add to Project dialog box, optionally, enter a comment, select
Check in from the Check in Options drop-down list, and click OK.
In Prospector, you will notice that the drawing icon state for the point
group changes to . This indicates that the point group is a project
object and it is not available for editing in the current drawing (Project-1).
6 To add the surface XGND to the project, from Prospector, under the
Project-1 drawing, expand the Surfaces collection, right click XGND, and
click Add to Project.

Creating and Adding Project Data | 113


7 In the Add to Project dialog box, optionally, enter a comment, select
Check in from the Check in Options drop-down list, and click OK.
In Prospector, you will notice that the drawing icon state for the surface
changes to . This indicates that the surface is a project object and
it is not available for editing in the current drawing (Project-1).
To verify that you cannot edit the surface, select the surface in Prospector,
right-click, and click Rebuild. A message is displayed stating that the sur-
face cannot be rebuilt.
8 Click File Save to save Project-1.dwg.
9 To verify the project objects, in Prospector, expand the Projects collection,
<project-path> Tutorial, and then expand the Points Groups and Sur-
faces collections. The collections should contain the objects that were
added from the Project-1.dwg.

Accessing and Modifying Project Data

These exercises demonstrate how you can access and modify project data and
subsequently check the data back in and synchronize your drawing.

Exercises:
Getting Project Data
Checking Data Out
Changing the Point Group Query
Checking Data In
Synchronizing the Drawing Data with the Project Data

Getting Project Data

In this exercise, youll create a new drawing and do a get on the object data.

To get the project data


1 Click File New.
2 In the Select Template dialog box, click _Autodesk Civil 3D Imperial By
Layer.dwt and then click open.

Accessing and Modifying Project Data | 114


3 Click File Save as.
4 In the Save Drawing As dialog box, browse to the following location:
My Documents\Projects\Drawings
5 Save the file as Project-2.dwg.
6 In the Prospector tree, expand the Open Drawings collection, right-click
Project-2, and click Attach to Project.
7 In the Select Project dialog box, from the data tree, select Tutorial, and
click OK.
8 In Prospector, under Projects, expand the Tutorial collection and then
expand the Drawings collection.
PROJECT-2 is attached and displayed in the Drawings collection.
9 Click File Save.
10 Under the Tutorial collection, expand the Surfaces collection, right-click
the surface XGND, and click Get From Project.
11 In the Get From Project dialog box, you are prompted with a warning that
Objects may be overwritten (if they exist) in your current drawing.
The point group Existing Ground Points does not exist in the current
drawing so the message Point Group Existing Ground Points not found
is displayed.
12 Click OK.
13 Repeat Steps 10 through 12 for the point group Existing Ground Points.
14 In Prospector, under Projects, expand Tutorial and select the Point collec-
tion. The item view displays the list of project points.
15 Click in the list view and press Ctrl-A to multi-select all the points. Right-
click, and click Get From Project.
16 Click OK in the Get From Project dialog box.
The Project-2 drawing now has all the data from the Tutorial project.
17 To see the data, in Prospector, under the Open Drawings collection,
expand the collections under Project-2.
You will see the list of Points, the Point Group Existing Group Points, and
the surface XGND.
Notice that the point group and surface are marked with , which
means that they are out of date.
18 Right-click the point group Existing Ground Points and click Update.
19 Right-click the surface XGND and click Rebuild.
20 Since these objects were gets from the project (and not checkouts of the
project copies), to edit the objects, you will need to unlock them by right-
clicking on them and clicking Unlock.

Accessing and Modifying Project Data | 115


The data can be analyzed and edited but it cannot be checked back into
the project. To make edits to the project copies of the objects, the objects
must be checked out for edit.

Checking Data Out

In this exercise, youll check out a surface and point group.

To check data out


1 In the Prospector tree, expand the Open Drawings collection, under
Project-2 expand the Surfaces collection, right-click XGND, and click
Check Out.
The Event Viewer may be displayed with a message that the breakline data
crosses a point.
2 In the Check Out dialog box, click OK.
Notice that the icon beside the surface changes to a . This indicates
that the surface is checked out.

Note If there are any issues with the data, such as added breaklines crossing
existing points, Autodesk Map will display a corresponding message in the
Event Viewer. See the Surfaces tutorial for more information.

3 In the Prospector tree, expand the Open Drawings collection, under


Project-2 expand the Point Groups collection, right-click Existing Ground
Points, and click Check Out.
4 In the Check Out dialog box, optionally, add a comment, and then click
OK.
Notice that the icon beside the point group changes to a . This indi-
cates that the point group is checked out.
You will not edit any of the point data so these will not be checked out to
the Project-2 drawing.
The point group shows the out-of-date symbol and needs to be updated
and the surface needs to be rebuild with that Point Group.
5 Right-click the point group Existing Ground Points and click Update.
6 Right-click the surface XGND and click Rebuild.
When you rebuild the surface, you create a new version of that project
object, and the red triangle displayed next to the surface indicates this
state.

Accessing and Modifying Project Data | 116


Changing the Point Group Query

In this exercise, youll change the point group query.

To change the point group query


1 In the Prospector tree, under Project-2, expand the Point Groups collec-
tion, right-click Existing Ground Points, and click Properties.
2 In the Point Group Properties dialog box, click the Include tab.
3 Clear the With Numbers Matching check box.
4 Select the With Raw Descriptions Matching check box, and enter GRND
into the corresponding field.
The point group now only contains points with the raw descriptions of
GRND.
5 Click OK.
6 In Prospector, under Project-2, right-click the surface XGND and click
Rebuild.
The surface should be updated since the points that the surface is built
from have changed.

Checking Data In

In this exercise, youll check modified data back in to the project.


Since the point group and surface have been modified, these objects need to
be checked back in to the project.

To check the data in


1 In the Prospector tree, under Project-2, expand the Point Groups collec-
tion, right-click Existing Ground Points, and click Check In.
2 In the Check In dialog box, optionally, add a comment, and then click
OK.
3 In the Prospector tree, under Project-2, expand the Surfaces collection,
right-click XGND, and click Check In.
4 In the Check In dialog box, optionally, add a comment, and then click
OK.
The project objects are now updated with the edits to the point group and
the surface.

Accessing and Modifying Project Data | 117


Synchronizing the Drawing Data with the Project
Data

In this exercise, youll synchronize the drawing data with the project data.
The drawing that was initially used to add the objects to the project is out-
of-sync with the project.
In Prospector, under Open Drawings, notice that Project-1 has the icon
beside it. This icon indicates that the drawing attached to the project is out-
of-date relative to the project.

To synchronize the drawing with the project data


1 In Prospector, under Open Drawings, right-click on Project-1, and click
Sync To Project.
2 In the Sync To Project dialog box, click OK, to confirm the synchroniza-
tion.
The Event Viewer may be displayed with a message that the breakline data
crosses a point.
Project-1 is now synchronized to the project.

Accessing and Modifying Project Data | 118


Surfaces

The Surfaces tutorials will show you how to work with

land surfaces.

In this tutorial:

Creating and Adding Data to a Surface


Changing the Surface Style and Display
Editing Surface Data
Creating a Watershed Analysis
Generating Surface Volume Information
Using the Object Viewer

Creating and Adding Data to a


Surface

Exercises:

Creating a New TIN Surface


Adding Point Data to a Surface
Adding an Outer Boundary to a Surface
Adding Breaklines to a Surface

When you first create a surface, its name is dis-


played in the Surface collection in the Prospec-

119
tor tree, so that you can perform other operations, such as adding data and
editing the surface. When first created, the surface is empty, and therefore
will not be visible in the drawing.
After data has been added to a surface, it becomes visible in the drawing in
accordance with the display settings specified in the referenced surface style.

Creating a New TIN Surface

This exercise demonstrates how to create an empty TIN surface and then add
data to the surface, including a set of survey points (in a point group), bound-
aries, and breaklines.

TIN Surfaces
A TIN surface comprises the triangles that form a triangulated irregular net-
work. A TIN line is one of the lines that makes up the surface triangulation.
To create TIN lines, Autodesk Map connects the surface points that are closest
together. The TIN lines form triangles. The elevation of any point in the sur-
face is defined by interpolating the elevations of the vertices of the triangles
that the point lies in.
In this exercise, youll create an empty TIN surface.
When a surface is initially created, its name is displayed in the Surface collec-
tion in the Prospector tree so that you can perform other operations such as
adding data and editing the surface.

To create a TIN surface


1 In the Autodesk Map window, select File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Surfaces), and open the drawing Surface-
1.dwg.
2 On the Surfaces menu, click Create Surface.
In the Create Surface dialog box, in the Type drop-down list, select TIN
Surface.
3 Click to select the layer for the surface.
4 In the Object Layer dialog box, click and select C-TOPO-XGND from
the list of layers.
This is the layer on which the surface is created.
5 Click OK to close the Layer Selection dialog box, and click OK again to
close the Object Layer dialog box.

Creating and Adding Data to a Surface | 120


6 For the surfaces properties, use the following:

Name: XGND
Description: Existing ground surface
Style: Standard

7 Click OK to create the surface.


8 If the Prospector tab isnt already selected in Toolspace, click it and expand
the Surface-1 drawing in the Prospector tree.
The new surface name is displayed under the Surfaces collection. Note
that although the surface has been created, it is empty, and does not con-
tain any data.

Adding Point Data to a Surface

Point Groups
Point groups provide you with a flexible and convenient way to group and
identify points that share common characteristics or are used to perform a
task, such as creating a surface.
You can create point groups that contain specific points, for example, all
existing ground points, making it easier to manage the surface points.
In this exercise, youll add a set of survey points (in a point group) to the sur-
face from a previously created point group that already exists in the drawing.
The point group was previously created by importing points from a PENZD
space-delimited format point file (Existing Ground Points - PENZD.txt).

To add point data to a surface


1 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, expand the XGND surface under the
Surfaces collection.
2 Expand the Definition collection under the XGND surface, right-click
Point Groups, and click Add.
The Point Groups dialog box is displayed.
3 Select the point group Existing Ground Points from the list, and click OK.

Note This point group was previously created by importing points from a
PENZD space-delimited point file (Existing Ground Points - PENZD.txt).

Creating and Adding Data to a Surface | 121


The point group, which contains the surface points, is added to the XGND
surfaces definition. This is indicated by the , which is displayed
beside the Point Groups item in the Prospector tree.
4 If the surface is not displayed in the drawing area, right-click the XGND
surface name in the Prospector tree, and click Zoom To.
5 The surface is displayed in the drawing area.

Adding an Outer Boundary to a Surface

Boundaries
Boundaries are closed polylines that affect the visibility of the triangles either
inside or outside of the polylines. An outer boundary is used to define the
extents of the surface; all triangles inside of the boundary are visible and all
triangles that are outside of the boundary are invisible.
Areas hidden by boundaries are not included in calculations, such as total
area and volume.
Surface boundaries are defined by selecting existing polygons from the draw-
ing. The surface definition displays the numerical ID and a list of vertices for
each boundary.
In this exercise, youll insert a polyline from an external DWG file and create
an outer surface boundary from the polyline.

To add an outer boundary to a surface


1 On the Insert menu, click Block.
2 In the Insert dialog box, click Browse, navigate to the tutorial drawings
folder (MapTutData\Surfaces), select Outer Boundary.dwg, and click Open.
3 In the Insert dialog box, use the following settings:

Insertion Point: X, Y, and Z are set to 0.00, 0; Specify On-Screen is


cleared.
Explode: Selected.
Scale: Specify On-screen is cleared; Uniform Scale is selected; X is set to
1.00.
Rotation: Specify On-screen is cleared; Angle is set to 0.

4 Click OK.
The polyline is inserted into the drawing.

Creating and Adding Data to a Surface | 122


5 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tree, expand the XGND surface under the
Surfaces collection.
6 Expand the Definition collection under the XGND surface, right-click
Boundaries, and click Add.
The Add Boundaries dialog box is displayed.
7 For the boundarys properties, use the following:

Name: XGND-Outer
Type: Outer
Non-Destructive Breakline: Cleared
Mid-Ordinate Distance: 1.0000

8 Click OK to accept the values and close the Add Boundaries dialog box.
9 In the drawing area, select the yellow polyline that was inserted from the
Outer Boundary.dwg file.
The boundary is added to the surfaces definition, and the surface display
in the drawing area is clipped to the area defined by the outer boundary.
10 Optionally, to hide the original polyline, turn its layer off by entering
Layer at the command line and clicking the light bulb icon beside the C-
TOPO-BNDY layer.

Adding Breaklines to a Surface

Breaklines
Breaklines are used to define features, such as retaining walls, curbs, tops of
ridges, and streams. Breaklines force surface triangulation along the breakline
and prevent triangulation across the breakline.
Breaklines are critical to creating an accurate surface model, because it is the
interpolation of the data, not just the data itself, that determines the shape
of the model.
You can use 3D lines or 3D polylines as breaklines. The x, y, and z coordinates
of each vertex on the polyline that you select are converted into TIN vertices.
For 3D lines, each line that you select is defined as a two-point breakline.
In this exercise, youll insert 3D polylines from an external DWG file, use the
AutoCAD command QSELECT to select the polylines, and create standard
breaklines from the selected polylines.

Creating and Adding Data to a Surface | 123


Note This exercise uses the QSELECT command to create a selection set that
includes all objects matching the filtering criteria you specify. QSELECT can apply
either to the entire drawing or to an existing selection set. The selection set cre-
ated by QSELECT replaces or is appended to the current selection set.

To add breaklines to a surface


1 On the Insert menu, click Block.
2 In the Insert dialog box, click Browse, navigate to the tutorial drawings
folder (MapTutData\Surfaces), select Breaklines.dwg, and click Open.
3 In the Insert dialog box, use the following settings:

Insertion point: X, Y, and Z are set to 0.00, 0; Specify On-screen is


cleared.
Explode: Selected.
Scale: Specify On-screen is cleared; Uniform Scale is selected; X is set to
1.00.
Rotation: Specify On-screen is cleared; Angle is set to 0.

4 Click OK.
The 3D polylines are inserted into the drawing.
5 At the command line, enter QSELECT.
6 In the Quick Select dialog box, use the following:

Apply To: Entire Drawing


Object Type: 3D Polyline
Properties: Layer
Operator: = Equals
Value: C-TOPO-BRKL
Include In New Selection Set: Selected

7 Click OK. The 3D polylines are selected in the drawing area.


8 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tree, expand the XGND surface under the
Surfaces collection.
9 Expand the Definition collection under the XGND surface, right-click
Breaklines, and click Add.
The Add Breaklines dialog box is displayed.
10 For the breaklines properties, use the following:

Description: XGND-Breaklines
Type: Standard

Creating and Adding Data to a Surface | 124


Mid-Ordinate Distance: 1.0000

11 Click OK.
The previously selected 3D polylines are added to the surfaces definition
as breaklines, and the surface displayed in the drawing area is updated.

Note If there are any issues with the data, such as added breaklines crossing
existing points, Autodesk Map will display a corresponding message in the
Event Viewer. For this tutorial, you can ignore the message, but if you want
to investigate the issue further, see Further exploration, below.

12 Optionally, to hide the original 3D polylines, turn their layer off by enter-
ing Layer at the command line and clicking the light bulb icon beside the
C-TOPO-BRKL layer.
Further exploration: If there are data contention issues, such as breaklines
crossing existing points, they are reported in the Event Viewer, so that you
can perform further investigation.
1 When the Event Viewer is displayed, expand the Event Viewer collection
in the Tree tab, and double-click the event message to display the Event
Properties dialog box.
2 In the Event Properties dialog box, in the Description field, highlight the
coordinates, right-click and click Copy.
3 Click the Close button to close the Event Properties dialog box.
4 Open a text editor such as Notepad and press Ctrl-V to paste the coordi-
nates.
5 In Notepad, remove the space after the comma delimiter between the
coordinates.
6 In Notepad, highlight the coordinates, and press Ctrl-C to copy them.
7 At the Autodesk Map command line, enter zoom to display the Zoom
command options.
8 Enter Center.
9 Right-click at the command line, click Paste, and press Enter.
10 Enter a magnification height of 50 and press Enter.
The drawing area is zoomed into and centered on the point that the break-
line is crossing.

Creating and Adding Data to a Surface | 125


Changing the Surface Style and Display

This exercise demonstrates how to change and constrain the surface styles
and display.
Using styles is an efficient way to control surface display. Rather than answer-
ing prompts for numerous variables every time you create a new surface, you
can create a surface and then reference a pre-defined style. Because you
define all the variables in the style, it makes global changes after surface cre-
ation very easy.

Exercises:

Editing the Surfaces Style


Using a Different Style for a Surface

Editing the Surfaces Style

Surface styles are managed the way all civil object styles are managed in
Autodesk Map, by using the Toolspace Settings tree. All civil objects have a
standard object style grouping on the Settings tree, called an object style col-
lection. You can create, edit, copy, and delete the styles for a civil object.
Surface styles define how the surface components are displayed in the draw-
ing. If you want to change the way the surface component displays, either
use a different style or edit the style.
The surface styles contain the following component parameters and compo-
nent display settings for the creation of surface data objects:

Borders. Interior and exterior border and datum display.


Contours. Minor, major, depression, and user-defined contour lines dis-
play.
Grid. Primary and secondary grid display.
Points. All surface points for the TIN or Grid surfaces.
Triangles. TIN face information.
Analysis. Directions, elevations, slopes, and slope arrows.
Watersheds. Watersheds analysis display.

Changing the Surface Style and Display | 126


In this exercise, youll hide the display of the points on the surface and turn
on the display of depression contours.

To edit the surfaces style


1 In the Autodesk Map window, select File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Surfaces) and open the drawing Surface-
2.dwg.
2 In Toolspace, on the Settings tab, expand the Surface collection under
Surface2.
3 Expand the Surface Styles collection to display the list of existing surface
styles in the drawing.
4 The style (Standard) that is being referenced by a surface in the drawing
is designated with an orange marker:
5 Right-click the Standard surface style, and click Edit.
6 In the Surface Style - Standard dialog box, click the Display tab.
7 In the Component Display table, turn off the visibility of the points in the
surface. To do this, click the light bulb icon in the Visible column to dim
it, and click Apply.
8 Click the Contours tab.
9 Expand the Contour Depressions property group, change Display Depres-
sion Contours to True, and set Tick Mark Length to 5.
10 Click OK.
The depression contours are now visible on the surface. You can get a bet-
ter view of them by zooming to the upper-left of the surface.

Using a Different Style for a Surface

In this exercise, youll change the surface style, which the surface is referenc-
ing, to display different views of the surface.

Note This exercise uses the surface in sample drawing Surface-2.dwg.

To use a different style


1 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, expand the Surfaces collection, right-
click on the XGND surface, and click Properties.
2 In the Surface Properties dialog box, on the Information tab, click the
Object Style drop-down list and select Border & Triangles.

Changing the Surface Style and Display | 127


This style is set to display the borders and the TIN faces with vertical exag-
geration. This makes it easier to see the vertical relief of the surface.
3 Click OK.
The surface representation is updated to display the TIN triangles and bor-
der.
4 On the View menu, click 3D Orbit.
5 Using the 3D Orbit tool, rotate the surface in the drawing area to display
the exaggerated triangle elevations.
6 To return to the regular plan view of the surface, click View 3D Views
Plan View Current UCS.

Editing Surface Data

This exercise demonstrates some common surface editing tasks, including


edge swapping, TIN line deletion, and surface smoothing. Youll also hide
part of the surface using a hide boundary.

Exercises:

Swapping TIN Edges


Deleting TIN Lines
Adding a Hide Boundary
Smoothing a Surface

Swapping TIN Edges

Edge Swapping
Edge swapping is used to change the direction of two triangle faces in the sur-
face so that, for example, the triangle edges match ridges or swales.
Edge swapping is sometimes required to render an accurate model of the sur-
face, for example to match ridges or swales on the surface.
In this exercise, youll swap several TIN edges in a surface.

Editing Surface Data | 128


To swap TIN edges
1 In the Autodesk Map window, click File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Surfaces) and open the drawing Surface-
3.dwg.
In this drawing, the surface is displayed as TIN lines overlaid on an exter-
nally referenced landbase image.
2 Zoom into the lower-left area of the surface.

3 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, expand the surfaces Definition


collection and right-click the Edits item.
4 From the right-click menu click Swap Edge.
At the command line, you are prompted to select an edge (line) to swap.
5 Click a TIN edge to swap it.

Editing Surface Data | 129


The edge is swapped if the following criteria are met:

You clicked within 1 unit of an edge.


Two visible triangles are separated by the edge.
The edge is not a breakline edge or an edge created by an Add Line com-
mand.
The quadrilateral formed by the two triangles (which are separated by
the edge) is convex.

6 Optionally, continue to select other edges to swap.


7 Press ENTER to complete the operation.
The edits are added as Swap Edge operations to the Edits list view in Pros-
pector.

Note The Description column in the list view provides the coordinates of
the pick point along the edge that was swapped.

Deleting TIN Lines

Deleting TIN Lines


Deleting TIN lines may be required, for example, if the surface has TIN trian-
gles on the perimeter that are long and narrow. In this case, the triangles
might not be accurate for the surface, and should be deleted.
Surface TIN or Grid lines can also be deleted within a pond or building foun-
dation, for example, to create a void area. By removing these lines, you can
prevent contours from being drawn through the void areas.
When an edge is removed, an either interior border that follows the adjacent
lines is created, or the exterior border is modified to follow the new lines.
In this exercise, youll delete TIN lines from a surface.
The TIN lines fall within a pond. By removing these lines, you can prevent
contours from being drawn through the pond area.

To delete TIN lines


1 In the Autodesk Map window, select File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Surfaces) and open the drawing Surface-
3A.dwg.

Editing Surface Data | 130


In this drawing, the surface TIN lines are displayed with an externally ref-
erenced underlying landbase. It is zoomed in to an area of the surface that
features a small pond.
2 Zoom into the pond area of the surface.

3 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, expand the surfaces Definition


collection, and right-click the Edits item.
4 Click Delete Line.
At the command line, you are prompted to select an edge (line) to remove.
5 Click an edge that crosses the surface of the pond.
The edge is removed and an interior border, following the adjacent TIN
lines, is created.
6 Continue selecting edges to delete until all TIN lines that cross the pond
surface have been removed.

Editing Surface Data | 131


7 Press ENTER to complete the operation.
The edits are added as Delete Line operations to the Edits list view in Pros-
pector.

Note The Description column in the list view provides the coordinates of
the vertices for the edge that was deleted.

Adding a Hide Boundary

Hide Boundaries
Hide boundaries mask areas of the surface so triangulation, and therefore
contours, are not visible in the area. They are used to punch holes in a surface
(for example, a building footprint).

Editing Surface Data | 132


Note When you use a hide boundary, the surface is not deleted. The full sur-
face remains intact. If there are surface TIN lines that you want to permanently
remove from the surface, then use the Delete Line command.

In this exercise, youll create a Hide boundary on the surface, which will
mask unwanted triangulation.

To add a hide boundary


1 In the Autodesk Map window, select File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Surfaces) and open the drawing Surface-
3B.dwg.

Note This drawing is similar to Surface-3A.dwg with the addition of the C-


TOPO-BRKL layer being displayed.

2 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, expand the XGND surface under the
Surfaces collection.
3 Expand the Definition collection under the XGND surface, right-click
Boundaries, and click Add.
The Add Boundaries dialog box is displayed.
4 For the boundarys properties, enter or select the following:

Name: XGND-Pond Hide


Type: Hide
Non-Destructive Breakline: Selected
Mid-Ordinate Distance: 1.0000

5 Click OK.
6 In the drawing area, select the polyline object that matches the perimeter
of the pond.
The hide boundary is added to the surfaces definition, and the surface dis-
played in the drawing area is modified to display the pond as a hole in
the surface.

Editing Surface Data | 133


Smoothing a Surface

Surface Smoothing
Surface smoothing is an operation that adds points at system-determined ele-
vations using Natural Neighbor Interpolation (NNI) or Kriging methods. This
results in smoothed contours, with no overlap.
You perform smoothing as an edit operation on a surface. You can specify
smoothing properties and then turn them on or off. When the smoothing is
turned off, the surface reverts back to its original state. However, the smooth-
ing properties are preserved in the surfaces operation list.
NNI is a way to estimate the elevation (z) of an arbitrary point (P) from a set
of points with known elevations.
The method uses information in the triangulation of the known points to
compute a weighted average of the elevations of the natural neighbors of a
point.
To use NNI, you only need to select the output locations of the interpolated
points. The elevations of the interpolated points are always based on the
weighted average of the elevations of the existing neighboring points. NNI
interpolates only within the surface.
In this exercise, youll smooth a surface using the Natural Neighbor Interpo-
lation (NNI) method.

To smooth a surface using NNI


1 In the Autodesk Map window, select File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Surfaces) and open the drawing Surface-
3C.dwg.

Editing Surface Data | 134


2 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, expand the XGND surfaces Def-
inition collection and right-click Edits.
3 Click Smooth Surface.
4 In the Smooth Surface dialog box, for the Select Method property, select
Natural Neighbor Interpolation.
5 In the Point Interpolation/Extrapolation Output parameter group, select
Grid Based for the Output location.
The Grid Based output location interpolates surface points on a grid
defined within specified polygon areas selected in the drawing. After the
areas are defined, the grid x and y spacing, and orientation properties can
be specified.
6 Click the Value column for the Select Output Regions parameter, and click
the .
7 At the command line, enter surface for the output region.
The Smooth Surface dialog box is displayed.
8 Enter 10 for the Grid X-Spacing.
9 Enter 10 for the Grid Y-Spacing.
10 Click OK to smooth the surface.
The display of the surface is smoothed and the operation is added as a
Smooth Surface item into the Edits list view in Prospector.

Note The Description column in the list view displays the type of surface
smoothing that was used (Natural Neighbor Smoothing).

Creating a Watershed Analysis

This exercise demonstrates how to create a watershed analysis of the surface.

Exercises:

Configuring and Viewing the Watershed Analysis


Modifying the Watershed Analysis
Configuring and Inserting the Watershed Legend

Creating a Watershed Analysis | 135


Watershed analysis, which is one of several types of analysis that you can per-
form on a surface, enables you to visualize and analyze the surface water-
sheds. It includes the following general steps:

Configure the watershed display and legend settings.


Configure and create the watershed analysis.
Insert the watershed legend table.

Autodesk Map uses the surface TIN lines to calculate the areas that water
would flow along the surface. From these areas, the drain targets and water-
sheds are determined.
Other types of surface analysis include slope, angle, aspect, elevations, and
contours.

Configuring and Viewing the Watershed Analysis

In this exercise, youll change the surface style and modify the style for water-
shed display.

To configure and generate the watershed analysis


1 In the Autodesk Map window, select File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Surfaces) and open the drawing Surface-
4.dwg.
2 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, expand the Surfaces collection, right-
click on the XGND surface, and click Properties.
3 On the Information tab of the Surface Properties dialog box, click the
Object Style drop-down list and select Watersheds.
This object style is set to display the watersheds.
4 Click OK.
5 In the Settings tab in Toolspace, expand the Surface collection.
6 Expand the Surface Styles collection to display the list of existing surface
styles in the drawing.
7 Right-click the Watersheds surface style, and click Edit.
8 In the Surface Style - Watershed dialog box, click the Watersheds tab.
9 In the Watershed Properties table, expand the Depression Watershed
property group, change Use Hatching to True, click Hatch Pattern, and
click .
10 In the Hatch Properties dialog box, click AR-SAND in the Pattern drop-
down list and enter 15 in the Scale field.

Creating a Watershed Analysis | 136


11 Click OK to close the Hatch Properties dialog box, and click OK again to
close the Surface Style dialog box.
The watersheds are displayed on the surface in the drawing area.

Modifying the Watershed Analysis

In this exercise, youll modify the watershed analysis.

To modify the watershed analysis


1 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, expand the Surfaces collection, right-
click on the XGND surface, and click Properties.
2 On the Analysis tab of the Surface Properties dialog box, click the Analysis
Type drop-down list, and select Watersheds.
3 Ensure that Standard is selected in the Legend drop-down list.
4 Click to generate the watershed analysis.
5 The details of the surfaces watersheds are displayed in the Details table.
6 Click to display the Watershed Display dialog box, and click the light
bulb beside the Boundary Point and Boundary Segment watershed types
to hide the display of all boundary point and boundary segment water-
sheds.
7 Click OK to close the Watershed Display dialog box and click OK again to
close the Surface Properties dialog box.
The revised watersheds are displayed on the surface in the drawing area.
8 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tab, click the surfaces Watersheds collec-
tion.
The Prospector list view displays a tabular list of the surfaces watersheds
with their IDs, description, type, and the ID of the watershed that they
drain into.
9 Optionally, to pan or zoom to an individual watershed, right-click the
watershed item in the list view, and click Pan To or Zoom To.

Configuring and Inserting the Watershed Legend

In this exercise, youll add a watershed legend table to the drawing.

Creating a Watershed Analysis | 137


To configure and insert the watershed legend
1 In the Settings tab, expand the Table Styles collection to display the list of
existing surface table styles in the drawing.
2 Expand the Watershed collection, right-click Standard, and click Edit.
The Table Style dialog box displays the properties of the surface table
styles.
3 In the Data Properties tab of the Table Style dialog box, clear the Sort Data
check box.
4 Click OK to close the Table Style dialog box.
5 On the Surfaces menu, click Add Legend Table.
6 Select the surface in the drawing area.
7 At the prompt to specify the table type, enter Watersheds.
8 You are prompted to specify if you want the table to automatically update
if the analysis information changes. Enter Yes to enable automatic updat-
ing.
If the watershed analysis changes due to a change made to the surface, the
legend will automatically update.
9 Click in the drawing where you want to place the upper-left corner of the
table.
The legend table is displayed in the drawing at the location that you
selected.

Generating Surface Volume Information

This exercise demonstrates how to create a base and comparison surface and
create both a persistent volume surface from them, as well as create compos-
ite volume calculations between the base and comparison surface.

Exercises:

Creating the Base and Comparison Surfaces


Creating a TIN Volume Surface
Creating a Composite Volume Calculation

Generating Surface Volume Information | 138


Creating the Base and Comparison Surfaces

A volume surface is a persistent surface object. Therefore, you can display cut
and fill contours, cut and fill points, add labels to it, add it to a project, etc.
A volume (cut, fill, net) of a volume surface is a property that can be viewed
by selecting Surface Properties.
In this exercise, youll create base and comparison surfaces, from which
youll subsequently derive volume calculations.

To create the surfaces


1 In the Autodesk Map window, select File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Surfaces) and open the drawing Surface-
4B.dwg.
The surface in this file (Existing Ground without Berm) is similar to the
one in Surface-4.dwg except that there is no berm at the south end of the
surface.
The Existing Ground without Berm surface will be the base surface for the
volume calculations.
2 On the Surfaces menu, click Create Surface.
In the Create Surface dialog box, in the Type drop-down list, select TIN
Surface.
3 For the surfaces properties, use the following:

Name: Berm
Description: Berm surface
Style: Standard

4 Click OK to create the surface.


5 If the Prospector tab isnt already selected in Toolspace, click it and expand
the Surface-4B drawing in the Prospector tree.
The Berm surface name is displayed under the Surfaces collection. Note
that although the surface has been created, it is empty, and does not con-
tain any data.
The Berm surface will be the comparison surface for the volume calcula-
tions.
6 On the Insert menu, click Block.
7 In the Insert dialog box, click Browse, navigate to the tutorial drawings
folder (MapTutData\Surfaces), select Berm Breaklines.dwg, and click Open.
8 In the Insert dialog box, use the following settings:

Generating Surface Volume Information | 139


Insertion Point: X, Y, and Z are set to 0.00, 0; Specify On-Screen is
cleared.
Explode: Selected.
Scale: Specify On-screen is cleared; Uniform Scale is selected; X is set to
1.00.
Rotation: Specify On-screen is cleared; Angle is set to 0.

9 Click OK.
The polylines are inserted into the drawing.
10 At the command line, enter QSELECT.
11 In the Quick Select dialog box, use the following:

Apply To: Entire Drawing


Object Type: 3D Polyline
Properties: Layer
Operator: = Equals
Value: C-TOPO-BRKL
Include In New Selection Set: Selected

12 Click OK. The 3D polylines are selected in the drawing area.


13 In Toolspace, on the Prospector tree, expand the Berm surface under the
Surfaces collection.
14 Expand the Definition collection under the Berm surface, right-click
Breaklines, and click Add.
The Add Breaklines dialog box is displayed.
15 For the breaklines properties, use the following:

Description: Berm-Breaklines
Type: Standard
Mid-Ordinate Distance: 1.0000

16 Click OK.
The previously selected 3D polylines are added to the surfaces definition
as breaklines, and the surface displayed in the drawing area is updated.

Creating a TIN Volume Surface

In this exercise, youll create a TIN volume surface, which is a persistent sur-
face object.

Generating Surface Volume Information | 140


To create a TIN volume surface
1 On the Surfaces menu, click Create Surface.
In the Create Surface dialog box, in the Type drop-down list, select TIN
Volume Surface.
2 For the surfaces Information properties, use the following:

Name: Berm Volume


Description: Berm volume difference surface
Style: Standard

3 Under the Volume Surface property group, click <Base surface> and then
click the .
4 From the Select Base Surface dialog box, select Existing Ground without
Berm, and click OK.
5 Under the Volume Surface property group, click <Comparison surface>
and then click the .
6 From the Select Comparison Surface dialog box, select Berm, and then
click OK, and then click OK in the Create Surface dialog box.
7 If the Prospector tab isnt already selected in Toolspace, click it and expand
the Surface-4B drawing in the Prospector tree.
The Berm Volume surface name is displayed under the Surfaces collection.
Note that the icon next to the surface name is a . This indicates that
the surface is a TIN volume surface.
8 To view the volume statistics for the surface, in Prospector, right-click the
Berm Volume surface, and then click Properties.
9 In the Surface Properties dialog box, click the Statistics tab and then
expand the Volume statistics to view information such as cut, fill, and net
volume.
10 Click OK to close the Surface Properties dialog box.

Creating a Composite Volume Calculation

The composite volume method uses the points from two surfaces, as well as
any location where the triangle edges between the two surfaces cross. The
cut, fill, and net are calculated based on the difference between the eleva-
tions of the two surfaces.
In this exercise, youll use the Composite Volume utility to calculate volume
information between two surfaces.

Generating Surface Volume Information | 141


To create composite volume information
1 On the Surfaces menu, click Utilities Volumes.
2 In the Composite Volumes vista, click the Create New Volume Entry
button.
3 Click the <select surface> entry in the Base Surface column and select the
Existing Ground without Berm from the drop-down list.
4 Click the <select surface> entry in the Comparison Surface column and
select Berm surface from the drop-down list.
After the surfaces are selected, the volumes are calculated and the follow-
ing types of information are displayed:

Cut: The amount of material that has to be removed.


Fill: The amount of material that has to added.
Net: The difference between the cut and the fill. For example, if a vol-
ume is 200 cubic meters of cut and 100 cubic meters of fill, the net is
100 cubic meters <cut>.
Net Graph: A graphical percentage representation of the whole vol-
ume. A fill net is displayed as a green bar indicating that material needs
to be added to the project site. A cut net is displayed as a red bar, indi-
cating that material must be removed.

Using the Object Viewer

In this exercise, youll learn how to display a surface in three dimensions


(3D), and view it in the Object Viewer.

To view a surface in 3D using the Object Viewer


1 In the Autodesk Map window, select File Open, navigate to the tutorial
drawings folder (MapTutData\Surfaces), and open the drawing Intro-2.dwg.
2 Change the surface style to 3D Elevations, using the sequence of opera-
tions in Using a Different Style for a Surface on page 127.
3 Click the surface to select it.
4 On the General menu, select Utilities Object Viewer.
5 In the top row of the Object Viewer window, click for a Flat Shaded
3D view of the surface.

Using the Object Viewer | 142


6 In the viewing area of the Object Viewer, click and move the mouse to
rotate the surface, viewing it from different angles to see the topography
in three dimensions.
7 If you want to pan, zoom, or change the appearance of the surface, select
other icons in the top row of the Object Viewer window.
8 Click and drag the lower right corner of the Object Viewer window to
change the size of the window and the displayed surface.
9 Close the Object Viewer window to return to the 2D plan view of the sur-
face.

Using the Object Viewer | 143


| 144