bulletin of

Duke University 2008-2009
Undergraduate Instruction

bulletin of

Duke University 2008-2009
Undergraduate Instruction

ACADEMIC LIAISONS Martina J. Bryant Associate Dean Ingeborg Walther Associate Dean PUBLICATIONS COORDINATOR Jennifer Deer COORDINATING EDITOR Rob Hirtz COVER PHOTOGRAPH University Photography

The information in this bulletin applies to the academic year 2008-2009 and is accurate and current, to the extent possible, as of April 24, 2008. The university reserves the right to change programs of study, academic requirements, teaching staff, the calendar, and other matters described herein without prior notice, in accordance with established procedures. Duke University prohibits discrimination and harassment, and provides equal employment opportunity without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, sex, or age. The university also makes good faith efforts to recruit, employ, and promote qualified minorities, women, individuals with disabilities, and veterans. It admits qualified students to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students. The university also does not tolerate harassment of any kind. Questions, comments, or complaints of discrimination or harassment should be directed to the Office of the Vice-President for Institutional Equity, (919) 684-8222. Further information, as well as the complete text of the harassment policy, may be found at: http://www.duke.edu/web/equity/. Duke University recognizes and utilizes electronic mail as a medium for official communications. The university provides all students with e-mail accounts as well as access to e-mail services from public clusters if students do not have personal computers of their own. All students are expected to access their e-mail accounts on a regular basis to check for and respond as necessary to such communications, just as they currently do with paper/ postal service mail. Information that the university is required to make available under the Student Right to Know and Campus Security Acts may be obtained from the Office of University Relations at (919) 684-2823 or in writing to 615 Chapel Drive, Box 90563, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708. Duke University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award baccalaureate, masters, doctorate, and professional degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Duke University. The Bulletin of Duke University publishes the following titles: The Fuqua School of Business, Nicholas School of the Environment, Undergraduate Instruction, the Graduate School, The Medical Center, The Divinity School, Information for Prospective Students, Information for Graduate Studies, Summer Session, Graduate Program in Nursing, The School of Law, and The Duke Community Standard in Practice: A Guide for Undergraduates. Bulletins are also available online at: http://www.registrar.duke.edu/registrar/studentpages/student/bulletins.html

May 2008

2

Contents
Academic Calendar University Administration 7 9

General Information
Duke University The Mission of Duke University Resources of the University Duke as a Residential University The Undergraduate College and School The Duke Community Standard

12
13 14 15 19 20 21

Degree Programs
Degrees and Academic Credit Trinity College of Arts and Sciences General Education Course Requirements The Edmund T. Pratt Jr. School of Engineering

22
23 23 27 34

Academic Procedures and Information
Entrance Credit and Placement Transfer of Work Taken Elsewhere Academic Advising Registration Accommodations Course Load and Eligibility for Courses Course Audit Independent Study Academic Internships Submission of Term Paper Declaration of Major in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Class Attendance, Excuses, and Absences Class Scheduling Incomplete Course Work Final Examinations and Excused Absences Grading and Grade Requirements Continuation Academic Warning and Probation Changes in Status Academic Recognition and Honors Prizes and Awards Notification of Intention to Graduate Graduation and Commencement Education Records The Provision of Academic Information to Parents and Guardians Procedure for Resolution of Students’ Academic Concerns Undergraduate Grade Review Procedure Exclusion of Disruptive Students from a Course

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45 48 49 50 51 51 53 53 53 54 54 55 55 56 56 57 58 59 60 62 65 70 71 71 71 71 72 73

Contents 3

Compliance with Academic Regulations Campus Centers and Institutes Specialized Programs Special Summer Programs

73 75 79 89

Special Study Centers, Programs, and Opportunities 74

Campus Life and Activities
Student Affairs Residential Life Dining Facilities Religious Life Services Available Offices for Program Planning Student Organizations Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Intercollegiate Athletics Judicial System and Regulations Student Obligations and Requirements

90
91 91 92 93 93 97 99 100 100 100 101

Admission
Principles of Selection Requirements for Application Application Procedures

102
103 103 104

Financial Information
Tuition and Fees Living Expenses Fall and Spring Refunds Summer Administrative Withdrawal Charges and Refunds Student Aid

106
107 110 111 111 112

Courses and Academic Programs
Definition of Terms Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Aerospace Studies—Air Force ROTC (AEROSCI) African and African American Studies (AAAS) Art, Art History, and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/ VISUALST) Art History (ARTHIST) Visual Arts (ARTSVIS) Visual Studies (VISUALST) Asian and African Languages and Literature (AALL) Arabic (ARABIC) Chinese (CHINESE) Hebrew (HEBREW) Hindi (HINDI) Japanese (JPN) Korean (KOREAN)

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119 119 119 121 126 127 136 139 152 157 158 161 161 162 162

4 Contects

Wolof (WOLOF) 163 Biological Anthropology and Anatomy (BAA) 165 Biology (BIOLOGY) 172 Canadian Studies (CANADIAN) 187 Chemistry (CHEM) 189 Children in Contemporary Society (CCS) 195 Classical Studies (CLST) 197 Greek (GREEK) 201 Latin (LATIN) 202 Computer Science (COMPSCI) 205 Cultural Anthropology (CULANTH) 214 Dance (DANCE) 225 Documentary Studies (DOCST) 232 Early Childhood Education Studies 238 Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS) 239 Economics (ECON) 246 Education (EDUC) 259 Energy and the Environment 265 English (ENGLISH) 266 Environmental Sciences and Policy Program (ENVIRON) 281 Study of Ethics (ETHICS) 293 Film/Video/Digital (FVD) 297 Focus Program (FOCUS) 304 Genome Sciences and Policy (GENOME) 304 Germanic Languages and Literature (GERMAN) 306 Global Health (GLHLTH) 315 Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (PHYSEDU) 318 Health Policy (HTHPOL) 321 History (HISTORY) 323 House Courses (HOUSECS) 339 Human Development (HUMANDEV) 339 Information Science and Information Studies (ISIS) 341 International Comparative Studies (ICS) 346 Islamic Studies (ISLAMST) 359 Jewish Studies (JEWISHST) 362 Latin American Studies (LATAMER) 364 Linguistics (LINGUIST) 367 Literature Program (LIT) 372 Marine Science and Conservation Leadership 383 University Program in Marine Sciences 386 Markets and Management Studies (MMS) 388 Mathematics (MATH) 392 Medical Physics (MEDPHY) 401 Medicine (School)—Graduate (School) Basic Science Courses Open to Undergraduates 401

Contents 5

Medieval and Renaissance Studies (MEDREN) Military Science—Army ROTC (MILITSCI) Modeling Biological Systems (MBS) Music (MUSIC) Naval Science—Navy ROTC (NAVALSCI) Neuroscience Program Nonlinear and Complex Systems (NCS) Philosophy (PHIL) Physics (PHYSICS) Policy Journalism and Media Studies Political Science (POLSCI) Politics, Philosophy, and Economics Psychology and Neuroscience (PSY) Public Policy Studies (PUBPOL) Religion (RELIGION) Romance Studies (ROMST) French (FRENCH) Italian (ITALIAN) portuguese (PORTUGUE) Spanish (SPANISH) Romance Studies (ROMST) Study of Sexualities (SXL) Slavic and Eurasian Studies Russian (RUSSIAN) Balto-finnic (BALTFIN) Hungarian (HUNGARN) Pashto (PASHTO) Persian (PERSIAN) Polish (POLISH) Romanian (ROMANIAN) Serbian and Croatian (SERBCRO) Turkish (TURKISH) Ukrainian (UKRAIN) Sociology (SOCIOL) Department of Statistical Science (STA) Theater Studies (THEATRST) Women's Studies (WOMENST) University Writing Program (WRITING) Pratt School of Engineering Engineering (Interdepartmental) (EGR) Biomedical Engineering (BME) Civil and Environmental Engineering (CE) Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science (ME)

408 415 417 418 427 428 430 430 437 443 446 467 468 484 497 506 507 514 519 521 528 534 535 536 545 545 545 545 546 546 546 547 548 549 560 565 573 580 580 581 584 593 602 614

Index

623

6 Contects

Academic Calendar 2008-2009
Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. The Pratt School of Engineering. Consult calendars of the various schools for additional information.

Summer 2008
February 25 May 14 Monday—Registration begins for all Summer sessions Wednesday—Term I classes begin The Monday class schedule is in effect on this day Regular class meeting schedule begins on Thursday, May 15 Drop/Add continues Thursday—Regular class meeting schedule begins Friday—Drop/Add for Term I ends Monday—Memorial Day. No classes are held Wednesday—Last day to withdraw WP or WF from Term I classes Monday—Term I classes end Tuesday—Reading period Wednesday—Term I final examinations begin Thursday—Term I final examinations end Monday—Term II classes begin Wednesday—Drop/Add for Term II ends Friday—Independence Day Holiday. No classes are held Monday—Last day to withdraw WP or WF from Term II classes Thursday—Term II classes end Friday—Reading period (until 7:00 p.m.) 7:00 p.m.—Term II final examinations begin Sunday—Term II final examinations end

15 16 26 June 11 23 24 25 26 30 July 2 4 28 August 7 8 10 August 19 20 25 September 1 5 October 5 10 15 29

Fall 2008
Tuesday—New student orientation begins Wednesday, 11:00 a.m.—Convocation for new students Monday, 8:30 a.m.—Fall semester classes begin. Drop/Add continues Monday—Labor Day. Classes in session Friday, 5:00 p.m.—Drop/Add ends Sunday—Founders’ Day Friday, 7:00 p.m.—Fall break begins; Last day for reporting midsemester grades Wednesday, 8:30 a.m.—Classes resume Wednesday—Registration begins for Spring semester, 2009

Academic Calendar 7

November 12 13 25 December 1 5 6-8 9 14 January 7

Wednesday—Registration ends for Spring semester, 2009 Thursday—Drop/Add begins Tuesday, 10:30 p.m.—Thanksgiving recess begins

Monday, 8:30 a.m.—Classes resume Friday—Fall semester classes end Saturday-Monday—Reading period Tuesday, 9:00 a.m.—Final examinations begin Sunday, 10:00 p.m.—Final examinations end

Spring 2009
Wednesday, 8:30 a.m.—Spring semester classes begin The Monday class schedule is in effect on this day Regular class meeting schedule begins on Thursday, January 8 Classes meeting in a Wednesday/Friday meeting pattern begin January 9 Drop/Add continues Thursday—Regular class meeting schedule begins Monday—Martin Luther King, Jr. Day holiday: classes are rescheduled to be held on Wednesday, January 7 Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.—Drop/Add ends Friday—Last day for reporting midsemester grades Monday—Registration begins for Summer 2009 Friday, 7:00 p.m.—Spring recess begins Monday, 8:30 a.m.—Classes resume Wednesday—Registration begins for Fall semester, 2009 Friday—Registration ends for Fall semester, 2009; Summer 2009 registration continues Saturday—Drop/Add begins Wednesday—Spring semester classes end Thursday-Sunday—Reading period Monday—Final examinations begin Wednesday, 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.—Reading period Saturday, 10:00 p.m.—Final examinations end Friday—Commencement begins Sunday—Graduation exercises. Conferring of degrees

8 19 21 February 20 23 March 6 16 April 1 10 11 22 23-26 27 29 May 2 8 10

8 2008-2009

University Administration
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Richard H. Brodhead, PhD, President Victor J. Dzau, MD, Chancellor for Health Affairs; and President and Chief Executive Officer, Duke University Health System, Inc. Peter Lange, PhD, Provost Neal F. Triplett, MBA, President of Duke Management Company Tallman Trask III, MBA, PhD, Executive Vice-President Joseph L. Alleva, MBA, Director of Athletics Pamela Bernard, JD, Vice-President and University Counsel John F. Burness, AB, Senior Vice-President for Public Affairs and Government Relations Robert M. Califf, MD, Vice-Chancellor for Clinical Research H. Clint Davidson, Jr., MBA, Vice-President for Human Resources Kemel Dawkins, BA, Vice-President for Campus Services Tracy Futhey, MS, Vice-President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer Scott Gibson, MBA, Executive Vice-Dean for Administration Catherine Lynch Gilliss, DNSc, Vice-Chancellor for Nursing Affairs and Dean of the School of Nursing B. Hofler Milam, MBA, Vice-President for Finance Larry Moneta, EdD, Vice-President for Student Affairs Molly K. O’Neill, MSHA, Vice-Chancellor for Medical Center Integrated Planning; and Vice-President for Business Development and Chief Strategic Planning Officer, Duke University Health System, Inc. Benjamin D. Reese, Jr., PsyD, Vice-President for Institutional Equity Richard V. Riddell, PhD, Vice-President and University Secretary; Special Assistant to the President James S. Roberts, PhD, Executive Vice-Provost for Finance and Administration Robert S. Shepard, PhD, Vice-President for Alumni Affairs and Development Robert L. Taber, PhD, Vice-Chancellor for Corporate and Venture Development Samuel M. Wells, PhD, Dean of the Chapel Huntington F. Willard, PhD, Vice-Chancellor for Genome Sciences and Director of the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy

9

R. Sanders Williams, MD, Senior Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Founding Dean, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore Phail Wynn, Jr., MBA, EdD, Vice-President for Durham and Regional Affairs

GENERAL ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION
Peter Lange, PhD, Provost Nancy B. Allen, MD, Vice-Provost for Faculty Diversity and Faculty Development Bruce W. Cunningham, PhD, University Registrar Kimberly Harris, BS, Director, Academic Human Resources Deborah Jakubs, PhD, University Librarian and Vice-Provost for Library Affairs David Jamieson-Drake, PhD, Director, Institutional Research Deborah A. Johnson, PhD, Assistant Vice-Provost and Director for Student Information Systems and Services Jacqueline Looney, PhD, Associate Vice-Provost for Academic Diversity and Associate Dean of the Graduate School Gilbert Merkx, PhD, Vice-Provost for International Affairs and Development Stephen Nowicki, PhD, Dean of Undergraduate Education Amy Oates, BA, Director, Academic Financial Services and Systems Katharine Pfeiffer, MA, Assistant Vice-Provost and Director, Student Information Services and Systems James S. Roberts, PhD, Executive Vice-Provost for Finance and Administration Susan Roth, PhD, Vice-Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies Judith Ruderman, PhD, Vice-Provost for Academic and Administrative Services James N. Siedow, PhD, Vice-Provost for Research John Simon, PhD, Vice-Provost for Academic Affairs Jo Rae Wright, PhD, Vice-Provost and Dean of the Graduate School

ARTS AND SCIENCES
George L. McLendon, PhD, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences N. Gregson G. Davis, PhD, Dean of the Humanities Sarah J. Deutsch, PhD, Dean of the Social Sciences Alvin L. Crumbliss, PhD, Dean of the Natural Sciences Robert F. Barkhau, BS, Director, Arts and Sciences Facilities Charles W. Byrd, Jr., PhD, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Sandra P. Connolly, MS, Senior Associate Dean for Finance and Administration Colleen Fitzpatrick, MEd, Associate Dean for Development Edward D. Gomes, Jr., BS, Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences for Information Science and Technology Lee W. Willard, PhD, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Planning

TRINITY COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Robert J. Thompson, Jr., PhD, Dean of Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Gerald L. Wilson, BD, PhD, Senior Associate Dean for Administration; Social Sciences and Director of the Office of Pre-Law Advising Martina J. Bryant, EdD, Associate Dean for Social Sciences and Director of the Office of Pre-Business Advising Paula E. Gilbert, PhD, Director and Associate Dean for Continuing Studies and Summer Session Norman C. Keul, PhD, Associate Dean for Humanities and Interdisciplinary Programs Caroline L. Lattimore, PhD, Associate Dean for Social Sciences Mary Nijhout, PhD, Associate Dean for Natural Sciences, Director of the Undergraduate Research Support Office, Pre-Graduate Study Advising Margaret Riley, PhD, Director of Study Abroad and Associate Dean for Study Abroad Daniel Scherier, PhD, Associate Dean for Natural Sciences and Director of the Office of Health Professions Advising Michele Rasmussen, PhD, Associate Dean for Natural Sciences and Director of the Academic Advising Center Sabrina L. Thomas, PhD, Associate Dean for Social Sciences and Director of the Office of Pre-Business Advising Ingeborg Walther, PhD, Associate Dean for Humanities and Director of the Office of Curriculum and Course Development Milton A. Blackmon, EdD, Assistant Dean for the Undeclared and Humanities Donna Kostyu, PhD, Assistant Dean for the Undeclared and Natural Sciences Diane L. McKay, PhD, Assistant Dean for the Undeclared and Humanities Lynn K. White, MD, Assistant Dean for the Undeclared and Mathematical Sciences Aaron J. Todd, MS, Assistant Dean, Academic Advising Center

10 University Administration

THE EDMUND T. PRATT JR. SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Thomas Katsouleas, PhD, Dean Tod Laursen, PhD, Senior Associate Dean for Education Linda Franzoni, PhD, Associate Dean for Student Programs Constance E. Simmons, MBA, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs

STUDENT AFFAIRS
Larry Moneta, EdD, Vice President for Student Affairs Zoila Airall, PhD, Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs for Campus Life Sheila Curran, PGCE, Fannie Mitchell Executive Director, Career Center Kathy R. Hollingsworth, PhD, Executive Director, Counseling and Psychological Services Edward Hull, MEd, Dean of Residence Life and Executive Director of Housing Services Caroline Nisbet, MA, Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs for Resource Administration William Purdy, MD, Executive Director, Student Health Center Suzanne Wasiolek, MHA, JD, LLM, Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs and Dean of Students

ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID
Christoph O. Guttentag, MA, Dean of Undergraduate Admissions James A. Belvin, Jr., AB, Director, Office of Undergraduate Financial Aid

University Administration 11

General Information .

Three young women. When West Campus opened in 1930. In December 1924. East Campus houses all first-year undergraduate students. a teacher-training institution. Gothic in style and dominated by the soaring tower of the Chapel. West Campus. the Giles sisters. Duke has a long history of educating women. The college moved to the growing city of Durham in 1892 when Washington Duke provided financial assistance and another local businessman. the original Durham campus became the Women’s College of Duke University while Trinity continued as the name of the men’s undergraduate college. opened in 1930. The Dukes—a Durham family that built a worldwide financial empire in the manufacture of tobacco and the production of electricity in the Carolinas— had long been interested in Trinity College. Engineering Duke University 13 . Beginning as early as 1851. Washington Duke’s gift to the school’s endowment in 1896 was based on the condition that the college would treat women "on an equal footing" by establishing an on-campus residence for them. Duke’s indenture creating the family philanthropic foundation. about equal numbers of undergraduate women and men attend Trinity College and the Pratt School of Engineering combined. engineering courses were taught intermittently in the nineteenth century. Carr. Washington Duke. After a brief period as Normal College (1851-59). the predecessor of Duke University. when local Methodist and Quaker communities joined forces to support a permanent school that they named Union Institute. the trustees graciously accepted the provisions of James B. for the expansion of Trinity College into Duke University. became a liberal arts college. Duke. and affiliated with the Methodist Church. which provided. likewise. has a long history in engineering. Trinity underwent both academic and physical expansion. the Duke Endowment. Now. the school changed its name to Trinity in 1859.Duke University Duke University was created in 1924 by James Buchanan Duke as a memorial to his father. The original Durham campus became known as East Campus when it was rebuilt in stately Georgian architecture. in part. Today. received Trinity College degrees in 1878. As a result of the Duke gift. Julian S. East Campus then served as the home of the Woman’s College of Duke University until 1972. Trinity traced its roots to 1838 in nearby Randolph County. when the men’s and women’s colleges merged into the Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. donated land.

000 undergraduates from a multiplicity of backgrounds. increase our wisdom. The university frequently wins attention for its research achievements and academic innovations. the mission of Duke University is to provide a superior liberal education to undergraduate students. and a School of Engineering in 1966 with the addition of graduate courses. transforming in 1984 to a graduate school. Modern times have seen Duke realize its founders’ aspirations. The following year. becoming a major center of learning far removed from its origins in a log schoolhouse in rural Randolph County. For more information. Duke continues to work hard to honor James B. and its faculty often is called upon to provide leaders for academic and professional organizations. through sophisticated medical research and thoughtful patient care. Its reach is now global. the business school. ability and vision" to serve as its officers. their opportunities. Its motto.D. was reorganized in 1930. adding "and Earth Sciences" to its name in 2000. The School of Law. to provide wide ranging 14 General Information . Many Duke schools and departments are consistently ranked among the nation’s very best. and by pursuing those areas of teaching and scholarship that would "most help to develop our resources.became a permanent department in 1910.edu/web/Archives/. was established in 1969 and renamed the Fuqua School of Business in 1980. became the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in 1974 and was renamed the Nicholas School of the Environment in 1995. and the first M. Duke University has encouraged generations of students to understand and appreciate the world they live in. determination and application".duke. the first Ph. including approximately 6.] degree was awarded in 1927. an undergraduate College of Engineering in 1939.D. Duke's founding indenture of Duke University directed the members of the University to "provide real leadership in the educational world" by choosing individuals of "outstanding character. to prepare future members of the learned professions for lives of skilled and ethical service by providing excellent graduate and professional education. and their responsibilities. reflects the university’s fundamental belief in the union of knowledge and faith. to help those who suffer. visit http://www. Eruditio and Religio. to cure disease and promote health. its love of freedom and truth. attending not only to their intellectual growth but also to their development as adults committed to high ethical standards and full participation as leaders in their communities. in 1929. to promote an intellectual environment built on a commitment to free and open inquiry.D. The school was renamed the Edmund T. Duke embraces a diverse community of learners. The School of Forestry. The Mission of Duke University James B. which was founded in 1938. and promote human happiness. Pratt Jr. Duke’s charge to attain "a place of real leadership in the educational world. the undergraduate School of Nursing was born." To these ends. in 1932. to advance the frontiers of knowledge and contribute boldly to the international community of scholarship. The last professional school to become part of Duke University. and the defense of scholarship." Today. the advancement of learning. School of Engineering in 1999. and its valuation of service to others. by carefully selecting students of "character. The first Divinity [B. founded in 1904. and several have achieved international prominence. Academic expansion of the university throughout its history has included the establishment of other new graduate and professional schools as well. trustees and faculty.

and a commitment to learning. freedom and truth. Interdisciplinary teaching and learning are increasingly emphasized at Duke University in order to confront the complex intellectual and cultural challenges of our modern. Recognizing that a diverse faculty enriches the curriculum and the overall undergraduate experience. and the Duke Univeristy Medical Center. All Duke libraries. In addition. Duke has made major efforts to expand the breadth and quality of the faculty across the spectrum of disciplines. The Duke libraries Web site http://library. Faculty research of international acclaim informs undergraduate coursework. the Rare Book. chat reference. elevate the spirit. Resources of the University The Faculty. Chat reference assistance and IM are available twenty-four hours a day. the Law School. active professionals and life-long learners using the power of information technologies. a sense of the obligations and rewards of citizenship. and IM. the nation and the world. global society. for traditional students. Today. and Special Collections Library. The overall university faculty now contains more than 2. and classrooms commonly serve as incubators for new ideas. including those at the Divinity School. In recent years. supplemented by instructors whose expertise in the field has qualified them for teaching. Duke seeks to build its faculty with attention to what the whole person brings to the classroom. Indeed.educational opportunities. are open to undergraduates. most significantly through its building of a strong faculty with expectations for personal attention to teaching along with dedication to research. and on West Campus at the Perkins and Bostock libraries. Library services directed especially to undergraduates are available at the Lilly and Music libraries on East Campus. ask us” is the motto of the Duke librarians who work with students at information desks in the libraries and via telephone. Manuscript. and to promote a deep appreciation for the range of human difference and potential.edu is a gateway to books. recognizes and fosters cross-fertilization between research interests and pedagogy. and stimulate the best effort of all who are associated with the University. to contribute in diverse ways to the local community.000 full-time members. Undergraduates interact with senior faculty on a regular basis. and databases as well as a source of information on topics such as selecting resources and citing them in a paper. librarians will meet by appointment Resources of the University 15 . A number of faculty in the professional schools teach and mentor undergraduates. and the Biological and Environmental Sciences Library.duke. Duke University seeks to engage the mind. Duke University originated as an undergraduate college in the nineteenth century. on and beyond our campuses. seven days a week and are accessible from the library Web site. “Save time. e-mail. Duke commits itself to facilitating a sound education for its undergraduate students. the sustaining of an historic devotion to undergraduate teaching is a major priority for Duke University. the Bass Professorship. and to attain and maintain a place of real leadership in all that we do. journals. including freshmen students in the Focus program and a series of first-year seminars designed just for them. the Fuqua School of Business. one of our most highly innovative faculty awards. Its awarding of graduate and professional degrees and its preeminence in many fields of research came significantly later. By pursuing these objectives with vision and integrity. the state. not only in the classroom but also through independent studies. The Library System.

The print collections are complemented by electronic resources: tens of thousands of e-journals. Librarians work with individual students and make class presentations 16 General Information . political science. and Web browsers. undergraduates can borrow books from any of these libraries. the William R. The information commons on the first floor of Perkins and the first floor and lower level of Bostock are outfitted with computers loaded with an array of software. Perkins and Bostock also offer a variety of study spaces.with students for individual research consultations in which they help identify useful sources for a research project. and hundreds of DVDs and VHS recordings that students can check out. The glass-walled von der Heyden Pavilion. There are extensive collections from and about East and South Asia. including African American studies. Perkins lower floor 1 houses a teaching and learning commons where there are interactive classrooms and smaller workshop/studio spaces designed to accomodate six to eight students collaborating in work groups. art history. networking. classics. journals and music-related media. is available to students only. also on East Campus. and Europe as well the United States and one of this country’s largest collections of Canadiana. religion.D..000 feature films and documentaries as well as experimental and animated productions. engineering. The collections support the social sciences and humanities. There are secluded carrels and informal seating as well as large reading rooms. Africa. The Devil DVDs program is co-sponsored by Lilly and Duke Student Government. is a popular destination for study and conversation as well as a cup of coffee. media players. anthropology. a collection of current. and computer and decision sciences. mathematics. have a rapidly expanding collection of music scores. and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Undergraduates also have access to Lilly’s more than 15. Subject specialist librarians are available for research consultations on a particular topic. books. The Music Library and Music Media Center. discuss searching databases effectively. and women’s studies. plus chemistry. literature. physics. and Special Collections Library (RBMSCL) to use unique and rare materials that range from ancient papyri to the records of twentieth-century advertising. including more than 10. Selected computers have scanning. Perkins Library and the adjoining Bostock Library and von der Heyden Pavilion form the university’s main research library complex. popular DVDs. many with spectacular views of the campus. The Lilly Library on East Campus houses the collections for the visual arts. Latin America. Undergraduates are encouraged to become familiar with all the Duke libraries because each collection has its own character. the library’s café. thousands of LPs (many jazz). history.000 CDs. and Web development capabilities. home of the Perk. sociology. Every campus library features wireless and high speed Internet access as well as access to the online catalogs of materials held by all Duke libraries and the libraries of North Carolina State University. and theater studies. or just offer advice for getting started in the library. The collections support research in a wide variety of disciplines and programs. Manuscript. economics. Using a Duke I. On West Campus. Devil DVDs. North Carolina Central University. databases. East Campus librarians also take their laptops and go into the residence halls to help students with research as part of the “Librarian in the House” program. and statistical tools. and reflect Duke’s emphasis on interdisciplinarity and the university’s international focus. philosophy. Duke undergraduates have the opportunity at the Rare Book. statistics. including Microsoft Office. In addition. and has services geared especially to first-year students.

School of Nursing. The Frank Engel Memorial Collection consists of a small group of books on consumer health and nonmedical subjects for general reading.edu/science/. North Carolina. Over 298. Traditional library services include reference. Internet assistance. Mudd Building. The Duke libraries host film screenings. also located on West Campus. The award is administered by the university’s Undergraduate Research Support Office and is presented annually. book discussions and other events that are open to students. including the Trent Collection in the History of Medicine. located in the Seeley G. staff. and libraries. molecular and cell biology. stories and essays. the Friends of the Duke University Libraries sponsor contests and awards for students. supports botany. Detailed information on services and resources may be found in the information guides available at the library. Services are available to Medical Center faculty. and students from the School of Medicine. including the records of student organizations. The School of Law Library. The Medical Center Library. and clinical activities in the medical field. Its holdings are in marine sciences and policy-related aspects of the marine environment. The Medical Center Library. For more information about the science libraries. also part of the RBMSCL. beverages. The Biological and Environmental Sciences Library. The Medical Library Education Center (MLEC). environmental sciences.725 volumes are available. forestry. museums. lectures. One of the most popular is Professor Reynolds Price’s Halloween reading of poems. houses an electronic classroom for hands-on computer training. To encourage undergraduate use of its holdings. this library annually offers the Middlesworth Award for the best undergraduate paper written using materials from the library’s collections. The Friends’ most popular student event may be the study break it hosts at the Perkins and Lilly libraries at the end of every semester during exams. see: http://www. and administers the records of the university. Public workstations for searching databases and the online catalog are available in the reference area and other areas of the library. together with several newspapers and popular magazines. The Friends also sponsor a $750 award that supports undergraduate summer research in archives. Digital versions of selected materials from the RBMSCL are available at the library’s Web site: http://library. It is a major research collection Resources of the University 17 . as well as graduate departments in the basic medical sciences. research.duke. preserves. author visits.lib.duke. The Lionel Stevenson Essay Contest and the Jeremy North Student Book Collectors Contest are offered in alternating years. provides the services and collections necessary to further educational. ecology. Each carries a first prize of a $500 gift certificate redeemable at the Gothic Bookshop. circulation. and meteorology. The Duke University Archives. with over 620. The School of Law Library. located on the lower level of the library. In addition.000 volumes.to help identify materials related to research projects.304 electronic journal titles are available. Approximately 175 current print-only subscriptions and 4. hydrology. Division of Allied Health. at the Duke Marine Laboratory. and encouragement. and Duke Hospital. The Pearse Memorial Library is located in Beaufort. serves both the university and the local legal community. collects. The library has extensive back files of older volumes. zoology. and document delivery services which are supplemented by mediated and self-service online database searching.edu/ specialcollections/. Students are offered homemade baked goods.

including the George C. The Office of Information Technology.html SWAT (Students Workers Assisting with Technology). detailed procedures. with long-standing concentrations in European law and business law materials. regulations. as well as history. OIT helps students establish their network connections and provides them with free help getting started on the Internet. faculty. Christie collection in jurisprudence and the Floyd S. current and retrospective collections of federal and state codes. A large section of the library collection is devoted to treatises on all phases of law. Members of the Duke community are assigned their own e-mail accounts. see http://www. All undergraduate residence halls and Central Campus apartments are wired for direct access to Duke’s campus-wide computer network. the library holds substantial research collections in foreign and international law. and other social and behavioral sciences relevant to legal research. and session laws.oit. During the first weeks of school. with concentration on congressional. OIT's Web site. The Law Library relies increasingly on electronic sources of legal information while continuing to develop and maintain in-house collections of print and other resources to support research and scholarship. legal research.of legal literature that includes reported decisions of federal and state courts. numerous contact points. The Office of Information Technology (OIT) is responsible for computing and communications services and support for the university community.oit. The foreign law collection is extensive in coverage. and. Computing. beginning this year. judicial. all residence halls will be equipped with the latest high-speed wireless. and in the uses of information technology and can assist in all facets of legal research and library use. Special treatise collections are maintained in several subject areas. SWAT. The periodical collection includes current and retrospective access to all major law journals. holdings. The library staff is highly knowledgeable in law. Riddick collection of autographed senatorial material. OIT offers personal Web-based storage (WebFiles) and discount automatic personal-computer backup services through a vendor. SWAT takes place at the beginning of each school year. economics. visits the residence halls and ensures that all students’ personal computers are connected to DukeNet within the first week of classes. offers software downloads. Undergraduate and graduate students whose course of study requires access to legal literature are welcome to use the library and check out circulating materials. All materials are included in the Duke University Libraries online catalog and other tools for finding and accessing electronic resources.duke. and many other resources to help students. government. a team of technically trained student consultants. The international law collection is strong in primary source and treatise material on both private and public international law topics. which they have access to from their own computers or from computers on any Internet-enabled computer via Webmail.edu/comp-print/storage/index. and growing collections in Asian and Latin American law.S. institute proceedings and newsletters. In addition to its U. One of OIT’s first priorities when students arrive on campus is to make sure they get connected to the Duke network. and staff make the most of information technology resources at Duke. bar association publications. and administrative law materials.duke. Researchers in the law library have access to an increasing number of electronic databases for both general and specialized legal research. 18 General Information . www. For more information.edu. The library is a selective depository for United States government publications. Storage and Backup Services.

visit www. Computer Labs. For additional information. and long distance is billed on a per-minute basis. see www. the Fitzpatrick Center for Engineering. Microsoft PowerPoint. Medicine and Applied Sciences. Technology Training. Duke has always taken the position that education encompasses social and personal development as well as spiritual and intellectual growth. visit www. The labs have been designed to meet a wide spectrum of student needs and include a campus-wide array of printers called ePrint. Educational. houses 341. There are more than 20 general purpose computer labs across Duke. office. In addition to the teaching and research laboratories in the departments of natural and social sciences and in the Pratt School of Engineering. Other rate-based services include paging and cellular service. social. It also houses the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. and shared instrumentation facilities. Duke Cable Television. and outdoor adventure programming is planned and presented throughout the year for living groups through the cooperative work of Student Affairs. There are a number of faculty members who live in residence halls. While the university was established to provide a formal educational opportunity for students. which opened in 1994.Help Desk.oit. cultural. Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. skillbuilding techniques.edu/helpdesk.duke. adjacent to the campus. Microsoft Word. and the Brain Imaging and Analysis Center in the Medical Center. OIT oversees a number of Internet kiosks and public ePrint stations. the Pratt School of Engineering.oit. North Carolina.edu/help/training/. The goals of these various programs are Duke as a Residential University 19 . the Duke Forest. The workshops are typically one-hour sessions filled with useful. Duke offers optional telephone service in on-campus residences. For more information. Hands-on training workshops are available to both graduate and undergraduate students on a number of popular software applications such as Macromedia Dreamweaver. and computer security. and resident students. In addition to the general-purpose computer labs. For additional information or to register for a workshop. Telephones. The Levine Science Research Center. Duke as a Residential University Duke enjoys a long tradition as a residential university and has sought to provide for undergraduates attractive on-campus housing in both residence halls and apartments. see www. Duke seeks to provide a supportive environment substantially anchored in its residential program. Cable Television.oit. provides TV both free and pay-service packages. Seminar rooms are also located in several houses. and services.oit.duke.duke. and the French Family Science Center. and ePrinter.edu/phones-pagers/student/. InDesign. there are other facilities in which some advanced undergraduates work on individual projects. Help Desk staff are available to assist students with Duke supported software.edu/comp-print. hardware. the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory.oit.duke. and classroom space for interdisciplinary science research. DTV. There is a monthly fee for the local service.edu/phones-pagers/student/. the Duke University Lemur Center in Duke Forest. recreational. Undergraduates have the opportunity to pursue research in an array of science facilities across the campus.duke. including the Medical Center. Kiosks. state-of-the-art teaching laboratories. Microsoft Excel. Science Laboratories. These include the Duke University Marine Laboratory in Beaufort. The Help Desk web site is at: www. For more information.000 gross square feet consisting of laboratories.

and to develop a greater sense of community within the individual residence halls as well as within the greater university. Cross cultural fluency is integral. and some forty percent of Trinity students study abroad in semester. and to the countries of the rest of the world. the men and women who earn degrees are likely to become leaders in industry. Duke offers its undergraduates the opportunity to study with many internationally recognized experts in their disciplines and with faculty members who are jointly committed to undergraduate instruction and to the advancement of knowledge. and service learning complement more formal coursework. Within Arts and Sciences. The kind of people they become will matter not only to them and their families. thus. The undergraduate educational experience is rated one of the finest in the country. They will have influence on and will be influenced by the social fabric of which they are a part.to enhance the quality of intellectual and social life for the residents on campus. year. approximately 620 Arts and Sciences faculty from 32 departments and programs teach in the undergraduate program. The university recognizes that students learn not only through formal lectures. Situating the liberal arts college at the heart of a major research university provides Trinity students with opportunities to connect to the full array of faculty scholarship. Trinity College is the undergraduate liberal arts college within the School of Arts and Sciences. Distinctive characteristics are interdisciplinary programs that build bridges among fields. both within and outside the classroom. and the professions. and an innovative undergraduate curriculum which affirms the values and skills of the liberal arts: critical thinking. Amidst changing external conditions. to the United States. and opportunities for student research. emphasis on internationalization. is educating citizens of the United States and of the world. if it is doing its job properly. but also through the interplay of ideas among faculty members and students. general education based on the problems and the promises of a technological society. synthesis. the university must ensure that students acquire the tools and flexibility to prepare them for life-long learning activities. The undergraduate engineering program at Duke University is designed both for students who intend to become professional engineers and for those who desire a modern. internships. The curriculum encourages the pedagogies of engagement. it offers undergraduates opportunities to test their ideas against those of their professors and to engage with those who have committed their lives to academic careers. Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. The Undergraduate College and School In Trinity College of Arts and Sciences and the Pratt School of Engineering. but also to their communities. problem solving. and summer programs. The environment in which students are educated is as important in 20 General Information . Pratt School of Engineering. This innovative undergraduate course of study infuses students with the excitement of discovery and prepares them with the skills and experiences necessary for successful leadership and satisfying lives in the new millennium. not only individuals aspiring to personal fulfillment. instruction is offered by university faculty who engage in research and in graduate and undergraduate teaching. to facilitate student-faculty interaction outside of the formal classroom setting. and writing. At Duke. government. The university.

how to synthesize relevant information and ideas and apply them in a creative. To uphold the Duke Community Standard: • I will not lie. • I will conduct myself honorably in all my endeavors. they are method-oriented.shaping their future as their classroom experiences. Engineering is not a homogeneous discipline. they are goal-oriented. using the techniques of their discipline in their teaching and research to investigate various natural and artificial phenomena. Other engineering faculty members function more typically as scientists. and service and to the principles of honesty. feasible design. it requires many special talents. social. Some faculty members in the Pratt School of Engineering are designers. with its humanitarian. The Duke Community Standard Duke University is a community dedicated to scholarship. The Duke Community Standard 21 . the other is the liberal arts environment of the total university. and to protect and promote a culture of integrity. concerned with teaching students how to solve problems. and scientific emphases. fairness. respect and accountability. leadership. In the Pratt School of Engineering this environment has two major components: one is modern technology derived from the research and design activities of faculty and students in the school. or steal in my academic endeavors. Citizens of this community commit to reflect upon these principles in all academic and non-academic endeavors. cheat. and • I will act if the Standard is compromised.

Degree Programs .

Within the curriculum of each college or school. and each requires thirty-four semester courses to satisfy the requirements for the degree. literatures. General Education requirements consisting of the following: Required Courses: Areas of Knowledge. Since a course may have several intellectual goals and intended learning outcomes. Students must accept personal responsibility for understanding and meeting the requirements of the curriculum. and quarter (. half (.Degrees and Academic Credit Duke University offers in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. PROGRAM I This innovative curriculum is meant to encourage breadth as well as depth and provide structure as well as choice. It supports a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach to knowledge and fosters the development of students’ abilities to read and think critically and in historically and ethically informed ways.0) in each of the following five areas: • Arts. students have the major responsibility for designing and maintaining a course program appropriate to their background and goals. it may potentially and simultaneously satisfy more than one general education requirement. They are assisted by faculty advisors. civilizations. The curriculum has two components: general education and the major. and performance. Literatures. which ordinarily consist of three to four hours of instruction each week of the fall or spring semester or the equivalent total number of hours in a summer term.).5) courses. • Ethical Inquiry (EI): two (2.0) courses. and academic deans. quantitative studies. Students must complete the requirements of the curriculum listed below and explained more fully on the following pages in order to satisfy the requirements for the degree. or certificate program. to communicate lucidly and effectively.0 s.0) courses. Trinity College of Arts and Sciences A variety of approaches to a liberal education is provided by Program I and II. commonly abbreviated as courses. as well as requirements of a major. Credit toward a degree is earned in units called semester courses (1.0) courses. minor. The curriculum provides a liberal arts education that asks students to engage a wide variety of subjects: arts. and to undertake and evaluate independent research. Courses designated as offering exposures to each of the following Inquiries. and Performance (ALP) • Civilizations (CZ) • Natural Sciences (NS) • Quantitative Studies (QS) • Social Sciences (SS) Modes of Inquiry. Double (2. natural sciences. may be met by a course passed under the pass/fail grading system. and social sciences. as indicated below: • Cross-Cultural Inquiry (CCI): two (2. Either program leads to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. No degree requirements (including prerequisites). It reflects Duke’s desire to dedicate its unique resources to preparing its students for the challenging and rapidly changing global environment.25) courses are also recognized. Two courses (totaling 2. Degrees and Academic Credit 23 . departmental directors of undergraduate studies. except the requirement for thirty-four courses credits and continuation requirements. The general education component includes two interrelated features: Areas of Knowledge and Modes of Inquiry. and in the Pratt School of Engineering the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering.c.

including Writing 20 in the first year.0) in the same language.0) courses designated as seminars.. • Writing (W): three (3. four credits of dance/American Dance Festival technique/performance (i... not more than two with a grade of D. Other courses that a student is using as electives may or may not carry general education designations.• Science. Transfer courses and interinstitutional courses may be considered for approval to count toward the Area of Knowledge and Modes of Inquiry requirements. international placement credits. and transfer credits allowed. in the chapter “Academic Procedures and Information.0 semester credit course.. The Minor Minors are available although not required.0) courses. • After the first year: a total of two full (2. not partial credit courses). (The total may include partial credit courses. or a thesis course. The details of the FL requirement are explained more fully below. and one credit from academic internships. independent study. if officially designated as a research independent study course. four half-credit house courses). law. 24 Degree Programs .e. four in military science. international placement credits.0) courses. and pre-matriculation credit for college courses taken elsewhere before entering the first-year class may function only as elective courses.0 to 3.. Technology. Elective Courses Advanced placement credits.e. environment courses numbered 200 or above). • Research (R): two (2. at least one of which must be taken after the first year. including military science physical activity courses). A maximum of one research independent study (coded R) may be submitted toward the requirement of writing-intensive courses (W) in the disciplines. Small Group Learning Experiences • During the first year: one full-course seminar (i. tutorials.0) courses. business. medicine. (See the sections on advanced placement and transfer of work elsewhere. two credits of house courses (i. determined by level of proficiency. a 1. • The number of advanced placement.g. six from a professional school (e. Independent Study courses do not count toward the general education requirements except for the Research designation.) Course Credits There are several separate and specific requirements concerning course credits in Trinity College. and Society (STS): two (2. and pre-matriculation credits for college courses taken elsewhere before matriculation in the first-year class at Duke do not count toward the general education requirements. Thirty-four (34) courses are required for graduation. eight half-credit courses).e. • Foreign Language (FL): one to three courses (1. engineering. and two writing-intensive (W) courses in the disciplines.e. Advanced placement credits.”) The Major The requirements for majors in the department or program in which a student wishes to obtain a bachelor’s degree (see below) are described after the course listings for each department or program. They are described after the course listings for each department or program. two half-credit activity courses. international placement credits. and including: • No more than one credit of physical education activity (i.

literatures. Through courses in arts. Because Duke believes that engagement with each is essential. Students need to be prepared to grapple with issues pertaining to them throughout their lives and careers. This Mode of Inquiry provides an academic engagement with the dynamics and interactions of culture(s) in a comparative or analytic perspective.General Education Component Areas of Knowledge. In fulfilling this requirement. These themes are (1) cross-cultural. and statistics. civilizations. the curriculum adopts the following division of courses: into the five areas of knowledge of arts. and performance. Duke has chosen to divide the humanities and natural sciences further to assure that undergraduates engage the full range of substantive concerns and approaches there. the ways in which knowledge has been organized reflect both differences in subject matter and methods of discovery. In the second half of the last century. It involves a scholarly. Science. they need to develop and apply skills in ethical reasoning and to gain an understanding of a variety of ways in which. the pace of such change accelerated dramatically. Thus. and the relations between difference/diversity and power and privilege within and across societies. economic. as in the Copernican or Darwinian revolutions. This includes but is not limited to the interplay between and among material circumstances. and social sciences. marked by increasing differentiation and an array of academic disciplines. Thus. They have fundamentally changed the world. and in its practical everyday experience. courses about civilizations ask students to attend to the analysis and evaluation of ideas and events that shape civilizations past and present. The first three of the six required Modes of Inquiry address important cross-cutting intellectual themes that represent enduring focal points of inquiry and involve application of knowledge to which many disciplines speak. Through courses in natural sciences students learn how to interpret and utilize information in an increasingly technological world. quantitative studies. Disciplines have traditionally been grouped into three divisions: humanities. social and aesthetic representations. while courses in quantitative studies. Cross-Cultural Inquiry (CCI). across time and place. comparative. and natural sciences. aesthetic. between or within national boundaries. It seeks to provide students with the tools to identify culture and cultural difference across time or place. Advances in science and technology have wrought profound changes in the structure of society in the modern era. students are encouraged to undertake comparisons that extend beyond national boundaries and their own national cultures and to explore the impact of increasing globalization. natural sciences. and (3) involving science. social sciences. Students must take two courses providing exposures in each of these three modes. mathematics. If students are to be prepared to analyze and evaluate the scientific and technological issues that will confront them and to understand the world around them. for an informed and educated person in the twenty-first century. This delineation is dynamic. Technology. Modes of Inquiry. literatures. science and technology will play an even greater role in shaping the society of the future. as in the rise of the automobile and television. and Society (STS). and performance. help develop skills of inference and analysis. including computer science. students must satisfactorily complete two courses in each area. Undergraduate education is a formative period for engaging in critical analysis of ethical questions arising in human life. not optional. both its philosophical foundations. Ethical Inquiry (EI). scientific understandings. Trinity College of Arts and Sciences 25 . Through courses in the social sciences students learn about the causes of human behavior and about the origins and functions of the social structures in which we operate. (2) ethical. political economies. and society. technology. social and cultural differences. ethical issues and values frame and shape human conduct and ways of life. both individual and social. Students need to be able to assess critically the consequences of actions. Historically. students learn about the creative products of the human intellect. and integrative study of political. and to sharpen their understanding of the ethical and political implications of public and personal decision-making.

national. students who place into the first semester of the intermediate level will take three full courses. in exceptional circumstances. Such exceptions must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies in the department of that non-cognate language." 2) For students who begin their study of a foreign language at Duke in an elementary language (first or second semester) course. students who place into the second semester of the intermediate level will take two full courses. they need to have a sustained engagement with writing throughout their undergraduate career. To function successfully in the world. They need to understand the interplay between science. students must take at least three writing courses at Duke: a) Writing 20 in their first year and b) two writing-intensive courses (W) in the disciplines. cognate languages. The six required Modes of Inquiry also include Foreign Language. To accomplish this. Thus. in some cases be sufficient for specific non-cognate languages. and intend to complete their requirement in that language: Completion of a 100-level course that carries the FL designation. but also how the needs of society have influenced the direction of science and technology.they need exposure to basic scientific concepts and to the processes by which scientific and technological advances are made and incorporated into society. and Romance and Germanic languages are the cognate languages offered at Duke. To satisfy the foreign language competency requirement students must complete one of the following: (1) For students who enter their language study at Duke at the intermediate level or above. 26 Degree Programs . technology. Students in German will be tested during the first week of classes to verify placement. and a study of foreign language improves students’ native language skills. Through the latter type of courses students become familiar with the various modes and genres of writing used within an academic discipline and learn how the conventions and expectations for writing differ among the disciplines. Russian requires an official written and oral proficiency examination at Duke for foreign language placement. Therefore. Foreign Language (FL). Students who plan to continue studying any other language should consult with the director of undergraduate studies in that language or see the table "College Board Tests" in the chapter "Academic Procedures and Information. Writing. students need to be able to write clearly and effectively. Greek and Latin. course work through the intermediate level may. at least one of which must be taken after their first year. and intend to complete their requirement in that language: The successful completion of three full courses in the same language that carry the FL designation. students can develop cross-cultural competency and become more successful members of their increasingly complex local. However. and international communities. By developing proficiency in a foreign language. and students who place into the 100 level will take one course. Duke has set internationalization as an institutional priority in order to prepare students to live in an increasingly diverse and interdependent world. students may petition their dean for an extension of this deadline. and Research. Foreign language courses below the intermediate level cannot be used to satisfy requirements in Areas of Knowledge or other Modes of Inquiry. Effective writing is central to both learning and communication. Students must be registered in an FL designated course no later than the first semester of their sophomore year. not only how science and technology have influenced the direction and development of society. Foreign language study substantially broadens students’ own experiences and helps them develop their intellect and gain respect for other peoples. Students need an awareness of how language frames and structures understanding and effective communication. Writing (W). In acknowledgement of the differences in the acquisition process of non-cognate vs. and society—that is.

one Research Independent Study (coded R) may be submitted for approval for the Writing in the disciplines (W) designation. and synthesized. 2 Courses offering exposures to Modes of Inquiry that do not count toward Areas of Knowledge. One Research Independent Study (coded R) may count toward the Writing in the Disciplines (W) requirement. they may also be represented by the following matrix: General Education Course Requirements Areas of Knowledge1 (Minimum required) Arts. small group learning experience courses assure students opportuni- General Education Course Requirements 27 . in exceptional circumstances. Engagement in research develops in students an understanding of the process by which new knowledge is created. In addition to the descriptive representation of the general education requirements stated above. organized. As a research university.Research (R). Techology. This is important not only for undergraduates who wish to pursue further study at the graduate level. accessed. It also fosters a capacity for the critical evaluation of knowledge and the methods of discovery. Students must be registered in an FL designated course no later than the first semester of their sophomore year. critical evaluation. Literatures. No student will be required to take more than three courses. however. students may petition their dean for an extension of this deadline. By supplementing the classroom and lecture methods of instruction. 4 Writing 20 must be taken in the first year. and application of knowledge and understanding. and Performance (2) Civilizations (2) Natural Sciences (2) Quantitative Studies (2) Social Sciences (2) Other2 Minimum Exposures Required Cross-Cultural Inquiry Modes of Inquiry Science. and Society Ethical Inquiry Foreign Language Writing Research 2 2 2 1 to 33 34 including Writing 20 2 1 Courses will be designated with regard to their Area(s) of Knowledge. Small Group Learning Experiences. Foreign language courses below the intermediate level cannot be used to satisfy requirements in Areas of Knowledge or other Modes of Inquiry. Courses can be counted toward only one Area. at least one of the two additional courses coded W must be taken after the first year. N. but also for those who seek employment in a rapidly changing and competitive marketplace. Duke seeks to connect undergraduate education to the broad continuum of scholarship reflected in its faculty.B. Such a rich setting provides students with opportunities to become involved in a community of learning and to engage in the process of discovery and move beyond being the passive recipients of knowledge that is transmitted to being an active participant in the discovery. 3 The requirement is based on a required level of proficiency.: Independent Study Courses do not count toward the general education requirement. Students are required to complete two research exposures.

While discussion sections (D) and preceptorials (P) do not satisfy the formal Small Group Learning Experience in the college. A residence period of eight semesters is the typical amount of time a student may take to earn either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree. the semesters completed at the institution previously attended are counted as semesters of residence at Duke. (American Dance Festival courses are included in the total limitation on dance technique/performance courses as noted above in this paragraph. with an enrollment limit set by the individual department. A student will not be permitted residence of more than ten semesters in order to be graduated. and every member of the class is enrolled. For independent study students pursue their own interests in reading. Residence. 28 Degree Programs . (5) no more than one semester-course credit in elective academic internships. it is an additional and optional unit attached to a regular course involving one or more extra meetings per week. A discussion section. (3) no more than two credits in house courses. Instructors in all courses that satisfy the requirements for small group learning experiences. develop skills. A seminar (ordinarily indicated by the suffix S) is an independent course of twelve to fifteen (exceptionally to eighteen) students who. engage in disciplined discussion. must meet with the students at least once every two weeks during the spring/fall semesters and at least once every week during the summer terms. and defend ideas when challenged. (4) no more than six credits for courses taken in professional schools. The requirements for small group learning experiences are listed under Program I. (2) no more than four semester-course credits in dance/American Dance Festival technique/ performance courses. refine judgment. Seminars and tutorials may not be taken on the pass/fail basis. research. but meet with an instructor for guidance and discussion. and (6) no more than four semester-course credits in military science. This period may be extended for one or two semesters by a student's academic dean for legitimate reasons if it seems probable that an extension will enable the student to complete all remaining requirements for graduation. is an integral part of a larger regular course. see the sections on advanced placement and Transfer of Work Taken Elsewhere in the chapter "Academic Procedures and Information" and the Residence section immediately below. The number of meeting hours per term is the same as for regular courses of equivalent credit. including independent study. like physical education courses. unless the course is offered only on that basis. do not satisfy Area of Knowledge requirements. together with an instructor.ties to engage in discussion. Thirty-four semester courses are required for graduation. Instructors are encouraged to present to each student at the end of the term a written evaluation of the student's work. including a maximum of two courses passed with a grade of D. For purposes of establishing the length of residence of a student admitted in transfer. The thirty-four course credits may include (1) no more than one semester-course credit in physical education activity courses. students who transfer to Duke with sophomore standing are required to complete a seminar by the end of their sophomore year at Duke or to submit documentation that they completed a seminar course at the college they attended previously. A tutorial (T) is a group of one to five students and an instructor meeting for discussion which is independent of any other course. A preceptorial (P) is a group of usually no more than twelve students and an instructor in which discussion is the primary component. No additional course credit is given for a preceptorial. and writing.) Certain military science courses listed as carrying credit do not count toward graduation but appear on a student's permanent academic record. Military science courses. Course Credits." To meet the first-year seminar requirement. See the section on independent study in the chapter "Academic Procedures and Information. above. they offer additional opportunities for students to participate in small classes. For limitations on transfer credit and Advanced Placement credit.

The courses for a departmental major may include introductory or basic prerequisite courses and higher level courses in the major department or in the major department and related departments. dance. Minor. theater studies. they must include the student's last eight courses. Two majors is the maximum number of majors that may be recorded on a student’s record. at least eight of which must be at the 100 level or above.For the minimum residence period. The Academic Advising Center and the academic deans will have available from departments a standard set of course criteria for their interdepartmental major. Major. The criteria must include at least fourteen courses. A student who declares and completes requirements for two majors may have both listed on the official record. cultural anthropology. a program major. The total number of courses that a department/program may require at any level in the major and related departments may not exceed seventeen semester courses for the Bachelor of Arts degree and nineteen semester courses for the Bachelor of Science degree. Students are responsible for meeting the requirements of a major as stated in the bulletin for the year in which they matriculated in Trinity College although they have the option of meeting requirements in the major changed subsequent to the students' matriculation. at least ten of which must be at the 100 level or above. The directors of undergraduate studies in the two departments must agree General Education Course Requirements 29 . at least seventeen courses must be satisfactorily completed at Duke. or an interdepartmental major. Italian/Spanish (combined major). political science. and research techniques. At least half the courses for a student's major field must be taken at Duke although individual departments and programs offering majors may require that a greater proportion be taken at Duke. Departmental and program majors require a minimum of ten courses. French studies. art history/ visual arts (combined major). methodology. international comparative studies. physics. chemistry. such as theory. philosophy. English. Students are expected to acquire some mastery of a particular discipline or interdisciplinary area as well as to achieve a breadth of intellectual experience. often interdisciplinary. Italian and European studies. and Certificate Programs The Major. biology. The student will work with an advisor in each department to adopt an existing interdepartmental major or to design a new one. Canadian studies (second major only). earth and ocean sciences. visual arts. with at least ten at the 100 level or above. The requirements appear in the section following each department or program's course descriptions in the chapter "Courses and Academic Programs. All courses must be among those normally accepted for a major in the two departments. statistical science. computer science. Students may also complete work prescribed for a major in approved programs. literature. These departmental and program majors include: African and African American studies. biological anthropology and anatomy. Departmental or Program Major. The courses required for a major are specified by the department or program. Spanish. If only seventeen courses are taken at Duke. Asian and African languages and literature. music. economics. public policy studies. German. At least four of the seven courses required by each department is to be taught within the department. The courses of study must be approved by the directors of undergraduate studies in both departments. The interdepartmental major requires a minimum of fourteen courses. environmental sciences. French/Italian (combined major). Russian. religion." Interdepartmental Major. visual studies. medieval and Renaissance studies. linguistics. A student may pursue an interdepartmental major in two Trinity College departments or programs that offer a major. French/Spanish (combined major). mathematics. sociology. and women's studies. They therefore complete a departmental major. the courses must be split evenly between the departments. classical civilization. psychology. history. See the chapter ''Academic Procedures and Information'' for the majors within each degree and for procedures on declaring a major. art history. classical languages. environmental sciences and policy. These criteria will define a course of study covering core features of each discipline.

” Restrictions on Majors. Certificates. Genome Sciences and Policy. usually interdisciplinary. a major and two certificate programs. Certificate Programs. Art History. PROGRAM II Nature and Purpose. Fuller descriptions of these certificate programs appear in the chapter “Courses and Academic Programs. Program II typically best serves the needs of students who find that their intellectual interests cross departmental boundaries or who perceive areas of learning in clusters other than those of the current departmental units of the university. Students in Trinity College who believe that their intellectual interests and talents would be better served outside the regular curriculum options under Program I are encouraged to consider Program II. At least half the courses taken to satisfy a minor must be taken at Duke although individual departments may require that a greater proportion be taken at Duke. A student must declare one major and may declare a second (although not a third) major. As degree candidates in Program II. Students admitted into Program II follow individualized degree programs to explore a topic. minors. Islamic Studies. a student may declare as a maximum: two majors and either a minor or a certificate program. Early Childhood Education Studies. Jewish Studies. Thus. a minor. including an introductory and a capstone course. individual programs may prohibit such double counting or restrict it to one course. The combined number of majors. Health Policy. including at least three at the level of 100 or above. Further information about specific minors is available under the description of the individual department/academic programs in the chapter "Courses and Academic Programs. Human Development. At least half the courses taken to satisfy a certificate must be taken at Duke although individual programs may require that a greater proportion be taken at Duke. and Visual Studies. Students proposing an interdepartmental major must present a descriptive title for the major and a rationale for how the program of study will help them realize their intellectual goals. Philosophy and Economics. Eligible undergraduates electing to satisfy the requirements of a certificate program may use for that purpose no more than two courses that are also used to satisfy the requirements of any major. (2) Classical Studies. four of which are at the 100-level or above. or theme not available as a course of study within Program I. Modeling Biological Systems. Information Science and Information Studies. or other certificate program. and certificate programs may not exceed three. Program II graduates have gone on to graduate and professional schools around the country and to satisfying positions in many areas of employment. Markets and Management Studies. Global Health. Energy and the Environment. Documentary Studies. Certificate programs are available in: Children in Contemporary Society.'' Students may not major and minor in the same department/program with the exception of three departments. Minors require a minimum of five courses. Policy Journalism and Media Studies. Study of Ethics. Among the many topics for Program II have 30 Degree Programs . Latin American Studies. a major and two minors. Politics. including Rhodes and Fulbright scholarships. The Minor. and have received national recognition for career success. or a major. The courses required for a minor are specified by the department/academic program. Film/Video/ Digital. and Study of Sexualities. They have won important awards. Minors. and a certificate program. and (3) Romance Studies. approach to a subject that is not available within any single academic unit. Neuroscience. All certificate programs consist of at least six courses. students separate themselves from the requirements and options of Program I including the requirement for a major and the options of multiple majors and minors. in which multiple majors are already possible: (1) Art. A certificate program is a course of study that affords a distinctive. Marine Science and Conservation Leadership.to an initial list of courses that the student will take in the two departments and jointly approve any subsequent changes to that course of study. question. minor.

upon meeting certain requirements.duke. If the student's application to the professional school is accepted. Students will select a faculty advisor in one of the departments or programs of Trinity College. and U. The curricular program proposed by a Program II candidate must address the student's specific interests. Further information may be obtained from the Academic Advising Center and from the office of the academic dean responsible for Program II. and with the academic dean for Program II. (3) obtain the approval of the appropriate preprofessional advisor and academic dean in Trinity College. question. and ambitions and evaluate the resources at the university. Admission. Upon endorsement by the Program II Committee.been architectural design. Application to Program II requires students to propose a topic. To qualify the student must (1) successfully complete twenty-six semester courses in Trinity College. Upon successful completion of the work in the first year of the professional school. The program must be approved by the sponsoring department or program and also by the Committee on Program II of the Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences. the program becomes an obligation assumed by the student. they are ineligible for admission after the midpoint of their junior year.S. the student takes a leave of absence from Trinity College in order to transfer to the professional school for the fourth year and begins work on the professional degree. Until formally accepted into Program II. bioethics. in the latter case. Students will be accepted into Program II only after their first semester at Duke. national security. or outside it. students should first attend an information session. Full information is available on the Program II Web site: http://www. Students who withdraw from Program II for any reason assume all requirements of Program I. and residence. planetary and evolutionary biology. the name of the professional school. and physical activity and dance courses.S. the date of graduation from General Education Course Requirements 31 . the epic in music and literature. interests.edu/trinity/ program2. General Requirements: Apart from the requirements arising from the approved plan of work. It must also offer a coherent plan for learning rather than a sampler of interesting courses and should incorporate the depth and breadth of study expected of a liberal education in Trinity College. Graduation with distinction is available for qualified students in Program II. The undergraduate record notes the student's enrollment in the combination program. If interested in Program II. dramatic literacy. COMBINATION PROGRAMS OF TRINITY COLLEGE AND DUKE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS A student interested in attending a Duke professional school (environment or law) may. curricular breadth. that department or program will become the sponsor for the student. the regulations on military science. or theme for the degree program and to plan a special curriculum adapted to their individual interests and talents. the baccalaureate degree is awarded to the student. The student and faculty advisor together assess the student's background. with approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. and (4) be admitted to the professional school. house. although the regulation relating to the last eight courses may be adjusted to suit the student's approved plan of work. a student should register for courses to satisfy the curricular requirements for Program I.aas. See the section on honors on page 62. professional school. (2) fulfill all degree requirements in Trinity College except for eight elective courses. then confer with faculty or directors of undergraduate studies in the departments closest to their interests. a Program II student must satisfy certain general requirements to satisfy the requirements for the degree: thirty-four semester-course credits for graduation. the sponsoring department must offer a Program I major within the B. degree option. to support those ambitions. combine the senior year in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences with the first year in the professional school. Programs may be proposed for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree.

Graduate Schools of Business. General advice may be sought from the advisor for pre-graduate study.e. advisor in the major department are the best resources for advice about graduate school in the arts and sciences. Counseling and additional information are available from the preprofessional advisors in Trinity College: Dean Mary Nijhout (environment) and Dean Gerald Wilson (law). Students planning to enter schools of medicine and dentistry can prepare for admission by completing any of the regular departmental majors in Program I or by completing Program II. master of arts. Economics 51 or 55. or doctor of philosophy degree should discuss their plans as early as possible with faculty in the proposed field of advanced study and refer to the pregraduate advisor’s Web site. they should become involved in research which may involve laboratory work. Information on this and other requirements is available in the bulletins of specific graduate programs and Web sites. published by the Association of American Medical Colleges or Official Guide to Dental 32 Degree Programs . Most engineering graduate schools require that a candidate have the equivalent of a Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree. Students interested in graduate work in engineering should consult the associate dean of the Pratt School of Engineering or the director of graduate studies in one of the engineering departments. Many graduate schools require a reading knowledge of a foreign language. In addition. consult Medical School Admissions Requirements. analytical skills. For a complete listing of these and any additional course requirements set by each school. Virtually all medical schools and most schools of dentistry require the same basic group of college premedical courses—a year of biology. statistics. or computer science. Economics 182. About a fifth of all medical schools require a year of college mathematics and some specify calculus.Trinity College. but it does not include courses taken in the professional school. A research mentor. however. and by taking those courses required by the professional schools of their choice. and the degree awarded. 02 Allen Building. It may also be included in the "Handbook for Majors'' for the major department. and Mathematics 31 as those which develop analytical skills. many schools require a year of English and courses in the humanities or social sciences. Information on the tests can be obtained from the appropriate preprofessional school or pregraduate school advisor in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. Health Professions Advising Center) for general information and guidance. Graduate Schools of Arts and Sciences. Information specific to particular graduate and professional schools can be obtained from the Web site of each school. Prebusiness Advising Office. Students interested in obtaining a master of science. Graduate and professional schools require special tests for students seeking admission.D. Graduate Schools of Engineering. students should gain a good liberal arts background. PREPARATION FOR GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS Students planning to enter a graduate or professional school should consult appropriate Web sites and published information from the relevant advising offices (i. Students have often chosen such courses as Computer Science 1. 011 Allen Building. Prelaw Advising Center. students should seek input from their faculty advisors and pregraduate and preprofessional advisors where appropriate. and an understanding of human nature. Medical and Dental Schools. For further information concerning undergraduate preparation. In preparing for graduate business school. advanced seminars. or independent study. Pregraduate School Advising Office. For specific information regarding courses and curriculum choices. and the Ph. choosing courses that will help them develop communication skills. As undergraduates. a faculty advisor.. students in the natural and social sciences may obtain conditional admission if they have a sufficient background in mathematics. and a year of general physics. see the Prebusiness Handbook for Duke Seniors and Alumni and other resource materials are available in the Prebusiness Advising Office. Students seeking information about graduate schools of business should consult the advisor in Trinity College. a year each of inorganic and organic chemistry.

students should refer to the Duke Prelaw Handbook or the Prelaw Handbook published by the Association of American Law Schools and the Law School Admission Council. or others of the allied health professions should prepare with course work in the natural sciences and behavioral sciences within a liberal arts curriculum. The health professions advisor is available to meet with students interested in allied health professions. health administrators. They may choose virtually any field for their major work. 177A. It may also include biblical language skill. Theological Schools and Religious Work.edu/admissions. 177-178. including non-Western cultures as well as European and American. Public Policy Studies 55D. academic deans. natural sciences. English 117A. the fine arts and music. history. philosophy. Sociology 10D. For a fuller discussion of undergraduate preparation for the study of law. prelaw students have often chosen from among the following: Economics 51D. Students should also confer with the authorities of their respective religious judicatories to determine requirements for a successful application to the school of their choice. 182. This may include a year of language study at the college level. both in the Judeo-Christian and in the Near and Far Eastern traditions. Students contemplating theological study should correspond with appropriate schools.divinity. General Education Course Requirements 33 . appropriate preparation for theological study could include the following subjects: English language and literature. and anthropology. Graduate Programs in the Health Professions.duke. psychology. These and similar resources for schools of optometry and veterinary medicine are located in the Health Professions Advising Office. sociology. Law Schools. or consult the prelaw advisor in the college. Though no specific courses are required. biblical and modern languages. Political Science 91. both the physical and the life sciences.Schools. 207S. Students who plan to prepare for law school and a career in law should seek breadth in their undergraduate course program with specialization in one or more areas. religion. particularly its history and its methods. Philosophy 48. and with the advisor for the health professions. 127. Generally speaking. More detailed information about theological education may be obtained from the director of admissions of Duke University Divinity School by calling (919) 660-3436 or toll-free (888) GO-2-DUKE. Some theological schools require various languages for admission. or at: www. Up-to-date information on allied health professions and programs is best accessed through the Internet. Students interested in careers as physical therapists. History 126D. published by the American Dental Education Association. This kind of course work introduces the student to ways of thinking that will be germane to theological study. Students should discuss their programs of study with their major advisors. Greek and/or Hebrew.

4 This requirement is met by completion of one course from each of four of the following seven areas: digital systems. and Performance (ALP). and computer science will not meet the elective requirement. which follow. 62. Engineering and Applied Sciences 4 s. and Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science. Courses selected must be those which present essential subject matter and substance of the discipline. telephone (410) 347-7700.2 This requirement is met by completing Chemistry 21L. and special programs of study in interdisciplinary fields. Pratt Jr. Civil and Environmental Engineering. Five programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). statistics. Baltimore. 107. and Social Sciences (SS). Digital Computation 1 No more than 1 credit in physical education activity and 1 credit in music activity can be used to meet Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree requirements. House courses may not be used to meet BSE requirements. are offered by the Departments of Biomedical Engineering. 4 A maximum of 2 advanced placement credits may be used to meet Humanities and Social Sciences requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree. 111 Market Place.3 This requirement is met by completion of five courses selected from at least three of the following four areas of knowledge: Arts. 63. materials science. systems analysis. Literatures. and 108. 34 Degree Programs . 3 Every student must take one of the following physics courses here at Duke: Physics 61. 103. preferably including quantitative expression.c. See departmental requirements. 2 A minimum of 9 credits in mathematics. These programs are biomedical engineering. electrical and computer engineering. and PMC Credit. and statistics are required.c. natural science. electrical engineering (through 2010 only). information and computer science. for any specific courses to be included. at least two of the five courses must be selected from a single department and at least one of those courses must be 100-level or above. School of Engineering Duke University offers in the Edmund T.c 5 s. Students are expected to have acquired digital-computer programming capability before their sophomore year. MD 212024012. Courses in mathematics.The Edmund T. The programming capability may be satisfied by passing Engineering 53L. School of Engineering programs of study which lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering. and an elective course in one of the natural science departments which presents fundamental knowledge about nature and its phenomena. This program of courses should reflect a thematic coherence and fulfill an objective appropriate to the engineering profession. IPC. No skill courses can be used to fulfill this requirement.c. a student must complete successfully a minimum of thirty-four semester courses. For graduation with a Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree. and thermal science and transfer processes. and mechanical engineering. Physics 61L and 62L. Electrical and Computer Engineering.At least one course must be classified SS. or 143 depending on AP. 32. electrical science. In order to provide depth in the subject matter. Suite 1050. civil engineering. mechanics (solid and fluid). Civilizations (CZ).c 4 s. Foreign Languages (FL). Pratt Jr. A list of disallowed courses is maintained in the dean's office. This requirement is met by completing Writing 20 This requirement is met by completing Mathematics 31. Humanities and Social Sciences 5 s. These thirty-four semester courses must include the following: General Requirements1 Writing Mathematics Natural Science 1 s. These accredited programs.

and • the opportunity to explore intellectual opportunities in Trinity College. • an exposure to the range of career opportunities in engineering. military. Including the 4 credits in engineering and applied sciences listed under general requirements.5 Second Semester Mathematics 32L Physics 61L Writing 20 or Humanities/Social Science Elective Technical Course Total Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Half credit course not required. or naval science are taken in addition to the minimum program. These courses must be included in the sixteen semester courses listed under departmental requirements. The department administering the major field of study will specify this requirement. The general layout for the curriculum is as follows: First Semester Mathematics 31L Chemistry 21L Writing 20 or Humanities/Social Science Elective Engineering 53L Engineering 101 Total 1 Courses 1 1 1 1 . The above assumes no advanced placement credit. A maximum of two semester courses of junior or senior level air science. The Pratt First Year Curriculum The first year of study in the Pratt School of Engineering is largely common to all engineers. Engineering 10 (Introduction to Engineering). The Edmund T. School of Engineering 35 . In general. with seven of the eight first year courses being completely transferable between the five accredited engineering majors. Total Minimum Requirement1 1 34 s. • instruction in modern engineering problem solving skills. a total of 13. it will consist of both required courses and electives to be planned in consultation with the departmental advisor. Students predisposed toward a particular Pratt major use the eighth course to begin fulfilling degree requirements for that major as indicated below. on which the science and practice of engineering are based.5 4–4. while undecided students are encouraged to use this eighth course to aid in their subsequent selection of a major. but recommended. All other courses completed in air. The first year curriculum offers: • a general education in the fundamentals of mathematics.c. Pratt Jr.0 credits in engineering work are required. a first-year colloquium in which both disciplinary and multi-disciplinary opportunities in engineering are explored. physics and chemistry. or naval science course work may be counted in satisfying the minimum requirements of thirty-four semester courses for a baccalaureate degree in engineering. military science. including the use of digital technology for both computational and laboratory applications. through satisfaction of the University writing requirement and selection of a humanities and social sciences elective. or initiation of a Trinity or Pratt double major/minor).c. is also recommended to first year students to aid in this process of intellectual discovery. See the individual departmental requirements.Departmental Requirements Departmental Specifications 15 s. In the event that such credit is granted for one or more of the above courses. which follow. substitutions of upper level technical requirements can be made or other curricular interest may be pursued (including freshman Focus programs.

The first year technical course should be selected according to the student’s intended major: Intended Major Biomedical Engineering Civil Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering Mechanical Engineering Undecided 1 Suggested Technical Course Chemistry 22L Engineering 25L Electrical and Computer Engineering 271 Engineering 201 Select from all above Engineering 20 is required for Mechanical Engineering majors. After the first year. recommended curricula become more department specific. 36 Degree Programs . and are outlined on the following pages for the sophomore through senior years.

Options for dual majors in Electrical and Computer Engineering. This is done by rearranging courses.edu. 260L. Pratt Jr. Cellular and Tissue Engineering (MC). (2) Imaging and Measurement Systems (IM). 264L. 202L.duke. (3) Molecular. only one of several possible sequences. EL) or a General (GE) designation. To encourage depth in a specific area of Biomedical Engineering. Biology 25L. and (4) Electrobiology (EL). School of Engineering 37 . either structural engineering and mechanics (S/M) or environmental engineering The Edmund T. 207. and Mechanical Engineering as well as elective concentrations are available on the department Web site: www.bme. Students intending to study abroad should plan to travel in the Fall semester of their Junior year. Civil and Environmental Engineering Departmental Requirements The program in civil and environmental engineering calls for concentration in one of two areas. 262L. Select from the following: Biomedical Engineering 227L. Students must take one required class in each of their two selected Areas followed by two electives in one of the selected Areas. Sophomore Year First Semester Physics 62L Biology 25L Engineering 75 or Biomedical Engineering 110 Mathematics 103 Social Science or Humanities Elective Total First Semester Mathematics 108 Electrical and Computer Engineering 54L or Biomedical Engineering 171 Life Science Elective Social Science or Humanities Elective Total First Semester Biomedical Engineering Design2 Biomedical Engineering Area Elective I3 Biomedical Engineering General Elective or Social Science or Humanities Elective Elective Total 1 2 3 Courses 1 1 1 1 1 5 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Second Semester Biomedical Engineering 153L Biomedical Engineering 100L Mechanical Engineering 83 or Biomedical Engineering 83 Mathematics 107 Social Science or Humanities Elective Total Second Semester Biomedical Engineering Area Core Class I1 Biomedical Engineering Area Core Class II1 Statistics 113 Biomedical Engineering 154L Total Second Semester Biomedical Engineering General Elective Biomedical Engineering Area Elective II3 Biomedical Engineering General Elective or Social Science or Humanities Elective Elective Total Courses 1 1 1 1 1 5 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Junior Year Senior Year Select from the following : Biomedical Engineering 201L. There are four Areas of Biomedical Interest: (1)Biomaterials and Biomechanics (BB). Any BME Class with a GE designation may be used to fulfill the two Biomedical Engineering General Electives. All BME elective courses have one or more of Area of Interest designations (BB. students select two Areas of Biomedical Interest in the Junior year.Biomedical Engineering Departmental Requirements All general requirements and departmental requirements comprising the accredited Biomedical Engineering major are incorporated in the following sequence. 261L. Both Area electives (I and II) must be from the same Area as described in the text above. Pre-med students should consult with their advisor about course planning. and a second life science elective by the end of the junior year. These students will need to take Chemistry 151L and 152L. Students are encouraged to consult with their advisors when selecting Areas of Biomedical Interest and electives. 236L. MC. 233. Civil Engineering. IM.

ME 83L. while the E/W sequence culminates in CE 193L (Integrated Environmental Design).CE 134L].5 4.5 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Second Semester Mathematics 107 Civil Engineering 130L Engineering 123L Elective Engineering 150 Total Second Semester Statistics 113 Elective Civil Engineering 139L Civil Engineering Course1 Elective Total Second Semester Civil Engineering 192 or 1932 Elective Elective Elective Total Courses 1 1 1 1 .5 Courses 1 1 1 1 1 5 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Junior Year Senior Year 2 Students selecting the S/M sequence should take the following CE courses: [Junior Year: Fall Semester . because of the number of electives in the program. The following table is a guide only. at least five semester courses in humanities and social sciences. Allowable natural science courses include but are not limited to Biology 25L. and Physics 55.CE 133L.CE 124L]. Senior Year: Fall Semester . ME 101L. and in addition to specified CE courses. Earth and Ocean Sciences 11. at least one civil engineering elective course at the 100 or 200 level. Typically.5 4. at least one course in the natural sciences. Spring Semester .CE 123L. other alternatives for courses sequencing exist. Electrical and Computer Engineering Departmental Requirements The general Pratt School of Engineering requirements and Electrical and Computer Engineering departmental requirements comprising the accredited electrical and computer 38 Degree Programs . students have chosen the sequence of courses (S/M) or (E/W) that best satisfies their interests. it is possible to follow both sequences. with one of these at the 200 level. however. Students selecting the E/W sequence should take the following CE courses: [Junior Year: Spring Semester . Spring Semester . The S/M sequence culminates in CE 192L (Integrated Structural Design). Senior Year. Earth and Ocean Sciences 12. Either sequence satisfies all of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree in civil engineering. Fall Semester . Sophomore Year First Semester Mathematics 103 Physics 62L Engineering 75L Civil Engineering 24L or Elective Civil Engineering 100 Total First Semester Mathematics 108 Engineering 115 Civil Engineering 122L Civil Engineering Course1 Total First Semester Civil Engineering Course1 Elective Elective Elective Total 1 Courses 1 1 1 1 . The regular program of electives shall include: at least one from ECE 27L. Students planning to attend graduate school are strongly advised to take at least one additional civil engineering elective (making two total). by the end of the sophomore year. ECE 148L.CE 131L.and water resources (E/W).CE 120L. or BME 83L.

School of Engineering 39 . This course must have as a prerequisite at least one course in the discipline. Linear Algebra and Differential 1 Equations SS-H 2 1 Total 5 Spring Semester ECE Elective STA 113 or Math 135 or ECE 255 ECE Concentration Elective 21 SS-H 4 Total Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Junior Year Senior Year Spring Semester ECE Concentration Elective 41 ECE Design Elective/ECE Elective Elective Elective Total Electrical and Computer Engineering concentration electives to be selected from the following areas: signal processing. electromagnetic fields. Electromagnetics MATH 108. and 275 are approved. Electrical and Computer Engineering concentration electives must be selected from at least two areas. Electrical and Computer Engineering Major Sophomore Year Fall Semester Courses PHYSICS 62L. solid-state devices and integrated circuits. Magnetism. Electrical and Computer Engineering 123. and at least two courses must be from the same area Note for electrical and computer engineering majors: the selection of approved electives should take into account a departmental requirement that a student must have accumulated by graduation time 12 electrical and computer engineering courses. digital systems. 164. Pratt Jr. communications and control systems.1 cuits BIOLOGY 25L. and 1 Optics MATH 103. 154. 251.engineering major is all incorporated in the following program. Microelectronic Devices and Cir. Intermediate Calculus 1 ECE 52L. Signals and Systems Courses 1 1 1 1 5 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 ECE 51L. currently. This program is presented as a guide to assist students in planning their four-year program and should not be viewed as an inflexible sequencing of courses. Electricity. Introduction to Digital Systems COMPSCI 100E Elective Total Fall Semester ECE Concentration Elective 11 ECE 53L. 135. including an engineering design elective to be taken in the junior or senior year of the program. photonics. Principles of Biology 1 MATH 107. The Edmund T. 261. Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations SS-H 3 Total Fall Semester ECE Concentration Elective 31 ECE Elective/ECE Design Elective SS-H 5 Elective Total 1 Spring Semester ECE 54L.

with the exception that engineering courses below the 100 level taken during the freshman or sophomore years may substitute for two of these 100-level electives. three of the nine electives must be 100 level or higher. either through the associate dean of the Pratt School of Engineering or through the director of undergraduate studies in the second department. The completion of the requirements for the major in this department must be confirmed no later than the time of registration for the final semester. Restricted to 100-level or higher. If an engineering student completes simultaneously the requirements for a departmental major in arts and sciences and the requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree. These interdisciplinary programs in engineering and applied science. the director of undergraduate studies for the second major must certify that the departmental major requirements have been met. IDEAS. ROTC courses cannot be counted toward the 100-level requirement. the official record will indicate this fact. Declaration of Major. A list of disallowed courses is maintained in the dean’s office. A student is urged to declare a major before registration for the first semester of the sophomore year. or satisfies simultaneously the requirements for two engineering majors. Declaration of major is accomplished by completing a form available in the Office of the Dean of Engineering. Five of these nine electives must be selected to meet the humanities and social sciences requirements of the Pratt School of Engineering. However. leading to the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree. The student must initiate the procedure. but is required to do so by the time of registration for the first semester of the junior year. Courses which are common to both majors shall be counted toward satisfying the requirements of both majors. provide opportunities for students to es- 40 Degree Programs . Also. Double Major.Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Departmental Requirements The general requirements and departmental requirements comprising the accredited mechanical engineering major are all incorporated in the following program. Sophomore Year First Semester Engineering 75L Physics 62L Mathematics 103 Elective1 Total First Semester Mechanical Engineering 125L Mechanical Engineering 101L Mathematics 108 Elective1 or Mechanical Engineering 83L Elective1 Total First Semester Mechanical Engineering 141L Mechanical Engineering 150L Mechanical Engineering Elective3 Elective1 Total 1 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Courses 1 1 1 1 1 5 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Second Semester Engineering 123L Elective1 Mathematics 107 Engineering 119L Total Second Semester Mechanical Engineering 83L or Elective1 Mechanical Engineering 126L Natural Science Elective2 Mechanical Engineering 131 Elective1 Total Second Semester Mechanical Engineering 160L Mechanical Engineering Elective3 Elective1 Elective1 Total Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Courses 1 1 1 1 1 5 Courses 1 1 1 1 4 Junior Year Senior Year 2 3 Part of a program of approved electives planned with the student’s faculty advisor to suit individual interests and abilities.

Certificate Program in Energy and the Environment. or from the Office of the Dean of Engineering. The objective of this multidisciplinary program is to provide students with an understanding of the breadth of the issues that confront our society in its need for clean. and performance of aerospace vehicles and systems. and materials science. Administered jointly by the Pratt School of Engineering and the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences. environmental engineering. The certificate program culminates in a multidisciplinary capstone project course. and reliable energy. teaming engineers with non-engineers to tackle real world energy problems. and energy resources and technology. may propose a unique combination of courses designed to meet particular career objectives. The International Honors Program is a certificate program consisting of six to eight semester courses. affordable. or from the Office of the Pratt School of Engineering. Although not individually accredited. Specific program requirements may be obtained from the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Earth and Ocean Sciences. The objective of this interdisciplinary program is to provide students with an understanding of the relationships between the design elements of buildings and construction processes. Programs with a broad foundation in the engineering sciences also may be developed under this program by those who intend to enter nonengineering professions. Early planning and advising are essential to fulfilling all IHP requirements as part of the baccalaureate degree program. The objective of this multi-disciplinary program is to educate students in the enginering principles related to the conceptualization. Certificate Program in Aerospace Engineering. from the Director of Undergraduate Studies of that department. A proposal must be submitted to the associate dean of the Pratt School of Engineering and the Engineering Faculty Council for approval. Application for admission to this integrated program may be made during the senior year. the DUS in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science. with sufficiently advanced planning. these programs satisfy the national engineering accreditation criteria. International Honors Program. design. in consultation with the advisor or another faculty member. the certificate provides students with an understanding of the three key disciplines in the study of energy and the environment: markets and policy. The proposal must include a letter stating the students reasons for pursuing the suggested program of study. depending on the foreign language level proficiency of the student. fulfill humanities and social sciences or approved elective requirements which are encompassed in the schools accredited engineering programs. Bachelor of Science in Engineering/Master of Science Program. analysis.tablish special majors in interdisciplinary fields such as computer engineering. Specific program requirements may be obtained from the Civil and Environmental Engineering Web site. This certificate program is available only to students enrolled in the Pratt School of Engineering. from the Director of Undergraduate Studies of that department. Any student. Pratt Jr. This certificate program is available only to students enrolled in the Pratt School of Engineering. environmental impacts. All of the IHP course requirements may. Provisional admission to the Graduate School may be granted when the student enrolls for the semester during which the Bachelor of Science in Engineering de- The Edmund T. it may be submitted as early as the second semester of the freshman year and must be submitted before the beginning of the senior year. Specific program requirements may be obtained from the Mechanical Engineering and Material Science Web site. This program provides students with an opportunity to plan a coordinated five-year program of studies in the Pratt School of Engineering leading to both the Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Master of Science degrees. Certificate Program in Architectural Engineering. Specific program requirements and an application may be obtained in the office of the dean of engineering. or from the Office of the Dean of Engineering. the DUS in Civil and Environmental Engineering. School of Engineering 41 .

Residence Requirements. A student who fails to meet this continuation requirement must leave the university for at least two semesters. The term satisfactory progress shall be defined also by the following schedule: 1.c. or better in 18 s. and one law course.c. director of undergraduate studies. a student must have passed 13 s. The courses taken elsewhere must be approved in advance by the students major advisor and academic dean. Both grades will remain on the student’s record. at Duke and earned P. a student must have passed 6 s. This must include the work of the final two semesters. permanent dismissal from the university usually results. Continuation Requirements. Repetition of Courses. To begin enrollment in the fourth year. Following application for readmission. C-. including satisfactory progress toward fulfillment of curricular requirements within ten semesters. 2. return must be approved by the dean and the director of undergraduate studies in the student’s major department. A student who enrolls in more than four courses in a given semester and fails two or more of them will not be permitted to enroll for more than four courses in the following semester without approval of the dean.gree requirements will be completed. or D+ in a required mathematics. in which at least two courses must be passed. a student may be dismissed temporarily or permanently for failing to make satisfactory progress toward graduation.c. with permission of his or her advisor. A complete summer session may be counted as a semester. In the Summer Session: to maintain enrollment at Duke a student may not fail more than one full course during that summer. science. three business courses. In addition. With the consent of the instructor and the faculty advisor. D.c. To begin enrollment in the fifth year. 3120 Fitzpatrick Center (CIEMAS). it requires completion of an engineering internship. at Duke and earned P. Only one credit may be counted toward satisfying continuation requirements and toward fulfilling graduation requirements. 3. C-. a student must have passed 27 s.c.c.c. or better in 25 s. If the student thereafter fails to pass three courses in a semester. A student may take no more than one course on a pass/fail basis each semester. a student must have passed 20 s. or a required engineering course may. C-. four graduate level engineering courses. Master of Engineering Management. Open to students after completion of the accredited bachelor's degree in engineering. except for the first semester of the freshman year. at Duke and earned P. A student must achieve a satisfactory record of academic performance each semester and make satisfactory progress toward graduation to remain enrolled in the university.c. This program offers engineering students exposure to both business and law as well as advanced engineering. incomplete work is con- 42 Degree Programs . with the following exceptions: the student who has completed more than four full semesters of work at Duke may take the last two courses elsewhere. others may take the last course elsewhere. 4. C-. An engineering student who has earned a grade of D-. Specific program requirements and application forms may be obtained from the Master of Engineering Management program office in The Wilkinson Center for Engineering Management. Pass/Fail Grading Option. At least seventeen semester courses must be completed satisfactorily at Duke. A student must pass at least three courses in each semester. To begin enrollment in the second year. and academic dean. or better in 11 s. repeat the course. or better in 4 s. For purposes of continuation. Graduate level courses during this period which are in excess of Bachelor of Science in Engineering requirements may be credited toward fulfillment of the Master of Science degree requirements. at Duke and earned P. an engineering student may choose to be graded on a pass/fail basis in up to four unrestricted electives or social sciences-humanities electives within the thirty-four-course program. To begin enrollment in the third year.

Therefore. Of the thirty-four semester courses which fulfill the specified categories in the Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree requirements. The Edmund T. School of Engineering 43 . Grade Requirement for Graduation. when eligibility to continue from the summer session to the fall is in question. or better. thirty-two or their equivalent in number must be passed with grades of P. incomplete courses must be satisfactorily completed in time for a passing grade to be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar no later than the weekday preceding the first day of fall classes.sidered failure to achieve a satisfactory performance in that course. Pratt Jr. C-.

Academic Procedures and Information .

available from their academic dean. or pre-matriculation credit. Trinity College will record on students’ permanent Duke record courses of these three types completed prior to their matriculation at Duke. Departmental policies regarding advanced placement may vary. Spanish. by the end of the fifth semester of enrollment. and pre-matriculation credit. art history. AP. the two elective as well as up to two acceleration credits may be included in the graduation total for students graduating in seven consecutive semesters. College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP) Examinations. chemistry. Japanese. international placement credit (IPC). Additionally. The three types of pre-college work are regarded as equivalent and may be used for placement into higher-level course work and to satisfy departmental major and minor requirements at Duke to the extent allowed by the individual departments. taken prior to matriculation in college. Scores should be submitted directly Entrance Credit and Placement 45 . The criteria for evaluating such work are the same as in Trinity College (see the section on work taken during high school). is the basis for consideration of placement in advanced courses in art. IPC. Students may not use acceleration credits in order to compensate for time taken away from their studies. Latin. computer science. as well as up to six acceleration credits. AP scores of 4 or 5 in German. history. French literature. Up to six additional credits may be awarded for acceleration toward the degree. economics. an AP score of 5 in French or Spanish language may result in placement in courses at the 100 level. Latin. A score of 4 or 5 on College Board Advanced Placement Program Examinations. Specifically. and prematriculation credits may not be used to satisfy general education requirements—the Areas of Knowledge or the Modes of Inquiry. biology. The Pratt School of Engineering evaluates AP and IPC credit as Trinity College does. a limited amount of elective course credit may be awarded in Trinity College on the basis of pre-college examination and/or credits earned of the following three types: advanced placement (AP). The Department of Mathematics will also consider a score of 3 for placement beyond the introductory course. IPC. Japanese. Trinity College students may be granted up to two elective course credits towards the degree requirement of 34 course credits for any combination of AP. may be included in the graduation total for students graduating in six consecutive semesters. The two elective credits. psychology. German. physics. English. French. Acceleration is defined as completing the requirements for the bachelor’s degree one or two semesters earlier than the original expected graduation date. music. Students wishing to graduate early must complete an early graduation form. studio art. mathematics. and statistics. but awards transfer credit to qualified students for college-level course work completed prior to matriculation with a grade of at least B-. Approval of the director of undergraduate studies or supervisor of first-year instruction in the appropriate department is required before final placement is made.Entrance Credit and Placement Scores on the tests discussed below and documented previous educational experience are the criteria used to determine a student's qualifications for certain advanced courses. environmental science.S. and Spanish literature may result in placement in courses at the 100 level.E degree. These courses may be used to satisfy distribution requirements toward the B. In addition. political science. The record of a student presenting such a score and desiring to continue in the same subject at Duke will be evaluated for placement in an advanced course.

the All India Senior School Certificate Examination. or AP credits may be used toward the 34 required for graduation. may not be used for the Areas of Knowledge or the Modes of Inquiry. see www.to the Office of the University Registrar. First-year Duke students may submit for evaluation college courses taken at another American college or university after commencement of the student’s junior year of high school. may not be used to satisfy the general education requirements—the Areas of Knowledge or the Modes of Inquiry. Pre-Matriculation Credit. (For details concerning transferring this work. German. Course credit is not 46 Academic Procedures and Information . the German Abitur. or Singapore A-Level Examinations. Students may use all of these courses for placement into higher level courses and to satisfy departmental major and minor requirements at Duke to the extent allowed by individual departments.duke. and mathematics. thus.phy. the student must take Physics 143. AP and pre-matriculation credits may be used to accelerate. these courses may be used to satisfy distribution requirements toward the B. pre-matriculation credits awarded for such work may be used as electives and. The expectation is that they will be sent prior to matriculation or at least by the end of the first year. In the Pratt School of Engineering. Additional IPC. or pre-matriculation credits may be used toward the 34 required for graduation. AP courses completed with a score of 4 or 5 will be recorded on a student's permanent Duke record. International Placement Credit (IPC).php. Similarly. thus. the Areas of Knowledge or the Modes of Inquiry.edu/undergraduate/elsewhere. students with a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Physics-C Electricity and Magnetism exam will receive credit for Physics 62. AP. these credits do not satisfy the general education requirements and.S.e. Spanish (101 and beyond). In the Pratt School of Engineering. In Trinity College. Hong Kong. the student must take Physics 63.E degree. Exceptional Trinity College students presenting a score of 5 on the AP Physics-B exam may be placed out of Physics 53 with consultation of the Physics director of undergraduate studies. IPC. Entering students with a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Physics-C Mechanics exam will receive credit for Physics 61. i. If awarded AP credit for Physics 61 and 62.) No pre-matriculation credit will be awarded for college course work completed on a study abroad program undertaken prior to matriculation at Duke. For more details about AP course credits and international AP course credits in physics. the French Baccalaureate. Scores acceptable for consideration are determined by the faculty and evaluated by the university registrar. College Board Tests. This option is not available to students in the Pratt School of Engineering. In Trinity College. these courses may be used to satisfy distribution requirements toward the B.S. degree. See the following information concerning policies in the Department of Physics: Advanced Placement in Physics. AP courses count toward the general requirements and the student is required to take one physics course here at Duke. see the section on "Work Taken During High School" on page 48. Duke University recognizes the International Baccalaureate Program. In the Pratt School of Engineering. the Swiss Federal Maturity Certificate. the British. any combination of two IPC. Course equivalents for these programs may be recorded on a student's permanent Duke record for placement and credit according to the same policy governing use of AP and pre-matriculation credits (see above). Enrollment in a course for which AP credit has been given will cause the AP credit to be forfeited. AP and pre-matriculation credits may be used to accelerate. AP courses do not count toward the general education requirements. Latin. Additional IPC. although no credit will be granted for these courses. if awarded IB or A-level credits for Physics 61 and 62. This policy applies to students entering either the Pratt School of Engineering or Trinity College. Any combination of two pre-matriculation. and the Indian School Certificate examination. Scores on College Board Tests are the basic criteria for placement in French. Neither credit nor advanced placement is given for a score below 5 on the Advanced Placement (AP) Physics-B exam.E..

edu/web/classics/ ugrads/ latin-greek.html. Spanish. Newly admitted students who wish to continue the study of French. an exception may be granted with permission of the director of undergraduate studies in the appropriate department. In the absence of an achievement test score. but could for 76).given for courses bypassed. 25L.duke. Students should also check the Self-Placement Guidelines at: http://www. 31L. or Latin begun in secondary school must take a College Board Achievement Test or College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in that language by June of the senior year in secondary school. Students who plan to take mathematics at Duke are expected to present College Board Scholastic Achievement Tests (SAT). in French. or Advanced Entrance Credit and Placement 47 . 680-800—Math. The first semester of a language may not be taken for credit by a student who has completed more than two years of that language in secondary school..5 Latin1. In Spanish or French. 2 College Board Achievement Score 240-410 420-480 490-580 590-630 640-plus 200-410 420-480 490-580 590-620 630-650 660-plus below 200 200-370 380-450 460-580 590-650 660-plus 200-520 530-630 640-690 700-plus 500-670 680-800 Placement French 13 or 14 French 2 French 15 or 63 French 76 French 100-level course German 1 or 14 German 2 German 65 German 66 German 117 German 118 and beyond Spanish 13 or 14 Spanish 13 Spanish 2 Spanish 15 or 63 Spanish 76 Spanish 100-level course Latin 1 Latin 63 Latin 91 Latin 100-level course Mathematics 25L Mathematics 31L German1. German. or a score of 5 on the AP language exam qualifies students to enroll in a 100-level course.edu.g. a score of 4 or 5 on the AP literature exam. Students should also check the self-placement guidelines at http://www. 4 Spanish1..edu/ undergrad/selfplacement. In rare cases. Incoming students must take the SAT II before enrolling in a Spanish course.html.g. Subject French1. Mathematics Achievement (Level I or Level II).duke. Students should also check the Self-Placement Guidelines for French at: http://languages.duke.german. No credit will be allowed for courses two levels below the achievement score (e. students with a score of 640 in French could not receive credit for 63. The following tables will assist students in making reasonable course selections in the subjects indicated. from 100 to 76 or from 76 to 63.6 Mathematics7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 In these languages students are permitted to drop back one level without loss of credit (e. In no case will credit be given for French 1 or Spanish 1 to students who have completed more than two years of French or Spanish in high school. course placement is determined by the SAT score as follows: 670 or below—Math. from 117 to 66 or from 66 to 65 in German).

plus two for a summer. Transfer of Work Taken Elsewhere Work Taken During High School. Placement in Languages Other Than French. 48 Academic Procedures and Information . and not pre-calculus or English composition courses. the department offers a written examination which is used in conjunction with other criteria for placing students at the appropriate level. medical. or Latin should consult with the appropriate director of undergraduate studies. In the case of Asian and African languages as well. should refer to the placement guidelines on the Web site of the Department of Mathematics. or consult with the supervisor of first-year instruction in mathematics during New Student Orientation. part of the regular curriculum of the college. taken in competition with degree candidates of the college. taken on the college campus. may a student transfer more than ten courses when combining study abroad and the allowable number of domestic transfer courses. When an advanced course is completed. In the case of Russian and Turkish. a student in Trinity College may receive transfer credit for no more than two courses taken in the United States at another accredited four-year institution. No course credit may be earned by reading out. Students may be certified for advanced course work by passing a qualifying examination prepared by the department. (See also the section on entrance credit in this chapter for a discussion on the number of pre-matriculation credits that can transfer and how they may be used at Duke. In cases that involve transferring study abroad credit. Spanish. or Advanced Placement Examinations but who believe that their background in mathematics justifies a higher placement. and Latin. Formal review of courses meeting these criteria will proceed after an official transcript of all college courses taken and documentation pertaining to these criteria are received by the University Registrar. Achievement. or financial reasons. students should consult with the appropriate language coordinators. Reading Out of Introductory Courses. After matriculation as a full-time candidate at Duke. and who do not submit the College Board SAT or Achievement Test or Advanced Placement Program score in mathematics. or while on leave of absence for personal. A student in the Pratt School of Engineering is limited to four of these types of transfer courses. but no course credit is awarded. taught by a regular member of the college faculty. not used to meet high school diploma requirements and not included on the high school transcript at any time.or better. a student in Trinity or Pratt may transfer up to eight credits for a full year. whether in the summer. Spanish. however. Students who wish to continue in any language other than French. Placement testing in mathematics is not offered during New Student Orientation. Students demonstrating academic ability may be granted the option of reading out of an introductory or prerequisite course in order to allow them to advance at their own pace to upper-level work. In no instance. Students should consult with the appropriate directors of undergraduate studies who must approve the proposed program of reading.Placement Program (AP. an entry is made on the permanent record that the qualifying examination was passed.) Work Taken After Matriculation at Duke. All students who plan to take mathematics during their first semester at Duke. not taken on a study abroad program completed prior to matriculation at Duke. German. New students who have been placed in Mathematics 25L or 31L on the basis of College Board SAT. College-level courses taken elsewhere prior to matriculation at Duke may be considered for pre-matriculation credit provided they meet each of the following criteria: were taken after the commencement of the junior year of high school and yielded a grade of B. Reading for a course and auditing are mutually exclusive procedures. should also confer during New Student Orientation with the supervisor of first-year instruction or with the director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Mathematics. while withdrawn from the College. either level AB or level BC) scores. German.

They may count toward a major. (The same is true of courses taken abroad. Further information is available from the university registrar.International students who take courses in their home country for transfer will be subject to the same policies and limitations governing domestic credit. respectively. and any problems encountered or anticipated. or certificate if approved by the relevant academic unit. Students wishing to receive Modes of Inquiry codes for transfer course work must apply for those codes using the Transfer Course Modes of Inquiry Request Form available at: www. Students who request placement on the basis of nonDuke courses will be required to show their work (including books. writing samples. students confer Academic Advising 49 . syllabus. Area of Knowledge and Modes of Inquiry codes. Students will not be awarded more than four course credits for one semester’s work at the institution from which they are transferring credit. minor. The semester-course unit of credit awarded at Duke for satisfactorily completed courses cannot be directly equated with semester-hour or quarterhour credits.edu/trinity/t-reqs/. upon evaluation. plans for achieving them. For purposes of this regulation. and credit for not more than two semester courses is allowed for extension courses. yield transfer credit at Duke may be given Areas of Knowledge and Modes of Inquiry codes. No credit is given for work completed by correspondence. no additional transferred work will be displayed on the record or used as a substitute for a previously transferred course. Foreign language courses taken elsewhere and approved for transfer as credit to Duke may be used for language placement.duke. Only those courses taken in which grades of C. but grades earned are not recorded. At least half of the courses submitted toward fulfillment of a student’s major field must be taken at Duke. but they should confer at least once before every registration period to review goals. Courses taken in the United States that. Credit equivalency is determined by the university registrar. upon evaluation. Transfer Credit for Students Transferring to Duke. Approval forms for Duke students taking courses at institutions other than Duke may be obtained online or from the offices of the academic deans.) They could count toward the major. minor. Students transferring from a degree program in another accredited institution may be granted credit for up to 17 semestercourse credits. but departments may make exceptions to this rule in special circumstances. courses taken at other institutions with P/F grading or the equivalent will not be accepted for transfer credit. exams) to the director of undergraduate studies in the department of that language. Before declaring a major in Trinity College.aas. See the section above for information on the evaluation of courses for transfer and the limitation on transfer courses for the major. Once the limit of transferred credit has been reached. No credit will be accepted for course work taken while a Duke student is withdrawn involuntarily. or certificate program if approved by the relevant academic unit.or better have been earned are acceptable for transfer credit. Transfer Credit and the Foreign Language Requirement. interinstitutional credits (see the section on agreement with neighboring universities) are not considered as work taken at another institution. All courses approved for transfer are listed on the student’s permanent record at Duke. lower or upper level. and/or to pass an in-house proficiency exam appropriate to the level. The same rules that apply to the transferring of courses to meet other curriculum requirements apply to foreign language courses. Courses for which there is no equivalent at Duke may be given an 888 or a 999 number. Courses accepted for transfer in this circumstance may be given. Academic Advising Students and their advisors confer when necessary. Students wishing to transfer credit for study at another accredited college while on leave or during the summer must present a catalog of that college to the appropriate dean and director of undergraduate studies and obtain their approval prior to taking the courses.

Undergraduate students are issued an identification card (DukeCard) which they should carry at all times.with the premajor advisor and the academic dean for premajor students. Course Changes after Classes Begin in the Fall and Spring Terms. www. also. the statement regarding the reciprocal agreement with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. and the University of North Carolina at Greeensboro. the schedule must be approved by the advisor. and parking fines) by the date specified for registration for the following term will not be permitted to register for the following term until such fees and fines have been paid in full. In the case of students enrolled in Continuing Education. A student enrolled at Duke may not enroll concurrently in any other school or college. and at its Web site. Students are expected to present their card on request to any university official or employee. and fraudulent use may result in loss of student privileges or suspension. a 50 Academic Procedures and Information . the student is assigned a faculty advisor. and services available to currently enrolled students. Students who fail to register for the fall or spring semester are administratively withdrawn and must apply for readmission if they wish to return. Loss of the card should be reported immediately to the DukeCard Office at (919) 684-5800. The card is a means of identification for library privileges and provides access to many university facilities. After the drop/add period no course may be added. Students planning to register for a course under the interinstitutional agreement must have the course approved by the appropriate director of undergraduate studies and their academic dean. and discuss it at an appointed time with their advisors. During the drop/ add period changes may be made in course schedules through ACES. Prior to registration each student receives special instructions and registration materials via ACES. Concurrent Enrollment. functions. A replacement fee will be charged for lost or stolen cards. Those who register late are subject to a $50 late registration fee. library fines. Much good advising is informal and occurs in conversation with members of the faculty. North Carolina State University at Raleigh.Upon declaring a major. Students prepare a course program via ACES. Registration Students are expected to register at specified times for each successive term. Official enrollment is required for admission to any class. See the chapter ''Special Programs'' for information regarding the reciprocal agreement with neighboring universities.duke.edu. late fees are assessed after the first day of classes.registrar. Students who expect to obtain certification to teach in secondary and elementary schools should consult an advisor in the education program prior to each registration period to ensure that they are meeting requirements for state certification and that they will have places reserved for them in the student teaching program. See. Students have the responsibility to understand and meet the requirements for the curriculum under which they are studying and should seek advice as appropriate. Duke Identification Card and Term Enrollment. during the second week of the drop/add period they may drop courses at their own discretion. Students may drop and add courses during the first week of classes in the fall and spring terms at their own discretion. Further information about registration procedures may be obtained from the Office of the University Registrar. The card is not transferable. the advisor's approval is necessary for registration and all course changes. North Carolina Central University in Durham. the academic dean for that division is also available for consultation. notwithstanding the fact that the student may have paid in full the tuition for the following term. the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Those students who have not paid any fees owed to or fines imposed by the university (such as laboratory fees. however. but a permission number provided by the appropriate instructor or department is required for adding a course. In the Pratt School of Engineering. In the Pratt School of Engineering.

. Course work discontinued without the approval of the dean will result in a grade of F. Course changes during the summer term are accomplished through ACES. During the first three days of the term. Substantially limiting refers to an impairment that prevents an individual from performing a major life activity or significantly restricts the condition. to explore possible coverage. but not limited to. Receiving accommodations or special assistance at another college or university does not necessarily qualify an individual for the same accommodations and/or assistance at Duke University. Students with other medical conditions that may require special assistance (e. and for reasons of course overload..g. Seniors may request an underload. assists students with disabilities who are enrolled in Trinity College and the Pratt School of Engineering. no course may be added. In order to receive consideration for reasonable accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). speaking. including part-time status. accessibility. for the last semester (see the section on Full-Time and Part-Time Degree Status in this chapter).e. or duration under which an average person can perform a major life activity. performing manual tasks. i. manner. they should consult immediately with their academic dean during the schedule correction period that occurs immediately after drop/add ends. the academic dean may give permission prior to the final four weeks of classes. students will be charged $150 per course for dropping a course or courses if this results in any reduction in course load for the term. breathing. Course Load and Eligibility for Courses Students are reminded that it is their responsibility to be certain that their course load conforms with academic requirements. In fall and spring terms. Course Changes for the Summer Terms. (See also the section on withdrawal charges and refunds. seeing. students may drop a course or courses for which they have registered without penalty.course may not be changed to or from the pass/fail or audit basis. housing) must contact the director of the Student Disability Access Office at (919) 668-1267. Students requesting accommodations under the provisions of the ADA (e. Course work discontinued without the dean's permission will result in a grade of F. After the third day of the term. After the drop/add period. students permitted to withdraw receive a notification of W on their academic record. Accommodations 51 . For academic assistance available to all Duke undergraduate students. To withdraw from a course. Prior to the first day of the term. and a notification of W will be recorded on their academic record.) Accommodations The Duke University Student Disability Access Office. academic. walking. students must obtain permission from their academic dean. housing. Courses may be added before or during the first three days of the term.g. students must enroll in at least four course credits. hearing. a student must have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities such as. please refer to the Academic Resource Center section of this bulletin.. caring for oneself. as well as additional services for students with learning disabilities and attention deficit disorder. Duke students who are blocked from continuing into a summer term must see their academic dean. dining) must contact Duke Student Health Service at (919) 684-3367 for further information. The academic dean may also permit students with compelling reasons and in a normal course load to withdraw from a course up to the first day of the final four weeks of classes. students with compelling reasons may withdraw from a course through the twentieth day of a regular term (sixteenth day at the Marine Laboratory). more than four semester courses. When students note errors in their course schedules. With the permission of the academic dean. and learning.

but the credit for only one counts toward the required number of courses for continuation and the thirty-four (34) courses required for graduation. 52 Academic Procedures and Information . provided the instructor. Students in the Pratt School of Engineering may enroll in two laboratory courses. and the dean of the Graduate School give their signed permission. and the academic dean may also limit the course load for a student who has previously received an academic warning. Students wishing to enroll in a 200-level course in their sophomore (second) year must secure permission of the instructor of the course and of their academic dean. lack no more than three semester courses toward the fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree may enroll in graduate courses. Students may direct additional questions about course sequencing to their academic dean. the director of graduate studies. In certain subjects. such as the sciences. Seniors who. Students are responsible for ensuring that they have the stated prerequisites for a course.or above and not transferred to Duke may not be repeated at Duke. students in Trinity College may ordinarily register for up to five and a half course credits. a student may enroll in a physical education activity or technique/performance activity course for one-half course credit. D. both grades count in the grade point average. Course repeat request forms are available in the offices of the academic deans. During the drop/add period. A course previously passed. Under exceptional circumstances. and the foreign languages (particularly at the introductory and intermediate levels). Given this circumstance. Physical education activity courses may be repeated. one of which may be a laboratory course. and up to five and a half or six course credits with the approval of their dean. it follows that students who complete a higher level course in a sequence may not subsequently enroll in a lower one in that sequence. Students may not register for two courses officially listed as meeting at the same time. however. Eligibility for Courses. During the same period.or higher has been earned previously.Students should take note that two additional semester credits are needed in order to meet the thirty-four (34) semester-course requirement for graduation. for a maximum course load of five semester courses. but only one full credit of these courses counts toward graduation. some lower level courses must be taken in sequence because the content presented at one level is necessary for successful work at the next higher level. In addition. or D+ in any course in Trinity College are allowed to repeat the course only at Duke and with permission of their academic dean. however. Students must be enrolled in at least three course credits per semester in order to be considered in full-time status for loan deferment and athletic eligibility purposes. except where noted in the course description. Registration for six course credits requires the approval of their academic dean. In Trinity College no course may be repeated for credit or a grade if a C. The grade earned in the repeated course as well as the grade earned originally appear on the transcript. Information about course eligibility is often contained in the official description of the course (see the chapter "Courses and Academic Programs"). ACES will enforce the prerequisites for some courses when registration for them is attempted. Students who receive a D-. the Duke course will be removed from the academic record. students in the Pratt School of Engineering may register for up to five course credits. permission to do so may be granted. Furthermore. In no case will students be allowed to register for more than six credits. Admission to the Graduate School is necessary. may be audited. at the beginning of the final term. The rules established by the Graduate School provide that juniors may enroll in a 200-level (senior-graduate) course. If it is determined such a course has been taken elsewhere and repeated at Duke. The maximum course program for one term of the summer session is two courses. Students on academic probation may register for no more than four course credits. a course taken at another institution with a grade of C. Juniors and seniors are normally not allowed to enroll in 300-level courses. the former identified as a repeat. mathematics. their academic dean.

Courses may be audited by faculty members. (4) evaluation by the instructor of the work. After the drop/add period in any term. Physical education activity. In a summer term. Such research independent study courses bear a Research (R) code and satisfy general education Research requirements. Academic Internships In Trinity College course credit can be earned for internships only when they include as a component an academic course of instruction. nonlaboratory courses with the above exceptions. a part-time degree student may audit courses by payment for each course audited. but are expected to attend class sessions.duke. Auditors must register on the Friday before classes begin. Both require (1) approval of the instructor involved as well as the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the relevant department or program. One research independent study may be submitted and approved for a Writing (W) code in addition to the R code designation. A student in a summer term carrying less than a full program for credit may secure permission to audit (above exceptions apply) but is required to pay an audit fee for the course. The request form is available on T-Reqs: www. The prohibition against registering for two courses meeting at the same time applies. but no other curriculum code designations are permitted for research independent study courses. and no student taking a course for credit may be reclassified as an auditor. no student classified as an auditor in a particular course may take the course for credit. including the final product. A student may not repeat for credit any course previously audited. and dance technique/ performance courses may not be audited. Such independent study courses do not bear a Research (R) code and do not satisfy any general education requirements. as well as spouses of currently enrolled students. Courses entitled Independent Study are individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic taken under the supervision of a faculty member and resulting in an academic and/or artistic product. alumni. Independent Study Independent study enables a student to pursue for course credit individual interests under the supervision of a faculty member. They do not receive credit for the course. (2) student meetings at least once every two weeks during fall or spring semester and once each week during summer semester. Academic internships must be offered under Course Audit 53 . With the written consent of the instructor. (3) completion of a final product to be completed during the semester for which a student is registered for the course. employees and their spouses. associated with the independent study. without additional fees. Students who wish to request a W code for one research independent study course must take the appropriate form to 011 Allen Building by the end of the semester they are enrolled in the course. and members of the Institute for Learning in Retirement. Independent study is of two types: Independent Study (non-research) and Research Independent Study. Students must register for audit courses by submitting a signed permission note from the instructor to the Office of the University Registrar. Courses entitled Research Independent Study are individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member.aas. Formal application is not necessary. applied music. studio art. a student carrying two courses for credit may be given permission to audit. In the fall or spring term.edu/trinity/t-reqs/. Consult the chapter ''Financial Information'' for the appropriate fee schedule. a full-time degree student is allowed to audit one or more courses in addition to the normal program. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic.Course Audit Students who audit a course submit no daily work and take no examinations. written permission from the instructor must be obtained and an approval form must be signed by the director of the Office of Continuing Education. staff.

Students who. Further information about procedural requirements may be obtained from the academic deans. students are assigned an advisor in the department of the major and an academic dean in that division. A student who has not yet declared a major and is interested in an interdepartmental major should consult the Academic Advising Center as part of the process of completing the longrange plan and declaring a major. Declaration of Major in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences All students entering Trinity College enter as undeclared majors and are assigned an academic advisor and academic dean. It must consist of fourteen or more courses. Before declaring a major in Trinity College. Each student's internship must be sponsored by a departmental/program faculty member and approved by the director of undergraduate studies. wish to change it should do so in the Office of the University Registrar. and the general pattern of elective courses. Only one course credit from these elective academic internships may count toward the thirty-four (34) course credits required for graduation.the auspices of an academic unit in Trinity College. They thus have an experiential component and a formal intellectual component leading to submission of a substantive research paper for evaluation. Although students may declare a major as early as the spring of the first undergraduate year. The plan should describe the proposed major program. students work with their academic advisors and with other members of the faculty and staff to develop a long-range academic plan which outlines progress and academic goals for the future. at least four of the seven courses required by each department must be taught within the department. all students must secure formal approval of their long-range plans and declare a major before they will be permitted to register for classes for their fifth undergraduate semester or to study abroad on a semester or year-long program. A student may declare an interdepartmental major in two Trinity College departments or programs that offer a major after receiving the approval of the directors of undergraduate studies of the departments involved. Any changes in majors or minors made after the end of the drop/add period in the senior year must be made through the graduation clearance office in Trinity College. While one of the departments must be identified as the department primarily responsible for the advising for the student’s major program. Academic internships are of two types: 1) academic internships that are required for an existing major and are required in programs designed to meet state teaching certification standards. After declaring a major. Students proposing an interdepartmental major must present a written plan that has the signed approval of the two directors of undergraduate studies to the Academic Advising Center or the academic dean for interdepartmental majors. 2) all other academic internships. which are considered to be electives. Such internships typically draw upon work experience to investigate a research problem from one or more intellectual/disciplinary perspectives. with at least ten at the 100-level or above. The major must be planned early in the undergraduate career. having already declared a major. Any subsequent 54 Academic Procedures and Information . Submission of Term Paper Students who wish (under unusual circumstances) to submit a single paper for credit in more than one course must receive prior written permission from each course instructor. The long-range plan is available on ACES. related classroom and outside experiences. the courses must be split evenly between the two departments. as well as the means by which the student will meet established college requirements for graduation. as noted above. A student who has already declared a major and is interested in changing to an interdepartmental major should consult the academic dean responsible for students completing an interdepartmental major. The student must indicate the multiple submission on the title page of the paper. the student must have an advisor in both departments. the plan must include a descriptive title and rationale as well as a list of courses that will be taken in both departments.

Russian. After registration begins. Excuses. biological anthropology and anatomy. chemistry. and Absences 55 . no class time may be changed without prior permission of the Chair of the University Schedule Committee. however if the student's second major is not offered within the degree to be granted for completion of the first major. In case of long-term illness or personal or family problems. it makes them eligible for considerations based on policy set by the instructor of the course. French/Spanish (combined). linguistics. and since regular and punctual class attendance is expected. literature. mathematics. A student who wishes to declare a second major should do so in the Office of the University Registrar. environmental sciences and policy. and women's studies. statistical science. Italian. Asian and African languages and literature. students must accept the consequences of failure to attend. personal or family emergency (known to and approved by the academic dean). A dean's excuse does not exempt students from completing an assignment.pratt. only for missed work. art history/visual arts (combined). for students in the Pratt School of Engineering.edu/ students/policies. Italian/Spanish (combined). for students in Trinity College or at: http://www. psychology. Excuses. computer science. chemistry. sociology. Spanish. absent excessively. In accordance with faculty policy.edu/ trinity/t-reqs/illness. Bachelor of Science. international comparative studies. cultural anthropology. music. visual studies. classical civilization. Canadian studies (second major only). Majors offered within each degree are listed below: Bachelor of Arts. English. earth and ocean sciences. Within-class tests (except for the final) Class Attendance. The short-term illness procedure is not in effect during final examinations. religion. visual arts. Only one undergraduate degree may be earned. Dean's excuses are not issued for short-term illnesses.duke. economics. Detailed information about the policy and the notification procedure is available at T-Reqs: http://www. economics. Students who must miss a graded assignment due to one of the three circumstances noted should see their academic dean. rather. and Absences Responsibility for class attendance rests with individual students. biology. theater studies. earth and ocean sciences. instead. in their opinion.php#short_term. Biological anthropology and anatomy. or authorized representation of the university off-campus may receive a dean's excuse. or laboratories. French/Italian (combined). mathematics. German. Class Scheduling Class times are officially scheduled at registration unless designated ''to be arranged'' (TBA). medieval and Renaissance studies. psychology. the academic dean may find it appropriate to notify instructors of an extended absence. public policy studies. computer science. art history. classical languages. physics. physics. history. Officials in charge of groups representing the university are required to submit the names of students to be excused to the appropriate deans' offices forty-eight hours before the absences are to begin. French. students who miss graded work due to short-term illness must notify instructors according to the Short-Term Illness Notification policy approved by the faculty.duke. Class Attendance. students who miss graded assignments for long-term illness. and statistical science. biology. discussion sections.aas. philosophy. Dean's excuses are not issued for class absences. Slavic and Eurasian Studies. dance.changes to the course of study must be jointly approved by the directors of undergraduate studies. environmental sciences. Instructors may refer to their academic dean students who are. In courses where a defined number of absences are permitted. political science. students should make judicious use of them by saving them for unavoidable circumstances. African and African American studies. a notation of the second major will appear on the transcript. A student may not declare more than two majors.

The student must present an acceptable explanation for the absence to the appropriate academic dean within forty-eight hours after the scheduled time of the examination. If the I is not completed by the deadline. In the summer session. Hourly tests may be given in the last week of classes. emergency. or summer terms must be resolved in the succeeding spring or fall term. However. It should be noted that uncleared grades of X may have 56 Academic Procedures and Information . the student may request in writing to his or her academic dean the assignment of an I (incomplete) for the course. the instructor is required to announce plans for the final examination exercise. Exceptions are made for block tests that have been approved by the University Schedule Committee. Because end-of-the-semester travel arrangements are not the basis for changing a final examination. If the absence is excused by an academic dean. An I assigned in the fall. a notation of the I will remain permanently on the student's record. students are advised to consult the final examination schedule when making such arrangements. The X is converted to an F if the academic dean does not approve the absence.) If the request is approved by the instructor in the course and by the student's academic dean. a final written examination may not exceed three hours in length and a final take-home examination may not require more than three hours in the actual writing. even after the final grade is assigned for the course. because of illness. whether or not a final examination is administered during the exam period. Once recorded. No later than the end of the first week of classes of the fall and spring term. If a final examination is to be given in a course. it will convert to an F grade. Professors may also establish earlier deadlines.are to be given at the regular class meeting times. respectively. based on the time period of the class. Incomplete Course Work If. In courses in which final examinations are not scheduled.edu/trinity/t-reqs. generally according to the day and hour of the regular course meeting. If a student whose work is incomplete is also absent from the final examination. in which case the instructor may submit an F. it will be given at the time scheduled by the University Schedule Committee. spring. Take-home examinations are due at the regularly scheduled hour of an examination. In addition. changes may not be made in the schedule without the approval of the committee. final examinations are held on the last two days of each term as specified in the Bulletin of Duke University Summer Session and may not be scheduled within the last three days before the examination period. then the student must satisfactorily complete the work by the last class day of the fifth week of the subsequent regular semester (or earlier if there is a question of the student's continuation in school). an exam that substitutes for a final examination may not be given in the last week of classes. A student not enrolled in the university during the semester following receipt of an I or X will have until the end of the fifth week of classes of the next semester (fall or spring) of matriculation to clear the I. an X is given instead of a final grade unless the student's grade in the class is failing. a student cannot complete work for a course. the form of the final exercise is determined by the instructor. Deferral of a final examination will not be authorized by the academic dean if it is ascertained that the student has a history of excessive absences or failure to complete course work in a timely fashion in the course in question. Unless departmental policy stipulates otherwise. Final Examinations and Excused Absences The times and places of final examinations for the fall and spring terms are officially scheduled by the University Schedule Committee.aas.duke. or reasonable cause. an I cancels eligibility for Dean's List and Dean's List with Distinction. If a student is absent from a final examination. Students may not complete work in a course after graduation. (Forms are available on T-REQS at www. the student arranges with the dean and the instructor for a make-up examination to be given at the earliest possible time. an X is assigned for the course (see below). Final examinations for short courses are held on the last day of the course.

Additionally. low pass.7 1. a P is not calculated into the grade point average. Grading and Grade Requirements Final grades on academic work are provided to students via ACES after the examinations at the end of each term. see the section on course load and eligibility for courses on page 51.0 1. These grades (except P) may be modified by a plus or minus. Seminars and tutorials may not be taken on the pass/fail basis. Failing Grades. superior. a notation of the X will remain permanently on the student's record. The semester and cumulative grade point averages are determined at the end of each semester and displayed for students on the academic history reports made available to them via ACES. P. for grading on a pass/fail basis in one elective course each semester and summer session.0 0 With pass/fail courses. passing (see pass/fail option below). in Trinity College not more than two courses passed with D grades may be counted among those required for year-to-year continuation or among the thirty-four courses required for graduation. and are provided to students via ACES. following instructions included in registration information. Pass/Fail Grading System. even after the final grade is assigned for the course. Grade Point Average. A Z may be assigned for the satisfactory completion of the first term of a two-course sequence. Passing Grades. The grade is recorded on the student's record. a second entry of the course and the new grade earned are made on the record. except the requirement for thirty-four course credits and the continuation requirements. C. Once recorded. (See Grading and Grade Requirements below. but a U (failing) is a part of that calculation. B. If the student registers for the course again. and it is included in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average. Courses taken on the Pass/Fail basis (whether offered only Pass/Fail or elected Pass/Fail by the student) do not count toward satisfying the requirements of a major. or certificate programs.0 4.3 2. Courses for which a D grade is earned.0 2. For information on repeating a course with a D grade. may be met by a course passed under the pass/fail option.7 3. and the final grade for both courses is assigned at the end of the second course of the sequence.7 C+ C CD+ D DF 2. Although the D grade represents low pass. but the first entry is not removed.0 1. exceptional. unless the course is offered only on that basis. satisfy other requirements. A student not enrolled in the university during that following semester has until the end of the fifth week of the next semester of enrollment to clear the X unless an earlier deadline has been established by the instructor and the academic dean. Midterm advisory grade reports for first-year students are issued in the fall and spring.significant ramifications regarding continuation in the university.3 3. however.3 1.0 3. no other degree requirements (including prerequisites). Taking a course on the pass/fail Grading and Grade Requirements 57 . The grade point average is based on grades earned in courses offering credit at Duke and may be calculated based on the following numerical equivalencies to the grading system: A+ A AB+ B B4.) An excused X not cleared by the end of the fifth week of the following semester is converted to an F. satisfactory. minor. and D. Passing grades are A. With the consent of the instructor. a student who has declared a major may register. A grade of F or U (see pass/fail grading system below) indicates that the student has failed the course.

for readmission to the college. In the Summer Session: to continue enrollment at Duke in the fall. except in extraordinary instances and after a minimum of five years. when eligibility to continue from the summer session to the fall is in question. See the section on academic honors in this chapter. a student enrolled at Duke in any previous semester must not fail more than one full course taken during that summer.e. Continuation Students must achieve a satisfactory record of academic performance each term and make satisfactory progress toward graduation each year to continue in the college. and the course may not be retaken under the regular grading system. are permitted in any course. or one week prior to the first day of classes of the second term of the summer session. after readmission. See the section on incomplete work on page 56. the student will be ineligible. the student fails again to meet minimum requirements. no changes from pass/fail to regular status. where continuation is in question. In the Fall or Spring Semester: (1) in the first semester of enrollment at Duke. may not enroll in a summer term at Duke unless the requirement of satisfactory performance each semester has been satisfied. 58 Academic Procedures and Information . Furthermore. For purposes of continuation. (See the sections on course changes in this chapter. In the case of incomplete work in the spring semester. Students admitted to degree programs from Continuing Education should consult their academic dean concerning continuation. or from regular to pass/fail status.) Those desiring to return after the dismissal period may apply to Trinity College of Arts and Sciences for readmission. an incomplete during the academic year cancels eligibility for semester honors. Therefore. (A summer session may be counted as a semester. Effects of Incomplete Work. (2)after the first semester at Duke. incomplete work in any course must be completed with a passing grade in time for final grades to be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar no later than the weekday preceding the first day of classes of the spring semester. The designation W is recorded when a student officially withdraws from a course after the drop/add period. a student must pass at least three semester courses. The W and WA Designations. however. Students may not carry an underload without the permission of their academic dean. Students who fail to meet the minimum requirements to continue must leave the college for at least two semesters. Grades When Absent from Final Examination. After the drop/add period in any term. A P may not be converted subsequently to a regular letter grade.) WA indicates withdrawal from an audited course. Therefore. Neither W nor WA is a grade. The student.basis may make one ineligible for the dean’s list. A student who does not receive a passing grade in all courses must meet the following minimum requirements or be withdrawn from the college.. incomplete work is considered failure to achieve a satisfactory performance in that course. Dean's List and Dean's List with Distinction. a student must pass at least two semester courses. See the section on final examinations and excused absences on page 56. Satisfactory Performance Each Term (Semester Continuation Requirements). incomplete courses must be satisfactorily completed in time for a passing grade to be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar no later than the weekday preceding the first day of fall classes. as appropriate. For purposes of determining satisfactory progress each term and toward graduation. (3) a student taking an authorized underload after the first semester at Duke must earn all passing grades. For the purposes of continuation. i. incomplete work in a course indicated by a grade of I or X is considered a failure to achieve satisfactory performance in that course. incomplete work in any course is considered a failure to achieve satisfactory performance in that course. If. this requirement applies whether or not the student plans to attend one or more terms of the summer session.

or FF. i. except as noted. the following grades will result in academic probation for the succeeding semester: during the first semester of the freshman year. but whose record indicates marginal scholarship. Satisfactory Progress toward Graduation (Annual Continuation Requirements). Academic Warning.Any student excluded from the college under the provisions of these regulations may on request have the case reviewed by the senior associate dean of Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. Academic Probation.0 course credits have been passed in that semester).. based on which semester they will enter in the fall term. For a student enrolled in four or more semester courses.. the following academic performance will result in academic probation: during the first semester of the freshman year. the number of courses needed to satisfy the continuation requirement is determined from the table above. and during two consecutive semesters. DF. during any subsequent semester. No more than two courses completed with D grades may be counted toward fulfilling this annual continuation requirement. grades including DDD or DF (as long as 3. a certain number of courses must have been passed at Duke according to the following schedule: To be eligible to continue to the 2nd semester at Duke 3rd semester at Duke 4th semester at Duke 5th semester at Duke 6th semester at Duke 7th semester at Duke 8th semester at Duke A student must have passed 2 semester courses at Duke 6 semester courses at Duke 10 semester courses at Duke 14 semester courses at Duke 19 semester courses at Duke 22 semester courses at Duke.) Students admitted to degree programs from Continuing Education should consult their academic deans concerning warning and probation. A student who receives a single grade of F or a second D will be issued an academic warning by the academic dean. a student must have made satisfactory progress toward fulfillment of curricular requirements to be eligible to continue in the college. or DDFF. In a case where probation may be in question because of an incomplete grade. grades including DDDD. grades including DDDD. Failure to clear probationary status in the semester of probation will result in a student's dismissal for academic reasons.e. DDDF. plus two additional courses1 1The additional semester courses may be earned through advanced placement and/or transferred courses. grades including DD. For such students. Courses taken in the summer term at Duke may be used to meet this requirement. DF or FF (as long as the student has passed three other semester courses).e. Academic Warning and Probation 59 . will be subject either to academic warning or academic probation. grades of DD or F. or DDFF. For a student enrolled in an authorized underload (i. (See the section"Continuation" for information concerning dismissal. advanced placement may not be used to satisfy it. DDDF. Each year prior to the beginning of fall term classes. plus two additional courses1 26 semester courses at Duke. For students who have interrupted their university studies. and during two consecutive semesters. the continuation requirement must still be satisfied before the beginning of each fall term. Academic Warning and Probation A student whose academic performance satisfies continuation requirements (see above). the student will be notified by the dean of the need to have the incomplete replaced by a satisfactory grade in order to avoid probation. grades including DDD. fewer than four course credits). during any subsequent semester.

a medical leave of absence with proper documentation may be granted at any time. Most leaves of absence are granted for two reasons: personal and medical.'') For students withdrawing on their own initiative after the beginning of classes and up to the first day of the last four weeks of regular classes in the fall or spring term. Failure to do so will result in academic dismissal." "Financial Information. as well as administratively. In such cases. or a C average must be achieved in that semester. have their course selection approved by their academic deans and meet periodically with them." Students with a dismissal pending are not in good standing and therefore are ineligible to undertake coursework prior to the dismissal period. After reaching the second semester of the first year. but before the last day of classes in a semester should a leave be required before 60 Academic Procedures and Information ." and this chapter. Grades of C-. or before the last two weeks of regular classes in a summer term. "Academic Procedures and Information. Students who are readmitted may be considered for housing on campus. a W is assigned in lieu of a regular grade for each course. Applications for readmission are made to the appropriate school or college. Students placed on academic probation must acknowledge their probationary status in writing to their academic dean in order to continue in the college. Applications for readmission must be completed by November 1 for enrollment in the spring. Students are expected to file leave of absence forms with their deans by the end of the last day of classes of the semester immediately preceding the leave. whether in a normal load or an underload. Students may be involuntarily withdrawn for academic reasons. or tuition will be due on a pro rata basis. Students on probation. Students are expected to clear their probationary status during the semester of probation. and the degree of success attendant upon activities during the time away from Duke. and disciplinary reasons." "Campus Life and Activities. by April 1 for enrollment in the summer. In order to do so. The expectations pertaining to each are found in the chapters "Degree Programs. or better must be earned in each course. in which case a W is assigned by the student's academic dean. Each application is reviewed by officers of the school or college to which the student applies. are required to meet continuation requirements. of which no more than one may be taken on a pass/fail basis. Leave of Absence. Changes in Status Withdrawal and Readmission. violation of academic regulations. evidence of increasing maturity and discipline. They may not study abroad during the probation period. (See the section on refunds in the chapter ''Financial Information. and by July 1 for enrollment in the fall. P. They are also expected to seek assistance from campus resources. Students whose probationary status for reason of an underload continues to a second semester must adhere to the conditions and standards previously outlined for clearing probation. Their withdrawal will be noted accordingly on the official academic record.The probation status will be reflected on those academic records used for internal purposes only. Students who wish to withdraw from the college must give official notification to their academic dean. the probationary status continues through the next semester of enrollment or in both terms of the summer session. and a decision is made on the basis of the applicant's previous record at Duke. Notification must be received prior to the beginning of classes in any term. they must enroll in four full-credit courses. Probationary status cannot be cleared in a semester in which students seek permission and are allowed to withdraw to an underload. Students who withdraw voluntarily during the last four weeks of classes may not apply for readmission for the subsequent semester. financial reasons. A personal leave of absence usually starts after one semester ends and before the next semester begins. students in good standing may request a leave of absence for one or two semesters by completing a leave request form and submitting it to their academic dean. After these dates an F grade is recorded unless withdrawal is caused by an emergency beyond the control of the student.

See the chapter "Campus Life and Activities. Part-time students may register for not more than two courses (or two courses and a half-credit physical education activity)." Changes in Status 61 . provided they have submitted the appropriate information to the Office of Residence Life and Housing Services by its published deadline and provided that they lived on campus before taking their approved leave. Ordinarily.aas. Candidates for degrees must enroll in a normal course load (i. juniors must plan ahead and register their intention to be part-time by April 15 preceding the academic year in which the part-time semester will be taken. may not use more than six professional school credits toward the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. So that the number of part-time students can be taken into account in enrollment and budget decisions. such permission is given only to students for the final semester of their senior year. Students register at Duke as a nonresident student and pay the appropriate fees or tuition at Duke. Students returning from approved leaves and desiring housing on campus will be placed in the general housing lottery. Resident and Nonresident Status. students who take a medical leave of absence during a semester become eligible. but transfers may become effective only upon completion of the first year.duke. with proper medical clearance. the student will be ineligible to re-enroll as an undergraduate at Duke. If admitted after having earned a baccalaureate degree in either Trinity College or the Pratt school. citizenship records.. They will be sent registration information when they have provided to their academic dean acceptable medical documentation to clear them for a return. A student transferring to Trinity College of Arts and Sciences from the Pratt School of Engineering. prior to receiving a baccalaureate degree. to return after a full/regular semester has passed. and they must be cleared by their dean at least one week prior to the beginning of classes. Part-time students may not live in university housing. The school or college to which transfer is sought will give academic counseling to a student as soon as intention to apply for transfer is known. Students who intend to change from full-time to part-time status must request permission from their academic dean. Except for extraordinary circumstances. Registration information will be provided to students on leave by the university registrar. Students in good standing may be considered for transfer from one Duke undergraduate school or college to another. at least four semester courses) each semester. A student may apply to transfer at any time prior to receiving a baccalaureate degree. All returning students must register prior to the first day of classes for the term of intended enrollment. a student must complete in the new school/college a total of seventeen additional courses and fulfill degree requirements in order to be eligible for a second undergraduate degree at Duke. Detailed information about leaves is provided on the request form available in the academic deans’ offices and on T-Reqs: www.the semester ends. Students considering transferring to another institution should discuss this with their academic dean in the early stages of their planning. Students who fail to return as expected will be withdrawn from the university and will have to apply for readmission. Transfer from Duke to Another Institution. although no commitment will be implied. Full-Time and Part-Time Degree Status. If a student enrolled at Duke subsequently transfers to another institution as a degree-seeking student. The review of requests to transfer involves consideration of a student's general academic standing.e. This policy also applies to Duke programs conducted away from the Durham campus. upon completion of an application form available in the office of the designated associate dean in Trinity College and the assistant dean for undergraduate affairs in the Pratt School of Engineering. Degree candidates who matriculated through Continuing Education or are employees should confer with their academic dean about course load requirements. Transfer Between Duke University Schools. and relative standing in the group of students applying for transfer.edu/trinity/t-reqs/. Students who undertake independent study under Duke supervision and for Duke credit are not on leave of absence even if studying elsewhere.

(Note: this definition also applies to non-degree seeking visiting students during the period of their enrollment at Duke. music activity. Each student's overall achievement in the major or in Program II. while the remainder of those placing in the highest one third will receive the Dean's List honor as noted above. Graduation with distinction may be awarded at one of three levels: highest distinction. Dean's List accords recognition to academic excellence achieved during each semester. Interested students should consult the relevant directors of undergraduate study or Program II dean for information about specific requirements of and eligibility for graduation with distinction. the student ceases to be a Duke undergraduate student in the strict sense of the word. Graduation with Distinction accords recognition to students who achieve excellence in their major area of study as determined by the departments and as approved by the Committee on Honors of the Arts and Sciences Council. To be eligible for this honor. physical education activity. music activity. physical education activity. laboratory research. undergraduates must earn a grade point average placing them in the highest one third of their class and in addition must: (1) carry a normal academic load.e. while the remainder of those placing in the highest one third will receive the Dean’s List honor as noted above. though not all academic units offer all levels. (2) earn grades other than P in at least three semester courses. and (3) receive no incomplete or failing grades. students seeking to graduate with distinction will participate during their junior and/or senior years in a seminar and/or a directed course of reading. A nondegree student must apply to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for admission to degree candidacy. honors in two academic units for a single thesis. Undergraduates who in addition earn semester grade point averages that place them in the highest ten percent of undergraduates in their respective college will receive the Dean's List with Distinction honor. eligibility for the three categories of Latin Honors (summa cum laude. Their rights and privileges are then defined by the Duke Alumni Association. or independent study which results in substantive written work. including four credits other than dance performance/technique. An undergraduate student admitted to Trinity College or the Pratt School of Engineering officially becomes a Duke undergraduate student at the point of matriculation and is accorded all the rights and privileges of a Duke student at that time. including the written work. no pass/fail courses). All academic units offering a major have eligibility requirements and procedures leading to graduation with distinction. Undergraduate Status. and 2) receive no incomplete or failing grades.) Academic Recognition and Honors In determining a student's eligibility for academic recognition and honors. Some may offer a double honors option.Nondegree to Degree Status. undergraduates in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences must earn a grade point average for a semester that places them in the highest third of undergraduates in their respective college and in addition must (1) complete at least four course credits. In the Pratt School of Engineering. is assessed by a faculty committee. including at most two academic half courses (excluding dance performance/ technique. and house courses) for a regularly assigned grade (i. that is. In general. or distinction.. Undergraduates who in addition earn grade point averages that place them in the highest ten percent of their class also will receive the Dean’s List with Distinction honor. Graduation with distinction is separate and distinct from Latin Honors (see below). high distinction. magna cum 62 Academic Procedures and Information . Latin Honors by Overall Academic Achievement accords recognition for academic excellence achieved over the duration of an entire undergraduate career. Unlike the Dean's List honor which recognizes academic excellence achieved over the short term (one semester). only grades earned in Duke courses. as does Program II. and house courses. including those earned in Duke Study Abroad programs and in courses covered by the interinstitutional agreement (see index) are considered. When an undergraduate has completed all of the requirements of the bachelor’s degree and is no longer enrolled in course work towards the degree.

Finally. Phi Beta Kappa. For early election. Alternatively. students must have completed at least eighteen but fewer than twenty-four graded courses taken at Duke. undergraduates at Duke should be careful to scrutinize invitations to join national honor societies with which they are unfamiliar. The nomination must be received by the end of the semester following the student’s graduation. Box 99352. Recipients are determined by the following procedure: The grade point average included within the highest five percent of the previous year's graduating class is used to specify the grade point average needed by those students of the current graduating class to be awarded the summa cum laude honor. Department of Electrical Engineering. Full membership is conferred upon those who have demonstrated noteworthy research achievements. through peer-reviewed publications. Regular election requires at least twenty-four graded courses taken at Duke. Phi Beta Kappa. Duke Station. an undergraduate student who is interested in membership in Sigma Xi and who has completed a significant research project in a pure or applied science may inquire about membership procedures through the Duke Chapter Office (sigmaxi@duke. More information is available from from the Undergraduate Research Support Academic Recognition and Honors 63 . Reviews of the academic record of all prospective candidates are conducted in the junior and senior years. All other inquiries may be directed to the Secretary of Phi Beta Kappa. A dues paying student member of Sigma Xi or a student whose project advisor is a dues paying member of Sigma Xi is eligible to apply for research support to the Society's Grants-in-Aid of Research program. Additional information in available on the honors Web site. of whom no more than one percent can be selected by early election. Undergraduates who have shown potential as researchers may be invited to join as associate members. The grade point average included within the next highest ten percent of the previous year's graduating class is used to determine the grade point average needed by those students who will graduate with the magna cum laude honor. Because the last several years have seen a proliferation of academic societies in America. Eligibility requires a course of study with the breadth that characterizes a liberal education. Students who have graduated magna cum laude and who have been awarded Graduation with Distinction in their first or second major through a vote of at least three faculty members may be nominated for election to Phi Beta Kappa by a faculty member in the distinction department. especially over the last sixteen courses. the national academic honor society founded at William and Mary on December 5. The Scientific Research Society. The Program I curriculum meets those expectations. OTHER HONORS Trinity College of Arts and Sciences and the Pratt School of Engineering officially recognize the following national academic honor societies. chemical.Thus. Durham. Inquiries concerning distribution requirements for students in the Pratt School of Engineering should be directed to Professor Rhett George. The academic record must not contain an unresolved incomplete (I). each of which has a long and distinguished reputation at Duke and throughout the United States. NC 27708. and social scientists that recognizes scientific achievement. Program II and Engineering students must demonstrate comparable breadth in order to be eligible. The total number of persons elected annually is limited by chapter bylaw to no more than ten percent of the graduating class. and cum laude) is based on the cumulative grade point average for all work at Duke. is an honor society for engineers and natural. elects undergraduate students in Trinity College and the Pratt School of Engineering each fall and spring.edu). such students must also have achieved a superior academic record in graded courses at Duke. Eligibility for election is determined not by the university but by the bylaws of the local chapter (Beta of North Carolina) on the basis of outstanding academic achievement and high moral character. about twenty-five percent of each graduating class will receive Latin Honors. the grade point average included within the next ten percent of the previous year's graduating class will be used to determine those students eligible for graduating with the cum laude honor. Transfer students and other students who do not qualify under the preceding requirements may be eligible for deferred election. Sigma Xi.laude. Sigma Xi. physical. 1776.

Students interested in various prestigious fellowships for graduate study (for example. Box 90271.aas. Engineering students whose academic standing is in the upper eighth of the junior class or the upper fifth of the senior class have earned consideration by their local chapter. the Fulbright. and Winston Churchill) should consult the Web site: www.duke. International Postgraduate Scholarships. Pratt School of Engineering. Tau Beta Pi. 64 Academic Procedures and Information .sigmaxi.edu/ousf/postgrad/.duke.org) Web site.edu/web/sigmaxi/) or the Society's (www. Rhodes. Eligibility is determined on the basis of distinguished scholarship and exemplary character. Elections to the national engineering honor society. Tau Beta Pi. Marshall. Specific information about deadlines and procedures for the individual scholarships and fellowships is available through that site. North Carolina 27708. Luce. Duke University. Inquiries may be directed to the Advisory Board. are held in the fall and spring. Tau Beta Pi.Office at Duke or through the Chapter's (www. Durham.

Cytowic ’73. a Duke student and aspiring actor.. The Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts. The application deadline is in March. In recognition of exceptional achievement in musical theater. the Department of Music. management. with preference given to graduating seniors. dance. Reardon. a former President of Duke Players. These awards are granted annually by a faculty committee through the bequest of Duke alumnus and former trustee Edward H. This prize derives from income earned on the generous bequest (1956) of Professor David Taggart Clark. a member of Duke’s English department faculty from 1957 to 1999 and of the Program in Drama from 1991 to 1999. Benenson Awards in the Arts. The David Taggart Clark Prize in Classical Studies. or television. Alex Cohen Awards. a distinguished scholar of Renaissance English drama. funded by the Alex Cohen Endowment and the Department of Theater Studies. film/ video/digital and other art forms. According to current university policy. Cytowic was also a student member of the committee that established the Program in Drama. This award is presented annually to a current Duke student (preference given to third-year students) with demonstrated promise in playwriting. support student initiatives in theater during the summer. and by contributing to the life of the department. Two to four grants are awarded every spring. former professor of English (1947-1980) and director of Duke Players (1947-1967). and consists of an important book or books in the field of classics. The award covers the costs of attending the Vassar College and New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater Apprentice Program. Professor Reardon was an inspiration to decades of students through his commitment to producing and teaching theater on the Duke campus. in which case the scholarships will be incorporated in the winners' financial packages. Illinois. With the help of Professor Joseph Prizes and Awards 65 . It is supported by alumnus Amit Mahtaney.000 was established in 1983 through the generosity of Louis C. All undergraduates and graduating seniors are eligible. or production. The Jody McAuliffe Award for Excellence in Directing. It recognizes a graduating senior who has made extraordinary contributions to the life of the department and who has exhibited outstanding personal and professional qualities. This award is presented annually by the Department of Theater Studies to a Duke undergraduate for the best original script for stage.Prizes and Awards The achievements of undergraduate students are recognized in various fields of activity. Harold Brody Award for Excellence in Musical Theater. He was a founding member of the Summer Theater at Duke Company in 1972. He served as Interim Director of the latter in 1991-92. This award is presented annually to an undergraduate at Duke University for sustained excellence in directing for the stage. Cytowic Outstanding Acting Student Award. Funds are awarded based on merit for legitimate educational expenses for projects in art. Chicago. Randall Award in Dramatic Literature. creative writing. John M. Benenson. This award recognizes outstanding achievement in the study of dramatic literature. photography. These awards were established in honor of Alex Cohen (1972-1991). It was established in honor of Kenneth J. Sudler. This award. Richard E. which became the Department of Theater Studies. screen. forms and instructions are available in the spring term from the Office of Trinity College and online. Reynolds Price Award for Script-writing. this award is given annually to a Duke student or group of students. This award recognizes outstanding commitment and leadership in theater design. Reardon Award. Kenneth J. Richard Cytowic acted in and directed a number of productions for Duke Players during his three years as a Duke undergraduate. and the student-run musical theater group Hoof ’n’ Horn. These scholarships are identified by an asterisk (*). Dr. It is presented annually to the undergraduate student writing the best essay in a course in dramatic literature. Randall. This award is named for the distinguished founder of the Duke University Program in Drama. some of the scholarships listed must be awarded in honorary form unless the students chosen are on financial aid. It honors Professor Emeritus Dale B. The award was established by an alumnus with a deep affection for and appreciation of the art of musical theater. recognizes a graduating senior who has distinguished him or herself in class work. It is awarded to the senior major in classical civilization or classical languages who is judged to have written the best honors essay of the year. The following prizes suggest the range of recognition. now the Department of Theater Studies. It recognizes accomplishments in musical theater by students in the Department of Theater Studies. donated by Dr. Dale B. theater. Dasha Epstein Award in Playwriting. production. classicist and economist. The prize of $1.J. An award is presented annually by a faculty committee to a graduating senior who has demonstrated the most outstanding achievement in artistic performance or creation during four years of undergraduate work. music. These awards. Richard E. HUMANITIES The Edward H.J. Clum Distinguished Theater Studies Graduate Award.

recognizes outstanding work by an undergraduate enrolled in an English course in British Literature. This award. Rosati. distinguished teacher of writing at Duke. advance. and one who helped to build valued collections in the Duke library. Stanley E. The Anne Flexner Memorial Award for Creative Writing. The award is sponsored by the Department of Music through a continuing gift from Dr. This fund was established in 1962 to honor William Blackburn. awarded by the Department of English. Established by a gift of Larry Turner. The Guido Mazzoni Award in Italian. he planned and implemented the conversion of an engineering building into what is now the beloved Branson Theater on East Campus. The scholarship. This award was established by the family of Terry Welby Tyler. the late Mr. they are required to study privately. Although recipients need not major in music. his senior year in Trinity College.Weatherby. The scholarship is awarded by the Department of English to a junior or senior pursuing the study of creative writing. Jr. Named for the founder of the Ciompi String Quartet. James H. The Julia Wilkinson Mueller Prize for Excellence in Music. Professor of Italian. This prize was established in honor of Bascom Headen Palmer's achievement as recipient of the Hesperian Literary Society Medal in 1875. The Terry Welby Tyer. Open to all Duke undergraduates. A prize of $350 is awarded annually to a graduating senior for an original composition or a distinguished paper in music history or analysis. given by the Department of English. who graduated from Duke in 1945. It is renewable as long as the recipient continues to study the organ and maintains satisfactory progress. the competition for prose fiction (5. These scholarships cover fees for applied instruction. The Smith Memorial Scholarship. Blackburn Scholarship. Barbara Herrnstein Smith Award for Outstanding Work in Literary Theory or Criticism. given by the Department of English. This award was created by the trustees of the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation in memory and in honor of Francis Pemberton's service to the Biddle Foundation. Awards are given to encourage. Given each year to an outstanding French major in honor of Robert J. M. Award for Creative Writing.000-word limit) and poetry (200-line limit) is sponsored in the spring semester by the Department of English. The Richard L. is awarded to an organist who is an undergraduate music major. a lifelong friend of the Semans and Trent families. *The Margaret Rose Knight Sanford Scholarship. Predmore. in memory of Marvin Boren and Elvira Lowe Smith. The scholarships cover fees for private instruction.. Although recipients need not major in music. recognizes outstanding work by an undergraduate enrolled in an English course in literary theory or criticism. The Bascom Headen Palmer Literary Prize. to recognize and honor outstanding undergraduate poetry. Giorgio Ciompi Scholarships. This fund was established in recognition of the untiring efforts of Margaret Rose Knight Sanford on behalf of Duke University.. who would have graduated with the class of 1997. and reward creative writing among undergraduate students. professor of French at Duke University from 1972 to 1981 and Alexander Hull. *The William M. W. Duke University's quartet in residence. Niess/Alexander Hull Award in French. Given each year to an outstanding Spanish major in honor of Richard L. and member of the Italian parliment. professor of Spanish at Duke University from 1950-1978 and dean of the Graduate School from 1962-1969. these scholarships are given to undergraduates demonstrating outstanding ability on a string instrument. a talented amateur violinist. Italian patriot. This scholarship of up to $2. Niess. The scholarship is awarded to a female student who demonstrates particular promise in creative writing. they are required to study privately and to participate as members of the Duke Symphony Orchestra. this fund honors the memory of his friend. Awards are made by the Department of English. Fish Award for Outstanding Work in British Literature.000. An award of $300 will be presented to a graduating senior for achievement in musical performance. The Rudolph William Rosati Fund. Jr. This award was established by the family and friends of Anne Flexner. Predmore Award in Spanish. Jr. This award. Semans. these music scholarships are given to students who can demonstrate talent and achievement on a string instrument. The Robert J. class of 1935. recognizes outstanding achievement in the field of creative writing. and Mrs. who named the prize after Henry Schuman. military hero. The Larry and Violet H. Upchurch. 66 Academic Procedures and Information . Open to all Duke undergraduates. Turner Scholarships. The Henry Schuman Music Prize. a talented writer. the competition is sponsored by the Department of English. This award is given each year to an outstanding Italian major in honor of Guido Mazzoni (1859-1943). associate professor of French at Duke University from 1962 to 1993. Established in 1978 by Mr. A committee named by the provost oversees the program and distribution of the fund. *The Francis Pemberton Scholarship.

and selection will be made by the creative writing committee. such as attending workshops. who was a member of the Department of History at Trinity College and Duke University from 1909 to 1953. conferences. Students may apply for these grants by providing Carol Renegar with a statement of how the grant is to be used. The Joel Fleishman Distinguished Scholar Award. It recognizes one or more PPS students who have demonstrated strong leadership qualities and a commitment to public service. Two Holton awards are given: an award for educational research and an award for early childhood studies. An award to the outstanding student in the field of American government and constitutional law. This award is given by the Department of English for the most original honors thesis. Nomination of candidates will be made exclusively by members of the full time English department writing faculty. with the income to be used for work and projects involving education. The Melcher Family Award for Excellence in Journalism. Holsti. Holsti Award in American Foreign Policy and International Relations. Decisions are made by faculty in the Program in Education. and retreats. The Hill Support Grants set aside funds to assist undergraduate students in taking advantage of opportunities that might arise during the academic year. Award for Most Original Honors Thesis. taught at Duke from 1974-1998. A. State. '61.B. Connery. Stone. This award is presented annually by the Sanford Institute of Public Policy. This award. '48. a public policy studies major. An annual award to the undergraduate who submits the best paper in the subject matter of political science. Schutte Senior Writing Award. This cash award.B. and Local Governments. Laprade. SOCIAL SCIENCES The Winfred Quinton Holton Awards in Education. '40. and chairman of the department from 1938 to 1952. a political science major. A.Verville. Ole R.D. An award to honor the best undergraduate written work in the area of American foreign policy and international relations. Funds for the award are derived from gifts from the international relations faculty in the Department of Political Science. This will be available on a rolling basis. Funds for the award are derived from a gift donated by Elizabeth G. This prize is offered in honor of William T. Evans. Winfred Quinton Holton. no award will be made.D. A. It is given to a graduating senior of superior writing ability who contributes greatly to the wider writing community on campus.B. An award to the outstanding student in the field of American national and/or state and/or local governments. More than one studnet may apply for the same event. chosen by the Department of Political Science. Robert S. sophomore. recognizing the graduating major with the highest academic achievement in public policy. Ph. Ole R. Verville Award. A monetary prize is also donated by Judge Stone. and Lela Young Holton. is intended to recognize the whole of a student’s creative achievements during his or her time at Duke.Margot Hill Support Grants. and by a group of Professor Rankin's former students. Class of 1907. named in honor of Margot Hill’s (Duke ’04) high school English teacher. class of 1979. It is awarded to a senior who is being graduated with distinction and whose senior essay in history has been judged to be unusually meritorious. These awards were established in 1922 by gifts of Holland Holton. Professor Emeritus of Political Science. The Marguerite (Mimi) Voorhees Kraemer Award. American Government Award for Leadership and Academic Achievement. Alona E. The William T. Class of 1907. Prizes and Awards 67 . recognizes outstanding work by an undergraduate enrolled in an English course in American Literature. Duke University. Evans Prize in International Law. Award for Outstanding Work in American Literature. An annual award to an undergraduate and/or graduate student in arts and sciences whose paper(s) on international law reflect(s) excellence in scholarship. Elizabeth G. These monetary awards are given to students. Funds for the award are derived from income earned on the generous bequest of Professor Alona E. Should no candidate meet the standards of the award in a given year. J. but also an exemplary leadership role in service to Duke University or to the community as broadly defined. One or more awards have been donated by Robert H. This award is given to qualifying juniors as a scholarship to help defray the costs of participating in the summer internship program. Rankin Political Science Awards: Award in American Government and Constitutional Law. '44. Professor Emeritus of Public Law and Government at Columbia University and from 1949-65 a colleague of Professor Rankin when both were members of the Duke faculty. A monetary prize is donated by a former student of Professor Rankin's. given by the Department of English. This annual award was created by the family and friends of Mimi Voorhees. in memory of their son. (political science) '45. Judge Jerry B. who have demonstrated excellence in the study of American government and whose past achievements and future promise manifests not only high intellectual attainments. This $500 award is presented annually by the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy for the best published article written by a freshman. Laprade Prize in History. Award in American National.

The Maggie Schneider Award in Marine Biology. This award was established in 1989 by relatives of the distinguished twentieth-century mathematician Karl Menger. Psychology students submitting outstanding theses for Graduation for Distinction may be nominated for the Karl E. and Vera Laska in memory of their son. The Chemistry Department Award. The annual cash award is given through the Department of Mathematics to one or more undergraduate students in recognition of excellence in mathematics.or junior at Duke University. The prize consists of a copy of the Merck Index presented by Merck and Co. 68 Academic Procedures and Information . The Hypercube Scholar Award. Awarded annually to a graduating senior in the Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences by his/her peers in recognition of outstanding achievement in the earth and ocean sciences. endowed this award in his memory. Thomas V. This award consists of a monetary prize and inclusion by name on a memorial plaque in Zener Auditorium. The annual cash award is given through the Department of Mathematics in recognition of outstanding performance in mathematical competitions. by a faculty committee. Melcher (’74). This prize is given annually by the Analytical Division of the American Chemical Society to an undergraduate student in analytical chemistry. Karl Menger Award.. The Karl E. The Julia Dale Prize in Mathematics. on a granite tablet located in the divisional office. The parents and friends of James Brailsford Rast. The award is a one-year membership in the American Chemical Society and a one-year subscription to an appropriate journal. In memory of Maggie Schneider. NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS The Edward C. and interest in pursuing advanced work in a field of chemistry that utilizes molecular modeling extensively. Estwing Award. This prize is awarded annually to an outstanding senior chemistry major in the bachelor of science program. this prize is offered in memory of Professor Edward C. Selection by a faculty committee is based on the student's independent research and interest in pursuing advanced work in chemistry. Selection. Selection by a faculty committee is based on academic excellence and laboratory proficiency. This prize is awarded annually to an outstanding senior chemistry major in the Bachelor of Science degree program. The Excellence in Plant Science Prize. a member of the Class of 1958 of Duke University. Selection. The Merck Index Award. to support excellence in student journalim. The prize consists of books appropriate to the student's field of interest. Awarded annually by the Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences to a graduating senior in recognition of most outstanding achievement and promise for future success in the earth and ocean sciences. The award was created by Richard A. Zener Award. is based on scholastic excellence. in the opinion of the biology faculty. The award is sponsored by Andrew J. this award is given each year by the faculty of the Duke University Marine Laboratory to the biology major who demonstrates the love of learning and service in marine and conservation biology. The Terry Sanford Departmental Award. performance in independent study. by a faculty committee. is based on the student's scholastic achievement. This award was established in 1938 by friends and relatives of Julia Dale. Inc. Rast Memorial Award in Organismal Biology. Laska Memorial Award. It is a tribute to his warm regard for students and faculty and his appreciation of scholarly excellence. A committee of three faculty members along with the director of undergraduate studies determines the winner of this award. This award is given each year by the biology faculty in recognition of excellence in course work and research in the study of organismal biology. The prize consists of a molecular modeling computer software package presented by Hypercube. Zener Award for Outstanding Performance of a Major in Psychology. Horn Memorial Prize for Excellence in Biology. Horn. The prize consists of books appropriate to the student's field of interest. a former writer for The Chronicle. an assistant professor of mathematics at Duke University who died early in her career. Given each year to a graduating biology major who has shown. The deadline for article submissions is June 1. The James B. a member of the Duke class of 2004. the highest level of academic achievement and promise. Inc. The award is based on the student’s total academic record as well as the paper submitted to the award committee. This award is presented annually by the Sanford Institute of Public Policy to the graduating major recognizing his/her achievement in leadership. Thomas Vaclav Laska. The recipient receives a gift and his/her name is engraved. This prize is awarded annually to one or more graduating chemistry majors intending to pursue a career in medicine. American Chemical Society Undergraduate Award in Analytical Chemistry. Given each year by the plant science faculty to a graduating biology major who has demonstrated excellence in botanical research. The prize is a subscription to the journal Analytical Chemistry published by the American Chemical Society. with those of past recipients.

The award was initiated to honor the spirit of academic excellence and professional diligence demonstrated by the late Dean Emeritus Walter J. Tau Beta Pi Award. is given to those graduating seniors who. This prize is awarded annually to students from North or South Carolina graduating in the Department of Electrical Engineering. The award. The award was established in 1958 by the parents of George Sherrerd III. This award is presented annually to an outstanding senior in mechanical engineering at Duke University. Prizes and Awards 69 .ENGINEERING The Walter J. Seeley. effort. The basis for selection is the student's scholastic record. The School of Engineering Student Service Award. by their contributions of time. have significantly benefitted the community of the Pratt School of Engineering. The T. who was president of the American Cyanamid Company prior to his death in 1952. It is hoped that this award will serve as a symbol of the man and the ideals for which he stood. The Charles Ernest Seager Memorial Award. The recipient receives a monetary award and his or her name is inscribed on a plaque displayed in the Engineering Building. through superior academic achievement and extracurricular activities. and interest in a materials-related career.C. This award is presented to an outstanding senior in civil engineering who. a graduate of the Class of 1955. and leadership. has demonstrated interest and commitment to environmental engineering as a career. and participation in other college activities and organizations. The award consists of a certificate of recognition. and who has shown diligence in pursuit of an engineering education. Pearsall in memory of her grandfather. in the opinion of the electrical engineering faculty. consists of inscribing the name of the contest winner on a plaque displayed in the Engineering Building. The recipient is chosen by a committee of the mechanical engineering faculty and selection is based on academic excellence. engineering ability. Seeley Scholastic Award. The American Society of Civil Engineers Prize. Heyward Scholarship Award. This award is presented annually to a senior in mechanical engineering for outstanding efforts and accomplishments in behalf of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Student Section at Duke. The award has been established by Patricia S. Selection of the recipient is made by the civil engineering faculty. Gaugler Award in Materials Science and Engineering. have made the most progress in electrical engineering during the last year in school. Jr. a graduate of the Class of 1955. and their names are inscribed on a plaque displayed in the Engineering Building. or design projects completed at Duke. research. established in 1978. The basis for selection is the student's scholastic record. The recipient is presented with an inscribed plaque and his or her name is also inscribed on a plaque permanently displayed in the Engineering Building. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers Award. Gaugler. The Raymond C. The names of the recipients are inscribed on a plaque displayed in the Engineering Building. Raymond C. to recognize outstanding undergraduate scholarship. The William Brewster Snow Award in Environmental Engineering. contribution to the student chapter. The George Sherrerd III Memorial Award in Electrical Engineering. Recipients receive a monetary award. The prize consists of a certificate of award and the payment of one year's dues in the American Society of Civil Engineers. This award is given annually to the graduating Tau Beta Pi member who symbolizes best the distinguished scholarship and exemplary character required for membership. who. The Otto Meier. established in 1958 by the widow and friends of Charles Ernest Seager. as shown by their grades. and spirit. The name of the recipient is inscribed on a plaque displayed in the Engineering Building. and. This award is presented annually to the senior who has made the most progress at Duke in developing competence in materials science or materials engineering. The name of the recipient is inscribed on a plaque displayed in the Engineering Building. This award recognizes outstanding achievement in the annual Student Prize Paper Contest of the Duke branch of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers or significant contributions to electrical engineering. upon recommendation of the faculty of the civil engineering department. This award is presented annually to the senior in electrical engineering who. The prize is awarded annually by the North Carolina Chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers to two outstanding civil engineering seniors. The prize consists of a certificate of award and one year's payment of dues in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers for the membership year in which the honoree is awarded the baccalaureate degree. has attained the highest level of scholastic achievement in all subjects and has rendered significant service to the Pratt School of Engineering and the university at large. This award is presented annually by the Engineers' Student Government to that member of the graduating class of the school who has achieved the highest scholastic average in all subjects. in the opinion of the faculty of that department. The Milmow Prize. Meier's leadership in establishing the North Carolina Gamma Chapter in 1948 and his continuous service as chapter advisor until 1975. This award was established in recognition of Dr. This award.

made a significant contribution to life at Duke. This award commemorates the work of von Helmholz in laying the foundations of biomedical engineering. If desired. This award. Pas Award. established in 1980. Two cash awards are made annually to undergraduates through the Rare Book. and evidences potential for success in law was established by Ms. The Raymond D. Vail Award. and Special Collections Library which is housed within Perkins Library. Mrs. promote. M. This fund was created by the family of Kevin Deford Gorter to assist. Chester P. Lublin. Chiang Grants. former Director of Undergraduate Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering.D. This award to an outstanding graduating senior who will be attending law school and who has excelled in academics. Notification of Intention to Graduate The Diploma Form for students in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences and the Pratt School of Engineering is official notification that they expect to have completed all requirements for the degree and to receive the diploma on a particular graduation date. is sent to prospective graduates at their acpub e-mail addresses. This award commemorates the contributions of Leonardo da Vinci in laying the foundations for the study of biomechanics. The Eric I. 1944. The William Senhauser Prize. Trinity ‘61. Richard K. a member of the Class of 1942. and expand the Sport Clubs program at Duke University. Raymond D. The von Helmholz Award. This fund was created by the family and friends of Sirena WuDunn. This award is presented by a faculty committee of the Department of Biomedical Engineering to the biomedical engineering senior who has made the most outstanding contribution to the department. stipends for independent research or publications development and for needbased grants for study in Asia). The Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Faculty Award.Lublin. These awards were established to encourage and recognize excellence in research and writing by Duke students in their use of primary source materials held by the Rare Book. Lublin. to be submitted during the fall registration period. Given by the mother of William Senhauser in memory of her son. who gave his life in the Pacific theater of war on August 4. a practicing attorney and former member of the Trinity College Board of Visitors. The award consists of a certificate of recognition and the name of the recipient inscribed on a plaque displayed in the Engineering Building. This award is presented by a faculty committee of the Department of Biomedical Engineering to the biomedical engineering senior with the most outstanding academic record. This award to an outstanding graduating senior who will be attending medical school and who has excelled in both science and non-science areas of the curriculum was established in the name of an honored physician and surgeon by his wife. Eric Pas. An award is made annually to the student who has made the greatest contribution to the program and best exemplifies the purposes of Sport Clubs at Duke University. This award. is presented annually by the faculty of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering to a civil engineering senior in recognition of outstanding academic achievement. Manuscript. This award is made annually to the student in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences or the Pratt School of Engineering who has made the greatest contribution to the university through participation and leadership in intramural sports. Palmer Award. is presented to the graduating civil engineering senior judged by the faculty of the Department to have conducted the most outstanding independent study project. These grants support student projects with the goal of furthering Asian/ American understanding (qualifying projects would include the development and teaching of house courses. Raymond Lublin in honor of her son Richard K. The Sirena WuDunn Memorial Scholarship Fund. the diploma form. and Special Collections Library. This award recognizes the most outstanding undergraduate student teaching assistant in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. paper 70 Academic Procedures and Information . This award is presented annually in recognition of academic excellence to the graduating mechanical engineering senior who has attained the highest level of scholastic achievement in all subjects. SPORTS Kevin Deford Gorter Memorial Endowment Fund. Middlesworth Awards. The Charles R. established in 1998 in memory of Dr. travel grants to educational conferences. GENERAL EXCELLENCE WITH SPECIAL INTERESTS The Janet B. Manuscript. Awards are made annually to students who best embody Sirena’s ideals and interests and who have demonstrated academic excellence and interest in Asian culture. Premedical Award. It is the responsibility of students to submit the form on or before established deadlines. For students in Trinity College. The name of the recipient is inscribed on a plaque displayed in the Engineering Building. Aubrey E.The da Vinci Award. Lublin Pre-Law Award.

In the Pratt School of Engineering. Ideally. dates of attendance. They are sent copies of correspondence to students notifying them of changes in their academic standing or regarding unsatisfactory performance which may lead to academic dismissal or the necessity of attending summer school. degrees and awards received. with the necessary specific authorization and consent. The request must be made in writing and submitted to their academic dean by February 8. challenge the content of these records. Additionally. Graduation and Commencement Graduation exercises are held once a year in May when degrees are conferred upon and diplomas are issued to those who have completed degree requirements by the end of the spring term. The Office of the Registrar sends grade reports to students at the end of each term and midterm reports to first-year students and their parents or guardians. e-mail addresses. without the written consent of the student. and most recent previous educational institution attended. Parents and guardians may also be alerted to emergency and extraordinary situations which may impinge upon a student's well being. weight and height of members of athletic teams. Students who are within four course credits of graduation at the end of the spring term may request to participate in the annual graduation exercises. as appropriate. An explanation of the complete policy on education records may be obtained from the Office of the University Registrar. other available information is provided routinely to parents and guardians of undergraduates by the Office of the Dean. privacy.copies can be obtained from the deans in Trinity College. Those who complete the requirements by the end of the summer term or by the end of the fall term receive diplomas dated September 1 or December 30. diploma forms are available in the dean’s office. participation in officially recognized activities and sports. No information. Procedure for Resolution of Students’ Academic Concerns Trinity College provides formal educational opportunities for its students under the assumption that successful transmission and accumulation of knowledge and intellectual understanding depend on the mutual efforts of teachers and students. except directory information (see below) and notices about academic progress to parents and guardians (see page 62). telephone listing. It is primarily the responsibility of students to keep parents and guardians informed of their academic standing and progress as well as any difficulties which may affect their performance. It is the responsibility of the student to provide the Office of the University Registrar and other university offices. the college offers a range of learning experiences in which students strive to learn enough to be able to Graduation and Commencement 71 . major field of study. This information may be released to appear in public documents and may otherwise be disclosed without student consent unless a written request not to release this information is filed in the Office of the University Registrar. and release of information as they pertain to students' educational records. photograph. using appropriate procedures. respectively. contained in any student records is released to unauthorized persons outside the university or to unauthorized persons on the campus. Education Records Duke University adheres to a policy permitting students access to their education records and certain confidential financial information. The Provision of Academic Information to Parents and Guardians Duke University complies with the policies set forth in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy act of 1974 concerning confidentiality. addresses. Directory information includes name. Students may request review of any information which is contained in their education records and may.

72 Academic Procedures and Information .) If a student believes that productive discussion with the instructor is not possible. The Dean will review the case and decide whether there are grounds to convene an ad hoc Committee for Review of Grade. If a student’s concern involves a departmental policy rather than an individual course. through the preparation of course materials and the freshness of view of their students. addresses. student-faculty interrelationships in certain courses give rise to concerns that. criteria for evaluation of students. After meeting with the instructor. the student may make a formal complaint to the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the department or program concerned. if requested. The faculty and administration of Trinity College attempt to be genuinely responsive to all such matters and a student should not hesitate to seek assistance from faculty and administrative officers in resolving problems. If the problem concerns a specific course. Staff members in the department offices can assist in arranging appointments with the directors. Sometimes. depending on which college or school offered the course in question. the student should discuss the matter with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. an instructor’s methods of presentation. If the Chair or the DUS agrees with the instructor that there are no legitimate grounds for which to change the grade. A list of the names. to the attention of the Senior Associate Dean of Trinity College or the Senior Associate Dean for Education in the Pratt School of Engineering. When this occurs. A student may initiate this more formal appeal procedure by bringing his or her problems with assurance of confidentiality. it should be directed to the appropriate senior associate dean in the college or school in which the course is taught. however. is encouraged to confer with an academic dean of Trinity College or Pratt School of Engineering. a formal procedure of appeal to the Senior Associate Dean of Trinity College or the Senior Associate Dean for Education in the Pratt School of Engineering is available. When necessary. If the DUS and Chair believe there are grounds to consider a change and the instructor is unwilling to change the grade. directors of undergraduate studies may refer students to the department chairman. and the two of them will review the case with the instructor involved. Undergraduate Grade Review Procedure. for whatever reason. and telephone numbers of the various directors of undergraduate studies can be found in the University Directory. can inhibit successful teaching and learning. In those exceptional cases where a problem remains unresolved through informal discussion. then the grade is not changed. who will request information about the nature of the issue and about the earlier efforts made to deal with it. and faculty. in his or her absence. The DUS will present the case to the Chair of the department or program Director. Undergraduate Grade Review Procedure A student who questions a final grade received in a course should first discuss the matter with the instructor within thirty days of receiving the grade. discover nuances in their disciplines. when concerned about a grade. (See the following section. or administrative procedures in a course should be directed to the instructor of the course. the level of discourse. the student should first confer with the director of undergraduate studies in the department.test their ideas against those of the faculty. students often need assistance in resolving the issues. if the student still believes the instructor has assigned an inaccurate or unjustified grade. to the chairman of the department. the grade stands as recorded. courtesy requires that the instructor be informed before the student refers questions about the course to the director of undergraduate studies or. the DUS will notify the student that he or she may request a review of the case by writing to the Dean of Arts and Sciences or the Dean of the Pratt School of Engineering. If the Dean decides there are no grounds. A student in doubt about how to proceed in discussing a particular problem. If no satisfactory resolution is reached. or who seeks resolution of a problem. Questions about course content. A written request must be submitted before the end of the drop-add period of the semester following that for which the instructor recorded the grade.

and the Dean may initiate a grade change if that is the recommendation of the committee. the Dean will charge and convene an ad hoc Committee for Review of Grade. it is expected that the instructor and the student will meet to discuss and prepare in writing the conditions under which the student may return to the course. The academic dean will investigate the matter to determine whether the student should be referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs for consideration of formal charges of violation of university policies including “Classroom Disruption.” and/or “Failure to Comply. either the Executive Committee of the Arts and Sciences Council or the Engineering Faculty Council. This committee will then evaluate and review the case. Exclusion of Disruptive Students from a Course The successful conduct of courses depends upon a basic spirit of mutual respect and cooperation among the participants. an appeal is to be directed to the Senior Associate Dean of Trinity College. The decision of the senior associate dean in such a case is final. the instructor may ask the student to leave the class meeting.If the Dean decides that there are grounds to proceed.” If “probable cause” resulting in further judicial action is not found. If the student or the faculty member wishes to appeal the decision of the academic dean. Students who ignore official rules and requirements will at the least have their registration for the next academic semester blocked by their academic dean until after the close of the last window of that registration period.” “Disorderly Conduct. as this is a breach of the Duke Community Standard and a “failure to comply” as described in the The Duke Community Standard in Practice: A Guide for Undergraduates. in such a way that it seriously compromises the educational experience of the course for other students and/or prevents the instructor from accomplishing the goals of the course as outlined in the syllabus. If the disruptive behavior continues. If a student disrupts a class. Afterward. The committee shall consist of the Dean and two regular rank faculty members from the same division but not the same department (or from different departments in Pratt School of Engineering). Compliance with Academic Regulations Under no circumstances may students ignore official rules and requirements. a notation of W will be recorded on the student’s academic record. the matter is to be referred to the student’s academic dean who will make a decision concerning the status of the student in the course. The two faculty members of the committee are to be nominated by the appropriate faculty council. the instructor may report the matter to the student’s academic dean. the academic appellate officer for the College. If the student is permanently excluded from the course. Exclusion of Disruptive Students from a Course 73 . They could also be subject to involuntary withdrawal for a period of two semesters and/or referred to the Undergraduate Judicial Board for possible disciplinary action.

Programs.Special Study Centers. and Opportunities .

and to participate in DUCIS-organized conferences. Current areas of focus are globalization and equity. seminars. Japan. and emerging regional powers. summer research support for undergraduate students and administers the Fulbright program for graduating seniors. Current efforts within DUCIS are the Concilium on Southern Africa and the secretariat of the Association of International Education Administrators. It sponsors film series. Each year. DUCIS hosts international speakers with whom undergraduates can have direct contact. bring leading scholars and practitioners to the campus. human rights. Courses offered cover a range of disciplines including Chinese. who advises students seeking careers in the foreign service. DUCIS provides substantial support for undergraduate education from its federal funding as well as from its own endowments. who are on campus from a few weeks to a full academic year. DUCIS supports a wide range of global thematic programs. Department of State. Faculty members receive curriculum development grants that underwrite organizing new globally thematic courses for undergraduates. DUCIS welcomes visiting scholars. DUCIS funds. DUCIS was instrumental in developing new area studies centers at Duke. It is also the recipient of numerous grants from other federal agencies and from private foundations. global artistic production.Campus Centers and Institutes INTERNATIONAL AND AREA STUDIES PROGRAMS Duke University Center for International Studies (DUCIS). In more recent years. The seminars.S. and performances. The center regularly hosts a Diplomat-in-Residence from the U. Department of Education. Asian/Pacific Studies. Japanese. which meet every two to three weeks. are administered by the center. In recognition of its commitment to international studies. graduate students. and Korea. Located in the John Hope Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies. it has concentrated on initiating new centers and programs with strong interdisciplinary and interregional emphases. readings. one on global governance and democracy and the other on globalization and the artist. on a competitive basis. DUCIS has been designated a Comprehensive National Resource Center for International Studies by the U. DUCIS serves as the administrative arm for the Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs and Development.S. The center offers numerous opportunities for faculty members. art exhibitions. with emphasis on China. and lectures. and undergraduate students to pursue the study of international issues. Two university seminars. global health. and Campus Centers and Institutes 75 . Historically. The Asian/Pacific Studies Institute supports and encourages the study of Asian societies within the Pacific region.

Portuguese and Spanish. conferences. The center also sponsors visiting professors and lecturers from Latin America. At the graduate level the institute offers a certificate and an M. art history. and Opportunities . Box 90254. Majors are available at the undergraduate level through the International Comparative Studies program (East Asian concentration) or through the Department of Asian and African Languages and Literature. such as conferences on contemporary trends in European politics and society and recent developments in the European Union. curriculum development. telephone (919) 681-3981. which offers courses introducing students to various aspects of Canadian life and culture.Korean (language and literature). and teaching activities concerned with historical and contemporary European issues. Durham. Study abroad opportunities are available in China (Duke credit) and Japan (transfer credit).S. CENTER FOR DOCUMENTARY STUDIES The Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) at Duke University teaches. and library materials acquisition. history. Funded in part by the U.edu/. With the support of the U. e-mail: las@duke. Programs. life. a speakers series. including FLAS fellowships. religion. library resources and research clusters. and films. law. Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. cultural anthropology. the social sciences. engages in. and promotes research and dissemination of knowledge about the region. conferences. Web site: http://clacs. in East Asian Studies. The Canadian Studies Center administers the Canadian Studies Program. The committee also sponsors visiting lectures. are available annually. linguistics and language training. A West Europe concentration is available for International Comparative Studies majors.S. Additional information about this certificate program can be found in the chapter "Courses and Academic Programs. The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies coordinates undergraduate and graduate education in Latin American and Caribbean Studies. In addition. psychology.A. For more information consult the academic coordinator at Room 138 Franklin Center. Canadian Studies Center. business. political science. It also supports faculty-student working groups. graduate training. literature. political science. Scholarships and fellowships. this joint Duke-University of North Carolina Center coordinates interdisciplinary efforts primarily in the fields of Russian (including Soviet) and East European history. which students can earn in conjunction with their bachelor's degree.edu. and East European Studies. and sociology. economics. and culture. the center and the Institute for the Study of the Americas at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill sponsor the Consortium in Latin American Studies that includes occasional exchanges of faculty members from each institution and joint undergraduate and graduate student seminars as well as the annual Latin American Film Festival and the annual consortium conference. and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography. Courses and lectures in a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences are designed to increase students' knowledge and understanding of Canada. Faculty associated with the Duke-University of North Carolina Center for European Studies promote comparative research. this program regularly sponsors campus-wide events." Faculty associated with the center offer a wide range of courses in the humanities.duke. Concentrations in Canadian studies are described in the chapter ''Courses of Instruction.aas. symposia. Center for European Studies. and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory. film/video. Center for Slavic.'' Study abroad opportunities are available. Language instruction in Russian. NC 27708-0254. and Ukrainian is available. Polish. Department of Education. The institute provides support for visiting speakers and conferences. Special emphasis is placed on Canadian problems and comparisons of Canadian and American perspectives. and summer and academic year programs abroad. The center offers an interdisciplinary undergraduate certificate in Latin American Studies. Department of Education. Eurasian. audio. CDS achieves this work through academic 76 Special Study Centers.

the Hart Leadership Program. Additionally. while mastering the broader background of studies in public policy. community-based projects. and other students of documentary methods. 1317 W. students at Duke have the option of completing requirements for an undergraduate Certificate in Documentary Studies. The center administers the Policy Journalism and Media Studies Certificate. and professional documentarians.edu. In its approach to education. oral history and other fieldwork. including but not limited to the Office of Service Learning. and various scholarship programs. and journalism as they relate to a globalized and interconnected world. and public events. CDS created and hosts the Lehman Brady Visiting Joint Chair Professorship in Documentary Studies and American Studies at Duke and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. coordinated by the DCCE. Through the center. DEWITT WALLACE CENTER FOR MEDIA AND DEMOCRACY The DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy in the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy focuses on the study of communications. students have the opportunity to study with leading research scholars. For further information about the center or the certificate. Additional opportunities for student involvement include volunteer work with CDS community-based projects. history.duke. see www. Interdisciplinary undergraduate courses in Documentary Studies are open to students in a variety of majors and fields who wish to incorporate documentary work into their university experiences. activists. which brings a distinguished documentarian to teach on both campuses each year. Center for Documentary Studies. Pettigrew Street.aas. which involves a minimum of six approved courses and completion of a final project. It exists as part of the Office of the University Provost. Undergraduates interested in this field of study register for courses through the Department of Public Policy. Durham.duke. practicing journalists and commentators. research. As part of its undergraduate education program. work-study positions. visiting artists. economics. and a limited number of graduate assistantships. The center’s approach to education emphasizes the analysis of issues relating to media and democracy. NC 27705. For more information about CDS educational opportunities. and ethics. politics. It also offers courses in effective media writing and production. check the Web site at: http://cds. Courses include instruction in documentary tools and techniques along with an examination of documentary traditions.courses. annual awards. mass media. The program’s instructors include faculty members.edu/ or consult the Education Director. CDS also offers a non-credit certificate program in documentary studies in conjunction with Duke Continuing Studies and an increasing number of workshops and institutes for teachers. See also the sections on the certificate program and on public policy studies in the chapter “Courses and Academic Programs.pubpol.edu/centers/dewitt/ or e-mail media@pps.” THE DUKE CENTER FOR CIVIC ENGAGEMENT AND DUKEENGAGE The Duke Center for Civic Engagement (DCCE) serves as the administrative umbrella organization for all undergraduate civic engagement activities at Duke. artists. internships and fellowships. DukeEngage. is a program for undergraduates who want to pursue a summer or semester of intensive field-based work that contributes to the public Campus Centers and Institutes 77 . practices. and other liberal arts. book publishing. CDS emphasizes a balance between individual artistic expression and community goals as students complete documentary projects in off-campus settings. Students enrolled in the certificate program gain a thorough understanding of the press in the policy-making process and engage in courses and internships to learn about the practice of journalism. and media pioneers. Coordination takes place with organizations that connect service and learning. In addition. gallery and traveling exhibitions.duke. audio programs. the center sponsors the undergraduate Melcher Family Award for Excellence in Journalism. the Community Service Center. telephone (919) 660-3663.

chemistry. and problem-solving they are expected to accomplish at Duke. physics. ACADEMIC RESOURCE CENTER The Academic Resource Center (ARC) is composed of three programs—the Academic Skills Instructional Program. (2) as non-degree students. note-taking. economics. for those who have not been full-time college students for at least four years and are now resuming or beginning a bachelor's degree. or abroad. engineering. or international in scope. Programs. Local adult residents are encouraged to pursue academic study at Duke (1) as potential degree candidates. classroom interventions.good. computer science. Academic interventions and support services include. Duke University. and test-taking. one-on-one academic support via the ASIP. call the ARC at (919) 684-5917. The ARC was established in 1984 to offer learning assessment services and academic interventions to all undergraduate students. visit http://dukeengage. and languages. test-preparation. biology. DukeEngage includes three different types of learning opportunities: • those that are sponsored and organized by Duke. For more information. and Services for Students with Learning Disabilities and AD/HD. Students may arrange one-on-one college study skills conferences with an ASIP learning specialist. reading efficiency. Areas to be explored my include time-task management. for those with baccalaureates who now seek a sequence of 78 Special Study Centers. The clinical director reviews a student’s clinical documentation and evaluates the need for interventions and support within the context of the Duke undergraduate curriculum. offers academic interventions to undergraduate students with diagnosed learning disabilities and attention deficit disorders. Students tackle real-world problems and develop valuable skills and self-knowledge that result from an immersive service experience. All services are offered without additional university fees and carry no course credit. Students should call the Academic Resource Center to schedule an individual appointment or for more information about special programming.duke. CONTINUING STUDIES Academic Study. Submissions should be addressed to the Clinical Director. Students are encouraged to gain a greater understanding of their strengths and weaknesses and to develop strategies useful in managing the large amount of reading. and Opportunities . The Academic Skills Instructional Program (ASIP).edu. classroom support. Duke provides funding and administrative support to eligible students who want to address societal issues locally. The Peer Tutoring Program (PTP) provides free peer tutoring in introductory-level mathematics.S. possibly through a class or existing service learning program. Services are designed to support students in their course work and to assist them to develop the broad academic skills necessary for success. the following: testing interventions. DukeEngage projects are local. nationally. ASIP also offers special academic programs throughout the semester. Students who wish to be evaluated for eligibility for academic interventions and/or support services may submit clinical assessment documentation directly to the Academic Resource Center or request that any party in possession of the documentation forward the materials to the ARC on their behalf. and AD/HD academic coaching. • those that are initiated by students through grant proposals. the Peer Tutoring Program. through the Academic Resource Center. Services for Students with Learning Disabilities and AD/HD. The staff consists of professionals from a wide range of disciplines who are dedicated to enhancing the academic lives of the students they serve. • those that Duke coordinates with outside providers that specialize in organizing student internships or volunteer work in the U. national. For more information. but are not limited to. and/or abroad. writing.

NC 27708-0700. These students are given academic counseling by the Office of Continuing Studies and Summer Session and are subject to most of the regulations set forth for degree candidates. The broader interdisciplinary discussion courses impart a cross-disciplinary perspective to the course of study. Courses in the program satisfy the general curriculum first-year Specialized Programs 79 . The Focus Program requires participants to enroll in two seminar courses from the three or four courses offered within the assigned cluster and a half-credit discussion course. interrelated. management of personnel and volunteers. GMAT. December 1 for the spring semester. these short courses offer instruction concerning financial and resource management. Short courses (noncredit) in the liberal arts are offered regularly throughout the year for those interested in personal enrichment or career advancement. Applications may be obtained from the Office of Continuing Studies (the Bishop’s House on East Campus or (919) 684-2621) and must be returned to that office. and mutually reinforcing. Classes are small. and (3) as students completing the last year of work towards a degree at another institution. write or call the Office of Continuing Studies and Summer Session. Durham. Duke University. Taught by experts and practitioners. The program is administered by a faculty director. Specialized Programs THE FOCUS PROGRAM The Focus Program offers first-year and second-year students a variety of interdisciplinary course clusters in the fall and spring semesters. historical. participants of each cluster live in the same residence hall together with other first-year students. Box 90700. The Focus Program at Duke is distinct from other living/learning community programs in several respects. accompanied by a $35 application fee. For brochures on each program and for fuller information. The primary concentration of each cluster encourages study in the social sciences. and math and verbal skills.edu. leadership development. by August 1 for the fall semester. program staff. economic. Students interested in the nonprofit sector or in community development are invited to explore the noncredit course offerings of this program. managerial accounting. logical reasoning. technical communications. they provide opportunities for discussion and individualized research. Remaining elective courses are chosen by the student according to his/ her academic interests. Courses have been designed specifically for the program to help place the topics chosen for specialization in a broad interdisciplinary and global perspective. Student Schedules. and media relations. Test Preparation Program.duke. Since one of the aims of the Focus Program is to encourage the integration of academic life with residential life. engineering. and humanities as well as analysis of the social.edu. learnmore@duke. Nonprofit Management Program. and June 1 for Term II of Summer Session. April 15 for Term I of Summer Session. and a faculty advisory committee representing the various clusters. natural sciences. Short Courses and Certificate Programs. These courses focus on the skills critical for a good test performance: test-taking techniques. each course is centered on a common theme. The Focus Program draws its offerings from courses taught by over sixty Duke University professors in twenty-nine cooperating departments and centers within two institutes and four schools. or www. and political roots and problems of the topics. human resource management.undergraduate credit courses. Other offerings and certificate programs include teaching English as a second language. Focus Program participants may choose their own roommates and make other residential requests through the Residential Life and Housing Services office. and LSAT exams. Test preparation classes are offered in the fall and spring for the GRE.learnmore. (919) 684-6259. and paralegal studies. time management.

edu. trains. Navy. Direct inquiries to the Department of Aerospace Studies. The four-year program consists of both the General Military Course (GMC). All other successful POC applicants will attend an extended encampment. and detailed information on scholarships. Between the junior and senior years. Upon graduation and acceptance of a commission. Students who complete both the freshman and sophomore years of the program and successfully compete for entry into the POC will attend a four-week training encampment.duke. and Opportunities . The Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC). Questions and comments may be directed to the Focus Program office. in the Army Reserve. The Focus Program runs a program of follow-up grants for participants. entrance requirements. A three. Students may compete for one through four year scholarships. Grants and Awards. Programs. a course sequence taken during the freshman and sophomore years. Applications are accepted each semester for projects conducted during the following semester or during the summer. fax: (919) 684-4515. and commissioning requirements is available from the offices of the Department of Aerospace Studies (Air Force). Two programs are available. the Department of Military Science (Army). 265 Trent Building. e-mail: focus@duke. All uniforms and some texts are provided.edu. There is one mandatory summer training requirement. Students wishing to join the two-year program must confer with the Department of Military Science not later than March 1 of their sophomore year in order to qualify for a summer internship and two-year scholarship. or Marine Corps. (919) 684-9370.S. RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS Duke University and the military services cooperate in offering officer education programs to provide opportunities for students to earn a commission in the United States Air Force. books.seminar requirement. as directed 80 Special Study Centers. All members of the POC receive the nontaxable stipend. Leadership Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). The Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps (AROTC). AFROTC selects. Current Focus Program information may be found on the program Web site: http://focus. and commissions college men and women as officers in the U.or four-year program consists of the Basic Course (freshman and sophomore years) and the Advanced Course (junior and senior years). and the Department of Naval Science (Navy and Marine Corps). and the Professional Officer Course (POC) taken during the junior and senior years. 226–227 Academic Advising Center. Air Force. These programs are described below. Entry into the POC is competitive and requires successful completion of a field-training encampment during the summer between the sophomore and junior years. and a monthly tax-free stipend of $300-$500. Courses offered in these departments are described in the chapter ''Courses of Instruction'' in this bulletin. AFROTC offers a four-year and a two-year curriculum leading to a commission as a second lieutenant. or in the Army National Guard. POC cadets are given the opportunity to volunteer for advanced training in a variety of different areas.duke. The GMC is open to freshmen and sophomores. Air Force for a period of at least four years.edu/afrotc. Upon graduation all cadets are assigned to active duty with the U. (919) 660-1860 or visit www. Army. These grants are intended to help students continue the experience through research and projects with a faculty mentor. the threeor four-year progression program and the two-year lateral entry program. Army ROTC provides students of strong character with an opportunity to develop themselves as scholar/athlete/ leaders and earn a commission as an Army officer. These scholarships pay up to full tuition. the service obligation may be fulfilled on active duty. Direct entry into the Advanced Course (a two-year program) is possible by attending a (4) week Leadership Training Course (LTC) during the summer.S. Courses will also fulfill other general curriculum requirements (Areas of Knowledge and Modes of Inquiry). which takes place over a five-week period between the junior and senior years.

The student pays any special fees required of students at the host institution. AGREEMENTS WITH OTHER UNIVERSITIES Neighboring Universities. Box 90752. one interinstitutional course per summer may be taken at a neighboring institution participating in this agreement provided that the student is concurrently enrolled at Duke for one full course credit. Nonscholarship Advanced Course cadets also receive the $300-$500 monthly stipend. Students seeking further information on the NROTC program may call or visit the Department of Naval Science. and textbooks at government expense under the auspices of the Scholarship Program. and nomination by the Professor of Naval Science.000 per year). This agreement does not apply to contract programs such as the American Dance Festival or to study abroad programs. Selected students may receive up to four years of tuition. Nonscholarship students may be enrolled in the College Program. Detailed information is available from the Department of Military Science. Uniforms and naval science textbooks are provided by the government. and $300-$500 per month for each month in school (up to $5. Approval forms for courses to be taken at these neighboring institutions may be obtained from the offices of the academic deans and the University Registrar. Under the same conditions. and equipment allowance. but attend the university at their own expense. Trent Hall. Under a plan of cooperation. Courses taken at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill by Duke students in the Robertson Scholarship Program (a joint scholarship program for students at Duke and Specialized Programs 81 . (919) 660-3700. The courses may be eligible for Area of Knowledge and Modes of Inquiry coding. a $1. Only those courses not offered at Duke will be approved. Credit so earned is not defined as transfer credit since grades in courses taken under the interinstitutional agreement are entered on the official record and used in determining the grade point average. North Carolina Central University in Durham. (919) 660-3090. College Program students may compete for scholarship status through academic performance. Students in either program may qualify for a commission in the Marine Corps through the Marine Corps Option Program. In addition. 06 West Duke Building. Approval must be obtained at Duke from the Director of Undergraduate Studies of the subject of the course and the student’s academic dean. scholarship students receive subsistence pay and summer active duty pay of approximately $3. A minimum of four years of active duty service as a reserve officer is required upon graduation. cadets submit a preference statement concerning the method by which they wish to fulfill their service obligation and the specialty in which they desire to serve. At the beginning of the senior year. The Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC). Trent Drive. in the “students” section. A request to delay the fulfillment of the service obligation in order to attend graduate or professional schooling is also possible. uniforms. demonstrated aptitude for military service. Each summer they participate in four weeks of training either aboard ship or at naval shore facilities to augment their academic studies. fees. Forms are also available online at the Office of the University Registrar Web site. East Campus. which pay full tuition and fees. the interinstitutional agreement among Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Department of Naval Science offers students the opportunity to become Navy and Marine Corps officers upon graduation. North Carolina State University at Raleigh. a student regularly enrolled in Duke University as a degree-seeking student and paying full fees may enroll for one approved course each semester at one of the institutions in the cooperative program unless an equivalent course is offered at Duke in the same academic year. Cadets are encouraged to compete for Army ROTC scholarships. All of the above benefits are tax-free. or (800) 222-9184. the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.200 textbook.000 a year. They take the same courses and wear the same uniform. Room 361. and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.by the Secretary of the Army.

faculty director. Students are selected via applications submitted before September 25 in 82 Special Study Centers. public and private. is open to all students. and related fields. Students may study for a semester at either institution while students from these institutions enroll for the same period at Duke. The Summer Internships in the City program runs through Summer Sessions I and II and has two components.e. It aims to give students interested in finance a fuller picture of the opportunities available –academic. and music recording industries as well as contemporary art and entertainment law.edu/DukeinNY/ DUKE IN LOS ANGELES PROGRAM IN MEDIA ARTS AND INDUSTRIES This interdisciplinary. The Summer Internships in the City program does not include an NYU course. an arts internship. For more information please go to: http://econ. museum and gallery management. However. The program has four components. Programs. film and television. They take two courses at the University of Southern California (USC): one is in the School of Cinema-TV. and professional contacts in their area of interest. More information about this program is available in 02 Allen Building. Domestic Exchange Programs. consult Professor Marianna Torgovnick. Moreover. D. The internships may be in the fields of visual or performing arts.the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) are interinstitutional courses. Program participants receive four course credits. For more information. mentoring from Duke Alumni in the industry. the restriction on the number of courses and the kind of courses (i.C. each earning one Duke credit: one seminar taught by faculty from Duke during Summer Session I. The program is offered in the spring of each year. A substantive paper is required. sponsored by the Film/Video Digital program. They will gain firsthand knowledge of financial regulations and institutions both through coursework and personal interactions with Duke Alumni in the industry. off-campus study program for students wishing to engage in an intensive study of the arts that includes an internship. shadowing experiences.duke. hands-on experience with a business consulting project. and an arts internship that will run the length of both Summer Sessions. television. DUKE IN NEW YORK FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM The Duke in New York Financial Markets and Institutions Program introduces students to the financial services industry. and an elective course at New York University. or the Annenberg School for Communication. spring semester program. guest lectures and panels. and Opportunities . visits to trading floors. literary arts. DUKE IN NEW YORK ARTS AND MEDIA PROGRAM The Duke in New York Arts and Media Program is a fall-semester. It should particularly appeal to those interested in the film. They also take two Duke courses: a required seminar taught by the Duke faculty director (Film/Video/Digital 197S: Special topics in the United States Culture Industries) and a 15-hour/week internship (Film/Video/Digital 112S: Media Arts Internship in Los Angeles) which is chosen by the student and requires a substantive internship paper. Trinity College has exchange programs with two domestic institutions: Howard University in Washington. Georgia.. Students should leave the program with practical knowledge in the finance field. It incorporates four full-credit courses taught in NYU's Kimmel Center. or the Thornton School of Music. those not offered at Duke) permitted does not always apply. the second is a USC elective course. each earning one Duke credit: two seminars taught by faculty from Duke. and socials hosted by financial institutions. and Spelman College in Atlanta. The program is a joint venture between the Department of Economics and Markets & Management Studies. Robertson Scholars should refer to program materials for specific regulations. students will have a sense of the community of Duke Alumni and other professionals in the finance industry. group business consulting projects..

Duke University Marine Lab.nicholas. The situation of the Duke Marine Lab provides easy access to marine habitats. and boats. The Marine Lab serves students in the biological and environmental sciences as well as those in social science. Summer Sessions I and II).the fall semester. The Undergraduate Research Support (URS) Office in Trinity College promotes student learning through research by increasing the number and diversity of opportunities for students.duke. e-mail: ml_admissions@nichlas. only three course credits Specialized Programs 83 . and Bogue Sounds are rich with estuarine life and fringed by expansive salt marshes. by fostering mentoring and by supporting Trinity College's curriculum requirement for all students. The Rachel Carson National Estuarine Research Reserve and undeveloped Outer Banks stretch to the east of Pivers Island. spring. Singapore. eight for a full academic year. at certain British.. two for a summer—a student is expected to take a full. Spring. Albemarle. which offer students opportunities for extended travel with Duke faculty to places like France. For additional information and enrollment forms. Fall and Spring courses include Beaufort Signature Courses. administrative coordinator. Approved non-Duke programs earn transfer credit. at (919) 660-3030 for an application and more information. visit http://www. North Carolina. as defined by the other institution involved. however. an application is required so that student records can be appropriately coded. No pre-matriculation credit will be awarded for college course work completed on a study abroad program undertaken prior to matriculation at Duke. classroom buildings. and summer. is a 15-acre campus with research laboratories. contact the Academic Services Office. Consult with Carolyn Leith. DUKE UNIVERSITY MARINE LABORATORY (Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences) The Marine Laboratory of Duke University. offers competitive research fellowships for summer research and organizes summer research programs in multiple disciplines. and Japanese universities for the full academic year can transfer a maximum of eight courses. including coastal settings with contrasting degrees of development. STUDY ABROAD (Office of Study Abroad) A Duke student may earn credit for approved work completed during the academic year at a foreign university or for an approved program abroad sponsored by Duke or by another approved American college or university in the fall. 135 Duke Marine Lab Rd. Residential undergraduate courses are offered year round (Fall. Duke students in good standing are automatically accepted to the Marine Lab’s academic programs. Small class sizes and an island setting facilitate rewarding student-faculty interactions. Panama.edu or visit www. and engineering. a spit of heavily developed land. and Japanese universities which are on the trimester system. The office provides assistantships and grants through the academic year.edu/web/film/dula. Beaufort.edu/trinity/research. North Carolina 28516 (252-504-7502). Students attending certain British. Shallow waters of the Pamlico. to the west is Bogue Banks. a dining hall. normal course load. and Trinidad. The responsible Duke departments.duke. dormitories. located on Pivers Island in the historic town of Beaufort. However. humanities. Irish. make the final decision on the final number of credits transferable. To receive the maximum amount of transfer credit at Duke—generally four course credits for a full semester. For detailed information.duke. Irish.edu/marinelab.aas. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SUPPORT OFFICE Duke University actively strengthens connections between its undergraduate students' academic experience and the research endeavors of its faculty scholars and investigators.duke. Additional information and materials are available on the Web at: www.

edu/policies. Participants must have at least one year of Chinese language prior to departure. To determine eligibility to earn recognition for honors such as Dean’s List while studying abroad. unless otherwise noted. A student on academic or disciplinary probation or one who does not meet academic continuation requirements will not be permitted to study abroad. while abroad. as well as approval of the program and the courses by the dean responsible for study abroad and by the student's academic dean. Transfer credit courses may.duke. Information on these programs is available in the Office of Study Abroad. 2016 Campus Drive. of the appropriate directors of undergraduate studies for the courses to be taken abroad. they enroll in two Chinese language 84 Special Study Centers. consult the section on Academic Recognition and Honors or your academic dean.may be transferred for the single fall trimester. a scholastic grade point average of at least 2. and Opportunities . from the foreign language department concerned. When studying abroad. 2. and on the Web at http://studyabroad. Transfer credit will be awarded for work satisfactorily completed in Duke-approved programs abroad when the conditions outlined are met. Modes of Inquiry codes are only available to transfer courses through a petition process upon return. The Duke-administered programs are as follows: China. They will be given a personal leave of absence.7 for semester or academic year study abroad—a student lacking this average may petition the academic dean responsible for study abroad if there are unusual circumstances. Arrangements are normally made for students to register. While in China. Detailed information about independent study while abroad may be found at http://studyabroad. In cooperation with Yunnan Normal University. 3. International students may receive a total of two domestic transfer credits for study in their home country. for the term in which they plan to return. See the Financial Information chapter for information concerning fees for studying abroad on Duke-approved semester programs. Duke conducts a spring semester program in Kunming. obtained before leaving Duke. Programs.duke. Beijing. only students who study abroad for the full academic year in the same program are allowed to enroll in an independent course at a foreign institution and only in the second semester of the study abroad sojourn. No additional study abroad transfer credit will be awarded for a course overload. when applicable. Semester and Academic Year Programs Duke currently administers and supervises a number of its own study abroad programs.edu. that the student has an adequate knowledge of the language of the country in which study is pursued. Duke faculty are directly involved and the courses receive Duke credit. carry Area of Knowledge codes. Students attending such universities in the spring are required to attend the two remaining trimesters and may transfer a maximum of five credits. certification. students who have been dismissed for any academic reason must successfully complete a full semester on campus prior to being eligible for study abroad.html#independentstudy and in the Study Abroad Handbook. Students studying abroad on semester programs not administered by Duke will be charged a study abroad fee. approval. A student who wishes to receive credit for study abroad should take into account the following criteria established by the faculty and administered by the Faculty Committee on Study Abroad: 1. upon evaluation. Similarly. In these programs. Students who have been dismissed for any disciplinary reason must complete at least one regular semester with no further infractions on campus prior to being eligible for study abroad. Yunnan Province. as courses on campus do. regardless of the student’s acceptance in a program. Seniors planning to spend their final semester abroad are subject to the residence requirement and may face postponed graduation because transcripts from abroad are often delayed.

and Italian language. This fall or spring semester program is co-sponsored by Duke and the Organization for Tropical Studies. Quito. history.” is based at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador and the Universidad Politécnica Salesiana. Engineering students with only one year of German are eligible for the spring program if they take the special Intensive German for Engineers class in January. and select their remaining courses from offerings at the two host universities. As the administering institution of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. There are three mandatory courses: Mediterranean Cultures. Ludwig Maxmilians Universität (Munich. political science. ecology. students may take either a second classical language or art history. located six kilometers from the center of Florence. Students live in international student dormitories. The language of instruction is French. is on classical languages as well as on local manifestations of history and civilization in the ancient Mediterranean world. Duke students study at the Humboldt University of former East Berlin (fall) and at the Free University of former West Berlin or the Technical University of Berlin (spring). Italy. and Spanish language. in Sicily. Students take one core course designed especially for the program. with an overall B grade average. Students live for three weeks with families. Florence and Italy are the focus of this program. and student apartments. Ecuador. ancient history. Students are housed in a University of Catania residence hall. Germany. but not required. and Italian language and literature. Duke University may send classics majors and other students with strong classical interests for admission to a semester's work at the center. Universitat Autònoma de Specialized Programs 85 . Instruction by way of classroom meetings and on-site lectures in and around Florence is augmented by day-long trips to such cities as Siena and Pisa. VIU is an association of universities from around the world: Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia. Tel Aviv University (Israel). and the social sciences for Duke credit. This program is based at Venice International University. Berlin. and take courses at the 16th-century Villa Corsi-Salvati in Sesto Fiorentino. Greek or Latin (intermediate and advanced). In the fall semester they take specially arranged courses in German language. located on the island of San Servolo. Paris. Sicily. and archaeology. Rome. This semester or academic year interdisciplinary program in Latin American and Andean studies. France. Italy. The spring term requires two years of German or the equivalent. Latin. Some scholarship help is available. Previous Italian language study is encouraged. Students live in French households. The University of Catania. Germany). eat. Duke offers a semester or academic year program in Paris in conjunction with Emory University and Cornell University. In the longer spring semester. Students live with families. Students live. the humanities. and theater. foyers. as in Rome. A host family option is available for students who have had more than two years of Chinese before the start of the program. Costa Rica.courses and two non-language courses. architecture. the University of Michigan and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. For the fourth subject. The focus. Students take four core courses in tropical biology. although at least one year of German is recommended. A consortial program offered jointly by Duke. and two weekend excursions to Rome and Venice. Italy. and the remainder of the semester in dormitories at three research stations. The fall term is open to beginners. film. Scholarship help is also available for this program. Instruction is offered in Greek. Venice. called “Duke in the Andes. Florence. ancient art. usually in the junior year. is the site of a second ICCS classical studies program. Italy. Duke is a partner in this program only in the fall term. up to two of which may be transfer credit chosen from the regular course offerings of the Free University and/or the Technical University of Berlin. Supplemental courses have included music. Most courses are taught in English. Duke University. Università IUAV. Applicants must have completed French through the 100-level or equivalent. The program stresses full immersion in hands-on scientific and language-cultural studies. up to five courses may be taken. which typically offers core courses in Italian art history. for an additional course credit. Students earn Duke credit for program-administered courses and transfer credit for courses taken at the French universities.

based at Bogazici University. Students live in dormitories on the island of San Servolo. Duke-approved programs sponsored by other institutions are not administered by Duke University and all credits earned are transfer credits. and Boston College. all Trinity College and Pratt School of Engineering students are responsible for following the procedures and meeting the deadlines set forth in materials available at 2016 Campus Drive or on the Web. Students take four core courses in South African ecosystems. Information about Duke summer programs abroad and about the 86 Special Study Centers. or on the Web at http://studyabroad. The remaining two classes are electives chosen from the departments of History.Barcelona (Spain). The language of instruction is Spanish. historical. providing students from all partner universities the opportunity to take courses from a variety of international scholars. Duke Summer Programs Abroad The Office of Study Abroad. 2016 Campus Drive. St. The Sanford Institute of Public Policy Studies offers departmental majors the opportunity to study during the fall semester at the University of Glasgow. anthropology. Students live with host families. provides many opportunities for students to study abroad during the summer while earning Duke University credit. and Political Science. Glasgow. and Opportunities . Students are required to take one course with the Duke program director and one course in Turkish language. Tsinghua University (Beijing. field research. history. Duke University offers a semester or academic year program at the Universidad San Pablo in Madrid.edu. Economics. Istanbul. Programs. and history and culture. economics. Philosophy. Subject areas for courses include literature. in cooperation with several university departments. Spain. Scotland. The program is also open to students in other majors. among others. and religious issues emerging at the intersection of Europe and the Middle East. The program aims at improving participants’ Spanish fluency and deepening their understanding of Spain and its many cultures within a global context. and to retain enrollment status at Duke. Sociology. Petersburg and have the opportunity to improve their language skills in a living-learning environment. Japan). A number of approved programs sponsored by other institutions are also available to Duke students for study abroad. Previous Italian language study is encouraged but not required. conservation. Anthropology. To ensure credit from these programs. Students live in residence halls. in suites shared with Turkish and other international students. Students who do not follow the proper procedures will not be guaranteed credit for their study abroad experience. China).duke. Most courses are taught in English. Students live on campus and take the program's special seminar in public policy in addition to three transfer credit electives from the general university curriculum. with particular attention to the unique position of Turkey within the global context. Tilburg University (the Netherlands). Engineering. In all cases. Faculty from all partner universities offer courses at VIU. Waseda University (Tokyo. Students are housed with families. The program is based in Krueger National Park and includes one extended field trip to Cape Town. introduces cultural. The interdisciplinary curriculum of this spring semester program. Petersburg. This fall and spring semester program is co-sponsored by Duke and the Organization for Tropical Studies. and political science. Students are housed in the newest and largest Bogazici University dormitory. Turkey. This fall or spring semester program is offered for undergraduate and graduate students who have studied Russian for two years at the college level. All courses are taught in Russian. art history. the dean for study abroad must be informed in advance about a student's plans. South Africa. Madrid. Students are enrolled in the State University of St. Russia. Further information concerning semester and academic year programs may be obtained at the Office of Study Abroad.

twocourse program provides a comprehensive look at Ghanaian culture and politics. Bahia. The language of instruction is French. Paris. A major research project based on independent fieldwork is required. History of Netherlandish Art and Visual Culture in a European Context.time they will next be offered can be obtained from the Office of Study Abroad. offers two one-course. One year of college-level biology is required. Rio de Janeiro. six-week program provides the opportunity to take Duke courses in Paris. and art specialists. and rural farming villages. Applicants must have completed French 76 or the equivalent. 2016 Campus Drive. is taught in English by a Duke faculty member with Dutch and Flemish guest lecturers. The Office of Study Abroad. Accommodations are in hostels. and museums and craft villages near Kumasi. Students are housed in accommodations of the University of New South Wales. The first five weeks are based in Rio de Janeiro and hosted by the Advanced Program in Contemporary Culture of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Students live in pensions or foyers. home of the Wilson Botanical Gardens. Two semesters of college-level biology and one semester of Spanish or the equivalent are required. Costa Rica. Participants visit numerous Dutch and Flemish cities and museums. In addition to German language courses ranging from elementary to advanced levels. the program includes extensive field trips and excursions to rainforests and the dry northern savannah. Beijing. The double-credit course. The second course is an elective selected from several UNSW options. Germany. six-week program focuses on intensive Portuguese language and Brazilian culture study. Sydney. Accra. just outside Accra. history. and with host families. based at Capital Normal University. six-week program focuses on a contextual study of Late Medieval. China. Brazil. The six-week. The program includes excursions to locations such as the Northern Territory. This two-course. and the Great Barrier Reef. Belgium/Netherlands. Lady Elliott Island. or do one course in German and one in English. Participants must have at least one year of Chinese language to be eligible for the program. Renaissance. This six-week. Ghana. provides students with the opportunity to learn the equivalent of one year of Chinese in a single summer program. the most popular option. Accommodations are in hotels. This two-course. are offered. The Ethnobiology Program is based at the OTS station Las Cruces. coastal fishing towns. The program is based for the first two weeks in Amsterdam (Netherlands) and for the remaining four weeks in Ghent (Flanders). Australia. The following programs have been offered in previous years. Palo Verde. Specialized Programs 87 . hotels. This two-course. France. Based at the University of Ghana at Legon. who also directs this program. This two-course. Students are housed in dormitories. content courses in English. German majors are encouraged to enroll in two German language courses. tours to a former slave fort at Cape Coast and Elmina. Alice Springs. The Tropical Biology Program provides field-based. in collaboration with the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS). Optional homestay provided for students interested in greater language immersion. Non-German studies students may enroll in two elective courses taught in English. and Baroque art and culture in Belgium and the Netherlands. six-week program focuses on Australian environmental studies and is based in Sydney at the University of New South Wales. The program features an excursion to Salvador. and culture. hands-on instruction of tropical biology at OTS’s three field stations—Las Cruces. eight-week program. four-week summer programs in Costa Rica. This two-course. and La Selva—each located in a distinct ecosystem. which have a substantial focus in German politics. One course focuses on environmental/ecological issues and is taught by a professor in the biology department of Duke University. two course program is offered in cooperation with Rutgers University and features faculty from both institutions. Students live with host families. Berlin.

it is the setting for a four-week. The program includes excursions to such famous archaeological sites as Oaxaca and Teotihuacan. and Cordoba. United Kingdom. and readings. This one-course. Oxford. The course is taught in English. and politics. Accommodations are in hotels and onboard ships. The courses are taught in English. and students live with Spanish families. one-course program offers a study of the Classical Greeks’ pronounced emphasis on the rational aspect of human nature which enabled them to lay the foundations for subsequent intellectual developments in western thought. Segovia. four-week program in Rome explores the history and culture of Rome and includes visits to historical sites and museums. Italy. Russian language study at different levels is offered. six-week program in Madrid offers advanced Spanish students further language training as well as the opportunity to study Spanish culture. Both beginning and intermediate levels are double courses and count as two course credits each. and Opportunities . Museum visits. Geneva. The group attends over 20 theater productions in London and Stratford-upon-Avon. art. This program is offered every other year. Istanbul. This two-course. Toledo. one-course summer program focusing on comparative religion. Concentration is on Athens. This six-week. Cholula. London--Drama. Spain. Duke students are able to complete one full year of elementary or intermediate Spanish in this six-week summer program in Mexico. Switzerland. Sevilla. utilizes the Oxford tutorial system of education supplemented by lectures given at the University of Oxford's International Graduate Summer School by noted 88 Special Study Centers. Byzantine. six-week program generally focuses on Venetian culture. two course-credit program at New College. Russia. Students are housed in dormitories at the Cité Universitaire of the University of Geneva. Accommodations are in dormitories. The course examines the history of the city from the earliest times through the Baroque and modern periods. As the only city located between Asia and Europe and capital of the Roman. Both courses are taught jointly by faculty of Duke and a distinguished group of British theater practitioners from London. Petersburg. Students reside at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies. and Ottoman Empires. Petersburg. Accommodations are in a dormitory. Both courses are conducted in Spanish. Courses are taught in English under the direction of a Duke professor. This two-course. This four-week. This two-course. Sample excursions include Barcelona. Venice. Petersburg State University by faculty members of the university. history. Programs. This two-course. Rome. The program features a oneweek excursion to sites in western Turkey and along the Aegean coast. Granada. theater and musical performances. and in hotels during field trips that take them away from Rome. as well as the Cycladic Islands. Classes are taught at St. Students live in a dormitory of the Venice International University on San Servolo Island. Accommodations are with families (intermediate students) and in dormitories (beginning students). This program offers two Russian language and culture courses in St. A minimum of two semesters of college-level Russian is suggested. University of Oxford. Mexico. history. A field trip to Berlin is also included in this program. The courses are Theater in London: Text. Italy. Applicants must have completed Spanish 76 or the equivalent. and literature. For centuries Istanbul has been a major center to all three religions of the Judeo-Christian-Islamic tradition. walking lectures. northern and southern Greece. Salamanca. Madrid. and Theater in London: Performance.Greece. Athens and Islands of the Aegean. six-week program offers the opportunity to study drama using the resources of London's theaters in conjunction with study of dramatic texts. six-week program in Geneva focuses on globalization issues in business and international management. Turkey. Students are housed in an apartment-hotel. United Kingdom. Immersion into Mexican society is accomplished by exposure to both language and Hispanic culture. and local festivals may be included. St. and museum visits in Mexico City.

The Ciompi Quartet. and science. and programs in the Duke Gardens Amphitheater. North Carolina 27708-0072. performances. The festival provides an exciting. the Sarah P. and workshops. carillon recitals. and the University Union. will spearhead a chamber music series with guest artists. Duke's well-known chamber music ensemble. Box 90772. or telephone (919) 684-6402. ethics and society. Areas of study include Shakespeare. politics and government. THE AMERICAN DANCE FESTIVAL The six-week program offers a wide variety of classes.British scholars. write to the American Dance Festival. dance performances. artistically stimulating environment for the campus and community. Victorian literature. film series. British history. Duke Performances. For a catalog. Other special events will include outdoor family events. Duke University. classical and contemporary political philosophy. Special Summer Programs DUKE SUMMER FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS The Duke Summer Festival of Creative Arts is administered jointly by the Summer Session Office. Special Summer Programs 89 . Duke Gardens. Durham.

Campus Life and Activities .

About 82 percent of the undergraduate student body lives on campus each year. support. social. The division collaborates with students. Within the residence halls. except those located in Edens and the Keohane Quads. faculty. see the Web site at: http://rlhs. Upperclass students live in coed residence halls on West Campus. leadership development. single. A primary goal is to facilitate the creation of residential communities in which there are common interests. After the first year. Selective groups include residential fraternities and social communities such as Brownstone and Wayne Manor. space permitting. SHARE. Quads serve as the organizational framework for residence hall student governance. parents. and others in the delivery of key services. and in the Central Campus Apartments. In addition. Leadership opportunities. Eligible students who choose to live off-campus may retain their resident status Student Affairs 91 . and active recreational opportunities. For a current list of residential groups and communities. First-Year-Student Residence Halls. and various academic services and events. faculty dinners/discussions. University housing includes all residence halls as well as Central Campus Apartments. four professional staff members (Residence Coordinators) live on East Campus. Upperclass Residences. a clear indication of student appreciation for and satisfaction with the residential experience. community service opportunities. social and recreational activities. West Campus residence halls are organized into six quadrangles. Students. Residential Life Duke enjoys a long tradition as a residential university and supplements the formal academic education of students by providing a comprehensive residence life program. and physical development. Seniors are free to reside on campus. or off campus in one of the numerous private housing options available near campus.000 undergraduate students. Students enrolled beyond their fourth year and those who attend part-time are not eligible for university housing. each administered by a professional staff member (Residence Coordinator) who resides within the quad. Learning communities include Performing Arts and West Campus Wellness. students will reside in West Campus residence halls. First-year students are assigned randomly to their residence hall. and Prism are among the academically sponsored theme communities. The division is critically engaged in many aspects of students’ lives including the residential experience. staff. and intramural sports are but a few of the offerings in which students may choose to become involved. Each quad also features an array of selective living groups. free-flowing exchange of ideas. or triple rooms are available. see the Web site at: http://studentaffairs. with freshmen living in residence halls on East Campus and sophomores living in residence halls on West Campus. students may also elect to live in Central Campus apartments.duke. and programming. all of which are coed. learning communities. For more information. Semesters taken in "study away" programs are applied to the three-year residency requirement. and health. All students are required to live on campus for their first three years. Central Campus provides another housing option for juniors and seniors—a community of university-owned and operated apartments which accommodate about 1. double. cultural.Student Affairs The mission of Duke Student Affairs is to support the optimal growth of our students in achieving their educational goals and to provide services that enhance their intellectual. civic engagement.duke. triple rooms are available. relaxed social activities.edu/communities. After the second year. Juniors must choose to live either in West Campus residence hall rooms or in Central Campus apartments. and academically sponsored theme groups.studentaffairs. A faculty member lives in-residence in all but two of the first-year houses. Within all upperclass houses.edu. First-year students are required to live in East Campus university residence halls. space permitting. faculty. First-year students reside on East Campus in first-year student houses. The Arts Theme House. and staff work cooperatively to provide programs and activities in keeping with these guiding principles.

located at the Law School. Several dining plans are available that allow a student to make purchases in the various dining locations by accessing a prepaid account carried on the student identification card. serving as resource persons for students. Just off the Bryan Center plaza. and reinforcing behaviors congruent with the Community Standard. salads. sandwiches. The Armadillo Grill offers a variety of Tex-Mex options. also in West Edens Link. and pastries. soft drinks. fresh-squeezed orange juice. The Great Hall offers a wide variety of foods. Dining Facilities All students living in campus residence halls are required to participate in a dining plan. All residential students pay fees as a means of supporting the programming initiatives designed for the enrichment of the community in which they live. Pauly Dogs offers hot dogs. connecting East. all in one location. and lemonade in addition to burritos made by Cosmic Cantina. Alpine Bagels and Brews has bagels. The Perk (Bostock Library) is a traditional coffee bar offering coffees. fresh-squeezed orange juice. lunch. and resident students. and burgers. These graduate and undergraduate students have broad responsibilities in the residence halls which include advising the house leadership. The university provides free on-campus bus service. The primary purpose of the council system is to establish and sustain a vibrant residential community. and southern vegetables. A quad council is elected from constituent members on all three campuses to perform the dual roles of programming and governance. or DukeCard (see the section on food and other expenses in the chapter ''Financial Information''). the Alpine Atrium serves bagels. First-year plans include both board and debit accounts. Subway serves sub sandwiches. yogurt. assorted hot 92 Campus Life and Activities . the Pratt School of Engineering. The Bella Union. Other West Campus operations include Café La Balance (soups/sandwiches). Representatives from each council comprise the Campus Council which serves as the governing body to support and provide direction for residential life. Tommy’s Rubs & Grubs in West Edens Link serves BBQ ribs. salads. California. ice cream. There are a number of seminar rooms located in both east and west residences. it is a one-of-a-kind facility. to facilitate student-faculty interaction outside the formal classroom setting. West. and desserts. chicken. In the West Union Building on West Campus. soft drinks. Residence Hall Programming. With its spacious seating and comfortable sofas.and eligibility for university housing if they follow the proper procedures as published by Residence Life and Housing Services. Faculty members interact regularly with living groups in an effort to facilitate engaging and intellectually stimulating endeavors within the residence halls. In the Bryan Center. serves coffee. and dinner. In all but two of the first-year residence halls. Our 24 hour McDonald’s features a full McDonald’s menu for breakfast. also on West Campus. assorted coffees. smoothies. salads. and Central campuses. and to develop greater sense of community within the individual residence halls as well as within the greater university. Educational and cultural programming is planned and presented throughout the year in the residence halls through the cooperative work of Residence Life and Housing Services. Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. sandwiches. unlike the typical McDonald’s at the mall. plans for upperclassmen are debit accounts. sandwiches. All residence halls have resident assistants who live in-house and are overseen by professional staff in Residence Life and Housing Services. Chick-fil-A offers fried and grilled chicken sandwiches. facilitated by a rich blend of intellectual and co-curricular pursuits. assorted coffees. and desserts. desserts. The Loop Pizza Grill offers gourmet salads. Quenchers Juice Bar in the Wilson Center offers refreshing drinks that complement a healthy lifestyle. and the Sanford Deli in the Sanford Institute for Public Policy. The goals of these various residentially based programs are to enhance the quality of intellectual and social life for the residents on campus.and Chicago-style pizza. faculty members live in the halls and participate in house activities during the academic year. and beverages. and assorted snacks.

Through the religious life of the university. to learn from outstanding theologians from a wide array of traditions. Grace’s Café offers a wide variety of American and authentic Chinese cuisine. In Trent Hall. the East Campus Store on East Campus. and salad bar stations. administers the mediation and student conduct processes. The office plans and implements Parents and Family Weekend and New Student Orientation and coordinates the first-year and transfer student advisory counselors (FACs). the motto on the seal of the university. Central Campus Council. snacks. to provide a ministry which is responsible to the plurality of religious and spiritual interests on the campus. Office of the Dean of Students. The Refectory. and assists students with issues related to offcampus housing. This department is dedicated to creating a residential community supportive of a rich educational experience. Members of the Residence Life and Housing Services staff advise and support residentially-based governing bodies. and late night pizza and sub delivery from approved local vendors. Services Available Residence Life and Housing Services. and the Lobby Shop on West Campus as well as concessions at athletic events. to meditate in the beautiful chapel. This office responds to student and parent concerns. and to work to bring about a more just and humane society.and cold beverages.studentaffairs. pastries. pizza. and the location of the Duke Chapel at the center of the campus. wraps. Jewish. Students may also use their dining plan points to purchase food items in three campus convenience stores: Uncle Harry’s General Store on Central Campus. Muslim. FACs welcome their groups and help to acquaint new students with the university. and Twinnies (Ciemas Building) offers sandwiches and salads. FACs are upperclass men and women who are assigned to small groups of entering students. Our newest eatery. sodas and snacks from vending machines. During orientation. the six quad councils. Staff in Residence Life and Housing Services and the Dean of Students Office oversee the university’s response to student emergencies. and the Campus Council. grill. and ice cream. features coffee and fresh pasteries. desserts. Trinity Café has a diverse selection of quality coffees. an environment-friendly eatery. The Marketplace carries an array of choices including pasta. Blue Express (LSRC Pratt Dining Commons) provides hot and cold sandwiches and entrees. and drinks. Hindu. students are encouraged to search for meaning. and Protestant communities. and assorted beverages. and assists students in planning and presenting educational and cultural programs within the residence halls. The Dean of the Chapel and the Director of Religious Life work with campus ministers and staff from 27 individual groups.. For more information see the Web site at http://rlhs. to ask the ultimate questions. houses undergraduates.duke. deli. provides advising and support to Duke’s student Greek organizations. including Roman Catholic. Buddhist. pastries. Religious Life Two symbols indicate the importance of religion to this university since its founding: Eruditio et Religio. Judicial affairs are handled by coordinating and applying the general rules and regulations of the university as well as working with all participants involved in the Religious Life 93 . is located in the Divinity school and serves breakfast and lunch. It advises individual students regarding residential and interpersonal issues. The Terrace Café in the Duke Gardens features delicious baked goods as well as salads. bakery items. notably the East Campus Council. French Science café. On East Campus. rotisserie. The Office of the Dean of Students oversees undergraduate judicial affairs. to worship.edu. and snacks.

and Sexual Assault Support Services. at home. family members. Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) provides a range of counseling and psychiatric services to address the acute emotional and psychological difficulties of students. is available and may be purchased at the Student Health Center. Each semester. Students must verify and update insurance information each semester in ACES as part of Duke’s online registration process. Counseling and Psychological Services. for assessment and/or treatment. Other 94 Campus Life and Activities . research. including college adjustment. family relationships. The Student Health Center provides medical care. This insurance covers students both on and off campus. The university makes available a medical insurance plan to protect against the high cost of unexpected illnesses or injuries which are not covered by the student health fee and would require hospitalization. African American students. by appointment or walk-in. While students' visits with counselors are usually by appointment. CAPS offers counseling groups and seminars focusing on enhanced self-understanding and coping strategies. and gay. Participation in the Duke plan is mandatory for international students holding a J-1 or F-1 visa.edu. They provide evaluation and brief counseling/psychotherapy for a wide range of concerns. The professional staff is composed of psychologists. the Student Health Center offers a variety of wellness and health promotion programs. The primary location for medical care is the Student Health Center in Duke Clinic (primary entrance on Flowers Drive) where students are seen. and transgender students. lesbian. or the services of specialists. but remaining at Duke. academic performance. All full-time and part-time degree candidates must pay the student health fee for each semester or summer term enrolled at Duke. see the Web site at http://deanofstudents. These students will automatically be enrolled in and charged for the Duke plan. An optional summer fee for students not enrolled in summer session.duke. Waivers are also available to students who are full-time Duke employees or spouses of Duke employees. In addition to medical care. All full-time students and part-time degree candidates are required to enroll in this insurance policy unless they show evidence (the name of the insurance company and policy number) that they are covered by other generally comparable insurance. and intimacy and sexuality. surgery.studentaffairs. students with eating disorders. advice. The Student Health Center. The health promotion staff is available to assist students in making informed choices that support healthy lifestyles at Duke and beyond.edu.disciplinary process. During the academic year. For more information. Counseling and Psychological Services. When a student's health needs warrant additional specialized treatment. Student Health Fee. Student Health Insurance. Waivers of the student health fee are based on access to campus facilities. referrals are made to other health resources within the Duke Health System and healthcare providers in the local community. and education for all currently enrolled full-time students and part-time degree candidates.duke. or other academic activity.studentaffairs. For information about hours of operation and services. or health professionals not involved in the student's immediate care. The student health fee covers most services offered by the Student Health Center. Support groups have been offered for second generation Americans. and psychiatrists experienced in working with college students. bisexual. This policy applies to requests from university officials. students may call 681WELL (681-9355) 24 hours a day for health information and advice. emergencies services are available. Waivers may be granted to students residing more than 50 miles away who do not come to campus for class. clinical social workers. or while between home and school during interim vacation periods throughout the one-year term of the policy. see the Web site at: http:// healthydevil. Students residing on East Campus may also use the East Campus Wellness Clinic in Wilson Hall for assistance in accessing appropriate clinical services. students completing dissertations. friends. self-esteem and identity. Health records of Duke students are confidential and are released only with the student's written permission.

If a student desires information to be released. a student must have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities such as.studentaffairs. Workshops on resume and cover letter writing. A network of alumni volunteers provides career information. and the Graduate School. and sources of summer and full-time work opportunities using a collection of books. call the SASS staff at 919-684-3897 or visit the Women's Center. housing) must contact the Director. law enforcement. For more information. daily drop-in advising hours are available for quick questions. Sexual Assault Support Services. For additional information. In order to receive consideration for reasonable accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). walking.studentaffairs. manner. to explore possible coverage. and learning. Staff members are also available to lead workshops and discussion groups on topics of interest to students. Substantially limiting refers to an impairment that prevents an individual from performing a major life activity or significantly restricts the condition. emotional regulation. In addition to individual appointments.edu. performing manual tasks. or see the Web site at http://caps. call the crisis information line at 682-6882. CAPS' services are covered by the student health fee. breathing. SASS staff work closely with other University departments to provide comprehensive information and advocacy relevant to counseling. This process teaches skills in self-assessment. The Student Disability Access Office (SDAO) assists students with disabilities who are enrolled in Trinity College and the Pratt School of Engineering. periodicals. and other materials housed in the Career Center library. The center serves the students and alumni of Trinity College. hearing. seeing. For more information go to http://career. interview techniques. job-hunting strategies. or Durham Crisis Response Center at 919-403-6562. or duration under which an average person can perform a major life activity. Career Center. A full-time internship coordinator plus a variety of internship resources help students gain practical experience relevant to their career interests. caring for oneself. and shadowing opportunities. employers. academic.edu.. decision-making. career exploration. Career counselors help students begin the process of discovering career interests and options.duke. Student Disability Access Office. SASS offers prevention education to the Duke community and direct service to student survivors as well as their families and friends. written authorization must be provided. speaking. The Office of Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) provides a central on-campus resource for information and assistance regarding sexual violence. For crisis information and referral outside normal business hours. maintains a policy of strict confidentiality concerning information about each student's contact with CAPS. and researching employers are offered regularly to aid students with the job search process. and residential living. meditation and perfectionism. Students requesting accommodations under the provisions of the ADA (e. The staff is available to the university community for consultation regarding student development and mental health. In addition to coordinating the Survivor's Network. at (919) 668-1267. but not limited to. judicial and legal concerns.g. The Career Center provides services and programs that facilitate the career development process for Duke University students and alumni. Students may research career fields.duke. Students with medical conditions not covered under the Services Available 95 . CAPS. and job selection. Duke University is prepared to make reasonable accommodations to allow students with disabilities full participation in the same programs and activities available to students without disabilities. academic issues. the Pratt School of Engineering. the Dean-on-Call. consistent with professional ethics and the North Carolina law.groups have addressed such topics as eating and body image concerns. call (919) 660-1000. Services for Students With Disabilities. a support group for sexual assault survivors. medical services.

All students accommodated under this policy must have their request reviewed prior to the beginning of each semester and are expected to return to full enrollment when/if their health or physical condition improves sufficiently. student loan. state. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act states: "No qualified [disabled] person shall. provides authorized cash advances. For further information regarding this policy. SSC staff members are trained to answer general questions about other services that impact students including student health insurance. manages the North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grant Program. collects forms pertaining to registration and records. at (919) 668-1267. The Student Service Center (SSC) provides assistance with routine transactions and questions associated with student administrative services offices (bursar. or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity that receives benefits from federal financial assistance. Trinity College and the Pratt School of Engineering will accommodate students who have a documented long-term or chronic disability that prevents them from carrying a full course load. Students so authorized (and for as long as they continue to enroll in a course underload) are exempted from meeting normal continuation requirements. and student health services. parking. Students approved for a part-time course load are eligible for financial aid in accordance with federal. and an ePrint station . The compliance officer can be reached at (919) 684-8222. prints official transcripts. These students must pass at least five of six consecutive courses while on a course underload. on the basis of [disability].provisions of the ADA must contact Duke Student Health Service at (919) 684-3367 for further information. and processes classroom reservations for onetime events. The office accepts and posts payments to student accounts. and university guidelines. external loan. a DukeCard selfservice station where students can add dining and FLEX points to their DukeCard. In the interest of providing reasonable accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act. payroll deductions." (Appendix II. For other academic assistance available to all Duke undergraduate students. generates duplicate Work-Study authorization forms. Failure to meet this standard of academic performance will result in a withdrawal for academic reasons. Students who wish to petition a reduced course load (fewer than four courses) prior to the beginning of a semester must have their request reviewed and approved by the SDAO prior to the beginning of the semester. updates student biographical and demographic data. section 51. Students who wish to petition a part-time course load (fewer than three courses) must have their request reviewed and approved by the SDAO prior to the beginning of the semester. an underload/part-time course load will be authorized by the respective student’s academic dean upon the recommendation of the director of the Student Disability Access Office. The SSC also has walk-up computers for students to use. Student Disability Access Office. For these students.51(a)). The Vice-President for Institutional Equity is the designated compliance officer for the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. see the section on the Academic Resource Center in this bulletin. collects signatures on co-payable loan and scholarship checks. be denied the benefits of. Students approved for a part-time course load are also eligible for university housing. and DukeCard). be excluded from participation in. distributes reimbursement and travel advance checks. The SSC also serves as the functional coordination unit for the student 96 Campus Life and Activities . financial aid. registrar. please contact the Director. Student Service Center. provided they are able to function academically. issues International student ID cards. Receiving accommodations or special assistance at the high school level or at another college or university does not necessarily qualify an individual for the same accommodations and/or assistance at Duke University. These students must pass at least three of four consecutive courses taken while enrolled on a part-time basis.

such as sexual harassment or gender discrimination. raises awareness of how gender issues affect both women and men on campus.studentaffairs. personal and professional development. and publishes VOICES. The Women's Center promotes the full and active participation of women in higher education at Duke by providing advocacy.studentaffairs. and WiSE (Women in Science and Engineering). nonacademic facilities. harassment. go to the following Web site: http://osaf.portal. Offices for Program Planning The Office of Student Activities and Facilities. Black culture. and sexual orientation on campus and in the wider community. exhibitions. Women's Center programs and services address leadership. All of the center’s efforts are designed to deal critically. safety. referrals. the center advises and serves as a meeting place for student groups addressing gender issues on campus including SHARP (Sexual Harassment and Rape Prevention) peer educators. lectures. build unity and community. The Women's Center. acting both as liaison and advocate. The center offers internships. The Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture strives to increase awareness.edu. Duke's Sexual Assault Support Services is also housed in the Women's Center. For more information. and advocates for individuals and groups experiencing gender-related problems. The Office of Student Activities and Facilities (OSAF) promotes the development of leadership skills through a variety of programs that both educate and support individual students and student organizations. films.000-volume feminist lending library. For more information. The center responds to the changing needs of the university community. Located on the second floor of the West Union Building on West campus. International House. and educational programming on gender-related issues. and providing both counsel and direct services. the Women’s Center will be located at 306 Alexander during the renovation of Few Quad. For more information. see the Web site at http://wc. class. enhances cross-cultural interaction through programming and community Offices for Program Planning 97 . For more information. supportively. the Mary Lou Williams Center was named in honor of the pianist and composer who graced Duke University as an Artist-inResidence from 1977 until her death in 1981.edu. facilitating the financial management of organizational funds. International House serves as the center of co-curricular programs for internationals and U. promote self and group understanding.edu. and the intersection of gender with race.duke. and sexual orientation. paid student jobs. OSAF is the central resource for information concerning student organizations. see the Web site at http://www. see the center’s Web site at http://mlw. Until December of 2008.S.duke.edu/studentservicecenter/. and for the institutional event calendar. health. and the vast contributions of people of the African Diaspora. community conversations. The office coordinates the event registration process for student organization events and oversees all student-related nonresidential. DukePass. It provides programs and services that foster the successful academic and personal development of Black students at Duke University and positively impacts the community. The Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture.studentaffairs. ethnicity. Americans interested in other cultures and peoples. and volunteer opportunities to help with programming and operations. and creatively with individuals and entities in order to foster consciousness about the significance of Black experience.duke. a yearly literary magazine addressing issues of gender. International House assists internationals and their families with orientation and acclimation. The center sponsors performances. houses a 4. and a host of other enduring as well as innovative events. Additionally. GPWN (Graduate and Professional Women's Network). Black people. support services. campus climate concerns. and foster an appreciation for and understanding of Black history.

Bisexual. and to be a catalyst for creative partnerships between Duke University and the wider community. to befriending senior citizens and earning work-study money in community service internships. special events. The mission of the Center for Lesbian. For more information. and about lesbians.outreach. training sessions. serving meals at local homeless shelters. and Transgender Life. and straight-allied students. bisexuals. The Community Service Center also sponsors speakers. and alumni/ae to create 98 Campus Life and Activities . faculty. for.edu. public forums on student life. transgender. the Center for LGBT Life presents opportunities for all students. gays. It has responsibility for assisting with changes in the Duke University community that promote optimum growth and development for African American. student leadership training program. Through these services. as well as alumni/ae and members of neighboring communities.edu. the center strives to raise awareness about contemporary social issues. For more information see the Web site at: http://mcc. and faculty at Duke. faculty. bisexual. The Center for Multicultural Affairs provides support services for students of color and offers educational opportunities and resources in the areas of diversity and multicultural education to the campus at-large. and many other programs. gay. and a broad array of co-curricular. Council of Cultural Group Presidents. It also assumes a primary role on campus for the diversity education of all students as well as in helping to build a shared sense of community among all groups. and transgender matters at Duke.duke. Programs include an intensive orientation program at the beginning of the academic year. support. The center conducts and supports such activities as the student run Center for Race Relations. There are more than 2. and provides advocacy and support for the Duke international community.000 international students from 117 countries enrolled at Duke. seminars on current issues affecting students of color. faculty lecture series.studentaffairs. books. International Competency Training is offered for individuals interested in developing awareness and skills needed to manage cultural diversity at both interpersonal and organizational levels. staff. The center serves as a resource for the university community on students of color related issues and diversity in general. mentorship projects with university alumni. The International Association is a student-run group that sponsors culture nights. gay. sports.edu. transgender persons. and an annual campus-wide International Festival. and others. In these ways. and Transgender Life (Center for LGBT Life) is to provide education. The Center for Lesbian. advocacy on lesbian.duke. educational programming aimed at diverse audiences in and around the university. members of the Duke community can become involved with student service groups and Durham area agencies doing everything from tutoring and mentoring. teams. The Center for Multicultural Affairs. questioning. and bisexuals and transgender persons. gays. and space for lesbian. and employees. Bisexual. See the Web site for more information: http://csc. Americans for weekly conversation and language exchange. Gay. and institutional research on students of color.duke. The Community Service Center is a clearinghouse for volunteer and community service activities available to students. The center provides a safe haven to discuss issues of sexuality as they relate to self. The Community Service Center. and allies to socialize and discuss issues affecting the community. and Duke Partners that pairs internationals with U. Gay. family. a place for groups to meet and organize activities. advocacy. helping to care for people with AIDS.studentaffairs. and Native American undergraduates and graduate/professional students. Latino American. staff.S. friends. programming grants for student groups. the International Friends Program that pairs internationals with local families to promote friendship and cross-cultural learning. bisexual. Through the center.studentaffairs. see the Web site at http://ihouse. and information by. to provide opportunities for students to link their service work and coursework. a resource center and library containing magazines. trips. a friendly and comfortable location for lesbians. Asian American.

Chapel Choir. There are 38 nationally-affiliated Greek chapters on Duke’s campus. Duke Drama provides opportunities for non-drama majors to perform established and experimental drama. addresses issues of gender.oit.duke. Duke Union Community Television (Cable 13) is operated by students and produces color television programs that are broadcast throughout the campus on the university cable system. through university-wide committees. a literary magazine (the Archive). Many opportunities are provided on campus in the areas of music and drama. see the Web site at http://dsg. The DukEngineer. and Eruditio. a journal of campus news and opinion (Duke Blue). For more information.studentaffairs. Additionally. The Chronicle. the official student magazine of the Pratt School of Engineering. are published on a regular basis by students. Coordinating the efforts of individuals and organizations. over 40 percent of women belong to sororities and nearly 30 percent of men are fraternity members. Outing Club. Around 37 percent of undergraduates are Greekaffiliated. and the N. United in Praise. International Association. In addition. a social science journal. Baptist Student Union. Media. ethnicity. Several academic departments sponsor organizations and programs for students with special academic or professional interests. A humor magazine (Carpe Noctem). a comprehensive yearbook. Rural Health Coalition. which chooses the editors and business managers and reviews the financial budgets. For more information. Symphony Orchestra. These publications are under the direction of the Undergraduate Publications Board. DSG lobbies university administrators on practices and policies which govern all facets of life at Duke.C. Duke Ice Hockey. broadcasting to the Duke and Durham communities. see the Web site at http://lgbt. The working philosophy of DSG is that students have the right to participate in the university's decision-making process on matters that affect the student body. the Chanticleer. DSG is responsible for articulating undergraduate student thought on issues relevant to the university and for working to improve the educational process and university environment. Karamu performs drama related to the Black experience. Student Organizations 99 . There are also academic and leadership honorary societies.a more hospitable campus climate. The Duke Student Government (DSG) is the voice of the undergraduate student body of Duke University. and Collegium Musicum are examples of musical organizations. Wind Symphony. there are a number of independent publications on a variety of topics published by students and distributed on campus. WXDU 88.duke. DSG offers the opportunity for students to have input in university planning and policy development through the legislature. and sexual orientation. DSG's services seek to aid every undergraduate during his/ her Duke career.7 FM is the student-managed and programmed radio station. the campus newspaper. is produced each year. Hoof 'n' Horn presents musical comedy. Model United Nations Club. Cultural and Social Organizations. Black Student Alliance. Marching Band.edu. and through many unique student services. Student Organizations Duke Student Government. There are over twenty academic department majors unions on campus. appears twice each year and contains articles on technical and semitechnical topics as well as other matters of interest to the school. The scope of the more than three hundred student organizations is suggested by a partial listing of their names: Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity. a science magazine (Vertices). Cheerleaders. The Chorale. published by the Women's Center. publishes five issues weekly and is a separate not-for-profit organization. Sailing Club. VOICES magazine. Photography Group. a photography magazine (Latent Image).edu. The center is located on the garden level of West Union Building.

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation
Besides offering a variety of classes (see the chapter ''Courses of Instruction''), the Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation also sponsors numerous programs for all students in intramurals, sports clubs, and recreation. The Intramural Sports Program provides an opportunity for every student to participate in organized recreation competition in over 40 activities. The program is comprised of four major areas: men's intramurals, women's intramurals, co-ed intramurals, and recreation programs. It is open to all graduate and undergraduate students of Duke University. Participation, not skill, is a major factor that is emphasized in the program. More than 35 sports clubs have been chartered by Duke students for those with similar interests to participate in competition and recreational activities. Clubs vary from those which compete with clubs of other universities, such as soccer, rugby, and ice hockey, to those of a more recreational nature such as cycling, and sailing, and others which yearly present several performances. The university's many recreational facilities, available to all students, include the championship Robert Trent Jones Golf Course, tennis courts (some lighted) on both campuses, indoor swimming pools on East and West campuses and an outdoor pool on Central campus, three gymnasiums including the Brenda and Keith Brodie Recreation Center on East Campus and the Wilson Recreation Center on West Campus, several weight training rooms, squash and racquetball courts, outdoor handball and basketball courts, an all-weather track, numerous playing fields, jogging trails, and informal recreational areas. Tournaments in recreational sports are often organized and conducted by students. Students may reserve facilities and equipment at designated times.

Intercollegiate Athletics
The Athletic Department fosters intercollegiate athletics by striving for excellence and by providing the best possible framework within which highly accomplished student athletes can compete. The department has a dual responsibility to provide a high-quality athletic program and environment so that all students have the opportunity to compete to the fullest extent of their abilities. Duke is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association(NCAA) and the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The ACC consists of Boston College, Clemson, Duke, Florida State, Georgia Tech, Maryland, Miami, North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State, Virginia, Virginia Tech, and Wake Forest. The intercollegiate program for men includes football, soccer, basketball, cross country, swimming, fencing, wrestling, indoor and outdoor track, baseball, golf, tennis, and lacrosse. The women's athletic program provides intercollegiate competition in basketball, fencing, field hockey, golf, lacrosse, soccer, swimming, tennis, volleyball, rowing, indoor and outdoor track, and cross country. Freshmen may participate on all varsity teams. The director of athletics and associate director of athletics provide departmental leadership and coordinate all athletic policies with the University Athletic Council. The council consists of representatives from the undergraduate student body, the faculty, the administrative staff, the trustees, and the alumni. The council meets with the director of athletics periodically during the school year. The chairman of the council is the official university representative at national and conference athletic meetings.

Judicial System and Regulations
Duke University has high expectations for students’ scholarship and conduct. Each student is subject to the rules and regulations of the university currently in effect, or which are put into effect from time to time by the appropriate authorities of the university. At the same time, the individual is responsible for decisions and choices within the framework of the regulations of the community, as Duke does not assume in loco parentis relationships.

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Students, in accepting admission, indicate their willingness to subscribe to and be governed by these rules and regulations. They acknowledge the right of the university to take disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion, for failure to abide by the regulations or for other conduct adjudged unsatisfactory or detrimental to the university community. Responsibility for prescribing and enforcing rules and regulations governing student conduct rests ultimately with the Board of Trustees of Duke University and, by delegation, with administrative officers of the university. In the undergraduate schools, and in the university as a whole, many of these rules have been established over the years by cooperative action between students, faculty, and administrative officers. Representative student organizations, such as student governments and judicial boards, and more recently, community-wide bodies of students, faculty, and administrators, have initiated proposals for policies and rules necessary to assure satisfactory standards in academic and nonacademic conduct. These proposals have been accepted by university officers and have become a substantial, if not all-inclusive, body of rules governing student life at Duke. For current regulations, refer to the The Duke Community Standard in Practice: A Guide for Undergraduates. Students in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences and in the Pratt School of Engineering constitute an undergraduate community whose members are subject to the rules and regulations of the Undergraduate Community. Violations of any published policy by individuals and residential or nonresidential cohesive units may be adjudicated under the procedures set forth in the The Duke Community Standard in Practice: A Guide for Undergraduates.

Student Obligations and Requirements
Students are expected to meet academic requirements and financial obligations, as specified elsewhere in this bulletin, in order to remain in good standing. Certain nonacademic rules and regulations must be observed also, including accepting responsibility for behavior that is disruptive or threatening to the safety of self or others. Failure to meet these requirements may result in dismissal by the appropriate officer of the university.

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Admission

Principles of Selection
James B. Duke, in his Indenture of Trust, requested that ''great care and discrimination be exercised in admitting as students only those whose previous record shows a character, determination, and application evincing a wholesome and real ambition for life.'' Therefore, in considering prospective students, Duke University looks beyond the basic characteristics of academic competence possessed by the majority of applicants. It seeks, regardless of race, color, religion, national and ethnic origin, gender, handicap, sexual orientation or preference, or age, not only evidence of intellectual promise and maturity of judgment, but also a sense of life beyond the classroom. Often, this is expressed in the form of special talents and accomplishments; it is seen consistently in a student's determination to make creative use of the opportunities and challenges posed by Duke University.

Requirements for Application
As there are occasionally changes in admission policies or procedures after the printing deadline for the Bulletin of Duke University: Undergraduate Instruction, candidates are urged to consult the Duke University Viewbook: Information for Prospective Students for specific admissions information, dates, and policies. DEGREE STATUS Although there are no inflexible requirements as to subject matter, students are urged to choose a broad and challenging high school program. Candidates for admission should present a minimum of four years of English and at least three of mathematics, natural sciences, a foreign language, and social studies. Applicants to the Pratt School of Engineering are advised to take four years of mathematics and four years of science, including physics and chemistry. Calculus is a prerequisite for admission to the Pratt School of Engineering. All candidates for first-year standing must complete either the SAT Reasoning Test or theACT. Those students who choose to take the three-part SAT should also complete two SAT Subject Tests. Applicants to the Pratt School of Engineering should take one SAT Subject Test in mathematics (level 1 or 2). Students wishing to continue study or gain course exemption in a foreign language should complete an SAT Subject Test or Advanced Placement exam in that language. Even though the foreign language SAT Subject Test is not required for admission, we strongly recommend that students take the test before leaving high school. Students should refer to the Duke University Web site, at http://www.duke.edu, and follow the appropriate undergraduate admissions links for the most recent information on SAT Subject Test requirements for incoming students. The SAT Reasoning and Subject Tests should be taken by October of the senior year for Early Decision applicants and by January of the senior year for Regular Decision applicants. Students choosing to take the ACT will not be required to submit SAT Reasoning or Subject Test scores; however, the ACT will be used for admission only, not for placement or exemption. The ACT should be taken by

Principles of Selection 103

October of the senior year for Early Decision applicants and by December of the senior year for Regular Decision applicants. NONDEGREE STATUS Summer Session. Persons who are or were at the time of leaving their home institutions in good standing in accredited colleges or universities may be admitted for summer study only by the director of the Summer Session. Continuing Education. Admission as a continuing education student at Duke is limited to adults who live in the Triangle area; Duke graduates; persons who will be moving into the area and plan to reside here for a substantial period of time, for family and work reasons; and local high school seniors. These students are given academic counseling by the Office of Continuing Studies; they are subject to most of the regulations set forth for degree candidates.

Application Procedures
DEGREE STATUS The Duke University Viewbook: Information for Prospective Students and an application may be obtained from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Duke University, Box 90586, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0586. A nonrefundable processing fee that is determined annually must accompany the first part of the application. Students may apply using the Common Application plus two Duke-specific supplementary forms: the Student Supplement (Form A) and the School Report Supplement (Form B). The Common Application is available online and in secondary school guidance offices. The required Student Supplement to the Common Application is available from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions or through the admissions Web site. Students are encouraged to apply online by following the appropriate links on the admissions Web site. A personal interview is not required for admission, but it provides an opportunity to learn more about an applicant’s strengths and goals. For most applicants, Duke offers interviews with local alumni when the Student Supplement to the Common Application has been filed by the deadline (October 20 for Early Decision applicants and December 10 for Regular Decision applicants). Regular Decision. Candidates who wish to enter Duke as first-year students must submit a completed application no later than January 2 of their senior year in secondary school. Decisions are mailed from the university in early April, and accepted candidates are expected to reserve a place in the class by May 1. Early Decision. Students for whom Duke is a clear first choice may apply for Early Decision. Candidates who apply for Early Decision are required to sign a statement confirming their commitment to enroll at Duke if they are admitted in the Early Decision process and to withdraw applications from other colleges and universities as soon as they learn of their admission to Duke. Students may apply to only one school under a binding Early Decision plan. Duke reserves the right to withdraw the applications of students accepted to other schools under binding Early Decision plans. Secondary school counselors and parents are also asked to sign the Early Decision agreement. Students who are denied admission under the Early Decision program may not reapply for admission under the Regular Decision program. Students applying for Early Decision should submit a completed application by November 1. The SAT Reasoning Subject Tests or the ACT examinations should be taken no later than October of the senior year. Early Decision applicants who have not completed their standardized tests may be deferred to Regular Decision. Applicants are notified of their status—admit, defer, or deny—by mid-December. Admitted students are expected to respond by January 2. The credentials of candidates who are deferred are considered along with candidates for Regular Decision. Deferred students are no longer bound by the Early

104 Admission

Decision agreement and are free to accept offers of admission from other colleges and universities. This plan is designed to give well-qualified students who know Duke is their first choice a means of indicating that commitment to the university and of receiving a decision early enough to eliminate the necessity of applying to several colleges. Midyear Admission. A midyear (January) admission program has not been offered to first-year students for a number of years and there are no current plans to reinstate one. When offered, midyear admission has allowed students to begin their college work a semester early or to postpone matriculation for a semester. Transfer Admission. Transfer admission from other accredited institutions may be arranged for a limited number of students each semester. Because the transcript of at least one full year of academic work is preferred by the Admissions Committee, and because transfer students are required to spend their last two years at Duke, most candidates apply to Duke during their first or second year of college. All Duke students, except those majoring in engineering, must meet the requirements for the Trinity College curriculum, so students applying to transfer to Trinity College should plan to spend three years at Duke in order to meet the requirements for the Trinity College curriculum and the major. Candidates must submit completed application forms, official transcripts of all work completed at other accredited colleges, high school records, scores on the SAT or ACT, and employment records if there has been an extended period of employment since graduation from secondary school. See the section on transfer credit on page 48. September (fall semester) transfer students submit a completed application by March 15, learn of their decisions in mid-May, and respond to the university by June 1. January (if offered) transfer students submit a completed application by October 15, learn of their decisions by November 15, and reply to the university by December 1. January transfer is not available to students in their first year of college. NONDEGREE STATUS Summer Session. Registration forms and schedules of courses may be obtained by writing or calling the Office of the Summer Session, Box 90059, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0059, (919) 684-2621. No application fee is required. Continuing Education. Applications may be obtained from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and must be returned to that office, accompanied by the application fee, by August 1 for the fall semester and by December 1 for the spring semester. A certain grade point average over four courses must be attained before a nondegree student may apply for degree candidacy. More detailed information on nondegree course work through continuing education is available from the Office of Continuing Studies, Box 90700, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0700. READMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS A student who desires to return, following withdrawal from college, should apply directly to the appropriate college or school. (See the section on readmission procedures on page 60.)

Application Procedures 105

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees*
No college or university can honestly state that an education at the college level is inexpensive. Fees paid by students cover less than half the cost of their instruction and the operation of the university. Income from endowment and contributions from alumni and other concerned individuals meet the balance and assure each student the opportunity to pursue an education of unusually high quality. Students are urged to give their attention first to the selection of institutions which meet their intellectual and personal needs, and then to the devising of a sound plan for meeting the cost of their education. This process will require an in-depth knowledge of both the university's financial aid program and the resources of the student's family. Information describing in detail the various forms of financial aid may be obtained from the Office of Undergraduate Financial Aid web site at: http://dukefinancialaid.duke.edu. Estimated Expenses. The figures in this section are projections and are subject to change. Certain basic expenditures, such as tuition, room, and board, are considered in preparing a student's budget. These necessary expenditures, with a reasonable amount allotted for miscellaneous items, are shown below:
Academic Year, 2008-2009 Two Summer Terms, 2008

(two semesters) Tuition Trinity College Engineering Residential Fee Single Room Double Room Triple Room Food (projections include a meal plan service fee) 100% board plan 75% board plan Books and Supplies Student Health Fee Student Activity Student Services Fee Recreation Fee Residential Program Fee
1

(one semester equivalent) $9,408-10,976 $9,408-10,976 n/a $1,830 n/a

$36,065 $36,065 $7,070-8,510 $5,360-6,440 $4,770-5,750

$5,029 $4,329 $1,105 $568 $222 $232 $208 $93

$1,659 $1,049 $553 $175 $341

This fee is optional.

It should be realized that additional expenses will be incurred which will depend to a large extent upon the tastes and habits of the individual. The average undergraduate student, however, can plan on a budget of approximately $50,633. The budget estimate for the summer (two terms, one semester equivalent) is $13,659. These budgets represent most

*

The figures in this section are projections and are subject to change.

Tuition and Fees 107

student living expenses except for cable, telephone, parking, travel costs, loan fees, and major clothing purchases. Fees and Deposits for Fall and Spring. On notification of acceptance, students (including transfer students) are required to pay a nonrefundable registration fee of $100 which includes a one-time transcript processing fee, and to make an advance deposit of $200. The deposit will not be refunded to accepted applicants who fail to matriculate. Late Registration. Continuing students who fail to register during the registration period must pay a fee of $50 to the bursar. Part-Time Students. In the regular academic year, students who with permission register for not more than two courses in a semester will be classified as part-time students. Part-time students will be charged at the following rates: one course, $4,508; half course, $2,254; quarter course, $1,127. Registration for more than two courses requires payment of full tuition. Graduate students registered for undergraduate courses will be assessed three units for non-laboratory courses and four units for laboratory courses. Men and women in nondegree programs who are being considered for admission to degree programs, as designated by the Office of Continuing Education, pay fees by the course whether the course load is one, two, or three courses. Auditing one or more courses without charge is allowed for students paying full fees, provided that the consent of the instructor is obtained. Students who are enrolled for one or two courses may audit other courses by payment of $439 for each course audited. With the consent of the appropriate instructor and the director of Continuing Education, graduates of Duke may audit undergraduate courses for the above payment per course. Fall and Spring Student Bills. The Bursar’s Office issues bills to registered students for tuition, fees, and other charges approximately four to six weeks prior to the beginning of classes each semester. The amount due on the bill statement is payable by the due date as indicated on the bill. Inquiries can be made at the Bursar’s Office by e-mail at bursar@duke.edu, by facsimile at (919) 684-3091, or by telephone at (919) 684-3531. Current account information is available on the ACES Web site. Office hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. As part of the admission agreement to Duke University, a student is required to pay all bills as presented. If full payment is not received, a late payment charge will be assessed on the subsequent bill, and certain restrictions, as stated below, will be applied. Failure to receive a bill does not warrant exemption from the payment of tuition and fees, nor from the penalties and restrictions. Bills are mailed to the student’s permanent home address as maintained by the student on the ACES Web site. Non-registered students will be required to make payment for the current term’s tuition and fees, as well as any past due balance, at the time of registration. Payment can be made by e-check at www.bursar.duke.edu. Restrictions for Outstanding Account Balances. An individual will be in default if the amount due, as listed on the bill, is not paid in full by the required due date. In addition to the assessment of late payment charges, a student in default will not be allowed to register for future semesters, to receive a transcript of academic records, to have academic credits certified, or to receive a diploma at graduation. In addition, an individual in default may be subject to withdrawal from school and have the account referred to a collection agency and credit bureau. Duke Student Insurance. Undergraduates enrolled in programs that require payment of the student health fee must also maintain adequate medical insurance (in addition to paying the mandatory student health fee). Adequate medical insurance is defined as insurance that meets or exceeds the level of coverage provided by the Duke Student Medical Insurance Plan ("the Duke Plan"). International students holding an F-1 or J-1 visa are required to participate in the student medical insurance plan. These students will be automatically enrolled in and charged for the plan; no action is required on the part of the student.

108 Financial Information

Information on how to enroll or waive coverage under the Duke plan, as well as information regarding plan benefits will be available at www.bursar.duke.edu. Fees for Study Abroad. Students who register to study abroad on programs administered by institutions other than Duke University will pay the tuition and fees of the administering institution. There will be a fee of $2,468 per semester, payable to Duke University, to maintain a student's enrollment at Duke. Fees for Courses. Additional fees are charged for certain physical education activity and applied music courses. For specific charges, consult the Office of the Bursar. Tuition and Fees for Summer Session. Tuition for undergraduates is $2,352 for each 3 semester hour (s.h.) course, $3,136 for each 4 s.h. course, $1,568 for each half course (2 s.h.), $784 for each quarter course (1 s.h.), and $4,704 for each one and one-half course program (6 s.h.) offered at the Marine Laboratory. Tuition for graduate students taking an undergraduate course is as indicated above. Health Fee. All Duke students and all full-time non-Duke students are required to pay $87.50 per term. All students at the Marine Laboratory are required to pay $73 per five-week registration period. Music Fee. A fee of $107 will be charged for Music 79. A fee of $214 will be charged for Music 80 and 89. A fee of $428 will be charged for Music 90 and 99. Auditing Fees. With permission of the instructor, students registered for a full course program (two courses) may audit one non-laboratory course except a physical education and dance activity course, a studio art course, an applied music course, and foreign programs. No extra charge is made. Students carrying less than a full course program may be granted permission by the instructor to audit a course (the above exceptions apply) but must pay $235 for the course if it is in Arts and Sciences. Professional school course audit policies may differ. Payment of Tuition and Fees. The Office of the Bursar will mail bills in May, June, July, and August to current Duke students enrolled for Summer Session. The bill due date will be two weeks from the date of the bill. Students will also be able to view their bills on the web. Problems meeting these deadlines should be discussed with the Office of the Bursar prior to the start of the term. Failure to meet deadlines may have implications for fall enrollment. The Summer Session Office will enclose a statement of charges with the confirmation of registration letter sent to all visiting students, Duke graduates, and incoming Duke first-year students. Payment for Term I charges will be due on or before Wednesday, April 30, 2008. Payment for Term II charges will be due on or before Monday, June 16, 2008. If payment is not received by these dates, registration will be cancelled. Summer Session retains the right to withdraw students from classes if they never attend, have not paid tuition and fees, or if they have failed to clear with the bursar, by the end of the drop/add period. Those withdrawn for these reasons will be billed the health fee and an administrative withdrawal fee of $150 per course. Attendance in classes after the first three days of the term obligates the student for the full tuition and fees for the course. Students who, subsequent to withdrawal, clear with the Office of the Bursar may, with written permission of their academic dean, be reinstated in their classes as originally registered and receive regular grades. The administrative withdrawal fee will stand and the student will be liable for full tuition and fees. Transcripts. Requests for transcripts of academic records can be made via ACES, Duke’s online student records system. Transcripts requested via ACES will be mailed the next business day. (See University Registrar’s web page, http://registrar.duke.edu, for access to ACES.) Former students who do not have access to ACES may request transcripts by submitting a signed request directly to the Office of the University Registrar, in person,

Tuition and Fees 109

by mail, or by fax. E-mail requests are not accepted. Transcripts may be withheld for outstanding financial obligations. Duke Employees. With the permission of their supervisors, employees may, through the Office of Continuing Studies and Summer Session, take up to two courses for credit or audit during any one semester or one during a summer term. A formal application for credit course work must be submitted by August 1 for the fall semester, December 1 for the spring semester, April 15 for Term I of Summer Session, or June 1 for Term II of Summer Session. Only employees desiring to continue in the fall semester should apply for admission during the summer. Employees desiring to take a course for credit only during the summer should complete the Summer Session application/registration form. Many employees may be eligible to receive an Employee Tuition Benefit to enroll in regular university classes. Employees with at least two years of continuous service may be eligible to receive an Employee Tuition Benefit to enroll in regular university classes for academic credit. The Employee Tuition Assistance Program provides reimbursement of tuition for a maximum of two classes per semester (limit six semester classes per calendar year) up to $5,000 per calendar year for full-time employees. The employee's work supervisor must confirm the coursework is directly related to the individual's work assignment or future career development at Duke. For additional information and an application to participate in the Tuition Assistance Program, consult http://www.hr.duke.edu/benefits/education/tuition_assistance.html. Staff members of Continuing Studies and Summer Session are available to advise Duke employees on educational matters (919) 684-2621.

Living Expenses*
Housing for Fall and Spring. In residence halls for undergraduate students the housing fee for a single room ranges from $7,070 to $8,510 for the academic year; for a double room, the fee ranges from $5,360 to $6,440; for a triple room, the fee ranges from $4,770 to $5,750 per occupant. Apartment rates for upperclass students range from $5,170 to $6,450 per occupant. Detailed information concerning the student's obligations under the housing license and the consequences of failure to comply are published in the Bulletin of Duke University: Information and Regulations. Housing for Summer. For detailed information on types and costs of accommodations available at Duke University for the Summer Session contact: housing@studentaffairs.duke.edu, (919) 684-4304. Web site: http://rlhs.studentaffairs.duke.edu. Food and Other Expenses. Duke Dining Services and Duke University Stores operations are located on campus to serve the needs of the Duke community. The university identification card, known as the DukeCard, can be used to gain access to prepaid accounts and make purchases in many Duke University facilities. The first-year student dining program includes twelve prepaid meals per week at The Marketplace at East Union; plus dining plan debit account ''points'' for use at any dining location on campus, three convenience stores, concessions at athletic events, sodas and snacks from vending machines, and late night pizza and sub delivery from approved local on campus vendors. The cost of the First Year Plan is $1,975 per semester for the twelve-meal plan plus one of three ''points'' plans (Plan G-I) which range from $350 to $435. Participation in the First Year Plan is required of all first-year students who reside on East Campus. Upperclass students who live in the residence halls are required to participate in one of five dining plan debit accounts which allows access to all dining locations. The five
*

The figures contained in this section are projections and are subject to change prior to the beginning of the Fall 2008 semester.

110 Financial Information

plan levels (Plan A - Plan E) range from $1,625 to $2,495 per semester. Upper class students who live in Central Campus apartments are also required to participate in the dining plan, but may choose to do so at the lower minimum requirement of Plan J ($1,165 per semester). Nonresident students are not required to participate in the dining plan; however, Plan F at a cost of $570 per semester is offered as an option. An optional summer dining plan is provided in three plan levels ranging from $250 to $810 per summer term. Students may also purchase a Flexible Spending Account (FLEX) which can be used to purchase any goods or services from Dining Services, Duke Stores, and other campus operations. FLEX is optional and may be opened with a minimum balance of $25. Additional funds may be deposited to either the FLEX or dining plan debit account at anytime. Information regarding these accounts is sent to matriculating students. For more information about campus retail and food facilities, see the chapter “Campus Life and Activities” in this bulletin.

Fall and Spring Refunds
In the case of withdrawal from the university, students or their parents may elect to have tuition refunded or carried forward as a credit for later study according to the following schedule: Withdrawal Before classes begin During first or second week During third, fourth, or fifth week During sixth week After sixth week Refund Full Amount 80 percent 60 percent 20 percent None

Tuition charges paid from grants or loans will be restored to those funds on the same pro rata basis and will not be refunded or carried forward. In the event of death, a full tuition, fees, and residence hall refund will be granted. In case of a call to military service, a full semester's tuition, full purchase price of textbooks from the university's book store, and the pro rata amount of the room charge will be refunded. The outstanding balance of the food service plan will be refunded in case of military service or death. In the case of dropping special fee courses (e.g., music, art, golf), or of part-time students dropping audit courses, a full refund will be granted students during the drop-add period. Students changing status to part-time are required to request permission at the time of preregistration; therefore, no refunds are granted during the drop/add period or subsequently for changes which involve carrying less than a full-time load. Because Duke University participates in the Title IV federal aid programs, it follows federal guidelines with respect to the refund and repayment of these funds. All first-time students who withdraw within 60 percent of the enrollment period will have their charges and financial aid adjusted according to the federal regulations. Additional information regarding this procedure may be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid.

Summer Administrative Withdrawal Charges and Refunds*
Drop or Administrative Withdrawal Charges. Students who will not be attending a summer term or course for which they have registered must officially drop the course(s) prior to the beginning of the term whether or not they have paid tuition and fees. (See the section on course changes for the summer term in the chapter ''Academic Procedures and
*

This policy does not apply to study abroad program students.

Fall and Spring Refunds 111

2. Refunds (Except Study Abroad Programs). work-study. Students awarded financial aid will be notified at the same time they are offered admission. This will be done by taking into consideration the contribution that can reasonably be expected from the student and the family.'') Students who fail to drop the course(s) prior to the beginning of the term will be charged $150 per course. The health fee is not refunded. will meet 100 percent of the demonstrated need of each eligible admitted U.S. There is a financial obligation of full tuition and fees if the student withdraws from a course(s) or withdraws from the term after the third day. Additional information is available on the university’s financial aid Web site at http://dukefinancialaid. Students will receive information from the College Board about the IDOC process. Candidates should initiate their application for financial aid concurrently with their application for admission. The noncustodial parent must submit the CSS Non-Custodial Profile Application. Early Decision applicants must submit copies of their tax information directly to the Undergraduate Financial Aid Office. During the current academic year. (There is no charge for drop/adds that result in no change in course load in the same term.edu. citizen or eligible non-citizen. the custodial parent must submit the PROFILE and FAFSA. Full tuition and fees are refunded if the student officially drops a course(s) or withdraws from the term before the first day. the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to the federal processor and the PROFILE application to the College Scholarship Service (CSS). The College Scholarship Service will be collecting the noncustodial parent’s information through an online process.) 3. Students’ tax information will be sent to Duke electronically by the College Board. the Federal Perkins Loan. Financial Aid for Entering Freshmen. details will be e-mailed to applicants by CSS immediately following receipt of the PROFILE application. Students who will not be attending a summer term or course for which tuition and fees have been paid are eligible for refunds following these policies: 1. Instructions outlining the specific requirements and deadline dates will accompany application materials. To receive institutional funds. and the Federal Stafford Student Loan Program. over 43 percent of the student body receives more than sixty million dollars in aid of various types. and students needing assistance are strongly encouraged to apply for financial aid at the same time as for admission. For the student with demonstrated need. If tax returns for the most recent year are not available at the time of application. It is the intention of the Office of Undergraduate Financial Aid to set each award at a level consistent with a family's ability to meet the costs of attending Duke University. we will accept a copy of the prior year’s return to do an estimated aid award. Student Aid Duke University is strongly committed to its financial aid program and. Admissions decisions are made without reference to a student's application for aid. the Federal Pell Grant Program. There is a financial obligation of $150 per course if the student officially drops a course(s) or withdraws from the term during the first three days.Information. Students applying for federal loans and grants and not Duke University aid need to complete only the FAFSA. the net cost of an education at Duke University will generally be no greater than that for attendance at any private college or university. If a student’s parents are divorced or separated.duke. two forms must be submitted. 112 Financial Information . The university's aid program includes both merit and need-based scholarships. for the four years of undergraduate enrollment. Regular Decision applicants are required to submit their tax information directly to the College Board for processing by the Institutional Documentation Service (IDOC). Students will be asked to submit copies of their and their parents’ Federal Income Tax Returns from the most recent year (all schedules and W2s must be included).

100 of each student's need be awarded in the form of self-help funds. Interested students can obtain specific details as to available funding and an application through the Financial Aid Office in February of each year. and a copy of all pages. The Angier B." as appropriate. Summer School Financial Aid. The standard aid package at Duke provides that the first $3. All qualified students may receive need-based aid for up to eight semesters plus two summer terms. A student may choose to attend two summer sessions as part of their ninth semester of aid eligibility. Gift Scholarships. If a scholar is ineligible to return to Duke for academic reasons. Failure to meet this deadline may affect the type and amount of aid offered. Duke Memorial Scholarships. these scholarships are renewable for four (4) years of undergraduate study for those students meeting the following academic standards: Renewable merit scholarships will be continued for freshmen who complete the first year of studies with a 2. The deadline for the receipt of all application materials by the Financial Aid Office is May 1. and a student's continuation in the program is contingent upon good academic performance. competitively awarded on the basis of academic merit. Students demonstrating additional need will receive a grant from Duke University funds up to the amount needed. including schedules and attachments. have been established to encourage the intellectual achievement of men and women by recognizing those who possess outstanding academic and leadership abilities. The following are among the named gift scholarships offered through Duke University. Duke Memorial Scholarships.8 average or higher. These scholarships may be based on achievement in a particular field or on an outstanding overall record. and employment are integral parts of the financial aid program. Application materials can be completed online after January 1st. Specific details regarding retention standards will be provided to scholarship winners.Renewal of Financial Aid after the Freshman Year. TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID Gift scholarships or grants. This combination of university grant funds and opportunities for self-help enables Duke to extend its resources to a larger number of deserving students. or is dismissed for disciplinary reasons. Students not qualifying for financial aid due to their inability to meet these requirements may appeal directly to the Financial Aid Office. Angier B. a new Free Application for Federal Student Aid. All 2008-2009 freshman scholarship holders received full tuition if enrolled in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences or the Pratt School of Engineering. a Noncustodial Parent’s Profile. and promise of being eventual leaders in whatever field of endeavor they choose. if appropriate. Duke has a number of scholarships based on merit which are available from personal endowments and corporations.0 average or higher.0 average each semester to keep the scholarship or fellowship. he or she will lose the scholarship. The scholarship is a four-year program (eight semesters)." Thereafter. Upperclass students must complete each academic year with a 3. Duke Scholars are eligible to Student Aid 113 . of the parents' and student's current federal income tax return. The work-study opportunity and loan(s) offered as financial aid are considered to be the self-help portion of the award. and some portion of the aid offered an undergraduate is normally in each of these forms. creative talent. Where specified.000 to $8. Each year students must file an application for renewal of financial aid. Most are intended for entering freshmen and require no separate application. long-term loans. Financial aid is available for each summer session. students on review must receive a 3. a student must meet the continuation requirements outlined in the chapter "Academic Procedures and Information. Funds awarded in excess of this amount will generally be grant funds. Candidates are selected on the basis of intellectual performance. This application must include a new PROFILE form. Students failing to meet the required average will be put "on review. To have financial aid renewed. Students holding merit scholarships are required to maintain an average considerably higher than the minimum required for need-based financial aid recipients. All Angier B.

and textbook/equipment allowance of $900 in addition to providing a tax-free monthly stipend of $300500 per month for 10 months. fees. full board. All Duke students are eligible to apply for Army ROTC scholarships equal to full tuition. J. fees. Scholarships are available to qualified students who major in most fields. and a monthly tax-free allotment. can be either on active duty or with the reserve forces as determined by the Secretary of the Army. leadership.participate in a six-week summer study program at Oxford University in England. J. Robert H. A number of United Methodist Scholarships are available on a basis of demonstrated need to Methodist students who have given evidence of leadership in their local Methodist Youth Fellowship groups. A scholarship is awarded to an upperclass woman in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences on the basis of scholarship. Under the Oxford program the scholarship pays tuition. commitment to public service. Panhellenic Scholarship. Nonscholarship Advanced Course cadets also receive the $250-400 monthly stipend. and half at Duke University.000 grant for an approved independent project. Army ROTC Scholarship Program. W. graduate. One or more of these scholarships. summer community-building and enrichment opportunities in the United States and abroad. consideration will be given in the following order: (1) children of employees of R. and proven interest in the diversity of peoples and cultures both within the United States and beyond its borders. The award is based upon demonstrated ability. The awards may be up to $8. and a top-of-the-line laptop computer. that they need scholarship support to achieve their academic ambitions. interested Duke applicants are urged to file all financial-aid forms as early as possible. Baldwin Scholarships. This music scholarship of up to $2. and (3) other candidates who are residents or natives of North Carolina. Air Force ROTC College Scholarship Program. North Carolina. The program is designed so that every Robertson Scholar will have dynamic intellectual homes at two superb universities—Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill. The Richard Miles Thompson Scholarships are awarded annually to two upperclass students enrolled in the Pratt School of Engineering. Richard Miles Thompson Scholarships. Alice M. character. The scholarships range from $15. There are a number of awards available for each freshman class with a minimum value of $500. and financial need. through official financial-aid applications. A. Reynolds Memorial Scholarships. These scholarships. and living stipends at UNC-Chapel Hill or full tuition at Duke. Jones Memorial Scholarships. room. leadership. The awards are based upon academic merit and demonstrated financial need. and textbook reimbursement. these grants pay a portion of tuition. Students can apply for three-year scholarships during their freshman year and two-year scholarships during their sophomore year. primarily scientific or engineering. single room accommodation. following graduation. All exhibit exceptional leadership potential.500. (2) children of families residing in Forsyth County. Half of these scholars matriculate at the University of North Carolina (UNC)-Chapel Hill. and an allowance for transatlantic air fare.000 based on merit criteria set by the School of Engineering and financial need.000 up to full tuition. United Methodist Scholarships. and professional school scholars. Robertson scholars will receive full tuition. N. established by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation in honor of William O'Connor and in appreciation for his many years of service to the foundation. The Robert H. intergenerational community of undergraduate. designated excursions for all scholars. The William O'Connor Memorial Scholarship. The University Scholars Program is an interdisciplinary. assistance for additional demonstrated need. support for research and related travel. In considering candidates for the awards. Robertson Scholars. are awarded to engineering students whose outstanding academic and personal qualifications suggest that they will become leaders in a technological society. character. Pinnix Scholarships. varying in amount. and need. Undergraduate University Scholars receive a full-tuition scholarship. At least one of the four years of the scholarship could be used abroad on an approved program. This history-making undergraduate scholarship program was created and funded by visionary alumnus Julian Robertson and his wife Josie. The University Scholars Program. Commissioned service. There is no separate application. Those choosing not to participate in the Oxford program are eligible for a $2. and need. service. are awarded to women who are rising seniors in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences on the basis of scholarship. sponsored through the Jones Fund for Engineering. excellence in engineering. Reynolds Tobacco Company or any of its affiliates or subsidiaries. is awarded to student of a string instrument or organ. Recipients of these awards are students with outstanding ability and/or need who show promise of constructive leadership. Pinnix Scholarships are awarded annually to two upperclassmen enrolled in the Pratt School of Engineering. High school seniors must apply not later than 114 Financial Information . and support for a summer abroad or research project. Undergraduate University Scholars are exceptional students who have also demonstrated. Awarded without regard to academic major.

Several awards each year are given to needy students active in the Drama Program. leadership potential. with preference to African Americans. Decisions are made by a special committee appointed by the Drama Program. Scholarships will be awarded successively based upon each entering class and the availability of endowment income with first awards given in the Fall of 2005. room. Reginaldo Howard Scholarships. Scholarships are available for the four years of undergraduate study as long as the student maintains the academic average specified for renewal. The endowment. Kravis Scholarships. Assistance is given to students enrolled in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. first black president of the student government. are awarded annually. are provided to honor the late Reggie Howard. These awards are renewable annually for those meeting the stated requirements. Although not restrictive. The Janet B. For further information on any of the above scholarship programs. These awards are made annually to currently enrolled undergraduate students who have been and continue to be active in drama. Awards shall be made to a single individual or to several qualified students in need. Emma A. laboratory fees. preference is given to children of alumni. Applicants need not be drama majors but must have demonstrated need and demonstrate significant involvement in dramatic activities.November 1 of their senior year. This fund was created by the family and friends of Janet B. provides need-based support for disadvantaged students. can be awarded at any stage of the student's college career through either a nationwide selection process or by the professor of naval science at the university. Awarded to North Carolinians of exceptional ability. with preference given to African American and other minority students. awarded annually to freshman African-American students. Gross Scholarship. these awards recognize and encourage leadership potential and community involvement of students from North and South Carolina. provides whole or partial scholarships to undergraduate students who are. Trinity scholarships provide each winner an award equal to the value of tuition. Duke Scholarship Fund. which includes replacement of about one-half of the loan debt each year. The Steven and Toby Korman Drama Scholarships. These scholarships. Navy ROTC College Scholarship Program. Interested students should apply to the director of the program. Carolinas Honors Scholarships. Trinity Scholarships. based upon academic achievement. Five scholarships equal to full tuition are awarded each year. (919) 660-3700. An award is made annually to a student who has demonstrated strong leadership qualities and a strong interest in his or her Asian cultural heritage. The Student Aid 115 . valued at full tuition. This program provides for up to four years' tuition and textbooks. Kravis Scholars will receive financial aid for four years. The fund and distributions from it shall be administered in accordance with the policies and procedures of Duke Univresity and the laws of the State of North Carolina then in effect. worth $5. The Beth Gotham Semans Drama Scholarships. As part of the Benjamin N. The scholarship shall be awarded annually to a student(s) with demonstrated need who has demonstrated exceptional talent and ability in the field. enrolled in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences or Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University. and overall performance. using the same measurement standards applied by the Office of Financial Aid. contact the professor of naval science. Alumni Endowed Scholarships. fees. Kohler Scholarships in Drama. The endowment. Rhode Island. and the other follows a summer attendance at the Naval Science Institute at Newport. established in 2005. Three full-tuition per year Alumni Endowed Undergraduate Scholarships are awarded to needy students who demonstrate superior academic ability and leadership potential. Scholarships for Carolina Residents The Benjamin N. Duke Leadership Award.000 each. board. Interested students should apply to the director of the program. these scholarships are named to honor the fact that Duke University was originally named Trinity College. Carolinas Honors Scholarships. Chiang. The scholarship students will come from families with income below the median of students receiving financial aid at Duke the previous year. Ten scholarships. Chiang Memorial Scholarship Fund. Current Duke students can apply at any time. with first preference to students from the New York metropolitan area. and the cost of a summer program. Interested incoming students should apply to the director of the program. and a monthly stipend. These scholarships are awarded to talented prospective drama students who would not be able to attend Duke University without financial assistance. and an award for one Duke-sponsored summer study abroad program. are awarded each year to fifteen outstanding students from North or South Carolina who demonstrate financial need. These scholarships. two other two-year scholarships are available to rising juniors: one leads to a career in nuclear power. Sheafer Drama Scholarships. In addition. Additional information concerning Army ROTC scholarships is available from the professor of military science. established in 1997. or shall be at the time of receipt of the scholarship.

North Carolina. The loan programs which are available to students through Duke University are listed below: Federal Perkins Loan. The annual limit on a loan. Pratt Jr. established in 1996. North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grant. Duke University can arrange an alternate lender for students who are unable to obtain these loans through their home state agencies or local banks. In the case of a need-based financial aid recipient. Loans. The scholarships are renewable. The John M. These awards are based on financial need. North Carolina. provided that the recipient complies with the specified academic requirements. Recipients of these scholarships will receive up to demonstrated need levels based on merit criteria. provides scholarship support for undergraduate students in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences and Edmund T. They are renewable each year as long as the student maintains the required average. These scholarships are awarded annually to outstanding students from the Wake County area of North Carolina who major in English or the history of the United States. North Carolina Math Contest. Braxton Craven Endowed Scholarships. scholarship. Calabrese Endowment in the Fuqua School of Business. The Perry Family Scholarship. Each year scholarships of various amounts are awarded to students demonstrating both merit and need. character. Blalock Beard Scholarship. The scholarship is available for four years if the student meets the specified academic requirements. Preference is given to students from Alamance County. All qualified need-based aid recipients are required to apply for this grant. Welch Harriss Scholarships. The grant for each eligible student is approximately $1. and then to needy students from Iredell County. Interest accrues at the rate of 5 percent annually.) Alice Mack Scholarship. Need as established by the federal government's formula will be considered in the university's decision regarding applications. Repayment of loans under this act normally begins six months after the student has graduated or leaves college. Winners must have applied to and been accepted by Duke University. State Contractual Scholarships for Needy North Carolinians. Upon enrolling at Duke. North Carolina. Awarded to students from Winston-Salem and the Forsyth County area. Application is made through the College Scholarship Service's PROFILE. Loans under the Federal Stafford Student Loan program are available from banks or other incorporated state lending agencies. This scholarship is available for each of the four years of undergraduate enrollment as long as the student maintains the specified average. This loan is part of the student's financial aid award. and (3) students from North Carolina.F. These awards are made to entering freshmen who have achieved outstanding academic records. Awards shall be determined in accordance with University guidelines then in use and may include grants and grants-in-lieu of loans. Applications will be mailed to all eligible students during the summer. Should there be no needy graduate or professional student from the designated area. this grant reduces a student's tuition and therefore his budget. Braxton Craven scholars will be chosen on the basis of outstanding academic and extracurricular achievement and need. J. with complete payment scheduled within a ten-year period. Alyse Smith Cooper Scholarships.scholarships are applied toward the loan and work-study portion of the financial aid package and are renewable for four years. Recipients of these scholarships will receive an amount equal to the current tuition at Duke. (2) students from Guilford County. North Carolina. and Sally V. North Carolina. commencing nine months after the borrower ceases to be at least a half-time student at an institution of higher education. First preference is given to students from North Carolina. and academic achievement. Consideration will be given in the following order: (1) students from High Point. School of Engineering and for graduate students enrolled in any of Duke University’s professional schools or programs. The endowment. Recipients of the scholarship will be required to demonstrate high academic achievement as well as leadership and/or involvement in extracurricular activities. Loan funds supplied by the federal government and Duke University through Part E of Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 are available to qualified students. the top student finishing in the top ten in the North Carolina Math Contest taken as a high school senior is eligible to receive a scholarship equal to the amount of tuition. Funds provided by the state of North Carolina through the Legislative Grant Program are distributed to needy North Carolinians qualifying for the State Contractual Scholarship Program. (Recipients are chosen by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at the time of application. The North Carolina General Assembly has established a program of tuition grants available to North Carolina residents who are full-time students at private colleges and universities in the state of North Carolina. Federal Stafford Student Loan Program. which has a variable interest rate that is capped at 116 Financial Information . First preference shall be given to needy students from Mooresville. this scholarship is awarded every other year. that portion of the income (25%) shall be directed to the A.950 per year.

$4. Additional information about this loan program may be obtained from the Undergraduate Financial Aid Office. The university is pleased to offer a ten. Repayment begins six months after the student leaves school. Parents may borrow up to the cost of education less financial aid through the Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) program. All undergraduate students. loan applicants must submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid to the federal processor. $2. is $3. regardless of income. "Excel" is a supplemental educational loan program developed specifically to help families meet the costs of higher education. Credit-worthy families. Duke Signature Select Loan is an alternative educational loan program developed specifically to help students meet the costs of higher education.8 percent.duke. Principal and interest payments can be deferred until after the completion of the borrower’s education. For more information consult the External Loan Office. minimum student earnings will be $2. a freshman should save a minimum of $1. Every effort will be made to help students find jobs consistent with their interests. Annual loan amounts range from $2. Employment. Students with a credit worthy co-signer may borrow up to $15.500 for juniors and seniors. and $5.or twelve-month payment plan through Tuition Management Systems. Many families finance a college education with the assistance of an insured tuition payment plan regardless of whether they receive financial assistance from Duke.400 for seniors. Duke University also expects that students receiving financial aid will work during the summer.200 for sophomores. The Office of Undergraduate Financial Aid maintains part-time employment listings for the campus and Durham area. Student Aid 117 . More information can be obtained from the bursar’s office. These figures are viewed as estimates and are revised consistent with actual earnings.900 for use during the first year of college. Students may apply for Stafford loan funds by submitting a loan application directly to the External Loan Aid Office. In subsequent years. are eligible to borrow an Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. For information call 1-800-EDU-LOAN.5 percent and begins to accrue at the point repayment begins. interest payments begin 45 days after the first disbursement of the loan. and $2. The money is paid directly to the student. Duke University offers subsidized employment opportunities to many students not qualifying for need-based financial aid. Interested parents should contact their home state lending agency or the financial aid office. In the year before entering college. Although repayment of the principal begins six months after the student leaves school.6. and Share offers several repayment options. Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Program.000 to up to the cost of education less financial aid. Excel Loans. may be eligible to borrow through this program. In addition. regardless of need. Most financial aid recipients are offered a job as part of their aid package.edu). Tuition Plans.500 for sophomores. All students interested in working during the school year should review the jobs listing in the career counseling section of the Duke Home Page (www. Repayment of these loans begins sixty days after loan disbursement.000. Interest is based upon treasury bill rates but will be no higher than 8.300 for juniors. Federal Parents' Loan for Undergraduate Students Program. The loan limits and the interest rate are the same as for the subsidized Stafford Loan described above. The interest rate is variable.500 for freshmen. Interested students should submit the appropriate aid applications.

Courses and Academic Programs .

is not a substitute for a major but is a supplement. Nijhout. Assistant Professor Hill. Unit Admissions Officer Eligibility Requirements. The L suffix indicates that the course includes laboratory experience. For courses that will be offered in 2008-2009. Keul. Gilbert. must execute a written agreement with the government to complete the Professional Officer Course. and institutes. USAF. subject to any limitation set forth in the course description in this bulletin. Kostyu. Rasmussen. Courses numbered 1 through 49 are primarily for first-year students. arranged alphabetically. and White Aerospace Studies—Air Force ROTC (AEROSCI) Professor Wroth. (See the section on course load and eligibility in the chapter “Academic Procedures and Information. For enrollment in the Professional Officer Course. which indicate whether a major. Curriculum codes appear at the end of course titles.S. tutorial. Literatures. programs. and Society (STS) Foreign Language (FL) Research (R) Writing (W) Trinity College of Arts and Sciences Professor Thompson. sections. All freshmen and sophomores are eligible to enroll in the General Military Course in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Introductory-level courses are numbered below 100. Assistant Professor Fletcher. Assistant Deans Blackmon. T. courses numbered from 200 through 299 are primarily for seniors and graduate students. advanced-level courses are numbered 100 and above. Commandant of Cadets.”) Special Topics courses may be repeated (if the subtitles of the courses are different). and/ or a certificate is available in that particular field. suffixed to course numbers.Definition of Terms The following portion of this bulletin. Lattimore. USAF. Details are provided in the individual entries. preceptorial. includes courses of academic departments. The following symbols. An explanation of the curriculum codes follows: Areas of Knowledge: Arts. seminar. C-L: denotes a course that is cross-listed or a program under which a course is also listed. McKay. Technology. D. Lieutenant Colonel.) Courses taught in recent years or scheduled for 2008-2009 are included in this chapter with full descriptions. discussion section (for a larger class). as well as categories of courses. Dean of Trinity College and of Arts and Sciences. Riley. Director of Undergraduate Studies. offered in some programs. confirming that a student has satisfied the requirements of that program. Senior Associate Dean for Administration Wilson. a minor. Air Definition of Terms 119 . also consult the online ACES Schedule of Courses. Captain. the student must have completed successfully the General Military Course and a field training encampment. must be sworn into the enlisted reserve. and Performance (ALP) Civilizations (CZ) Natural Sciences (NS) Quantitative Studies (QS) Social Sciences (SS) Modes of Inquiry: Cross-Cultural Inquiry (CCI) Ethical Inquiry (EI) Science. P. identify small classes: S. Captain. and Walther. Associate Deans Bryant. and must agree to accept a commission in the U. USAF. (A certificate.

12. effective management tools to evaluate and improve processes. Half course. military customs and courtesies. 11. Instructor: Staff. and written and verbal communication skills. The military as a profession and current issues affecting military professionalism. 206S. and other leadership activities. Defense Studies. Half course. ethics. EI The national security process. STS Continuation of Aerospace Studies 51. Instruction in drill and ceremonies. Air Force Leadership and Management. Instructor: Staff. One course. ethical behavior. Laboratory required for AFROTC cadets. except 2L. effective delegation. Must be repeated each semester. Pass/fail grading only. regional studies. American tradition in foreign policy. Half course. cold war challenges. Fourth Year 205S. Leadership Laboratory mandatory for AFROTC cadets. Instructor: Staff. military law. EI Leadership and management fundamentals. and Air Force doctrine. national security issues. leadership vs. officership and professionalism. wearing the uniform. Air Force Core Values and communications skills. Half course. Leadership Laboratory mandatory for AFROTC cadets. Instructor: Staff. Air Force and joint doctrines. Topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force. EI Continuation of Aerospace Studies 205S. Third Year 105S. 52. 106S. Air Force issues. leadership ethics. Laboratory required for AFROTC cadets. Principle centered/situational leadership. preparation 120 Courses and Academic Programs . Historical examples to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power. Instructor: Wroth. Students in the General Military Course and Professional Officer Course are required to attend two hours of leadership laboratory each week. Mandatory for all Air Force ROTC cadets. Professional Officer Courses All students selected to continue in Aerospace Studies must pursue the following courses. counseling/feedback. Leadership Laboratory mandatory for AFROTC cadets. advanced leadership ethics. One course. The Evolution of US Air and Space Power. Instructor: Staff. the relationship with the president and Congress. STS A survey course designed to examine the general elements and employment of air and space power. management. the chain of command. Air Force Leadership and Management. Leadership Laboratory. A survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Instructor: Staff. Training philosophy. Leadership Laboratory mandatory for AFROTC cadets. case studies of different leadership styles. and advanced level briefings and papers. giving commands. Second Year 51. professional knowledge. General Military Courses First Year 2L. The Evolution of US Air and Space Power. are open to all other students with consent of instructor. and an introduction to communication skills. All courses. Officership. leadership principles and perspectives. Air Force officer opportunities. Foundations of the United States Air Force. From the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. from an institutional doctrinal and historical perspective. Defense Studies. Foundations of the United States Air Force. Instructor: Staff.Force upon graduation. Continuation of Aerospace Studies 11. and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. roles and missions. building and refining written and verbal communication skills from 105S. One course. Leadership Laboratory mandatory for AFROTC cadets. EI Continuation of Aerospace Studies 105S. Air Force doctrine.

Special Topics. Introduction to African and African American Studies. available through the Office of Study Abroad. Instructor: Staff. ALP. Focus Program Seminars. Instructor: Staff. C-L: see History 76. One course. C-L: see Music 74D 88FCS. One course. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in African and AfricanAmerican Studies. Instructor: Staff. Topics vary each semester offered. McClain. Not open to students who have taken African and African American Studies 106 or 106A. Crichlow. CZ One course. Interim Director. Seminar version of African and African American Studies 104. Assistant Professors Holsey and Makhulu A major or a minor is available in this program. The African and African American Studies courses are listed below. (Full descriptions of cross-listed courses may be found in the bulletin course listings of the particular department or program cited in the cross-listing. 99. Holloway. One course. Neal. 99S. 70. and race and public policy. Special Topics. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor: Staff. Seminar version of African and African American Studies 99. 49S. One course. One course. and refining communications skills from 205S. CCI One course. Special Topics. One course. Introduction to Jazz. Introduction to African and African American Studies. One course. except writing across discipline course. CCI Topics differ by section. CCI.for active duty. CZ One course. Instructor: Staff. C-L: see Music 74 74D. CCI. Topics vary semester to semester. The program encourages study abroad in Africa. 106A. and Wallace. Assistant Professor Makhulu. Special Topics. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in African and African American Studies. and Powell. within which they may focus on Africa or the Americas. SS Theories and issues of representation and practice. ALP. CCI Topics differ by section. One course. 104. CZ. gender and race. The program in African and African American Studies provides students with an interdisciplinary approach to the field. also C-L: Latin American Studies. Instructor: Staff. with specific attention to culture. Instructor: Lubiano. Film and the African Diaspora. cultural expressions. CCI. One course. Topics vary from semester to semester. nation. Music 74. 106B. Instructor: Staff. and other relevant language courses in the Department of Romance Studies. African and African American Studies (AAAS) Associate Professor Piot. African American freedom struggles from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries. the era of Jim Crow. African and African American Studies (AAAS) 121 . Instructor: Staff. W Same as 106A. Leadership Laboratory mandatory for AFROTC cadets. also C-L: Latin American Studies. One course. Introduction to Jazz. SS A range of disciplinary perspectives on key topics in African American Studies: slavery and abolitionism. Haynie. Piot. political and intellectual thought. Director of Undergraduate Studies. 104S. International Comparative Studies 71. Topics on the Third World and the West. Instructor: Wroth. C-L: Visual Studies 104A. Arabic language courses are taught in the Asian and African Languages and Literature Program. CCI. CCI One course. 101. Glymph. Instructor: Staff. Film/Video/Digital 102. Lubiano. Associate Professors Baker. One course. CZ. 55. Professors Darity. International Comparative Studies 74. One course. Topics vary from semester to semester. theories of race and racism. First-Year Seminar. C-L: see History 75. CCI. James. for example.) In addition. Topics on the Third World and the West. Instructor: Staff. and gender in contemporary and historic black films and filmmakers of Africa and the Diaspora. ALP.

CZ. CZ One course. C-L: see History 113B. South Carolina. ALP. also CL: Latin American Studies. CCI. Instructor: Piot. and Virginia. C-L: see History 127B. C-L: see Dance 110A. and theories about Africa and Africans. Cultural Anthropology 129B. Freedom Stories: Documenting Southern Lives and Writing. CCI One course. art and music. also C-L: Children in Contemporary Society 121. also C-L: Literature 165C. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 121. Introduction to African Studies. Slave Society in Colonial Anglo-America: The West Indies. also C-L: History 150ES 113B. also C-L: Women's Studies. C-L: see Music 133S. R. C-L: see Documentary Studies 112S. CCI. International Comparative Studies 127B. One course. R One course. R. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 127S. Religion 161A 110B. CZ One course. history and culture of societies and nation-states across the continent while also critiquing Euroamerican discourses. History and Modern Africa. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 151B. EI One course. C-L: see History 115B. 1492-1700. C-L: see Dance 110B. also C-L: History 129S 126S. The South in Black and White. also C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 110A. R One course. CCI. Women's Studies 188 110A.some classic. CZ. CCI. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 133S 122 Courses and Academic Programs . Religion 161B 112S. ALP. ALP.but also media accounts. CCI. CCI. images. CCI One course. International Comparative Studies 124S. English 180. EI. C-L: see Documentary Studies 132 131S. C-L: see History 127A. One course. age and gender. West African Rootholds in Dance. The Press and the Public Interest. also C-L: Policy Journalism and Media Studies 127A. CCI. novels and historical texts. imperialism and colonialism. International Comparative Studies 122. and some experimental and off-beat. CCI. History of Africa: From Antiquity to Early Modern Times. CZ. ALP. The Caribbean. United States Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities: Social Determinants and Public Policy Implications. CZ. CCI. One course. CCI. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 122. African Mbira Music: An Experiential Learning Class. C-L: see History 124S. Instructor: Staff. Europe's Colonial Encounter. 1492-1992. CCI One course. SS Explores the politics. C-L: see Sociology 116. CZ A range of disciplinary perspectives on key topics in contemporary African Studies: nationalism and pan-Africanism. CCI.107. CZ One course. CZ One course. SS One course. West African Rootholds in Dance. Political Science 174 108S. also C-L: Ethics 115A. SS One course. Behind the Veil: Methods. CZ. CCI. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 122A. also C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 110B. History 115C. ALP. Introduction to Asian and African Literature. CCI. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 125S. Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies. C-L: see Documentary Studies 125S. CCI. also C-L: Women's Studies. Gender and Sexuality in Africa. genocide and famine. SS One course. ALP. Latin American Studies 130. International Comparative Studies 115B. Related issues of power and inequality. Readings consist of not only anthropological texts. CCI. Culture and Politics in Africa. ALP. SS Constructions of gender and sexuality in different African societies. CZ One course. development and democratization. C-L: see History 115A. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 129 131. CZ One course. SS One course. International Comparative Studies 116. The Caribbean in the Eighteenth Century. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 136. Visual Studies 104B. Cultural Anthropology 129A. Instructor: Holsey.

EI One course. popular dance. Psychology of Ethnicity and Context. both during slavery and beyond. The ways in which prevalent ideas about race. CCI. One course. One course. Women's Studies 137 138S. C-L: see Political Science 141 149D. patterns of language. CCI. and the occult. CCI. Magical Modernities. Urban Education. International Comparative Studies 111 African and African American Studies (AAAS) 123 . C-L: Cultural Anthropology 153. CCI. Religions of the African Diaspora. race. also C-L: Global Health 135S. television. and class discrimination that evolved specifically to confront the presence of African American women first as slaves and later as free women. hip hop. One course. and art in the twentieth century. C-L: see History 145B. blues and jazz music. black social movements. EI One course. SS Tensions within the African context concerning rationalization and persistent belief in a supernatural order. also C-L: Documentary Studies 147. C-L: see Portuguese 140S. Focus on the economic basis of beliefs in magic. Wallace. Topics may include black cinema. Introduction to Racial and Ethnic Minorities in American Politics. One course. but not limited to. CZ. SS An interdisciplinary examination of contemporary educational problems in American cities. blacks and sports culture. witchcraft. C-L: see Psychology 133. and the cultural history of black style. SS One course. also C-L: Documentary Studies 145B. and gender coalesced around images of the African American women and African American women's struggles to assert independent identities. CZ. Instructor: Makhulu. and the United States. African Americans Since the Civil War. and the formation of public policy for urban schools and school reform. Latin American Studies. CCI Contemporary fiction of black women writers from West Africa. and more strictly religious forces that lie at the heart of Black diasporic religious expression. CCI. SS One course. Canadian Studies 140S. C-L: see Political Science 141D 150. race relations. music. Representations of cultural and national identities. also CL: Asian and African Languages and Literature 168S. Black Popular Culture. ALP. Diaspora Literacy: Black Women Novelists of the Third World. International Comparative Studies 153. and the revisioned histories as structured and framed within imaginative literatures. Introduction to Racial and Ethnic Minorities in American Politics. FL One course. FL One course. SS Diasporic religious expression and practice. Issues of colonialism and slavery as background. Africans in America to the Civil War. ALP.132. CCI. CCI. CCI. Brazilian Popular Culture. aesthetic. Children in Contemporary Society 149. popular literature. One course. African American Women and History. History 162S. CZ The history of African American women in the United States. ALP. with particular attention to race and class. CCI. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 140AS. gendered. Religion 160. One course. Francophone Literature. Instructor: Payne. CCI. C-L: see History 145A. CCI. and the overlap between magical phenomena and the workings of finance capital. C-L: Education 147. CL: Visual Studies 104C 134. as well as to the social. Instructor: Staff. Multidisciplinary readings. black nationalism. the Caribbean. Visual Studies 126BS 145A. Special attention to the relationship between religion and history. figurative representations. CZ. The ways in which African American popular culture may reflect the particular values and ethos of African Americans and the larger American society. C-L: History 145C. SS One course. The production of discourses of gender. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 150. Instructor: Lubiano. Instructor: Holloway. International Comparative Studies 110CS. Instructor: Glymph. and staff. C-L: see French 161S. CCI. 137. film. CZ. from Africa to the Americas. CZ The production and circulation of African American popular cultural forms including. Sociology 136.

African American Literary Genres (DS3 or DS4). R One course. debates regarding its impact. also C-L: Ethics 168S. C-L: see Dance 158. Open to juniors and seniors. CCI. Dance and Religion in Asia and Africa. From Apartheid to Democracy in South Africa. CCI. SS One course. CCI. 190B. also C-L: Policy Journalism and Media Studies 178. C-L: see English 164A 174. R One course. African American Literature. ways it is remembered today. CCI. ALP One course. Art. Latin American Studies 170. CCI. Africa and the Slave Trade. African American Intellectual History. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Instructor: Staff. Independent Study. C-L: see History 163E. of histories of slavery and colonialism in the Black Atlantic and genealogies of diasporic identification. CCI. Multidisciplinary readings from anthropology. ALP. ALP. SS History of the Atlantic slave trade in Africa. resulting in a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. CZ. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 174. SS One course. Independent Study. One course. CZ. The African Diaspora. SS One course. Cultural Anthropology 149C. various responses to it. CZ. ALP. One course. CCI. Consent of both instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. EI. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 175. C-L: see Literature 162AS 163. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 110A 158. EI. ALP. C-L: see Political Science 171. SS An exploration. CZ. Studies in an Individual African American Author. Instructor: Staff. R One course. 191B. R One course. EI. R See African and African American Studies 190B. R One course. Open to juniors and seniors. Instructor: Staff. International Comparative Studies 102A 162AS. CCI. W One course. ALP One course. CZ. Instructor: Holsey. Research Independent Study. Individual research and reading in a field of special interest. Social Facts and Narrative Representations. CCI. C-L: see History 170C. R One course. Instructor: Staff. Separation and Inclusion. 124 Courses and Academic Programs . the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. See African and African American Studies 190A. C-L: see English 166 183S.156. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 122B 190A. ALP. C-L: see English 165 182. ALP. also C-L: Portuguese 170C. R One course. also C-L: Policy Journalism and Media Studies 181. ranging from Africa to the Americas and Europe. CCI. One course. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 173S. Race and Equity. CZ. Latin American Studies 171. The Civil Rights Movement. Consent of both instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. CCI. A-E. 191A. under the supervision of a faculty member. Architecture. CCI. C-L: see Visual Studies 101F. C-L: see History 168BS. C-L: see Art History 176 157. A-F. SS One course. Afro-Brazilian Culture and History. CZ One course. 192H. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 110B 173. Religion 161N. The Atlantic Slave Trade. Consent of both instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. One course. CZ. One course. CCI. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 103FS. African American Literature. also C-L: History 176B 179. Twentieth Century. Research Independent Study. Modern and Contemporary African American Art. also C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 136. C-L: see English 164B 177S. and Masquerade in Africa.

Literature 200S 213S. Teaching Race. Special Topics. CCI. and art history. C-L: see Visual Studies 220S 278S. A. R One course. African and African American Studies 106 and 107. CCI. Seminar version of African and African American Studies 199. 299S. One course. Teaching Gender. 200S. Three courses focusing upon the Americas. Race and American Politics. SS One course. CCI. class. Seminar in Asian and African Cultural Studies. Instructor: Piot or Thomas. SS One course. Minority Mental Health: Issues in Theory. Consent of both instructor and director of undergraduate studies. capitalism. Special Topics. 194B. CZ. Seminar version of African and African American Studies 299. R. One course. one course in each of the following African and African American Studies (AAAS) 125 . C-L: Cultural Anthropology 191H. One course. ALP. Instructor: Staff. EI One course. Open only to senior majors. especially those of race. One course. Harlem Renaissance. Instructor: Staff. Continuation of African and African American Studies 194A Open only to senior majors. and Commerce in Islam. Instructor: Staff. History 297S. One course. Distinction Program Sequence. CCI. Instructor: Staff. and Research. One course. SS Encounters between African societies and global forces. EI. Literature 225S 299. International Comparative Studies 194A. CCI. Islamic Studies 262S. literature. Instructors: Staff. Special Topics. CCI. International Comparative Studies 229S. Justice. and gender. Topics vary from semester to semester. African Modernities. Distinction Program Sequence. One course. Racism. Instructor: Staff. One course. Research for the development of thesis. Treatment. One course. and Health. Students may choose one of the two following options. 195S. SS One course. Curricular content and its interaction with the social constructions of students and teachers. Instructor: Holsey. 2. SS. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 200S.history. development initiatives. Fugitive Slave (Maroon) Communities in New World Slave Societies. C-L: see Psychology 262S 269S. Topics vary from semester to semester. C-L: Women's Studies 297S. 199S. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 229S 254. Instructor: Lubiano. Topics vary from semester to semester. CZ. 199. Senior Seminar. Law. Race. Consent of both instructor and director of undergraduate studies. and Democracy. CZ Also taught as History 195S or 196S. SS Interdisciplinary analyses of the problematics of teaching about social hierarchies. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 203S. Inequality. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 288S. Instructor: Gaspar. C-L: see Religion 254. C-L: International Comparative Studies 198S. International Comparative Studies. THE MAJOR The major requires ten courses. The Americas Focus Major Requirements: 1. W One course. Instructor: Staff. CCI. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 279S 297S. eight of which must be at the level of 100 or above. also C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 254. One course. including colonialism. Special Topics. CZ One course. C-L: see Political Science 278S. Open to seniors majoring in African and African American Studies and to others with consent of instructor. also C-L: Public Policy Studies 278S 279S. Poverty. One course.

4. Rankin. Assistant 126 Courses and Academic Programs . 4.B. Foreign Languages The program recommends that majors complete at least two years of college-level study. History c. Courses must be selected in each of the following areas: 1. Religious. and Shatzman. or Political Institutions/Processes. and Weisenfeld. Social. History c. Art History. Bruzelius. Arts or Literature b. Both program foci (Africa and the Americas) must be represented in the three-course selection. B. Animal Behavior For courses in animal behavior. Social. African and African American Studies 198S (Senior Seminar). Art. Economic. Powell. Lenoir. Economic. Arabic For courses in Arabic. Associate Professors of the Practice Noland. THE MINOR The minor requires five courses. African and African American Studies 106 and 107. of a foreign language. or Political Institutions/Processes. or Political Institutions/Processes. African and African American Studies 198S (Senior Seminar). one course in each of the following areas: a. Religious. and Wharton. or equivalent. 3. History 3. Chair. Dillon. See the section on honors in this bulletin and contact the director of undergraduate studies. Religious. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ ARTHIST/VISUALST) Professor Van Miegroet. and three of which must be at the level of 100 or above. McWilliam. Anthropology See the Department of Biological Anthropology and Anatomy and the Department of Cultural Anthropology for information about those majors. Four additional African and African American Studies courses. Departmental Graduation with Distinction The program offers work leading to Graduation with Distinction. Economic. two of which must be African and African American Studies 106 and 107. Arts or Literature b. Students interested in additional study of African or Diaspora cultures are strongly encouraged to study an African or Caribbean language. Associate Professors Abe.areas: a. Stiles. see Biology. 2. Social. Assistant Professor Gabara. Professors Antliff. Africa Focus Major Requirements: 1. 3. see Asian and African Languages and Literature. Van Miegroet. Three courses focusing upon Africa. Four additional African and African-American Studies courses. N. Director of Undergraduate Studies. Leighten. Professor Stiles. Arts or Literature 2.

70. ALP Subjects. 97. ALP. 20. the multiple ways in which the works have been understood in the past as well as the present.Professor of the Practice Lasch. and advertising. art publishing. areas. CZ See Art History 97. Basic Art History. Art History. ALP. Professor Emeritus Markman Majors and minors in art history. precise observation. ALP. 98. 95S. II. Art. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. One course. CCI. Open only to students in the Focus Program. A range of art historical approaches and methods. political. museum and gallery work. expository writing. CCI. the ordering of diverse sorts of information. One course. R Topics vary each semester offered. CZ Same as Art History 69. CZ Same as Art History 70 except instruction provided in two lectures and one small discussion meeting each week. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 127 . areas. Adjunct Assistant Professor Schroder. CZ Subjects. Students of art history acquire a sophisticated understanding of the theory and practice of artistic production and reception. Visual Culture Outside the United States. CZ Course in the visual arts and/ or architecture taught in Duke programs abroad. Visual Culture Outside the United States. 1400). it also enhances the faculties of creative imagination. and scholarly research makes it a good general preparation for any profession. Special Topics in Art History. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Art History. painting. Instructor: Staff. ART HISTORY (ARTHIST) Art history is the study of works of art in the context of the broader social. clear expression. Instructor: Staff. A major or second major in art history provides basic training for those interested in teaching. 69. 49S. ALP. One course. Introduction to the History of Art. ALP. CCI. CCI. except instruction provided in two lectures and one small discussion meeting each week. 69D. CZ The visual arts of Asia. 70D. One course. ALP. Adjunct Professor Rorschach. One course. Art history's emphasis upon careful observation. CCI. Topics in Art History. visual studies. and critical judgment. Introduction to the History of Art. and photography are available in this department. Introduction to the History of Art. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. ALP. One course. I. One course. CZ The history of western architecture. First-Year Seminar. or themes that embrace a range of disciplines. C-L: International Comparative Studies 80FCS. Does not count toward the major in art history or design. and architecture: selected works in their historical context. art history/visual arts. and painting in a cultural context from prehistory to the Renaissance (c. and visual culture. CZ Continuation of Art History 69. and intellectual cultures of which they are a part. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. One course. From the Renaissance to the present. visual as well as verbal. the major also furnishes an appropriate background for graduate training in architecture. Adjunct Associate Professor Schroth and Brady. One course. 60. art historical areas. One course. CZ. One course. sculpture. ALP. Credit for Advanced Placement on the basis of the College Board examination in art history. ALP. Instructor: Abe or Weisenfeld. CZ Topics differ by section. visual arts. Instructor: Staff. ALP. or themes that embrace a range of disciplines or art historical areas. One course. Introduction to Asian Art. Studying art history develops the ability to evaluate and organize information. 71. Instructor: Staff. Introduction to the History of Art. primarily Chinese and Japanese sculpture.

Considering all media. C-L: Classical Studies 132 106. and the impact of new philosophical trends on aesthetic theory. ALP. Gothic Cathedrals. and Afghanistan. C-L: see Classical Studies 155 116. Rousseau and the cult of nature. with a special focus on France. ALP. sculpture. CZ. One course. and their construction. from roughly 1140 to 1270. prints. Art in the Hellenistic Age. 128 Courses and Academic Programs . financing. ALP. the protection of normative values. architecture and gardens. Representing Women in the Classical World. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 112A 111. 114. the course explores the role of visual representation in communicating complex social and political messages. Issues such as the construction of gender. R Great cathedrals of Europe in England. CZ The lives of women in the Classical world viewed through the visual culture of Classical art. topics may include the rise of academies. Medieval Architecture. C-L: Classical Studies 103. Iraq. CCI. Visual Studies 101A 105. historical and theoretical discussions of rococo and neoclassical styles. and different types of liturgical requirements on the shapes and spaces of religious buildings. the inclusion of burials. CZ. CZ One course. A consideration of Romanesque precedents and the origins of the various structural elements of Gothic architecture. Instructor: Staff. CZ Offered in the Leadership and the Arts Program in New York. Turkey. acculturation. ALP. aesthetic. Instructor: Dillon. The urban context of each city. CCI. including painting. Instructor: Staff. CZ. ALP. CCI. the idea of revolutions in history. Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture. CZ The paintings. questions of reception and memory. and more traditional art-historical themes of patronage and stylistic change. resistance. within context of such issues as power. One course. the role of the spectator in art. Germany. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 112B 113. the history of the site and its relics. Instructor: Bruzelius. ALP. and painting. and Italy. statues. Syria. the development of art criticism. 103. R A survey of the origins and development of medieval church architecture from Late Antiquity to the High Middle Ages in the Mediterranean and Europe north of the Alps concentrating on the effects of the cult of relics. the origins and development of fortifications and castles. One course. ritual. One course. CZ Survey of the major architectural traditions during the great age of Greek and Macedonian colonization. STS One course. and role in the fabric of medieval city life. Instructor: Dillon. Perspectives on Information Science and Information Studies. and the manipulation and control of sexuality are considered. social.100." Spectacle culture in the Hellenistic world. and "Hellenization. and the artistic and technological developments that made the construction of these complex and large-scale structures possible. ALP. One course. reliefs. C-L: Classical Studies 141 110. C-L: see Information Science and Information Studies 100. ALP. Instructor: Bruzelius. also C-L: Visual Studies 120A 102S. CCI. Egypt. CCI. Instructor: Dillon. the involvement of women in art and its institutions. Focus on political. and buildings of the Hellenistic kingdoms. in such culturally diverse places as Greece. One course. CCI. The Aegean Bronze Age. CCI. the expression of power and status. the preservation of social hierarchies. coins. Contemporary Art and Culture in New York. Emphasis on monastic architecture and especially the buildings of the mendicant orders. and technical aspects of Hellenistic architecture and the profound impact that the architectural forms of the period had on the city of Rome. the segmentation of the lay public. which saw important developments in urbanism and city planning. One course. Museum Internship. Through images of women in statues. Hellenistic Architecture. R One course. The vital role played by art in defining and expressing cultural change. CZ The visual arts and esthetic issues in the development of modern culture in Europe and the relationship between artists and the public in the period of the Enlightenment.

Subject varies from year to year. CZ. and exhibition venues from large-scale paintings in the annual state-sponsored salons to political satire in the press. Examination of the physical remains of the city and countryside to trace the development of one of the most important city-states in the Greek world and to understand its impact on western civilization. style. social. also C-L: Literature 120E. media. and the related arts. CZ One course. English 186B. English 123C 139S. History 116. including Leonardo. One course. and cultural context. CZ One course. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 142 143. Early Greek Archaeology: From the Fall of Mycenae to the Persian Wars. Topics in Renaissance Art. (Taught in Italy. ALP. Visualizing Cultural Dissent in Modernism. R Painting. CZ One course. C-L: see Classical Studies 145. C-L: Visual Studies 101B 122. 300 to 1400. CZ Specific problems dealing with the iconography. Instructor: Dillon. Instructor: Staff. and topography of ancient Athens from the Archaic to the Roman period. The art of the early Renaissance in its historical. also C-L: Literature 120F. 136.) Instructor: Staff. The Art of the Counter Reformation. CZ. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 106. ALP. One course. 1880-1945. CCI. Emphasis on art in Florence. ALP One course. Contributions of individual masters from Masaccio and Donatello to Botticelli and Mantegna. R Painting. Rome: History of the City. CCI. private arts. ALP. CZ Monuments. Introduction to Documentary Film. ALP. ALP. and cultural context. CZ. C-L: Classical Studies 126 126A. C-L: Classical Studies 128 134. ALP. and Venice. One course. One course. or an individual master from c. 1300 to 1600. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Athens. ALP. the Art. also C-L: Classical Studies 139S. ALP. CCI. C-L: see Film/Video/ Digital 102. CCI. and triumphal monuments. Emphasis on the art of Florence and central Italy. The Living Middle Ages. CCI. ALP. CZ Specific problems dealing with contextual and cultural issues in medieval art and architecture from c. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 129 . Visual Studies 117C 123. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 141 142. art. One course. CZ.121. ALP. CCI. archaeology. W One course. Fifteenth-Century Italian Art. ALP. Topics in Medieval Art and Architecture. Michelangelo. Sixteenth-Century Italian Art. CZ Interrelations of modernism and politics in a period of rapid social and technological change. Correggio. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 140C 141. CCI. History 116S. ALP. Titian. sculpture. Art History. CCI. CCI. CZ. ALP. Instructor: Staff. and political reaction on left and right. C-L: see Classical Studies 124 125A. C-L: see Classical Studies 123 124. social. Consent of instructor required. One course. 1400-1500. CCI. Contributions of individual masters. Instructor: Staff. R Religious art in Catholic Europe during and following the Council of Trent. Instructor: Staff. and the related arts: 1500-1600. Case study in understanding the role of archaeology in reconstructing the life and culture of the Athenians. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 131C 135A. CCI. ALP. Development of new media in the form of prints and photography reflecting these changes and a variety of social movements and political positions by artists exploring a range of subjects. C-L: see Medieval and Renaissance Studies 114S. Raphael. Investigation of the art of the High Renaissance in its historical. Documentary Studies 107. also C-L: Classical Studies 139. CCI. sculpture. Rome. CCI. One course. CCI One course. CZ Topics vary from year to year. Greek Art and Archaeology II: Classical to Greco-Roman. Instructor: Staff. also C-L: History 101F 128. Visual Studies 117F 139. Rome's cultural imperialism and the impact of foreign cultural traditions on the evolution of Roman art. Emphasis on portraiture. CCI. W One course. Aspects of Medieval Culture. ALP. Art of the Roman Empire. Instructor: Leighten. Topics in Italian Art and Architecture. rise of mass social movements. One course. Film Genres. English 123CS 140. CZ Art in the Roman world from Augustus to Theodosius. C-L: see Medieval and Renaissance Studies 114. Rise of the new religious orders.

ALP. (Taught in the Netherlands. Art in an Age of Revolution: Europe 1760-1850. ALP. C-L: International Comparative Studies 166. the Pre-Raphaelites. CCI. ALP. ALP. One course. romanticism. Art of Italy in the Seventeenth Century. Goya.) Not open to students who have taken 241-242. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 157. the body and artistic creativity.) Not open to students who have taken 241-242. focusing on the patronage of the Popes and Papal court. Instructor: Van Miegroet. the Carracci. 1850-1900. 161. Italian 134. International Comparative Studies 152. ALP. Poussin. CZ One course. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 144B 144B. CZ Introduction to the development of painting. CZ The second half of the nineteenth century in Europe with particular emphasis on realism. International Comparative Studies 160. Religiosity and personal mythologies. Second half of Art History 158-159. Changing conceptions of nature. History of Netherlandish Art in a European Context. French Art and Visual Culture in the Early Modern Period. C-L: see Medieval and Renaissance Studies 115. One course. and the related arts: 1580-1700. Friedrich. Guido Reni. postimpressionism. Instructor: Van Miegroet. R. CCI. and 130 Courses and Academic Programs . C-L: Art History 156. Delacroix. C-L: see Economics 143 158. CCI. Instructor: Staff. English 123E 151. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 151C. Considers the validity of the concept of a counter-reformation style. CCI. One course. and cultural context of artistic production in Baroque Italy. CZ. David.revival of interest in the early Church and the origins of Christian archaeology. One course. papal patronage and the monumentalization of Rome. SS One course. Fusseli. emphasis on the contributions of Caravaggio. ALP. Instructor: Van Miegroet. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 159. Visual Studies 101C 157. CZ One course. CZ The roots of modernity in European art: classicism. One course. and early realism. International Comparative Studies 159. northern legends and the middle ages. the Church's use of art in its campaign against Protestantism. CCI. One course. Art in Europe. C-L: see Spanish 152.) Instructor: Staff. CCI. Instructor: McWilliam. Course credit contingent upon successful completion of Art History 159. CCI. One course. CCI. Ingres. Renaissance and Baroque Art History. the Nazarenes. CZ. the cult of saints and the veneration of relics. and architecture in Rome from the fifteenth to the early seventeenth centuries. Artists include Blake. sculpture. ALP. Role of tradition: the impact of antiquity. social. CZ Topics differ by section. Turner. and architecture in Rome from the fifteenth to the early seventeenth centuries. impressionism. Bernini. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Art History. focusing on the patronage of the Popes and the Papal court. The historical. Aspects of Renaissance Culture. sculpture. (Taught in the Netherlands. also C-L: English 123F 156. International Comparative Studies 180A. Visual Studies 158. Women Writers of the Renaissance: Spain and England. CCI. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 137 149. One course. Instructor: Staff. CCI. ALP. ALP. ALP. CCI. Runge. R Students proficient in French will be encouraged to do some of the reading in French. CZ See Art History 241. ALP. Visual Studies 159. The Art Market. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 143 144A. Impact of the enlightenment and French Revolution on European visual culture. Renaissance and Baroque Art History. Consent required. (Taught at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 158. ALP. also C-L: History 148A. Instructor: Staff. History of Netherlandish Art in a European Context. Emergence of new publics for art and beginnings of a modern art market. CZ See Art History 242. One course. R Painting. required for credit for 158. Instructor: Staff. CZ Introduction to the development of painting. sculpture.

CZ Focus on periods. One course. Chinese Buddhist Art. social and political issues in the history of the photographic medium. Visual Studies 126KS. From ancient times to the present. ALP. CZ. Subject varies from year to year. Central. One course. Topics in Nineteenth Century European Art. CZ. Focus on the vast changes that have occurred in art and its media since 1945 and the moral and ethical roles that art plays in shaping culture and in reflecting its social exigencies. and architecture in relation to Buddhist texts. Latin American Studies Art. ALP. Instructor: Powell. Charles White.symbolism in France. Instructor: Staff. Architecture. Instructor: Leighten. CCI. Topics in Visual Studies. and Visual Art. areas. and cultural impact of experimental art after the atomic age and in the aftermath of the Holocaust. CZ Focus on a major aspect of Twentieth century European art. painting. One course. 20th Century Latin American Photography. C-L: see Spanish 177S. and Neue Sachlichkeit in France. Subject varies from year to year. Literature 133B. Jacob Lawrence. Art History. International Comparative Studies 110A. One course. One course. and masking traditions in West. Subject varies from year to year. Topics in History of Photography. Instructor: Abe. ALP. deStijl. One course. C-L: African and African American Studies 156 177A. R Emphasis on works derived from an Afro-United States cultural perspective. 177C. 1900-1945. CCI. Ethics 170. ALP. CZ Focus on a major aspect of contemporary European art. Elizabeth Catlett. CCI. Experimental Art and Its Ethics since 1945. C-L: Women's Studies 168. Romare Bearden. CZ Focus on a major aspect of nineteenth century European art. America. CCI. Italy. and ritual from the fourth through the ninth century C. CL: International Comparative Studies 167. ALP. Major figures include Henry Ossawa Tanner. Aaron Douglas. CZ. dada. Instructor: Staff. continuing into the post-biological age of genetic engineering. One course. Instructor: Antliff. STS A Cultural history of the televisual beginning with television and ending with multimedia. EI Major avant-garde movements of the post-World War II era covered globally. Modern and Contemporary African American Art. cultures and major ethical. and America. Germany. and others. all of which concentrate on the social. Avant-gardism. Visual Studies 101F 176. constructivism. Modernism. Instructor: Powell. Women's Studies. vernacular structures. Subjects. 177E. Consent of instructor required. ALP. CCI. 177B. C-L: International Comparative Studies 120G 173. 177G. Instructor: Staff. suprematism. Special Topics in Art History. Instructor: Staff. C-L: African and African American Studies 157. Topics in Contemporary Art. Instructor: Stiles. CCI. expressionism. CZ. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 132BS. 177FS. CCI. One course. surrealism. One course. Leighten. Instructor: Antliff or Leighten. CZ Major artistic movements and theoretical aims of early modernism: fauvism. ALP. Lois Mailou Jones. and Southern Africa. CZ. cubism. Bauhaus. Introduction to precedents in Indian and Central Asian Buddhist art. Emphasis on the relationship between Buddhist and non-Buddhist imagery. International Comparative Studies 101A. 177S. CZ. ALP. or themes that embrace a range of disciplines or art historical areas. futurism. C-L: Italian 137. CCI. CCI. and Masquerade in Africa. International Comparative Studies 168. or Stiles. One course. monuments.E. R Major art forms. practice. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 131 . from abstract expressionist painting to multimedia interactive art. ALP. Subject varies from year to year. ALP. One course. One course. FL One course. England. Topics in Twentieth Century Art (TOP). R Chinese sculpture. Instructor: Staff. Art. political.

One course. the internment of Japanese-Americans in the United States. ceramics. the Pacific War. One course. ALP. Instructor: Leighten. Monet. CZ The evolution of the impressionist movement and postimpressionist reactions of the 1880s. C-L: International Comparative Studies 180B 189AD. R Changes in the notion of sculpture in the twentieth century. shifts from discrete objects. and politics of the international movements of dada and surrealism. decorative arts. Japanese Print Culture. Focus on the development of various architectural typologies: Buddhist temples. and nationalism. religion. assemblages. the body. The relationship between artistic production and Japanese sociopolitical development seen through the critical issues of religion. CCI. Instructor: Weisenfeld. Instructor: Weisenfeld. site. C-L: International Comparative Studies 187. and intervention as visual expressions of parallel transformations in social and political ideas regarding the role of the artist and sculpture in culture. Sites ranging from prehistoric tombs and dwellings to contemporary design work of architects such as Isozaki Arata and Ando Tadao. ALP. and social activism. gender. Instructor: Weisenfeld. Instructor: Wharton. concerns related to gender. and private residences. ALP. C-L: International Comparative Studies 182. CCI. fortified castles. sculpture. politics. which flourished between the world wars. One course. technology. Ethical questions surrounding the establishment of the Japanese colonial empire in Asia. space. CZ. 180B. early Wright. structural.178A. Aesthetic. a forum for the critical evaluation of related theoretical issues. Japanese Architecture. Shinto shrines. and print media. and installations to concepts. Instructor: Stiles. historical. Instructor: Wharton. Instructor: Antliff. and religious issues considered. History and Theory of Modern and Postmodern Sculpture. aims. tea ceremony structures. and patronage. ALP. ALP. examined in the light of dada and surrealist theory. One course. ALP. environments. Postmodern Architecture. ALP. CCI. region. garden design. and LeCorbusier among the architects considered. One course. aesthetics practice. technologies. Labrouste. CCI. imperial and shogunal palaces. Modern Architecture. One course. CZ The origins. The relationship between prints and economics. C-L: International Comparative Studies 180BD 189B. Art Nouveau. C-L: Women's Studies 189A. except instruction provided in lecture form. and Arts and Crafts to the early twentieth century Bauhaus. and Pissarro. from Rodin to the present and global avant-garde. Dada and Surrealism. CZ Same as ARTHIST 189SAD. literature. photography. EI Japanese visual culture from the end of the sixteenth century to the contemporary period encompassing the country's unification under Tokugawa rule and later emergence on the world stage through painting. ALP. modern institutional structures. One course. representation. Modern Architechture. ALP. Later Japanese Art. Renoir. CZ. CCI. CZ Same as Art History 189BD. CZ Issues in Japanese print culture from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. and the American Occupation of Japan. architecture. CZ A survey of major architectural traditions of Japan. social. 132 Courses and Academic Programs . History of Impressionism. literature. CCI. changes in notions of materials. class. One course. CCI. An introduction to the rich and diverse Japanese printmaking tradition. and art. and philosophy. Particular attention to the work of Manet. Not open to students who have taken ARTHIST 189. CCI. except instruction provided in lecture format. CZ The history of European and American architecture from the eighteenth-century Neo-Classicism through Gothic Revival. CCI. literature. Instructor: Wharton. Japanese architectural practices compared with other Asian and EuroAmerican building traditions. Degas. C-L: International Comparative Studies 181A. Richardson. C-L: International Comparative Studies 120H 184. the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. One course.

Open to qualified students in the junior year. such as Expressionism and New Objectivity. ALP. C-L: International Comparative Studies 190B. ALP. and technical aspects of building investigated through primary texts. The major architectural movements from late historicism to postmodernism. ALP. Open to qualified students in the junior year. the crisis in history painting and the new appeal of landscape. by consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies. critics and collectors. post World War II. Not open to students who have taken ARTHIST 189. and the role of gender in Cubist aesthetics. Berlin: Architecture. considered in relation to upheavals in modern German history. Directed reading in a field of special interest. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. the academy and artistic training and exhibition. Instructor: Wharton. the impact of revolution and social change on visual art. Art and Architecture of Berlin. Later Wright and LeCorbusier. Research Independent Study. by consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 133 . CCI. anarchism and politics. ideological. portraiture and history painting. Fifteenth to the Twentieth Century. Cubism and Culture. See Art History 191B. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. History of Photography. One course.189BD. 199. ALP. by consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies. Instructor: McWilliam. contemporary philosophy and science. One course. Research Independent Study. funerary sculpture and the emergence of the public movement. W Painting and sculpture in Britain from Hogarth to the Pre-Raphaelites.) Instructor: Neckenig. aesthetic. by consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies. 1871-to the Present. One course. including visual and critical Art. CCI. One course. Instructor: Staff. Cubist aesthetics is contextualized in light of the cultural politics of the period. 196B. CZ Introduction to the visual arts of Germany from the fifteenth to the twentieth century through lectures conducted in Berlin's museums and cultural institutions. ALP. W Development of Cubism from its origins in Paris in 1907 to the movement's decline in the 1920's. ALP. Instructor: McWilliam. CZ Background examination of the Bauhaus through Corporate International Style as a background to the Postmodern core of the course. One course. R. writing on art from Hogarth and Reynolds to Hazlitt and Ruskin. Art and the City. CCI. French Art 1780-1850. Open to qualified students in the junior year. primitivism and anticolonialism. One course. approaches to college. the role of institutions and art collectors. One course. Political. under the supervision of a faculty member. C-L: German 196A 191A. (Taught only in the Duke-in-Berlin Program. One course. ALP. CCI. developments in narrative painting. Instructor: Staff. 190. Instructor: Staff. CZ. CCI. 196C. 192B. 192A. 191B. German Romantic and Realist artists. Postmodern Architecture. Instructor: Staff. CZ Development of urban Berlin from the Grunderzeit (the Boom Years) of the 1870s to the present: architecture of Imperial Berlin. Independent Study. R See Art History 191A. romanticism and changing conceptions of creativity and artistic individuality. German Old Masters. One course. CZ. CZ Major artists and movements in the history of the photographic medium. One course. the Weimar and Nazi periods. Independent Study. CZ A thematic history of painting in France from Classicism to Realism. Open to qualified students in the junior year. Modernist art movements. CCI. Disney Imaginers among the architects and designers considered. Taught in English in the Duke-in-Berlin summer program. Topics may include tradition. Instructor: Antliff or Leighten. Gehry. 1839 to the Present. CCI. Eisenman. Instructor: Staff. 198. Art History. reconstruction as a reunified city. English Art 1740-1850: Hogarth to the Pre-Raphaelites. Graves. resulting in a substantive paper or report.

traditions inherited and manipulated by photographers. Instructor: Staff. Bosch. International Comparative Studies 242. Consent of instructor required. CZ. R One course. ALP. R One course. Subject varies from year to year. R Specific aspects of the art or architecture in the Greek world from the late Geometric to the Hellenistic periods. CCI. CCI. R. Topics in Netherlandish and German Art. Subject varies from year to year. buildings. International Comparative Studies 245S. Brussels. the ways photography participated in nineteenth. SS Cross-disciplinary art history-visual cultureeconomics seminar. Film/ Video/Digital For Seniors and Graduates 201S. Instructor: Van Miegroet. Russian avant-garde). Topics in Romanesque and Gothic Art and Architecture. hands-on research in various collections. and photography of the 1950s. CZ One course. Greek Painting. 1960s. Course credit contingent upon completion of Art History 242. and critical photographic discourse throughout this period. Consent of instructor required. Technology and New Media in the University. Roman Painting. ALP. C-L: see Classical Studies 231S 240S. CZ. CCI. Instructor: Van Miegroet. literary. Topics include the invention of photography. CZ. R Specific problems in northern Renaissance or baroque art such as the Antwerp workshops of the sixteenth century or a critical introduction to major artists such as Van Eyck. ALP. C-L: Classical Studies 220S 210S. One course. Includes daily visits to major museums. One course. Subject varies from year to year. CZ. Leiden. Dürer. and 1990s. R Analysis of an individual topic. One course. (Taught in the Netherlands. Art and Markets. and Antwerp. (Taught in the Netherlands. drawings and connoisseurship problems. CZ. atelier procedures and followers. ALP. and a critical introduction to various research strategies. twentiethcentury documentary.and twentieth-century art movements as well as documentation and social change. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 237S 237S. such as Amsterdam. ALP. R Second half of Art History 241-242. ALP. 1970s. ALP. documentary and scientific research strategies. methods. C-L: see Classical Studies 232S 238S. CZ. also C-L: Visual Studies 250BS 241. Instructor: Bruzelius. pictorialism. 'straight' and purist photography. CCI. ALP. R A contextual study of visual culture in the Greater Netherlands and its underlying historical and socioeconomic assumptions from the late medieval to early modern period. SS. CZ. R One course. Documentary Studies. Topics in Greek Art. C-L: see Italian 210S. ALP. also C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 210S 227S. One course. CCI. CZ. CCI. and the Americas.) Not open to students who have taken Art History 158-159. History of Netherlandish Art and Visual Culture in a European Context. 1980s. History of Netherlandish Art and Visual Culture in a European Context. CCI. Instructor: Leighten. STS One course. CCI. Utrecht. 'Art' photography and documentary photography in the nineteenth century. social. Instructor: Van Miegroet. cultural. Bruges. Analytical and applied historical exploration of cultural production and local art markets. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 241. Bauhaus. and their emergence throughout Europe. CCI. CCI. One course.) Not open to students who have taken Art History 158-159. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 243S. required for credit for 241. Visual Studies 211. Ghent. ALP. and economic context. C-L: see Information Science and Information Studies 240S. surrealism. Consent of instructor required. Criteria 134 Courses and Academic Programs . Asia. photography and modernist art movements (dada. discussion sessions with leading scholars in the field. An analytical approach to their lives. C-L: Visual Studies 101G. Topics in Renaissance Studies. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 242. and Rubens. Visual Studies 210. C-L: see Classical Studies 236S 236S. and sites. International Comparative Studies 243S. through immediate contact with urban cultures. Greek Sculpture. One course.

C-L: see Information Science and Information Studies 250S. CCI. One course.for valuation of imagery or what makes art as a commodity desirable or fashionable. Instructor: McWilliam. including images of animals from prehistoric to contemporary representations. Topics in Modern Art. the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars. CCI. ALP. Consent of instructor required. Specific focus varies from year to year. Subject varies from year to year. CZ. CZ. Visual taste formation. reactions to the American War of Independence. CZ. STS One course. Special Topics. Visual Studies 252AS 247S. ALP. One course. Consent of instructor required. ALP. One course. Romance Studies 286S 265S. CZ. movement. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 248S 250S. CCI. and how the gap between theory and practice is negotiated in the real world setting. One course. Research Independent Study. C-L: see Information Science and Information Studies 260S 288S. ALP. Instructor: Staff. Economics 244S. One course. R Selected themes in modern art before 1945. as well as legal and ethical issues. Instructor: Stiles. 290S. Consent of instructor required. R. Caricature and party politics. CZ. the role of visualization in animal rights and survival. and the role of art dealers as cross-cultural negotiants. satires of fashionable society. SS. also C-L: Literature 261S. Subject varies from year to year. R Focus on a major artist. CCI. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 135 . Caricature. 1600. R Problems and issues in a specific period or genre of Japanese art. Instructorr: Antliff. Visual Studies 250AS. C-L: International Comparative Studies 284AS. the emergence of comic journalism. Instructor: Antliff. One course. Topics in Japanese Art. Instructor: Weisenfeld. ALP. 291A. Consent of instructor required. Topics in Italian Renaissance Art. Caricature and Popular Journalism in England 1760-1850. in the analysis of the cultural objectification and societal subjectification of animals. Critical Studies in New Media. Specific focus varies from year to year. Topics in Chinese Art. 285S. Museum Theory and Practice. Film/Video/Digital 255S. Issues involving collecting practices. C-L: see German 286S. CCI. or trend in nineteenth-century art. CCI. 1300 to c. ALP Subjects. radical journalism and the reform movement. CZ. Inventing the Museum: Collecting and Cultural Discourses of the Nineteenth Century. Leighten. Leighten. R The visual culture constructed around animals. animals as human totems and stuffed toys. C-L: International Comparative Studies 283S. 256S. Instructor: Staff. One course. One course. R Museum theory and the operation of museums. One course. areas. Visual Culture and Animal Studies. ALP. Instructor: Rorschach. One course. also C-L: History 286AS. portrayals of animal consciousness and debates about speciesism. STS One course. Instructor: Abe. SS. ALP. CZ. CCI. or McWilliam. Art History. Information Archeology: Studies in the Nature of Information and Artifact in the Digital Environment. ALP. Consent of instructor required. ALP. exhibition practices. ALP. especially art museums. Subject varies from year to year. consumer behavior. Instructor: Van Miegroet. or Stiles. 272S. with emphasis on major movements or masters. R One course. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 245S. CZ Social and political caricature from the accession of George III to the early Victorian era. and didactic techniques. Taught in the Nasher Museum. R Problems and issues in a specific period or genre of Chinese art. or themes that embrace a range of disciplines or art historical areas. Topics in Nineteenth-Century Art. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. R Topics in art and/or architecture from c. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved Art. C-L: International Comparative Studies 274S.

color. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor: Staff. One course. Instructor: Staff. graph theory. C-L: International Comparative Studies VISUAL ARTS (ARTSVIS) Studio art courses offer directed experiences in the practice of the visual arts. architecture. and working from imagination. enhancing the understanding of art both within the history of culture and as an individual human achievement. ALP. Includes methods such as mapping. Still life. One course. Credit for advanced placement on the basis of the College Board examination in Studio Art. Instructor: Staff. Introduction to particular types of methodologies (i. 292A. One course. Independent Study. and deconstruction) as fields of inquiry through which the study of the visual arts and culture have been practiced. Prerequisite for all intermediate and advanced Visual Arts and Visual Practice classes. video. landscape.topic. One course. abstraction. ALP Drawing as integrative tool where ideas and processes explored and expanded through a variety of media. upper-level courses encourage the student to develop a more individual conceptual approach and style. Instructor: Staff. C-L: see Information Science and Information Studies 87FCS 100. ALP Projects differ by section. selected contemporary debates. 87FCS. CZ. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Open only to qualified students in the senior year. Open only to qualified students in the senior year. One course. Topics in Art since 1945. Instructor: Lasch. virtual environments. R See Art History 291A. and performance. W Various theoretical perspectives that have shaped different disciplinary perspectives and practices in art history. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. 297S. One course. A major or concentration in studio art can provide the foundation for further study in various areas of the visual arts. 136 Courses and Academic Programs . Historiography of the last two decades in art history. R Historical and critical principles applied to present-day artists and/or movements in all media since World War II. Instructor: Stiles. Representation. Marxism. color theory. 291B. resulting in a substantive paper or report. ALP. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Projects in Visual Arts. or architect. within the context of historical precedents and traditions. 81FCS. Visuality in everyday life and its impact on other fields of knowledge. Open only to qualified students in the senior year. Does not count toward the major in visual arts. teacher. SS. 296S. Lower-level courses emphasize the fundamentals of drawing. One course. and drawing skills to be applied to conceptual. and form. Introduction to Visual Practice. One course. psychoanalysis. Directed reading in a field of special interest. Studio. Drawing. Instructor: Staff. See Art History 291B. One course. photographic and architectural principles. as well as in related fields such as advertising or design. drawing. ALP Subjects. under the supervision of a faculty member. as well as digital and time-based media like film. Consent of instructor required. Independent Study. and vernacular visual practices. R. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Research Independent Study. Department offerings emphasize the analysis and articulation of visual concepts and processes as they relate to a broader education in the humanities and sciences. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. post-colonial theory. Open only to qualified students in the senior year. areas. figure. General Art. race and gender. ALP. 54. Intended primarily for first and second year students. 21. Instructor: Staff. development of a visual language. 292B. Methodology of Art History. Visual Representation and Visual Culture. ALP Basic principles and methods of visual practice: 2DD and 3DD composition. It may prepare the student for further training as an artist.e. or themes that embrace art and visual culture. 60. Instructor: Staff. feminism. One course. Through problem solving within a range of projects. CZ. STS One course. Topics in Visual Arts.

ALP One course. and page layout. One course. Intermediate Architectural Design. Includes case studies and site visits. typography. Visual Studies 103ES 114S. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 110 and consent of instructor. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 103. and binding. ALP One course. illustration. and typographic evolution. C-L: see Documentary Studies 115. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 54. Instructor: Staff. also C-L: Visual Studies 103JS. Tectonics. Typography. 101. Instructor: Jones. 112S. ALP Writing systems.visual. letterform. ALP Sculptural principles. and technical disciplines. scale. designing and planning. One course. Photography. 107. Art History. also C-L: Visual Studies 103L 116S. Introduction to Illustrator and Pagemaker. 100 and consent of instructor. ALP One course. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 100 and consent of instructor. Consent of instructor required. 100 and consent of instructor based on portfolio. Intermediate Sculpture. economic. typographic composition. orthographic projection. 111. C-L: see Documentary Studies 114S. One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 119S. Both the directness and the flexibility of the medium of drawing are investigated. Instructor: Noland. computer design. abstraction. Large Format Photography. model building. Instructor: Staff. processes. ALP Studio practice in sculpture at the intermediate level. individual projects. Book Illustration. ALP One course. R Allows students to explore their artistic interests and biases through a series of self-directed projects. Photographing the Lives of Women and Girls. digital technologies as forms of visual inquiry. ALP Introduction to architectural design: space making with emphasis on process. ALP Studio course examining all aspects of bookmaking. view. questioning typologies and rethinking architecture as site of cultural production. ALP The human figure through different artistic media and from different visual perspectives. One course. ALP Architectural design as an "impure" plastic art interconnected with physical. printing technologies. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 54. One course. Information Science and Information Studies 113S. 110. space. Instructor: Shatzman. rendering. C-L: Visual Studies 102A 102. Exploration of graphic means to imagine and describe space and use it analytically to interpret/resolve problems. C-L: see Documentary Studies 113S. Intermediate Drawing. A significant body of drawings is developed in this class. Sculpture. Final projects on building program and architectural issues: threshold. Instructor: Jones. Instructor consent required. and field trips. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 137 . and field trips. Group and individual discussion and critique. and issues introduced through lectures. Emphasis on drawing and design skills and an anatomical knowledge of the human form. Class assignments accompanied by historical and theoretical readings. Consent of instructor required. Final projects are a self-portrait series Art. Introduction to Architectural Design. 104. entry. Projects range in scale from room to urban intervention to discrete structure. One course. and material as ensemble parts of project presentations to represent ideas as well as artifacts. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. ALP. and cultural forces. and modes of representation. 103. Instructor: Noland. readings. ALP. also C-L: Women's Studies 175S. One course. also C-L: Visual Studies 103KS 115. Consent of instructor required. One course. CZ An emphasis on how to see with the camera and ways of thinking about photographs. Figure Drawing. One course. class discussions. including theories of bookmaking. lectures. Drawing conventions. Development of architectural fundamentals. Introduction to Photography. 105. A Digital Approach to Documentary Photography: Capturing Transience. studio assignments.

ALP One course. Digital cameras provided as needed. Intermediate Narrative Production. 122AS. Policy Journalism and Media. The methods and history of lithographic printing. ALP One course. also C-L: Visual Studies 103M 118S. Information Science and Information Studies 144S. R Relief methods of woodcut and linoleum block printing and monotype techniques. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 54. Includes both black and white and color printing. Painting. well-edited body of work undergoing steady evolution over the semester. Concentration on both the technical and historical aspects of the media and its expressive potentials. Intermediate Digital Photography. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 54. also C-L: Documentary Studies 133S. One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 177S.Producing Film. Collaborative Art: Practice and Theory of Working Within a Community. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 150S. SS One course. Policy Journalism and Media. Instructor: Staff. ALP One course. One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 117. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 54. Students develop a significant body of prints using these techniques. ALP. One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 147S. ALP Intermediate digital darkroom course. also C-L: Public Policy Studies 176S. R Directed problems in the intaglio medium including etching. ALP. Instructor: Noland. Instructor: Shatzman. ALP One course. Printmaking: Lithography. also C-L: Visual Studies 103QS 146S. Experimental Filmmaking. blockouts crayon. 133. CCI. ALP. and photographic methods. C-L: Documentary Studies. Instructor: Shatzman. Film/Video/Digital 120. Visual Studies 103XS. Film/Video/Digital 117. 100 and consent of instructor. 100 and consent of instructor. Visual Studies 103YS. CL: see Documentary Studies 145S. ALP One course. CCI One course. 132. Printmaking: Relief and Monotype. C-L: see Film/Video/ Digital 133S. One course. SS One course. R The silkscreen medium and its stencil-making processes including paper stencils. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 142S. drypoint. One course. ALP. ALP. Alternative Photographic Processes. One course. Pre-requisites: Visual Arts 115. black and white. also C-L: English 186FS 138 Courses and Academic Programs . Prerequisites: Visual Arts 54. R Introduction to stone lithography and its drawing and printing methods. Projects emphasize the development of visual images through this medium. ALP. 100 and consent of instructor.and an individual documentary essay. aquatint. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 54. 116S or 118S. Instructor: Noland. Film/Video/Digital 119S. 100 and consent of instructor. Printmaking: Silkscreen. ALP. also C-L: Visual Studies 103TS 150S. informed by relevant precedents from the recent history of photography and resulting in portfolio presentation. also C-L: Visual Studies 103NS 125S. also C-L: English 186ES 147S. also C-L: Public Policy Studies 177S. Adapting Literature -. C-L: see Documentary Studies 118S. Instructor: Shatzman. Students develop a significant body of prints through use of this medium. Printmaking: Intaglio. Documentary Photography and the Southern Culture Landscape. CL: Film/Video/Digital 130. C-L: see Documentary Studies 176S. Includes local field trips. and color printing methods. American Communities: A Photographic Approach. Advanced Documentary Photography. Prerequisites: camera and consent of instructor. Development of coherent. Instructor: Shatzman. ALP Studio practice in painting with individual and group criticism and discussion of important historic or contemporary ideas. The Photographic Portrait: The Practice of Representation. Assigned projects emphasize conceptual issues supported by the medium. 138S. Students develop a significant body of prints using these techniques. 100 and consent of instructor. 131. ALP One course. One course.

R Individual directed study in a field of visual practice on a previously approved topic. 170. Small Town USA: Local Collaborations. and poverty from the 1950s to the present across cultures. Instructor: Lasch. C-L: see Documentary Studies 178S. Production. under the supervision of a regular-rank faculty member. and participates in natural and social environments. ALP. One course. Scene Design. Senior Capstone in Visual Practive. Special Topics in Visual Arts. 217. Instructor: Staff. also C-L: Visual Studies 131AS For Seniors and Graduates 200S. also C-L: Visual Studies 103ZS 180S. Information Science and Information Studies 166S. resulting in an academic and/or artistic product. One course. R One course. The Photographic Essay: Narratives Through Pictures. R One course. Poverty and the Visual. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required.158S. and Publication. Instructor: Staff. Visual Studies 117IS. One course. and society. 269S. and reception of visual images in culture. Instructor: Staff. 161S. Instruct. Subject varies from year to year. C-L: see Theater Studies 162S 163S. Instructor: Staff. ALP Capstone seminar focusing on advanced visual practice and theory. C-L: see Theater Studies 160S 165S. R One course. Lighting Design. resulting in an academic and/or artistic product. Intermediate Animation. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. social. politically. Consent of instructor required. under the supervision of a regular-rank faculty member. C-L: Film/Video/Digital 135S. VISUAL STUDIES (VISUALST) Visual Studies concerns all aspects of the production. Color Photography: Fieldwork and Digital Color. One course. visual culture. circulation. ALP One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 158S. Most importantaly. Studies in visual culture engage students in the analysis of rhetoric and semiotics of images. Instructor: Staff. understands. ALP. ALP. One course. ALP One course. including the completion of a body of work and participation in a culminating exhibition. ALP Subject varies from year to year. and cultural concept. ALP One course. CCI Projects differ by section. CZ Relationship between art. Independent Study. Film Animation Production. One course. ALP One course. Independent Study. Multimedia Documentary: Editing. Costume Design. CCI. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Projects in Visual Arts. ALP One course. One course. 178S. It emerged in the late 1970s during the same period as Cultural Studies. R One course. Art. also C-L: Public Policy Studies 158S. 218. CCI. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 151S 169S. and production assignments based on a broader understanding of poverty as a philosophical. C-L: see Documentary Studies 194S. Instructor: Staff. ALP. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 139 . Individual directed study in a field of visual practice on a previously approved topic. One course. Special Topics in Visual Arts. Visual Studies 103WS 160. Visual Studies enables students to interpret the representations that shape the visual constructs of a particular society. providing access to how visual meaning is socially. One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 180S 194S. C-L: see Theater Studies 161S 162S. ALP. ALP Special Topics in Visual Arts. and culturally constucted and received. economic. as a field of inquiry throughout the humanities. and to think through how the symbolic constructions of life organize how one sees. Consent of instructor required. science. ALP. visual analyses. 208S. Readings. Topics in Visual Arts. ALP Subject varies from year to year. to consider how systems of visual codes differ from culture to culture. research. Art History.

Central. One course. and 1990s. One course. Medieval and Renaissance Studies 157. C-L: see German 88FCS 100D. 'straight' and purist photography. 140 Courses and Academic Programs . Russian avant-garde). 1880-1945. coins. and masking traditions in West. circulation and reception to how visual media have historically exerted power. politically. designing and planning. Issues such as the construction of gender. CZ. and how the rhetoric and semiotics of representation provide access to ways in which visual meaning is socially. film. typography. Bauhaus. and dominate nature and animals. R Students proficient in French will be encouraged to do some of the reading in French. R Major art forms. C-L: Art History 156. Instructor: Van Miegroet. surrealism. media. 50. International Comparative Studies 180A 101F. and exhibition venues from large-scale paintings in the annual state-sponsored salons to political satire in the press.and twentieth-century art movements as well as documentation and social change. CCI. 'Art' photography and documentary photography in the nineteenth century. NS One course. including theories of bookmaking. Instructor: Staff. sexuality and class differences. rise of mass social movements. the ways photography participated in nineteenth. Film and Video 102A. Instructor: Powell. from issues of production. and political reaction on left and right. One course. and critical photographic discourse throughout this period. C-L: Film/Video/Digital 101A. the preservation of social hierarchies. photography and modernist art movements (dada. C-L: Art History 103. including visual and critical traditions inherited and manipulated by photographers. reliefs. Instructor: Leighten. C-L: Art History 121 101C. CCI. Through images of women in statues. Berlin in the Twentieth Century. computer design. advertising.(Team-taught. CZ. CZ. ALP. ALP. Architecture. and the manipulation and control of sexuality are considered. CZ Survey of visual culture. the course explores the role of visual representation in communicating complex social and political messages. vernacular structures. Introduction To Visual Culture. and constructed social experience. comics. Introduction to Astronomy. video. ALP. Documentary Studies. CZ Interrelations of modernism and politics in a period of rapid social and technological change. CCI. French Art and Visual Culture in the Early Modern Period. and photography of the 1950s. Art. CCI. History of Photography. Development of new media in the form of prints and photography reflecting these changes and a variety of social movements and political positions by artists exploring a range of subjects. monuments. CZ Major artists and movements in the history of the photographic medium. Visualizing Cultural Dissent in Modernism. Classical Studies 103 101B. 1839 to the Present. CCI. ALP. television. 1960s. CCI. and other imagery code vision and inscribe race. Book Illustration. International Comparative Studies 110A 101G. and Masquerade in Africa. and Southern Africa. Instructor: Dillon. ALP. CZ The lives of women in the Classical world viewed through the visual culture of Classical art. C-L: Art History 156. and culturally produced and obtained. the expression of power and status. One course. ALP Studio course examining all aspects of bookmaking. from the coliseum to shopping malls and museums to sports events. CCI. C-L: Art History 199. Art History 173. gender. Internet.) Not open to students who previously took this course as Art History 108D. C-L: see Physics 55 88FCS. how the gaze links cultural performativity. pictorialism. 1970s.establishing a clear connection between the theory and the practice of visuality is the foundation of Visual Studies. ALP. From ancient times to the present. elicited desire. the protection of normative values. Representing Women in the Classical World. ALP. One course. twentiethcentury documentary. Topics include the invention of photography. Topics include: how photography. EI One course. Instructor: Leighten. 1980s. and painting. C-L: African and African American Studies 157. One course.

One course. CL: see Documentary Studies 105S. also C-L: Sociology 128S 103QS. ALP. C-L: see Documentary Studies 101 103BS. also C-L: Visual Arts 147S 103US. The Photographic Portrait: The Practice of Representation. also C-L: Visual Arts 112S. R. Film/Video/Digital. One course. Alternative Photographic Processes. also C-L: Documentary Studies 150S. ALP One course. Children's Self Expression: Literacy Through Photography. ALP One course. SS One course. ALP. SS One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 145S. C-L: see Documentary Studies 168S. Film/Video/ Digital 139S. C-L: see Documentary Studies 115. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 134S. C-L: see Documentary Studies 100S. C-L: see Documentary Studies 113S. Visual Arts 113S 103FS. ALP. C-L: see Documentary Studies 144S. Policy Journalism and Media Studies Art. Planning the Documentary Film: From Concept to Treatment. Large Format Photography. ALP One course. EI. also C-L: Visual Arts 114S 103L. R. Public Policy Studies 182S. Collaborative Art: Practice and Theory of Working Within a Community. Children and the Experience of Illness. ALP. also C-L: Public Policy Studies 104S 103CS. CCI One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 118S. The Documentary Experience: A Video Approach. also C-L: Education 144S 103GS. Cultural Anthropology 162AS 103IS. ALP One course. Public Policy Studies 176S. C-L: see Documentary Studies 146S. ALP. C-L: see Documentary Studies 122S. Information Science and Information Studies 103VS. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 141 . also C-L: Women's Studies 175S. SS One course. Instructor: Shatzman. also C-L: Visual Arts 117 103NS. SS One course. also C-L: Religion 161QS. C-L: see Documentary Studies 117. Public Policy Studies 105S 103ES. Political Science 156S. ALP. CZ One course.illustration. ALP One course. also C-L: Sociology 152S 103TS. also C-L: Visual Arts 115 103M. Introduction to Photography. C-L: see Film/Video/ Digital 152S. C-L: see Documentary Studies 158S. and binding. C-L: see Documentary Studies 119S. also C-L: Film/Video/Digital 140S. ALP One course. Information Science and Information Studies 103KS. SS One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 114S. also C-L: Public Policy Studies 100S 103JS. Documenting Religion. CCI. also C-L: Visual Arts 144S 103RS. Traditions in Documentary Studies. Information Science and Information Studies 103WS. C-L: see Documentary Studies 176S. ALP. ALP. Intermediate Documentary Filmmaking. Medicine and the Vision of Documentary Photography. also C-L: Visual Arts 118S. R One course. Photographing the Lives of Women and Girls. Small Town USA: Local Collaborations. History 150BS. CCI. also C-L: Visual Arts 158S. Sociology through Photography. CCI. CCI One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 148S. A Digital Approach to Documentary Photography: Capturing Transience. SS One course. American Communities: A Photographic Approach. C-L: Visual Arts 101 103A. also C-L: Visual Arts 122AS 103PS. C-L: see Documentary Studies 147S. ALP One course. Visual Research and the American Dream. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 100 and consent of instructor. Documentary Photography and the Southern Culture Landscape. Art History. C-L: see Documentary Studies 104S. R One course. ALP One course. Public Policy Studies 158S 103XS.

C-L: see Classical Studies 106. QS One course. SS One course. Film and the African Diaspora. International Comparative Studies 170A 105F. Policy Journalism and Media Studies. Study of Sexualities 110C. Canadian Studies. CCI. Policy Journalism and Media Studies. also C-L: Film and Video. R. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 171. Women's Studies. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 116S. Islamic Studies 111AS. Modern Chinese Cinema. Indian Cinema. CCI. CZ. Linguistics 120. Film/Video/Digital 111G 105G. also C-L: Visual Arts 119S. Film/Video/Digital 111A 108A. History 131B. Policy Journalism and Media Studies. also C-L: Literature 112J. ALP. Film/Video/Digital. ALP One course. C-L: see Computer Science 124 110A. SS One course. CCI. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 170. Markets and Management Studies. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 175. also CL: International Comparative Studies 110H. Anthropology and Film. also C-L: Literature 112E. SS One course. CCI. also C-L: Film and Video 104B. CCI. CCI. CCI One course. SS One course. CZ One course. also C-L: Literature 112H. ALP. International Comparative Studies 104C. Sociology 160. Culture and Politics in Africa. C-L: see Economics 157 113A. Film/Video/Digital 110B. also C-L: Visual Arts 178S 104A. also C-L: Women's Studies 179. Melodrama East and West.103YS. Women's Studies 110G. SS One course. C-L: see African and African American Studies 122. also C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 132. CCI. Turkish 132. ALP. SS One course. Fantasy. Computer Graphics. QS. C-L: see Earth and Ocean Sciences 103S 112A. Mass Media. Documentary Studies. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 109 110E. CCI. Literature 151J. One course. Financial Markets and Investment. CZ. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 117. CZ One course. CZ One course. C-L: see African and African American Studies 101. Film/Video/Digital 111F 105E. ALP. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective. C-L: see African and African American Studies 132 105B. ALP. Opto-Electronic Design Projects. and Popular Culture. Japanese Cinema. Film/ Video/Digital. International Comparative Studies 141B. ALP. Advanced Documentary Photography. The Surface of the Earth. Advertising and Masculinity. CZ One course. ALP. CCI. Drama of Greece and Rome. CCI. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 122. CZ One course. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 104. Markets and Management Studies 110FS. International Comparative Studies. Korean Cinema. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 188. Color Photography: Fieldwork and Digital Color. also C-L: Literature 112G. CCI. SS One course. NS One course. ALP. Policy Journalism and Media Studies 103ZS. C-L: see Documentary Studies 177S. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 101C. Anthropology and the Motion Picture. Black Popular Culture. CZ. Documentary Studies. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 103E. C-L: see Documentary Studies 178S. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 179. R One course. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 132. CCI One course. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 108. C-L: see Electrical and Computer Engineering 135 142 Courses and Academic Programs . ALP. CCI. Public Policy Studies 177S. SS One course. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 110. CCI. Film/Video/Digital 111D 105C. Global Culture. SS One course. Representing the Middle East. also C-L: Theater Studies 117 109A. SS One course. also C-L: English 120.

ALP. Terror and German Cinema. C-L: see Film/ Video/Digital 108. English 101A. NS. R One course. CCI One course. Information Science and Information Studies 117C. STS One course. ALP. also C-L: Documentary Studies 141S 118AS. C-L: see Information Science and Information Studies 100. C-L: Visual Arts 165S. also C-L: Literature 120F. also C-L: Literature 112L 118ES. ALP. also C-L: Art History 100 121A. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 120A. C-L: see Electrical and Computer Engineering 189. also C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 114A. Political Science 156. Studies in Film History. C-L: see English 185. ALP One course. FL One course. ALP One course. Utopias and Nightmares: Science. Art History 136 117G. ALP One course. C-L: see Literature 115S. Conflict Resolution. Design. Art History. American Film Comedy. ALP. Introduction to Production. ALP One course. STS One course. Conflict. Film Genres. ALP One course. English 186B. Introduction to Film. Technology. CCI. Freud's Vienna: Experiments in Modernity Around 1900. also C-L: Theater Studies 171. also CL: English 124S. C-L: see Literature 110. CZ. C-L: see German 136S. ALP One course. Motion Graphics in Film and Video. Literature 120G 117H. Film/Video/Digital 101. Policy Journalism and Media Studies 121B. C-L: see German 189. Public Policy Studies 172 117IS. German Film. Digital Image and Multidimensional Processing. QS One course. Aesthetics. also C-L: Theater Studies 173S. Film/Video/ Digital 135S. also C-L: English 186A. ALP One course. CZ. English 101CS. One course. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 106. FL One course. FL. ALP. also C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 118BS. also C-L: English 186C. also C-L: Earth and Ocean Sciences 159 117AS. Introduction to Documentary Film. Sexualities in Film and Video. One course. Fundamentals of GIS and Geospatial Analysis. and Film. Literature 120E.113B. STS One course. Study of Sexualities Art. and German Culture. CZ. Perspectives on Information Science and Information Studies. ALP One course. Film/Video/Digital 115S. CCI. Literature 116. also C-L: Theater Studies 172. also C-L: Biology 110L 116B. Ecology. CZ One course. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 131S. also C-L: Art History 122. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 107. English 183S. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 141S. Information Science and Information Studies 117JS. Film/Video/Digital 105 116A. C-L: see Film/Video/ Digital 136S 117KS. Film Animation Production. Documentary Studies 117LS. CCI One course. also C-L: Film/Video/ Digital 111C 118C. Gender and Sexuality in Japanese Anime Culture. C-L: see Environment 159. C-L: see German 141S. ALP. R One course. Literature 120C. ALP. ALP. STS One course. Editing the TV Documentary: From Creativity to Collaboration to Negotiation. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 143 . C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 130S. and Culture. C-L: see Engineering 175 115A. Documentary Film/Video Theory and Practice. C-L: see Film/Video/ Digital 102. NS. C-L: see Literature 112F 121CS. C-L: see German 142S 119A. Weimar and Nazi Germany. Documentary Studies 107 117F. C-L: see Environment 110L. C-L: see History 135B. ALP. CCI. Film/Video/Digital 138S. SS One course.

CZ One course. FL One course. FL One course. ALP. ALP One course. Theater Studies 172A 126BS. C-L: see Russian 126S 127E. Policy Journalism and Media Studies 127CS. CCI. Latin American Studies 121G. also C-L: Film/Video/ Digital 104. FL One course. Media. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 118S. CCI. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 119S. ALP. Latin American Studies 127AS. and the Mafia. Aesthetics: The Philosophy of Art. W One course. SS One course. History 153C. C-L: see Russian 143 144 Courses and Academic Programs . French Films/American Masks. CCI. Contemporary Russian Media. Russian Language and Culture through Film. C-L: see Russian 125. CCI. ALP. World War II and French Film. CCI One course. also C-L: Policy Journalism and Media Studies 125BS. CCI. CZ. also C-L: Information Science and Information Studies. FL. ALP. Contemporary Russian Culture: Detective Novels and Film. CCI. FL. Comics and Culture: Images of Modern France in the Making. SS One course. Television Journalism. ALP. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 117. Film/Video/Digital 126G. also C-L: International Comparative Studies. CCI. STS One course. Magazine Journalism. Policy Journalism and Media Studies 125CS. also C-L: English 101B. SS. also C-L: International Comparative Studies. FL One course. STS One course. ALP. C-L: see Portuguese 140S. CZ. also C-L: Film and Video. C-L: see Physics 185. also C-L: Linguistics 108. W One course. FL One course. Policy Journalism and Media Studies 126A. ALP. ALP. FL. EI. EI. also C-L: Literature 112K. Yesterday's Classics/Today's Movies. C-L: see French 155. EI. NS One course. C-L: see Philosophy 112. C-L: see Literature 141. Philosophy of Mind. Film and Video. SS One course. Film and Video 127F. Contemporary Culture Wars. CCI One course. R. also C-L: Electrical and Computer Engineering 122 125A. C-L: see Russian 124S 127B. SS One course. ALP. CZ. C-L: see Spanish 177S. C-L: see Philosophy 102 122B. C-L: see Literature 114. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 181E. Film/Video/Digital 111B 126F. Modern Optics I. CZ. C-L: see French 156. Film Theory. also C-L: Sociology 121. SS. also C-L: Film/Video/Digital 117. Media and National Security. C-L: see French 159 126JS. CCI. FL One course. C-L: see French 157 126H. International Comparative Studies 132BS. ALP. C-L: see Literature 100. Women's Studies 122A. Film/Video/Digital 111E. CCI.121E. CCI. News Writing and Reporting. CCI. French Cinema. FL One course. SS. Film/Video/Digital 121F. African and African American Studies 140S 126E. also C-L: Art History 177S. Information Science and Information Studies 123A. FL One course. CZ. FL One course. C-L: see Russian 135A. CCI. 20th Century Latin American Photography. Brazilian Popular Culture. C-L: see French 158 126I. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 120S. C-L: see French 165S 126KS. CZ. International Popular Culture. Russian Language and Culture through Film II. Eastern Europe in Transition: Markets. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 140AS. CZ. CCI. R One course. ALP. Introduction to Cultural Studies. Italian Cinema. C-L: see Italian 132. SS One course. International Comparative Studies 161B. also C-L: Policy Journalism and Media Studies 125ES.

ALP One course. societal. ALP. the theater. Special importance placed on the Islamic contribution to Italian art and its development under the Norman kings of Sicily. Instructor: Bruzelius. ALP One course. CCI. History of Netherlandish Art in a European Context. ALP. Dutch art in its historical. International Comparative Studies 158. elaborately-staged executions of condemned criminals. and Lynch. such as Frans Hals and Johannes Vermeer. Masculine Anxiety and Male-Male Desire in Drama and Film Since 1950. CZ The development of Paris. Literature 131C 128GS. Roman Spectacle. CZ. SS One course. Paris: A City and its Culture 1850 . Art and Dissidence: The Films of Tarkovsky. C-L: see Theater Studies 176. ALP One course. CCI One course. C-L: see Women's Studies 162 129AS.127G. American Drama and Film: 1945-1960. International Comparative Studies 160. from the major remodeling initiated under the Second Empire to the advent of modern style Art. and psychological context. CCI. Instructor: Dillon. Rembrandt and his school. Criminality of Art. moral. also C-L: English 134B. CCI. Instructor: Van Miegroet. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 153. EI Gladiatorial games. Course credit contingent upon successful completion of Art History 159. ALP. also C-L: English 175S. (Taught in the Netherlands. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 159. and the stadium—in which they took place. R The art and architecture of southern Italy from the ninth through the fourteenth centuries. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 145 .1930. also C-L: Visual Arts 194S 150. CCI. CZ. CCI. CZ See Art History 241.) Not open to students who have taken 241-242. and Publication. The wide range of cultural influences and mixtures of populations that characterized the Kingdom of Sicily and the impact of these rich and diverse importations on the art and architecture of the southern part of the peninsula. CZ. C-L: see Theater Studies 103. also C-L: English 118. CZ See Art History 242. CCI. also C-L: English 162C 128F.) Not open to students who have taken 241-242. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 152B. C-L: Classical Studies 140 154. Literature 125AS 129A. Kurosawa. Not open to students who have previously taken this course at Art History 159. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 113 157. (Taught in the Netherlands. One course. International Comparative Studies 159. American Drama and Film Since 1960. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 158. ALP. required for credit for 158. ALP. ALP. Gender and Popular Culture. Production. ALP One course. were at work. C-L: see Theater Studies 179S. One course. the circus. Visual and literary representations of these spectacles. The Art of Medieval Southern Italy. CCI. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 112. and the form and elaboration of the venues—the amphitheater. Multimedia Documentary: Editing. One course. also C-L: English 162B 128C. The ritual of these entertainments and spectacles. CCI. Kubrick. seen through the major Dutch cities and towns where painters. Netherlandish Art and Visual Culture in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. One course. CCI. and chariot racing as some of the most popular forms of public entertainment in the Roman world. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 158. C-L: see Women's Studies 162S 131AS. ALP. Art History. C-L: see Theater Studies 102. wild beast hunts. Instructor: Van Miegroet. SS One course. R A contextual study of northern Netherlands art. C-L: see Russian 163. CZ One course. Second half of Art History 158-159. the circumstances of and occasions for their performance. One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 194S. History of Netherlandish Art in a European Context. Gender and Popular Culture. Instructor: Van Miegroet. ALP. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 104. Film/Video/ Digital 128B.

theories of classicism in Italy and Germany. CZ. class. EI Pre-1945 visual culture of Fascist Italy. popular visual production. One course. History of the Museum. the impact of economic globalization and consumerism on visual culture. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 164. One course. 180. aestheticized violence. and other museums. Instructor: Abe. display practices.. together with Paris's role as a environment favoring cultural production and exchange. sculpture. Franco Spain. architecture. animation. CZ. place. architecture) and topics including gender.g. and palaces. transport systems. ALP. subsequent printmaking projects. economic activities. Instructor: Abe. C-L: International Comparative Studies 180C 162. Cultural History of Graphic Reproduction.Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 181B. Instructor: Powell. How feminist art provokes change in cultural systems and social 146 Courses and Academic Programs . Focus on a variety of media (e. Fascism and Visual Culture: Art. temples. CCI. and ethnicity. and fashion with attention to the role of overseas Chinese in recent history. anti-Semitism. installations. 166. The city as a physical environment that has to be understood in terms of varied populations. C-L: International Comparative Studies 175. Ethical questions regarding patriarchal institutions and aesthetic practices. R Introduction to visual culture produced in China from the Neolithic period to the present including archaeological discoveries of burials. CCI. CCI. painting. Topics include early woodcut illustrations." Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 183. CCI. One course. European fin-de-siècle popularity of poster art and Japanese woodcuts. photography. CZ Survey of the modern image-based print culture in its technological advancements and social impact. film. ALP. W Introduction to the art and visual culture of contemporary Japan concentrating on the postwar period. the relationship between high art and popular culture. focusing on the changes in architecture and planning which transformed the French capital into a model of urban modernity. ALP. CZ Feminist aesthetic and theoretical discourses from the end of the nineteenth century to the present internationally. and comics (manga). the literati arts of calligraphy and painting. One course. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 196A. aesthetics. CCI. particularly 1980s to present. and contributed to modernism and postmodernism.in the interwar years. ALP. Focus on how these differences shape the form. One course. R The purposes and functions of the museum as a Western institution from precursors to the present. and museum practices in terms of visual studies. town planning. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 119. Chinese Visual Culture. The architecture. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 172A. natural history. race. The transnational spread of popular culture within the Asia-Pacific region and the cross-cultural exchanges between East and West. CZ. Feminism and Visual Culture. CZ. Mussolini's transformation of Rome. Feminist aesthetic differences in generation. Nazi Germany. Power. International Comparative Studies 173. photography. ALP. Italian Futurism. The role played by visual arts in shaping the city. and fascism as a form of "secular religion. including case studies of key moments and exemplary aesthetic expressions in the history of image reproduction on paper. Comparative study of the treatment of Western and non-Western objects. content. C-L: Literature 132C. fashion. tombs. graphic and industrial design. and pedagogical goals of art. Field research in museums required. Performance art. One course. and various fascist movements throughout Europe. and behavior of feminist art. the carte-de-visite. Instructor: McWilliam. Spectacle. twentieth-century photography and printmaking collectives in the Americas. and cultural representations. and the photogravure's role in the rise of the pictorial magazine. film. The incorporation of nonWestern visual culture and the globalization of the museum in the contexts of colonialism and modernism. 172. CCI. recording its appearance and interpreting its meanings. ALP. Instructor: Antliff. Contemporary Japanese Visual Culture. Instructor: Weisenfeld. Critical theory.

emphasizing social conceptions of television. One course. One course. Virtual Form and Space. Instructor: Olson. stylistic development. photography. STS Exploration of the visual culture(s) of medicine. C-L: Literature 133A. The changing role of diagnostic visuality and medical imaging from various philosophical and historical perspectives. and how women artists have negotiated ethical and political clashes of values. 191. studies performance and gender. sexuality. including Illustrator and Photoshop. CZ. areas. theoretical strategies. C-L: Documentary Studies 102 194. Instructor: Staff. Global Performance from late 1950s to the Present. examines interchanges between artists' theories of performance. One course. ALP. Screenings. broadcast television. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as ARTSVIS 106. Cultural Anthropology 179S 190. One course. Not open to students who have taken this course as Art. ALP. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as ARTSVIS 108. Comparison of the language and tools of old and new media. Instructor: Staff. and visual apparatus. ALP. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 186. reflections. ALP Photoshop and Illustrator used to introduce single and serial images for print and web output. thinks about the body as a vehicle for aesthetic expression. Design elements and principles. Visual Cultures of Medicine. EI Performance Art History/Theory explores cultural experimentation. ALP How photographers create. race. One course. One course. and lab. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 100 and consent of instructor required. Instructor: Rankin. Studio course that explores various applications of virtual environments and specific 3D modeling techniques. or themes that embrace a range of disciplines that relate to visual studies. Graphic Design: Theory and Practice. 184S. asks how performance alters the semiotics of visual culture and contributes to a paradigm shift from modernism to postmodernism. Instructor: Stiles. Not open to students who have taken this course as FVD 118. discussions. Special Topics in Visual Studies. traces interdisciplinary genealogies of performance globally. The connections between medical ways of seeing and other modes of visuality. discovering conceptual and stylistic connections. CZ. Introduction to animation principles. Film/Video/Digital 137 193. and ideological aims of performance art internationally. consideration of the economic and social forces unfolding in the context of the televisual. Instructor: Staff. cable television.relations. ALP Design history and theory. Art History. Analysis of visual materials. One course. One course. Digital Imaging. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 179S. communication. and their influence on how the medium has emerged as a cultural. Information Science and Information Studies 175. document. and information in its critique of social and political conditions. CCI. Instructor: Stiles. Theater Studies 175A. computer graphics. Lectures and projects focused on direct interaction with digitized elements of historically significant designs. and comments on visual expressions in local landscapes and fieldwork. Literature 133C. CL: Information Science and Information Studies 108. Information Science and Information Studies 192. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 175. and impact in the context of cultural criticism and art history. technological. C-L: Documentary Studies. The circulation of medical images and images of medicine in popular culture as well as in professional medical cultures. Women's Studies 176 183. and class. Instructor: Staff. ALP Subjects. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as ARTSVIS 123. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 179S. cinema. television. Cultural History of the Televisual. C-L: English 172C. and contemporary convergences with new media technologies. and reflect visual culture. Visual Culture and Photography. STS Critical history of the "televisual" in the American visual culture mediascape. Consent of instructor required. beginning with James Agee's notion of a photographer "ordering the façade" to interpretations. Women's Studies 175 181. examining the social forces shaping the development of television from its inception in the 1940s to the present-day. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 147 .

Instructor: Van Miegroet. required for credit for 241. and a critical introduction to various research strategies. intellectual and artistic history and uses of the book in photographic practice. Representations of War in Greece and Rome. Consent of instructor required. buildings. conceptual. Dillon. Instructor: Noland. 196S. Brussels. ALP. One course. 210. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 208S. and Flash. The Photobook: History & Practice. Instructor: Lasch. their past. Google Sketch-up. One course. CZ. Uses two test cases. as well as individual senior projects undertaken as a written thesis or visual production. International Comparative Studies 211. and an urban/architectural site (Bruzelius) to develop techniques of interpretation and representation. Seminar includes readings. Introduces techniques for the presentation and interpretation of visual material through a series of interpretative and reconstructive technologies. History of Netherlandish Art and Visual Culture in a European Context. print. One course. Bruges. Advanced Visual Practice. Instructor: Staff. and ephemeral displays such as triumphs and spectacles as instruments in constructing their collective beliefs about themselves. Mixing of new and traditional disciplines (multimedia). such as Amsterdam. CCI. CZ. Course credit contingent upon completion of Art History 242. including lesser known innovations and uses of photobook in Eastern Europe. Theories of Visual Studies. ALP. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 54. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 54. ALP. Illustrator. including the development of webpages (HTML/Dreamweaver). Instructor: Brady. an archaeological site (Dillon). Ghent. Consent of instructor required. formal innovations that mark international history of photography books through lectures/ hands-on examination of key books. and future. through immediate contact with urban cultures. and sites. ALP. One course.) Not open to students who have taken Art History 158-159. CZ. discussion sessions with leading scholars in the field. Google Maps. Prerequisite: Art History 108. and Antwerp. and at least one Art History course or equivalent work. including pictorial representations. R A contextual study of visual culture in the Greater Netherlands and its underlying historical and socioeconomic assumptions from the late medieval to early modern period. 195. assemble materials. CZ Considers how war was represented in ancient Greece and Rome and how Greek and Roman society used both war images and images of external enemies in their formulation of a collective identity. R Capstone seminar focusing on advanced visual studies theories. discussions. and visual manifestations of knowledge from the wider field of visual studies.ARTSVIS 55 or ARTSVIS 127. Includes daily visits to major museums. CCI. ALP Interdisciplinary course focusing on student productions. Marries historical awareness with studio practice. CZ. One course. Consent of instructor required. Embraces international contemporary art. Instructor: Dillon. Bruzelius. Leiden. (Taught in the 148 Courses and Academic Programs . Utrecht. History of Netherlandish Art and Visual Culture in a European Context. as well as areas normally considered outside art encouraged. Traces technical. 201S. ALP. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as ARTSVIS 128. scan. the Soviet Union and Japan. Simultaneous immersion in production of images as well as collecting of archives from various cultures. field trips. ALP. 205S. Photoshop. including concentration in just one. STS Research and study in material culture and the visual arts expressed by using new visual technologies to record and communicate complex sets of visual and physical data from urban and/or archaeological sites. CCI. short writings. hands-on research in various collections. CCI. CL: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 241. Consent of instructor required. at least one 100-level Visual Arts class. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 241. commemorative building programs. CZ Cultural. Instructor: Abe or Stiles. R Second half of Art History 241-242. Wired! New Representational Technologies. or Olson. (Taught in the Netherlands. as well as the multiple expressions of visual society. Any number of media accepted. Crafting of photobooks in several genres as students edit. 200S. CCI. One course.

CZ. Critical Studies in New Media. also C-L: Literature 261S. and respond to traumatic images with empathy. Zizek. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 242. International Comparative Studies 215S. ALP. STS One course. and the Caribbean. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 222S. 220S. France. EI Interdisciplinary seminar on the relationship between visuality and poverty from 1945 to the present. the humanities. film. Technology and New Media in the University. Early twentieth-century modernist movements in Spanish America. from mikvaot to hot spring spas. Instructor: Wharton. C-L: African and African American Studies 269S 225S. Languages of graphic satire in the context of specific historical moments. focusing on England. and indigenism. theory of the avant-garde. 250AS. STS One course. and the United States. Chronological overview. and the arts. from the War of Independence to the war in Iraq. CZ. gangs. Trauma in Art.Netherlands. From Caricature to Comic Strip. primitivism. One course. cults. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 287S. Uses philosophical and perceptual methods to explore the limits and limitations of visuality as it applies to science. including Lefebvre. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 149 . R The art and culture that was produced by and about African Americans (largely in the western metropoles) during the period roughly between the two world wars. ALP. and nationalism. CCI. One course. ethics. Consideration of space through theoretical texts. Germany. racism. Readings in the humanities and social sciences focus on issues related to lack. regionalism. R History of caricature as a medium for political critique and social comment from the eighteenth century to the present. Latin American Modernism and Visual Culture. C-L: see Information Science and Information Studies 250S. Habermas. understand. destruction. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 295S. Instructor: Lasch. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 269S. scarcity. Instructor: McWilliam. and pain in contemporary art. racial and cultural primitivism. growth of specialized juvenile graphic magazines and the development of the strip cartoon. history of popular journalism and the comic press. EI Theories of trauma applied to visual representations of violence. aiming to enable students to gain the visual acuity to identify. Art History. censorship and agitation for press freedom. 231S. C-L: Latin American Studies 230S. Topics include: race. Instructor: Van Miegroet. Other topics include black migrations to urban centers. One course. CZ. Literature. absence. Film/Video/Digital 250BS. cultural and trauma studies. 235S. ALP. minimalism. and study of the criticism and creative writings of this period. Instructor: Gabara. and mapped on specific historical landscapes. and invisibility. art. a focus on individual figures. Brazil. Students encouraged to fuse theory and practice in research presentations and visual productions. Poverty of the Visual. performance-as-a-visual-paradigm. Consent of instructor required. film. One course. Theories of trauma examined from a variety of sources including clinical psychology. Art History 250S. CZ. and sexual abuse to cultures of trauma. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 242. Spatial Practices. peripheral modernity. ALP. Film. Not open to students who have previously taken this course as Art History 221S. One course. R. One course. Consent of instructor required: preference given to students earning concentration in architecture. Harlem Renaissance. Theorizes visual culture through an examination of the forms of knowledge produced by impoverished populations. CCI. ALP. Instructor: Powell. SS. CCI.) Not open to students who have taken Art History 158-159. also C-L: Art History 240S Art. R How space works from medieval refectories to Starbucks. gender. from Jerusalem to Las Vegas. C-L: see Information Science and Information Studies 240S. ALP. CCI. Eliade. African American stream of early twentieth century visual modernism. examining the topic through multiple subjects from the Holocaust. One course. and literature. and an alternative. and Visual Culture. Instructor: Stiles. and cosmopolitanism. CZ. and literature. SS.

eight of which are at the 100 level or above. Instructor: Van Miegroet. degree in art history with a concentration in architecture. Distribution requirements for the major must be fulfilled. and their emergence throughout Europe. (For example. 110. R. 145. are required. and may include two courses in visual studies. is a logical preparation for Art History 247S (Topics in Italian Renaissance Art). Medieval and Renaissance Studies 245S. or themes that embrace a range of disciplines related to visual studies. seven 100-level or above courses within the following visual arts fields: visual practice. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 221. photography 150 Courses and Academic Programs . Media and Democracy. and the Americas. (4) three courses in mathematics. areas. (3) two courses in visual arts. 32. Institute of the Arts/Biology 45S. and/or engineering courses that offer or require advanced mathematics or physics skills (recommended courses include Mathematics 31. Art History 141. visual studies. THE MAJOR The student will elect a sequence of courses emphasizing the history of art. Students interested in preparing for graduate work in architecture should supplement their major requirements with the following courses: Mathematics 31. Civil and Environmental Engineering 161 or 162). Asia. CCI. Art History 69. medieval. visual arts. Instructor: Staff. One course. No more than two approved courses taken away from Duke (at other institutions or abroad) may count toward the requirements of the major. consumer behavior. One course. and non-western. and either Mathematics 103 or Physics 53L or 54L. or the combined major in art history/visual arts. Consent of instructor required. (Fifteenth-Century Italian Art). ALP Subjects. Criteria for valuation of imagery or what makes art as a commodity desirable or fashionable. Engineering 75L or 83L. Art History Major Requirements. ALP. 189AD or 189BD.251A. including Visual Arts 100. Two years of a foreign language at the college level are strongly recommended. CCI. The major in art history requires at least eleven courses. Renaissance/Baroque. 32. The major in visual arts requires at least eleven courses including Visual Arts 54 (Introduction to Visual Practice). SS One course. Art History 71 does not fulfill the non-Western requirement. or 206S ("topics" courses that focus on space or architecture may be used to fulfill this requirement. Economics 244S 260S.A. C-L: Art History 245S. The other eight courses must include at least one course in each of the following five areas: ancient. modern. Analytical and applied historical exploration of cultural production and local art markets. Visual taste formation. Concentration in Architecture The department offers a B. (2) seven additional courses in art history. as well as Visual Arts 54 (Introduction to Visual Practice). Special Topics in Visual Studies. architecture. Visual Arts Major Requirements. physics. One of the ten courses must be a 200-level seminar. Students planning to attend graduate school should consider taking two 200-level seminars: Art History 296S (Methodology of Art History). 130. 182. also C-L: Information Science and Information Studies. and 71. including at least three of the following: Art History 104. Certification of this concentration is designated on the official transcript. Visual Arts 100 and either Visual Arts 54 or 56. 70. SS Cross-disciplinary art history-visual cultureeconomics seminar. and 103. and the role of art dealers as cross-cultural negotiants. and a second seminar in the same field as a 100-level course already taken by the student. Physics 53L or 54L. Art and Markets. or other courses approved by the concentration in architecture advisor). Policy Journalism and Media Studies 252AS. Two of the three introductory art history courses. 111. Thirteen courses are required in four broad areas: (1) Art History 291/2 on a subject approved by the concentration in architecture advisor.

See the section on honors in this bulletin. and one 100-level course). Visual Studies 200S (Theories of Visual Studies). At least one of these courses must be a 200-level seminar. These include: two lower-level courses. Asian). two courses in art history (Art History 69. Art History. medieval. Visual Arts Requirements: Five courses in visual arts at the 100 level or above. as well as eleven additional courses to be divided as follows: three courses in visual studies. Visual Studies Requirements: Five courses to be distributed as follows: any three courses at the 100 or 200 level in visual studies and any two courses in any cross-listed discipline previously approved for the visual studies major. and sculpture. 70. Visual Studies Major Requirements. The visual studies major requires thirteen courses. and twelve upper-level courses. at least eight of which must be at the 100 level or above. 1839 to the Present). All senior visual arts majors are also required to take Visual Arts 200S (Senior Capstone in Visual Arts) during their final spring semester at Duke. in Visual Arts 269S (Special Topics in Visual Arts). courses taken pass/fail or Advanced Placement credits do not count towards the minor. Renaissance/baroque. Students are encouraged to enroll as seniors in an independent study and. or 71 (Survey of Art). printmaking. Courses required for the major include Visual Studies 100D (Introduction to Visual Culture) and the capstone course. THE MINOR Art History Requirements: Five courses in art history at the 100 level or above. during the spring of that year. and Art History 69. African. Students are highly encouraged to enroll in an independent study during their junior or senior year as one of their upper-level requirements. graphic design. and four previously approved cross-listed courses in any of the departments participating in this major. and non-western (pre-Columbian. Visual Arts 218 (Individual Project). painting. and Visual Studies (ARTSVIS/ARTHIST/VISUALST) 151 . Photography Requirements: Five courses at the 100 level or above. Visual Arts 100 (Drawing). two courses in visual arts (Visual Arts 54 and one 100-level course). The twelve upper-level courses are to be divided as follows: Art History: Six upper-level courses distributed across the fields of ancient.and new media. modern. and prior to their Senior Capstone experience. and Art History 199 (History of Photography. photography. with the following courses required: Visual Arts 115 (Introductory Photography). Art. 70. Departmental Graduation with Distinction The department offers work leading to graduation with distinction. and three courses either in art history and/or visual studies. or 71. Visual Arts: Six 100-level courses including a minimum of one course in at least three of the following primary areas of instruction: film/video/digital. One transfer course may count toward the requirements for the minor. Students must take at least one course in four of these five areas. COMBINED MAJOR IN ART HISTORY/VISUAL ARTS A combined major in art history and visual arts requires at least fourteen courses.

and the Gulf War. Associate Research Professor Moosa (religion) A major or a minor is available in this program. Topics differ by section. Cultural Anthropology 129A. Issues to include the relation between language and cognition. and educational perspectives. socio-linguistic practices in multicultural settings. Turkish 132. SS One course. One course. also C-L: History 131B. Languages offered are Arabic. Topics differ by section. CZ. many in translation. One course. Kim. CCI. Associate Professor of the Practice Kim. West African Rootholds in Dance. International Comparative Studies 102A 152 Courses and Academic Programs . Representing the Middle East. Religion 161B 121. Hindi. Asian and African Languages and Literature provides instruction in several languages and literatures of Asia and Africa. First-Year Seminar. and McLarney. C-L: African and African American Studies 121. Islamic Studies 135. and purposeful life in literature and film. C-L: see Dance 110B. Director of Undergraduate Studies. Instructor: Cooke. Lo. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 132. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Asian and African Languages and Literature. CCI. CCI. Dance and Religion in Asia and Africa. Japanese. ALP. CL: Linguistics 125S 132. Associate Professor Litzinger (cultural anthropology). ASIAN AND AFRICAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE (AALL) 49S. and Korean. ALP. and Saito.Asian and African Languages and Literature (AALL) Associate Professor Ching. C-L: Islamic Studies 100. sexuality. Chinese. Chair. Religion 161N. EI Covers selected wars in the twentieth century by examining the intersections between the experience of war and the ways in which men and women represent themselves. Kurokawa. language identity. C-L: see Dance 158. Affiliated faculty: Professors Allsion (cultural anthropology) and Lawrence (religion). ALP. Professors Cooke and Liu. Introduction to Asian and African Literature. War. 110A. SS Examination of bilingualism at the individual. One course. ALP. and Yao. and Korean literature courses. African and African American Studies 158. Instructor: Staff. Visual Studies 110H. Instructor: Staff. Focus on World Wars I and II. also C-L: African and African American Studies 110A. International Comparative Studies 141B. Lecturers Cai. anthropological. Hindi. also C-L: African and African American Studies 110B. Assistant Professors Ginsburg. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Asian and African Languages & Literature. Bilingualism. also C-L: Religion 161H. CCI An exploration of the ways in which different societies in Asia and Africa encourage particular constructions of self. Kim. and language policy and planning. International Comparative Studies 170H 136. Hebrew. Literature 165C. Vietnam. interpersonal. socio-linguistic. Gender. Plesser. Hebrew. Instructors He. Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Kim. 50. One course. and social levels from psycholinguistic. One course. ALP. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 149C. West African Rootholds in Dance. language maintenance. the Lebanese Civil War. One course. CCI One course. CZ One course. CCI One course. Hong. and Lee. 72. language development. CCI. ALP. International Comparative Studies 125S. CCI. Instructor: Staff. Heish. Kundalini Yoga and Sikh Dharma. Religion 161A 110B. Associate Professors Ching and Yoda. and Postcoloniality. Japanese. Instructor: Staff. C-L: see Dance 110A. Cultural Anthropology 129B. the Algerian Revolution. Khanna. CZ One course. C-L: see Dance 155. Chinese. Associate Professors of the Practice Endo. Vaishnava. The program offers Arabic.

Focus on contemporary academic and socio-cultural debates. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 191QS. Analyzes the dynamics between norms of modern civil society and those dictated by religious traditions. view about gender. Introduction to Israeli Culture. CCI. C-L: see Dance 149. historiography. legal documents. of the way in which girlhood. and the Israeli-Arab conflict. Cinema and nationalism. Instructor: Yoda. CZ Examination. political. film. and the moral frameworks in which different choices are debated in the Arab context. ALP. Religion 161J. Religion 161K. EI A comparative approach to Israeli cinema. Instructor: Yoda. Religion 144. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 149B. C-L: International Comparative Studies. Literature 165G 145. International Comparative Studies 170C 152. and history to explore themes and questions about modern South Asia and the realities of its peoples. Popular culture and its relationship with high culture. One course. Islamic Studies 160. One course. ALP. One course. C-L: see Dance 147. and Power. Instructor: Staff. 149. racial. C-L: Film/Video/Digital 111H. also C-L: Jewish Studies 155. militarism and civil society. Instructor: Lo. CCI Topics may vary. criticism. The Middle East in Popular Culture. interconnections of culture and Zionist ideology in the Israeli projection of the nation. historic. SS One course. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 149. Girl Culture. Cultural Anthropology 161. One course. EI Examination of Arab worldviews (including cultural variations. and girl bodies have figured in the construction of gender. CCI. CCI. CZ The examination of contemporary Israeli culture through art. Women's Studies 181S 158S. 154. CCI. CZ One course. artistic expressions. also C-L: Literature 163MS 159. Women's Studies 151 Asian and African Languages and Literature (AALL) 153 . in the context of American and European cinemas.S. Literature 163L 156. History and Practice of the Dance and Dance-theatre of India. The limits of representation: the historical and ideological deployment of Holocaust representation in different cultural contexts. CCI. CZ One course. CCI. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 101. CCI. through visual and literary texts.137. anthropology. ALP. Travel. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 191AS. CCI. Instructor: Staff. ALP. Concentration on interdisciplinary critical approaches to culture. CZ Integrates literature. Arab-Israeli Conflict. Documentary Studies 142. One course. Instructor: Ginsburg. Israel. and literature. and ethnic diversity of South Asia presented through both readings and contemporary films. CZ. Arab. Jewish Studies 130 157S. film. CZ. Representing the Holocaust. CCI. Instructor: Staff. One course. Media. ALP. and consumer culture in modern to contemporary Japan. Instructor: Ginsburg. such as literature. Cinematic representations of social. CZ Issues of representing the Holocaust in Israel through various cultural media. Not open to students who have taken Religion 160. and perspectives toward the U. One course. linguistic. CZ The literary. girl culture. film. Contemporary Israeli Cinema. Theater Studies 134 155. CCI. nation. International Comparative Studies 161. Religion 161C. immigration to and emigration from Israel. and Japan. architecture. ALP. representations and understanding of Arab societies. C-L: Literature 165B. masculinity and femininity. ALP. and music. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 155. CCI. Introduction to the Civilizations of Southern Asia. also C-L: Literature 132BS. Topics in Japanese Anime. Critically examines current Western assumptions. Explores the development of images of the Arab and seeks to understand them in the context of the Arab world as well as in its relationship to the West. Literature 112M. Gender. C-L: Jewish Studies 139. Dance and Dance Theater of Asia. One course. and ethnic tensions and fissures: social gap. Contemporary Culture in South Asia. Society and Culture in Film. History 193. SS One course. ALP. Jewish Studies 140. C-L: Women's Studies 142. EI. Palestine. Theater Studies 133. Religion 161P.). ALP. One course. and religion.

CZ An introduction to the history of Japanese cinema focusing on issues including the relation between the tradition-modernity or Japan-West in the development of Japanese cinema. CCI. C-L: Literature 165E. FL One course. The collapse of socialism in 1989 and the Gulf War as a turning point in the Arab world. The resilience of popular cinema in the face of Hollywood. ideological strife and longing and loss. Visual Studies 105C 172S. Korean Literature in Translation. magical realism and the poetry of T. and Egyptians. drama. Saudi Arabians. Response to these challenges in novels. melodrama. ALP. C-L: International Comparative Studies 163. Film/Video/Digital 111D. Eliot. Islamic Studies 166. film. CCI A chronological overview from earliest times until today. Lebanese. Western imperialism and political upheavals. historical texts. ALP. CZ Modern history of Egypt: Napoleon's conquest in 1798. essays. autobiographies. the culture of the petroleum industry. Gamal Abd al-Nasser. the Ottoman Empire. CCI Representations of passion and trauma in Korean society and history through various cultural media including literature. Orientalist knowledge. Canadian Studies. C-L: Literature 165F. the influence of Japanese films on the theory and practice of cinema abroad. also CL: African and African American Studies 138S. Instructor: Khanna. One course. CCI. Instructor: Ching or Yoda. CCI. ALP. G. ALP. and various other genres. CCI. The work of Guru Dutt. Includes an optional voyage to Egypt during the spring vacation. and other visual media. classics. One course. Novels. CL: Literature 112H. International Comparative Studies 120C 168S. Modern Japanese Literature and Culture. ALP. Narrative and nonnarrative expressive forms in folk and high culture in India. CZ One course. Considers post-1990 films and fiction by Iraqis. Trauma and Passion in Korean Culture. ALP. One course. CCI. television. Syrians. the Arab Renaissance. and of the Muslim difference in the homogenized consumerist global system. and popular culture that draw on folktales. Sufism. Satyajit Ray. C-L: Literature 112E. Egypt: Mother of the World. Latin American Studies 169. One course. Instructor: Kim. Palestinians. CZ The transmutation of Chinese culture and literature from the perspective of translation conceived as a broad range of literary and cultural activities. ALP. 167. films. Muhammad Ali. Tunisians. Intensified awareness of the role of the United States in the region as a result of 9/11. Japanese Cinema. Egyptian cinema. Instructor: Yoda. love. Instructor: McLarney. Egyptian cosmopolitanism. Women's Awakening. CCI. the "Description of Egypt". ALP. Japanese colonization. China and the West. may be repeated for credit. and popular culture. war and peace with Israel. sub-topics to include war. including transactions between cultures. Muslim Brotherhood. Begins with a brief introduction to Korean language and history as they relate to the study of literature. International Comparative Studies 165. C-L: see History 172B 170. and the ways in which cinema has served as a reflection of and an active agent in the transformation of Japanese society. International Comparative Studies 110CS. ALP. Indian Cinema. Instructor: Staff. Egyptian letters (novel. CZ The impact of 9/11 on Arab culture. Chinese Literature and Culture in Translation. R Sources of vitality in twentieth-century Indian cinema. Instructor: Cooke. mass media. Film/Video/Digital 111F. C-L: International Comparative Studies. CZ An examination of modern Japanese culture through a variety of media including literary texts. Visual Studies 105B 171. Aravindan. Arab Nationalism. cultural representations. Islamic Reform.162. Different material each year. In dealing with historical traumas such as the Korean War. and adaptation of one literary-cultural form 154 Courses and Academic Programs . and Mani Kaul. poetry). C-L: see French 161S. One course. of religion as a politically effective force. the Islamic Revival. Francophone Literature. appropriation of a foreign work into a Chinese version. CZ. Arabic Culture and 9/11.S. One course. CCI. One course. nationalism. CCI. and films. History 162S.

SS The diverse locales. Study of the relationship of music to social. Gender in Dance and Theatre. gender. CZ One course. C-L: Women's Studies 179. C-L: Literature 112G. Instructor: Hong. Islamic Studies 179. Religion 161I Asian and African Languages and Literature (AALL) 155 . and Islamic feminism. C-L: Islamic Studies 175. C-L: Literature 165A 173S. Topics include the role of the educated elite in relation to literature and culture and how the literati portray themselves in their works. ALP. also C-L: Women's Studies 111. and contexts. One course. CCI. ALP. Instructor: Kramer. C-L: Music 134. novels. CCI. Instructor: Kramer. Modern Political Thought in China and Europe. genres. C-L: Religion 161O. Topics include: national division. 181. CCI. China from Antiquity to 1400. ALP. practices. CZ East Asian musicians and their instruments. and the Middle East) and Africa. Music in South Asia. Korean Cinema. Topics include: basic tenets of Islam. One course. CCI. Cultural Anthropology 149A. autobiographical writings. International Comparative Studies 170A. CCI Roles and representations of women in Muslim societies of Asia (including Indonesia. C-L: Jewish Studies 132. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Hong. C-L: Music 135. Focus on self-criticism as manifested in Israeli and Palestinian literature and cinema and on its limits. One course.into another (such as literature into drama or film). CZ. and philosophical trends informed by listening to the musical forms themselves in recorded and live performances. Islam in America. CCI Melodrama as a genre in literature and as a mode of representation in film and other media. performance traditions. pop culture. CCI Survey of works in Chinese from Confucius to the Qing Dynasty including short stories. CZ. ALP. Emphasis on comparative method attending American and Chinese cultures and the politics of cross-cultural representation. African American Islam. Includes field trips and group projects in the local community. ALP. religious. Visual Studies 105F 176. CCI. racial recognition. genres. Relations between orthodoxy and marginalization of the literati and its impact on their writing. Music in East Asia. Instructor: Cooke. and ethnicities. and contexts. Instructor: McLarney. historical. C-L: see Dance 175. South Asia. Melodrama East and West. Gender Jihad: Muslim Women Writers. Introduction to Islamic Communities in North Carolina. One course. EI A cultural study of the collapse of the Israeli-Palestinian peace process and failure of Israeli and Palestinian doves to transform their respective communities and to change conditions on the ground. Literature 151J. One course. transnational identity and its influence abroad. and poetry. Film/Video/Digital 111G. Focus on women as producers of culture and as social critics. One course. and philosophical trends informed by listening to the musical forms themselves in recorded and live performances. and national identity-building. CZ South Asian musicians and their instruments. One course. C-L: see History 172C 182. One course. family. Literati/Literature Culture: Pre Modern Chinese Literature. CZ Introduction to Korean Cinema from mid-Twentieth Century to Contemporary Period. CCI. CZ One course. The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict in Literature and Film. Issues include: gender construction. Instructor: Cooke and Ginsburg. CCI. C-L: see History 112A 183. CZ. One course. ALP. CCI. interfaith and pluralism. class formation. as well as in Muslim minority societies(including Europe and the United States). Examination of ways writers and filmmakers project images of women in today's Muslim societies. historical. religious. Literature 163Q 184. performance traditions. Visual Studies 105E 180S. ALP. International Comparative Studies 170E 178. Instructor: Baird. Study of the relationship of music to social. mosque and school. Theater Studies 132. SS One course. Religion 161E 185.

television. C-L: Literature 112J. Topics vary each semester. ALP. Europe. C-L Film Video. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 254. aspects of Chinese media and popular culture: cinema. the Internet.188. SS One course. R An examination of modern Japanese culture through a variety of media including literary texts. Seminar version of AALL 195. 199. film. R East Asia as a historical and geographical category of knowledge emerging within the various processes of global movements (imperialism. Seminar in Asian and African Cultural Studies. C-L: see Latin American Studies 202S. ALP. Consent of instructor required. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. CCI. and films. Instructor: Liu. and Hong Kong. Place. comics. One course. Film/Video/Digital 111A. popular music. CCI. Special Topics in Asian and African Literature. CCI Seminar version of Asian and African Literature 252. One course. Same as AALL 156 but requires extra assignments. One course. Literature 287S 250S. Instructor: Ginsburg. and intellectual debates since gaige kaifang (reform and opening up). Topics include the history and aesthetics of the new wave cinema. One course. Hebrew. Space. Korean). Hindi. may be repeated for credit. Instructor: Hong. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 291S. soap operas as the new forum for public debate o popular culture. and Israel. Russian 203S. also C-L: Women's Studies 225S. Topics vary each semester. CZ Issues of representing the Holocaust through various cultural media. CCI. One course.) Instructor: Ching or Yoda. and fashion. such as literature. Japanese. 195S. R Topics vary each semester. Modern Japanese Literature and Culture. R Current issues of contemporary Chinese media and popular culture within the context of globalization. Chinese Media and Pop Culture. cell phone text messages. CCI. art. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. 252S. CCI. and soap operas produced in Mainland China in the post-Mao era. One course. Different material each year. newspapers and magazines. ALP. ideological discourse. German 264S 230S. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. Literature 200S 207S. cultural representations. Representing the Holocaust. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 285S. ALP. 200S. documentaries. Visual Studies 105G 191. the historical and ideological deployment of Holocaust representation in different cultural contexts. CZ Films. Special Topics in Asian and African Literature. ALP. Cultural politics. and the most recent wave of memorials and museums to be built in America. One course. Special Topics. One course. Chinese. Research Independent Study. Instructor: Staff. The limits of representation. (Same 156 Courses and Academic Programs . C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 225S 252. Instructor: Staff. Research Methods In International Area Studies. Romance Studies 202S. and debate over the relationship between Euro-American modernist and the national cinema. One course. Open to seniors completing the certificate in Asian and African Languages and Literature (Arabic. criticism. television series. International Comparative Studies 256. Modern Chinese Cinema. CCI. 195. music. economic regionalism). C-L: Jewish Studies 230 262. 253. Special Topics. and Power. CZ. One course. C-L: African and African American Studies 200S. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. CZ. ALP. (Same as Asian and African Languages and Literature 153 but requires extra assignments. One course. ALP. CZ Concentration on a theoretical problem or set of issues germane to the study of Asian and African cultures. Asian and African Languages and Literature Honors Seminar. colonialism. CCI One course. East Asian Cultural Studies. Cultural Anthropology 288S. Instructor: Staff. modern and contemporary Taiwan.

(Same as Chinese 188S but requires extra assignments. Topics include the history and aesthetics of the cinema. and poetry. Melodrama as a genre in literature and as a mode of representation in film and other media. Topics include the history and aesthetics of the cinema. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 260. Japanese colonization. the relationship of politics and form in postrevolutionary aesthetics. and soap operas produced in mainland China in the post-Mao era. ALP. class formation.as Asian and African Languages and Literature 162 but requires extra assignments. autobiographies. One course. love. and national identity-building. Seminar on Chinese Cinema. the emerging film criticism in China. Melodrama East and West. Instructor: Staff. One course. speaking. documentaries. Language laboratory. CCI. television series. One course. Trauma and Passion in Korean Culture. CZ. reading. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite: Chinese 184S or advanced oral and written proficiency in Mandarin Chinese. historical texts.) Instructor: Staff. melodrama. One course. CZ. racial recognition.) Instructor: Yoda. Relations between orthodoxy and marginalization of the literati and its impact on their writing. International Comparative Studies 267. soap operas as the new forum for public debates on popular culture. 279. ALP. ALP. Prerequisite: Chinese 184S or advanced oral and written proficiency in Mandarin Chinese. the influence of Japanese films on the theory and practice of cinema abroad. One course. Elementary Arabic. novels. autobiographical writings. soap operas as the new forum for public debates on popular culture. and the ways in which cinema has served as a reflection of and an active agent in the transformation of Japanese society. One course. One course. and soap operas produced in mainland China in the post-Mao era.(Same as Asian and African Languages and Literature 180S but requires extra assignments.) Research paper required. the emerging film criticism in China. and other visual media. R Films. 271. Emphasis on comparative method attending American and Chinese cultures and the politics of cross-cultural representation.) Research paper required. the relationship of politics and form in postrevolutionary aesthetics. and writing modern standard Arabic. Issues include: gender construction. Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Literati/Literature Culture: Pre Modern Chinese Literature.) Instructor: Ching or Yoda. C-L: International Comparative Studies 291. CCI. C-L: International Comparative Studies 288S. Research Independent Study. (Same as Chinese 188S but requires extra assignments. (Same as Asian African Languages 179 but requires extra assignments. 288. R Survey of works in Chinese from Confucius to the Qing Dynasty including short stories. 280S. R Films. Instructor: Staff. television series. FL Understanding. nationalism. Asian and African Languages and Literature (AALL) 157 . One course.) Instructor: Staff. film. Instructor: Staff. (Same as African Languages and Literature 171. Seminar on Modern Chinese Cinema. Instructor: Lo. One course. ideological strife and longing and loss. ARABIC (ARABIC) 1. documentaries. Western imperialism and political upheavals. sub-topics to include war. CCI Representations of passion and trauma in Korean society and history through various cultural media including literature. (Same as Asian and African Languages and Literature 167 but requires extra assignments.) Instructor: Hong. CZ An introduction to the history of Japanese cinema focusing on issues including the relation between the tradition-modernity or Japan-West in the development of Japanese cinema. Japanese Cinema. In dealing with historical traumas such as the Korean War. Topics include the role of the educated elite in relation to literature and culture and how the literati portray themselves in their works. but requires extra assignments.

CZ. Topics in Arabic. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. One course. One course. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. 63. including films. Readings include selections from the Qur'an. ALP. Instructor: Cooke. 64. Prerequisite: Chinese 1 or equivalent. FL Designed for students who can converse in Mandarin Chinese about personal information or daily topics but have little or no reading and writing skills in Chinese. FL Readings in classical and contemporary fiction and nonfiction. CHINESE (CHINESE) 1. FL Covers the basic elementary Chinese language curriculum (Chinese 1-2 and 63) in one semester. and radio broadcasts. One course. and conversation in modern standard Arabic. Prerequisite: Arabic 126 or consent of instructor. reading. One course. or putonghua. 35. social interaction. Instructor: Lo. Prerequisite: Arabic 125 or equivalent. 25B. Prerequisite: Arabic 1 or equivalent. Instructor: Lee. Prerequisite: Chinese 25A. Prerequisite: Arabic 2 or equivalent. television. Six class meetings a week. FL Designed to develop proficiency in conversational Egyptian Arabic within a cultural context: manners. Instructor: Staff. FL Readings and other material. Intermediate Arabic. C-L: International Comparative Studies 184. One course.2. 35. One course. ALP. Ibn Battuta. FL Introduction to speaking. Students who wish to make sufficient progress in two semesters to advance to Chinese 135 158 Courses and Academic Programs . One course. Consent required if student has not taken any Arabic previously. 14. and holiday traditions. All four language skills emphasized with additional work on reading and writing. FL Reading. FL Continuation of Arabic 63. One course. ALP. Introduction to some aspects of Chinese culture. Prerequisite: Arabic 63 or equivalent. Ibn Arabi. customs. One course. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. 101. Instructor: Staff. Intensive Elementary Chinese. CCI. Conversational Egyptian and Contemporary Culture. Abridged First-Year Chinese for Advanced Beginners. CCI Topics differ by section. Instructor: Staff. Elementary Arabic. Research Independent Study. composition. C-L: International Comparative Studies 142A 183. One course. Elementary Chinese. contemporary literature. Two courses. Advanced Arabic. Instructor: Lee. reading and writing skills. Instructor: Staff. One course. Ghada al-Samman and 1001 Nights. Prerequisite: Arabic 64 or equivalent. Not open to students who have studied Chinese for more than two years pre-college or students who can converse on topics of daily concerns in Mandarin Chinese. C-L: International Comparative Studies 126. CCI. speaking. Topics in Arabic. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Arabic. One course. Advanced Arabic. C-L: International Comparative Studies 191. Taha Husain. 2. understanding. 125. Instructor: Cooke. FL Continuation of Chinese 25A. Exercises in composition. and writing modern standard Chinese (Mandarin. Equal attention to listening. and the Arabic press. Literacy in Chinese. Instructor: Staff. FL Continuation of Arabic 183. Instructor: Staff. ALP. Instructor: Staff. FL Continuation of Arabic 1. Works include al-Jahiz. FL Continuation of Arabic 125. Intermediate Arabic. Prerequisite: Arabic 126 or consent of instructor. Elementary Chinese. One course. CZ. based on the Beijing dialect). the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. FL Continuation of Chinese 1.

ALP. Focus on grammar. reading. C-L: International Comparative Studies 126. CCI. Instructor: Yao. 100. 63. philosophy. Reading in Modern Chinese. FL Continuation of Chinese 125. and social issues after the economic reform in China. 136. and simple economic issues in China and Taiwan. One course. Instructor: Yao. Instructor: Cai. and history. Advanced Chinese. FL Designed for students who have completed Chinese 35 and 36 (previously Chinese 6 and 7). systematic sentence analysis. 64. and history. 182S. covering classical literature. FL Materials from public media used to analyze diverse social phenomena and cultural issues in contemporary China. Prerequisite: Chinese 135 or Chinese 181S. Literacy in Chinese. Confucianism. Introduction to more complex syntax with special attention to Chinese cultural and socio-political issues and topics. Prerequisite: Chinese 64 or equivalent. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Chinese. and distinctive functions of grammatical particles. or equivalent. Instructor: Staff. Focus on grammar. Intermediate Chinese. Consent of instructor required. Enhancement of knowledge of classical literature. essays. ALP. One course. Instructor: Cai. Introduction to Classical Chinese. CCI. 64 or equivalent. 36. Intermediate Chinese. Instructor: Staff. CCI. Instructor: Staff. and history. Historical background of essential texts in the ancient period. One course. C-L: International Comparative Studies 120F 170S. FL See Chinese 181S. CZ. FL Introduction to Classical Chinese for the basic reader. Language and Society II. 127B. marriage outlooks. Introduction to Classical Chinese II. culture. One course. Instructor: Yao. One course. 129B. and writing. Acquaintance with historical background of essential texts in the ancient period. Instructor: Yao. and current political. FL Continuation of Chinese 63. 125. Cultural Revolution.in the fall semester of the following year must take Chinese 35 and 36. Advanced Chinese. ALP. essays. FL Continuation of Chinese 35. and short stories. Prerequisite: Chinese 63. Major focus on developing literary reading and writing skills along with learning methods of writing academic Chinese essays on a wide range of complex topics. A gateway to advanced literary reading and writing (shu-mian-yu). CCI. ALP. oral practice. Instructor: Cai. Helps students to make sufficient progress in one semester to advance to Chinese 183S or 184S in the spring semester. Analysis of cultural and literary texts from variety of media and genres providing a basis for practice in discussion and writing. language laboratory. CCI. Prerequisite: Chinese 63. ALP. 36. ALP. FL Continuation of Chinese 170S. aural comprehension. Readings in Modern Chinese. CZ. CCI. Instructors: Lee and staff. C-L: International Comparative Studies 120E 135. systematic sentence analysis. philosophy. 126. One course. C-L: International Comparative Studies 122AS Asian and African Languages and Literature (AALL) 159 . Prerequisite: Chinese 135 or equivalent. Content drawn from newspaper articles. and other readings concerning history. Prerequisite: Chinese 125. 129A. FL Continuation of Chinese 135. A gateway to advanced literary reading and writing (shu-mian-yu). One course. One course. FL Proficiency in speaking. 181S. One course. philosophy. social. One course. CCI Topics differ by section. CZ. Content drawn from newspaper articles. or consent of instructor. and distinctive functions of grammatical particles. food. Topics include popular culture. Conducted in Chinese. 171S. Conducted in Chinese. Students who wish to make sufficient progress in two semesters to advance to Chinese 135 in the fall semester of the following year must take Chinese 35 and 36. FL Reading. Enhancement of knowledge of classical literature. One course. One course. Language and Society. 127A. One course. Instructor: Cai. Prerequisite: Chinese 35.

Instructor: Liu. FL Third-year Chinese. Consent of instructor required. One course. Includes field trips 160 Courses and Academic Programs . and television. Consent of instructor required. television. Offered in the Duke Study in China Program at Capital Normal University. Readings and discussion of selections from modern Chinese literature. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. 129B. One course. or consent of instructor. Advanced Progress in Chinese. and rhetorical analysis on a range of topics. FL Continuation of Chinese 112A. ALP. Consent of instructor required. popular culture. Consent of instructor required. Equivalent of fourth-year Chinese. C-L: International Comparative Studies 191. films. 193. Prerequisite: Chinese language proficiency at the fourth-year level or the equivalent. 129. FL Equivalent to fifth year. 127A. Instructor: Staff. Offered in the Duke Study in China Program at Capital Normal University. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. FL Equivalent to fifth year. One course. FL Continuation of Chinese 127A. and the Chinese press. 112B. Instructor: Staff. FL Readings and other material. Equivalent of fourth-year Chinese. Offered in the Duke Study in China Program at Capital Normal University. Readings of modern short stories and essays on special topics of the cultural politics in modern and contemporary China. Consent of instructor required. One course. CCI. ALP. Directed Study on Contemporary China. One course. including web sites. 129A. FL. CZ. Contemporary Chinese Culture. Exercises in composition. FL Continuation of Chinese 183S. Offered in the Duke Study in China Program at Capital Normal University. CZ. 195. One course. CCI. 127. and the arts of China. Special Topics in Modern Chinese. One course. FL Offered in the Duke Study in China Program at Capital Normal University. 112A. ALP. C-L: International Comparative Studies 184S. Special Topics in Modern Chinese. Research Independent Study. CCI. Discussion based on oral and written reports and topical readings. 111B. literature and the arts. ALP. CCI. Instructor: Staff. Offered in the Duke Study in China Program at Capital Normal University. Consent of instructor required. Includes interviews. One course. Topics in Modern Chinese. ALP.183S. 126. expository prose. FL Study of diverse public media in which Mandarin Chinese is the principal language of communication. Instructor: Staff. Third-year Chinese. Intensive Progress in Chinese. methods of writing Chinese essays. popular culture. Instructor: Liu. films. Instructor: Staff. FL Topics in Chinese culture and society including media. CCI. Offered in the Duke Study in China Program at Capital Normal University. CCI. Courses Offered in the Duke Study in China Program at Capital Normal University 111A. FL Elements of Contemporary Chinese Culture including media. Intensive Advanced Chinese. CCI. Topics in Chinese Culture and Society. 127B. CCI. One course. Offered in the Duke Study in China Program at Capital Normal University. literature. Intensive Advanced Chinese. Advanced Progress in Chinese. Topics in Modern Chinese. Instructor: Staff. FL Continuation of Chinese 111A. CCI. CCI. CZ. One course. and radio broadcasts. Prerequisite: Chinese language proficiency at the fourth year level or the equivalent. Instructor: Staff. One course. R Research and field studies culminating in a paper approved and supervised by the resident director. Instructor: Staff. ALP. One course. One course. Instructor: Staff. Intensive Progress in Chinese. Prerequisite: Chinese 125. Additional materials such as web sites. Instructor: Staff. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Instructor: Staff. 196.

Intermediate Hindi. Instructor: Vaishnava. Advanced Modern Hebrew. CCI. One course. One course. Cultural component emphasized through short readings. CCI Topics differ by section. FL Reading. FL One course. One course. FL Continuation of Hindi 63. and writing modern Hebrew. 2 or equivalent. understanding. Advanced Hindi. ALP. ALP. reading. writing. Conducted in Hebrew. Prerequisite: Hindi 125 or equivalent. 126. One course. One course. C-L: Jewish Studies 131S 191. Instructor: Staff. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Vaishnava. One course. One course. CCI. Instructor: Vaishnava. Topics in Modern Hebrew. 2. Prerequisite: Hindi 63. drama. CCI. One course. One course. One course. FL Continuation of Hebrew 1. Instructor: Plesser. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Emphasis on critical reading of literary and cultural texts. FL Continuation of Hindi 1. 100. poetry. Elementary Modern Hebrew. ALP. C-L: Judaic Studies HINDI (HINDI) 1. and speaking. and film. Instructor: Staff. C-L: Jewish Studies 125S. Instructor: Khanna. Prerequisite: Hebrew 125S or equivalent. One course. International Comparative Studies 141AS 183S. One course. including prose. Intermediate Hindi. composition.on cultural and societal changes in contemporary China. Prerequisite: Hindi 64 or equivalent. C-L: Judaic Studies 125S. CZ. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite: Hindi 1. Instructor: Ginsburg. CCI Topics differ by section. International Comparative Studies 126S. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Hindi. C-L: Jewish Studies 64 100. CZ. FL Conversation. conversation. FL Continuation of Hindi 125. Intermediate Modern Hebrew. ALP. and conversation. Prerequisite: Hebrew 63 or equivalent. 125. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 163A. Prerequisite: Hebrew 64 or equivalent. C-L: Jewish Studies 63 64. CZ. One course. FL Continuation of Hebrew 125S. Language laboratory. FL Introduction to modern Hebrew literature and Israeli culture. FL Introduction to speaking. C-L: Jewish Studies 1 2. Elementary Hindi. One course. Research Independent Study. ALP. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Instructor: Plesser. 64. Political Science 100GA HEBREW (HEBREW) 1. Instructor: Plesser. Intermediate Modern Hebrew. Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or equivalent. Instructor: Plesser. CCI. FL Continuation of Hebrew 63. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. One course. C-L: International Comparative Studies 170B Asian and African Languages and Literature (AALL) 161 . ALP. 63. Elementary Hindi. C-L: Jewish Studies 126S. and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Hindi 2. C-L: Jewish Studies 2 63. Instructor: Khanna. Elementary Modern Hebrew. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Hebrew. FL Proficiency in reading. composition. FL Reading. ALP. Instructor: Staff. introduction to the Devanagari script and the reading of graded texts. and language laboratory. Instructor: Vaishnava. CCI. basic grammar. Prerequisite: Hebrew 1. Advanced Modern Hebrew. Instructor: Staff. One course. Instructor: Ginsburg. Advanced Hindi.

Instructor: Kurokawa. C-L: International Comparative Studies 126. CCI. JAPANESE (JPN) 1. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. ALP. Instructor: Staff. SS Introduction to various research approaches to literary. One course. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Exercises in composition and conversation. FL Continuation of Japanese 63. One course. FL Continuation of Japanese 125. FL Designed for true beginners with no prior knowledge of Korean. One course. CCI. Political Science 291. One course. CCI. C-L: International Comparative Studies 191. Instructor: Khanna. 205S. and historical studies of Japan. One course. Instructor: Staff. 64. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Topics in Hindi. CCI Topics differ by section. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Japanese 184 or equivalent. Prerequisite: Hindi 126 or consent of instructor. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 290. Consent of instructor required. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Research Independent Study. Sociology 291 KOREAN (KOREAN) 1. FL Continuation of Japanese 183S. CCI. CCI. speaking. CL: International Comparative Studies 184S. Emphasis on bibliographical sources that best serve needs in chosen area of specialization. Instructor: Khanna. CCI. One course. Research Independent Study. Instructor: Endo. Elementary Japanese. Prerequisite: Japanese 1 or equivalent. introduces the basics of Korean. One course. FL Readings in prevailing literary and mass media forms. 63. Prerequisite: Hindi 126 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Endo. One course. ALP. Intermediate Japanese. Elementary Japanese. FL Readings and other materials. FL Continuation of Japanese 1. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Japanese. One course. Elementary Korean. Instructor: Kurokawa. One course. CCI. FL Readings and other materials. Topics in Hindi. FL Topics vary each semester. Prerequisite: Japanese 125 or equivalent. ALP. Advanced Japanese. 291. CCI. C-L: International Comparative Studies 184S. Advanced Japanese. One course. 162 Courses and Academic Programs . One course. C-L: International Comparative Studies 183S. Research Methods in Japanese. ALP. Prerequisite: Japanese 63 or equivalent. ALP. 2. C-L: International Comparative Studies 191. One course. The sounds of spoken Korean. Intermediate Japanese. listening. including video. ALP. Instructor: Endo. CZ. 101. 125. Continued development of the four language skills: listening. FL Continuation of Hindi 183S. Topics in Japanese. and writing. Instructor: Saito.183S. Exercises in composition. Cultural component emphasized through short readings. FL Continuation of Japanese 2. One course. ALP. Topics in Japanese. Instructor: Staff. the writing system Hangul. FL Introduction to speaking. reading and writing. sociological. One course. Instructor: Staff. History 292. Instructor: Endo. Instructor: Saito. including television and radio broadcasts. Instructor: Staff. reading. Seminar in Japanese. Consent of instructor required.

Instructor: Ndiaye. reading and writing informative and expository texts. and experience in reading at grade 4 or 5 level). Advanced Korean. FL Introduction to reading .and greetings. One course. Instructor: Staff. Uses Senegalese literacy manuals supplemented by selections from Senegalese radio and television. 63. basic communication. familiarity with culture. reading and responding to authentic texts. Asian and African Languages and Literature (AALL) 163 . Research Independent Study. Instructor: Staff. Includes manuals. Prerequisite: Wolof 1 or equivalent. Instructor: Staff. One course. 126S. short stories. and on writing. and listening. and political issues. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. FL Continue developing interpretive and expressive abilities through reading and discussions of essays. ALP. and experience in reading at grade 1 to 3 level). 2. social. Instructor: Staff. Proficiency-based course emphasizing four skills: reading. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. CCI. 183S. Instructor: Staff. Intermediate Korean. and newspaper articles. Prerequisite: Wolof 2. Instructor: Ndiaye. writing. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Korean. and understanding standard Wolof. 2. Includes the manuals of the Senegalese literacy program. speaking. and elementary reading skills for simple sentences. and movies. Instructor: Ndiaye. Prerequisite: Korean 126S or equivalent. 64. Elementary Wolof. ALP. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. fundamentals of grammar. ALP. Prerequisite: Korean 64 or equivalent (fluency in speaking. One course. Topics in Korean. CCI. Instructor: Kim. focus on reading and discussing authentic texts on modern Korean history and its social and cultural legacies. FL Focus on developing reading skills for narrative and descriptive texts. learning core grammatical patterns. reading simple narratives and descriptions. WOLOF (WOLOF) 1. 125. Intermediate Wolof. Instructor: Staff. Prerequisite: Korean 63 or equivalent (ability to speak on daily topics fluently and to read simple stories). Prerequisite: Korean 1 or equivalent (knowledge of Hangul and rudimentary speaking ability). development of complexity and sociolinguistic appropriateness in speech. CCI Topics differ by section. Instructor: Kim. Instructor: Kim. One course. FL Introduction to reading. Advanced Korean. music recordings. Prerequisite: Korean 183S or equivalent. One course. Topics in Korean. Listening and speaking about cultural practices and historical events. One course. Intermediate Korean. 184S. Instructor: Kim. video clips. FL Continuation of Korean 1. One course. One course. Prerequisite: Korean 125 or equivalent (fluency in speaking. speaking. Elementary Korean. ALP. One course. honing grammatical usage at the discourse level. and listening skills in the Wolof language. 100. One course. Introduction to Chinese characters. and honing grammatical usage and vocabulary choice. FL Continuation of Korean 63. 63. One course. and newspaper articles. 191. One course. CCI. writing. Elementary Wolof. Developing speaking and listening skills for everyday personal communication. writing. FL Listening and speaking about cultural. FL Focus on developing interpretive and expressive abilities through reading and discussions of essays. speaking. One course. Practice in listening and speaking in social settings with peers and colleagues. short stories. CCI. FL Continuation of Korean 125. newspapers. Prerequisite: Korean 2 or equivalent (ability to communicate in service encounters and express oneself in basic personal situations). familiarity with culture. CZ.

literatures. Japanese. Advising. Hebrew. (2) a minimum of three courses at or above the 100-level on the literature or culture of the area of concentration. Therefore. II. Japanese. with concentration in one of the six following areas: Arabic.THE MAJOR Asian and African Languages and Literature offers a curriculum that reflects an increasing awareness of the interconnectedness of the globe. two of which must be taken within the Asian and African Languages and Literature department. The course requirements for the major provide an intellectual vision that includes both study of language and culture practice and a critical theoretical framework for analyzing cultural experience. It provides students with an understanding of languages. Students working on their honors thesis will meet together at the beginning of the spring semester of their senior year to report on their research topics and again toward the end of that semester to 164 Courses and Academic Programs . The program fosters a view of literature and culture that is at once local and global. Hindi. and cultures beyond America and the West to prepare them for professional work or advanced graduate study in a number of international arenas. Chinese. informed by local histories of internal development as well as by theories of cross-cultural influence. Within the area of concentration. Study Abroad. An integral part of the student's experience will be study abroad. class. Chinese. modern Hebrew. Majors should consult with their Arabic. or Korean. The curriculum is based on a theoretical framework that examines contemporary national and ethnic cultures of Asia and Africa within a global context. Majors with grade point averages of 3. while not a requirement of the major. Chinese.3 or higher may apply in their junior year to the director of undergraduate studies for Graduation with Distinction (see the section on honors in this bulletin). Japanese. the student is required to take Introduction to Asian and African Literature and Culture (Asian and African Languages and Literature 121) This course aims at helping the student to establish cross-cultural links with students concentrating in other Asian and African languages. or Korean language and a comprehensive knowledge of a single culture related to each language. every student is required to complete one Asian and African Languages and Literature course at or above the 100 level outside the student’s language of concentration that includes an examination of the above conceptual categories. nation. or Korean advisors for appropriate courses from other departments. Eight (8) semester courses are required for this category. as reflected in the following requirements: I. aesthetics. III. Hindi. The major is organized in accordance with three overlapping structures. it is strongly encouraged. the student will acquire advanced linguistic skills in Arabic. The major requires a minimum of ten courses (at least eight of which must be at the 100 level or above). Hindi. of which two must be at or above the 100-level. This view draws on theoretical inquiries into indigenous cultural identities associated with such conceptual categories as gender. and sexuality. They include: (1) a minimum of three language courses. The major in Asian and African Languages and Literature also requires students to analyze critically the issue of indigenous cultural identities. modern Hebrew. The major provides exposure to different methodologies for interpreting indigenous literary and cultural tradition. Majors will be assigned one faculty advisor in their area of concentration. ethnicity. Departmental Graduation with Distinction. Its mission is to foster a view of literature and culture at once indigenous and global. Within the larger framework of Asian and African Languages and Literature. Students should discuss this option as early as possible with their major advisor.

see Physics on page 437. modern Hebrew. Biological anthropology and anatomy is an interdisciplinary department centering on the origin and evolution of human beings and their close biological relatives. One 100-level Asian and African Languages and Literature or culture course in the area of concentration. Associate Professors Alberts (biology). Assistant Professor of the Practice Digby. and 126. 1) Minor in an Area of Language Concentration: includes Arabic. primate Biological Anthropology and Anatomy (BAA) 165 . Chair. also see biology (on page 172) and chemistry (on page 189) majors. The department and its course offerings have three general focuses: primate behavior and ecology. Five courses are required as follows: Four language courses above the level of 02. Adjunct Associate Professor Ankel-Simons. Myers (orthopedics). (Students are expected to take 63. Areas of concentration include: Arabic. Brockman and Rasmussen. Terborgh (NSEES). or independent studies courses to fulfill the four-course requirement). 2) Minor in Asian and African Languages and Literature. Brown. Schmitt. see Slavic and Eurasian Studies on page 535 Biochemistry For courses in biochemistry. however. the student must obtain at least an A. and Struhsaker. 125. Biological Anthropology and Anatomy (BAA) Associate Professor Schmitt. see Medicine (School)—Graduate (School) Basic Science Courses Open to Undergraduates on page 401. Chinese 181. Assistant Professor Hare. THE MINOR A minor is offered to students interested in the study of language. or Korean. Adjunct Assistant Professors Berger. Hindi. Kay. Hindi. Japanese. Professors Emeriti Hylander and Simons. Major (radiology and surgery). Chinese. Asian and African Languages and Literature 121 (Introduction to Asian and African Literature and Culture). Adjunct Professor van Schaik. Smith (biology). or upper-level reading courses. Balto-Finnic For courses in Balto-Finnic. or Korean. Research Associates Madden and van Nievelt. and culture of a particular region of Asia and Africa. literature. Adjunct Research Scientists Anderson. students with proficiency of intermediate level or higher must take 183 and 184. Professors Glander. and Yoder (biology). Laboratory Research Analyst Johnson. Drea. Churchill. Lambert. Assistant Professor of the Practice Digby. In order to graduate with honors. Astronomy For courses in astronomy. Associate Research Professor Wall. for example. The minor offers two tracks: (1) Concentration in an Asian and African Language and (2) Asian and African Languages and Literature. one 100-level culture or literature course in another Asian and African Languages and Literature language area outside of the language of concentration. Pope. and Taylor (physical therapy). modern Hebrew. Chinese. Japanese.in the honors seminar. Roth (biology). one 100-level Asian and African Languages and Literature course on the literature or culture of the area of concentration.make a final presentation on their projects. Japanese 205. Adjunct Senior Research Scientist Brink. Lecturing Fellow Chatrath A major or minor is available in this department. and Williams. Five courses are required as follows: Two language courses at the intermediate level (63 and 64) or above. Director of Undergraduate Studies. 64. Five courses are required in each track.

anatomy. Darwin's contribution to evolutionary theory. Taught in South Africa (summer program) with guest lectures by South African archeologists. NS. Naturalistic and experimental studies of free-ranging and captive primates. and geologists. conflict resolution. primate behavior and evolution. Instructors: Churchill and Vogel. reproduction. First-Year Seminar. NS. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. One course. and water-craft. which houses a unique and diverse range of nonhuman primates. NS. impact of observer's cultural bias. biomedicine. 41. One course. One course. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. STS Human behavior and anatomy from an evolutionary perspective. Quaternary Prehistory of Southern Africa. Intended for non-majors. Mendel's work on genetics. warfare. Instructor: Staff. ecology and behavior. infanticide. development of primate science from species perspective. mating systems. a survey of human paleontology and human biology (emphasizing variation and adaptation). the origins of human social organization and culture. cooperative hunting. MSA archeology. STS Survey of ape (gibbons. and cross-species measures of intelligence. and functional and comparative anatomy. One course. Instructor: Berger. Topics differ by section. How We Once Did Things. NS. 55. especially prosimians from Madagascar. 49S. shelters. How biological factors have determined the use of tools and weapons. and field recording). Instructor: Staff. designed clothing. The historical development of pre-Darwinian evolutionary thinking. NS. reproduction. Brink. Diversity and flexibility of primate social systems. Intended for non-majors. Instructor: Staff. NS. and Quaternary geology. One course. Paleoanthropological Field Methods. alliances. STS The body-machine interface in human history and prehistory. One course. Instructor: Staff. palynologists. 40. Advanced students can study original fossils and casts at the division of fossil primates (Duke Lemur Center) and in the department's laboratories. use of mapping 166 Courses and Academic Programs . domesticated animals and arranged farms and cities. One course. modern synthesis framing the study of human origins and behavior in the context of modern evolutionary biology. Significant opportunities for independent research are found at the Duke Lemur Center. Sex. 100. Topics include evolutionary history. R A combined laboratory and lecture course covering the extant fauna and flora of southern Africa. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93. 102L. and gorillas) morphology.paleontology. medicinal use of plants. chimpanzees. NS Special topics seminar open only to students in the Focus Program. point provenancing techniques. Topics differ by section. ecology. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. 101L. Not open to students who have taken Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 40. One course. Instructor: Digby or staff. One course. Quaternary fauna and flora (focusing on the Cornelian and Florisian Land Mammal Ages). Focus Program Special Topics. 45. Lies and Evolution: An Introduction to the Primates. One course. communication. R A hands-on program of instruction covering methods of maintaining archeological provenance (grid systems. which also afford opportunities to study comparative anatomy from an adaptive and evolutionary perspective. or Churchill. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. stratigraphic reconstruction. bonobos. Next of Kin: Understanding the Great Apes. STS Same as Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 except instruction is provided in lectures and one small laboratory meeting each week.conservation. 93. locomotion. orangutans. Topics vary each semester offered. parental care. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. NS. paleoenvironmental reconstruction. social interactions. 93D. Instructor: Staff. 80FCS. Intended for nonmajors and majors. Labs emphasizing work with recent and fossil faunal material and with Middle Stone Age artifacts. dating methods applicable to the Quaternary. STS Primate biology and behavior: evolution.

132S. an overview of connective tissue structure and mechanics. 144L. Human Evolution Seminar. Human Functional Anatomy. Taught in the field in South Africa during the summer. Food For Thought: The Biology of Nutrition. tendons. and muscle). arctic. The basics of human ecology and the role of ecology in conservation. and a systematic overview (from head to toe) of human anatomy from a functional perspective. 135. and fundamentals of anthropological analysis of human skeletal remains (archeological treatment of burials. Instructor: Glander. 134L. grassland/savannah. eating disorders/addictive behaviors). Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93. or Churchill.technology (infrared theodolite and global positioning systems. Laboratory involving study of prosected cadavers and other anatomical preparations. 133L. STS Food as medicine and medicine as food. One course. 120. paleopathological analysis. Identification and siding of all the bones of the human body and the major osteological landmarks on each bone. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93. NS. One course. W Survey of field methods used to document primate behavior. 132. NS An introduction to the basics of human osteological analysis. NS Basics of functional morphology (including elementary biomechanics). Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 or Biology 25L. The Human Body. Emphasis on connective and other tissues involved in functioning of the musculoskeletal system (primarily bone. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 and 133L or 134L. use of space. Topics include edible resource distribution in varied environments and its relationship to mobility and subsistence strategies in modern huntergatherers. R. W A writing-intensive seminar version of Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 132. herbs. Primate biogeography. Anatomical and behavioral adaptations and phylogeny of fossils and living primates including Homo sapiens. recording of geological profiles. development and growth. populational affinities. One course. boreal forest. medicolegal applications). with an overview of geographic information systems). recovery and preparation of fossils. biomes. Primate Ecology. coastal. nutrition. basics of bone histology. CCI. NS Human gross anatomy seen from a functional and evolutionary perspective. NS Evolutionary biology of the hominidae. R. Instructor: Digby or staff. NS. ligaments. Instructor: Wall or staff. Primate Field Biology. and the archeological and fossil evidence for the evolution of human subsistence behavior. One course. determination of gender. vegetables. cartilage. Brink. Anthropology of the Skeleton. Instructor: Churchill. ties between diet and society in terms of historical and evolutionary perspectives. Instructor: Churchill. One course. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 or Biology 25L. working with topographic maps and aerial photos. focus on human behavioral solutions to subsistence problems associated with different environments (tropical/neotropical forest. How human cultures impact diet (for example. One course. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 or equivalent. The medicinal and dangerous properties of fruits. R The study of ecology using primates as examples. One course. Instructor: Churchill or staff. dietary specializations. One course. Laboratory includes observations of free-ranging primates at the Duke Primate Biological Anthropology and Anatomy (BAA) 167 . desert). 143. 137. Instructor: Churchill . Human Evolution. and fungi. stature. plant-animal interactions. NS The ecology of extant and extinct foraging societies. Instructor: Churchill or staff. Ecology and Adaptation of Hunters and Gatherers. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 or equivalent. NS. One course. and basic identification of animal fossils and stone tools. community ecology. Instructor: Berger. the concept of the niche and methods used in ecology. how modern technology and non-invasive data collection techniques currently allow for studies of eating patterns. Includes occasional labs. NS.

nervous. Primary emphasis on how social organization and social behavior influence the acquisition. Introduction to Anthropological Statistics. One course. 173L. NS. Instructor: Digby. 147. or area. the third focuses on sexual differentiation of morphology. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93. SS. The material is presented in three sections: the first focuses on primate social organization. Topics include crime scene protocol and body recovery. characteristics of populations and variables. One course. and reproductive strategies. One course. C-L: see Psychology 144S 183S. Instructor: Staff. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 or Biology 25L. Instructor: Staff. STS Sociobiological theory reviewed and applied to the social behavior of nonhuman primates. NS. Focus on skeletal anatomy relevant to primate evolution. 146. Sociobiology. One course. Primate systematics. Anatomy of the Lower Extremities. R Social life of primates. and the comparative method. parametric statistical methods emphasized. NS Same as Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 180 except in seminar format. The Primate Skeleton. One course. expression. Instructor: Staff. One course. Instructor: Drea. brain and behavior. C). NS. making personal identification. Primate Sexuality. QS Introductory course covering univariate and bivariate statistics as applied in biological anthropology. identify. postmortem modification of skeletal remains. with a focus on cognitive implications of social complexity. R. and courtroom testimony. determining time since death. the anatomy of bone. theory. A writing-intensive seminar version of Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 146. STS One course. NS Selected topics in methodology. 180L. human rights applications. NS. Students participate in the dissection.Center. STS A comparative and integrative study of primate sex and reproduction. STS An introduction to medicolegal anthropology and death investigation. STS Sociobiological theory reviewed and applied to the social behavior of nonhuman primates. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93. hominids. Instructor: Digby. hominids. discrimination and insight 168 Courses and Academic Programs . Instructor: Levin. Bodies of Evidence: Introduction to Forensic Anthropology. Instructor: Staff. and soft tissue structures using cadaveric specimens. mating systems. Sociobiology Seminar. NS. protocols for mass disasters. One course. 171. R The osteology of modern and fossil primates. Instructor: Wall. Current Issues in Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. One course. One course. basics of osteology. NS. NS. NS. Instructor: Staff. Topics include: tool use and causality. Instructor: Churchill. and humans. Not open to students who have had Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 47. Current Issues in Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. 180. One course. the second focuses on the endocrine system and behavioral endocrinology. and dissect all major muscular. 161. Prerequisites: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93(D) or Biology 25L. and. Thought in Action: The Origins of Human Tool Use (B. One course. 180S. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93. Evolution of Primate Social Cognition. vascular. NS Same as Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 180 except in laboratory format. NS Introduction to the functional anatomy of the lower extremities. Students locate. the primate fossil record. 151. W The comparative anatomy of primates from the perspective of adaptation and phylogeny. and transmission of information or knowledge. Current Issues in Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. and humans. this course places human sexuality within the broader context of the primate order. C-L: Biology 171 172L. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93. 146S. Primate Anatomy. In each section. One course. bony. Instructor: Staff. determining the manner and mode of death. 182S. Laboratory includes some dissection or prosection of human and nonhuman primates.

Prerequisite: 100-level anatomy or morphology course or consent of instructor. Directed reading. Hominid Socioecology. Instructor: Williams. Instructor: Staff. human impact (deforestation. Open to qualified students. and bone in reference to commonly encountered sports injuries of the upper and lower extremities. social influences on learning (for example.learning. knowledge of the social domain (individual recognition. 195S. before being given permission to register. NS. NS. who. craniofacial morphology. under the supervision of a faculty member. political. One course. Seminar format but. Primate Adaptation. conservation strategies/policies (objectives. For Seniors and Graduates 234L. NS A study of primate adaptation from an evolutionary perspective. must submit to the faculty advisor a written proposal outlining the area of study and listing the goals and meeting schedule. tutorial. impact on local human populations). One course. and consent of director of undergraduate studies. identification and siding of fragmented skeletal elements and teeth. R Advanced laboratory techniques for human osteological analysis. One course. Advanced Human Osteology. both at the species and community level. Senior Seminar. NS. cooperation. Senior Seminar. observation. hominin osteology. differences between human and non-human bone. and ethics of conservation biology. and language in primates. muscle. traditions and cultural transmission. social conflict and reconciliation. tactical deception and social manipulation. Instructor: Major. practice. Open only to qualified students. facilitation. 240S. resulting in a substantive paper or other approved product. Instructor: Staff. intentionality. alliances. and instruction. Instructor: Staff. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. resulting in a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. One course. EI. hierarchies). biomechanical analysis. STS Concepts. Radioloy and Pathophysiology of Sports-Related Injuries. W Anatomy of joints. who. visual monitoring. coalitions. functional morphology. a 100-level course in biological anthropology and anatomy. Research Independent Study. Relevant aspects of biogeography. ethical considerations on primate conservation. inhibition. a 100-level course in biological anthropology and anatomy. One course. depending on topic. kinship. vocal and gestural communication. Prerequisites: BAA 93. NS. 184S. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Impact of cultural. One course. or individual project (often including library research and detailed analysis) in a field of special interest. sense organs. 196S. Topics vary according to student interests but may include history and functional significance of locomotor and feeding adaptations. may include laboratory analysis of materials. 239L. One course. under the supervision of a faculty member. 192. One course. and consent of director of undergraduate studies. design of protected area networks. Instructor: Staff. R Analysis of how socioecological studies of human foragers and nonhuman primates can inform the interpretation of the hominid fossil/ Biological Anthropology and Anatomy (BAA) 169 . Primate Conservation. Case study format. Instructor: Drea. One course. behavior and demography. ecology. imitation). R Individual research in a field of special interest. hunting). Instructor: Staff. including humans. Prerequisites: BAA 93. Radiographic studies of sports-related injury. Independent Study. 193. case studies of human skeletons used to produce written skeletal report. before being given permission to register. 238S. and reciprocity. reproductive systems. Instructor: Staff. must submit to the faculty advisor a written proposal outlining the area of study and listing the goals and meeting schedule.

and behavior of primates as related to the origin and spread of past primates. and identification of approaches required to develop testable reconstructions. NS. with an emphasis on primates. Prerequisites: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93. R Advanced course in biological statistics. Biology 120 recommended. and behavioral observations using computer technology. Student analysis of comparative anatomical and behavioral field data resulting in a research paper. casts. NS. and allometry. communication (including language). One course. or consent of instructor. The diversity. NS. or area. life history. Topics include study design. Consent of instructor required. NS Special topics in methodology. 170 Courses and Academic Programs . Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 and 132. Instructor: Glander or staff. Topics include geochemical dating. Instructor: Staff. 248S. Principles of parametric and nonparametric statistics and their application to hypothesis testing in biological anthropology. and rate and direction of evolutionary change. NS Origin and successive stages of development of human ancestors. and various procedures for classifying primates. Summary of documented historical changes during hominid evolution. Biometry. parental care. The radiation of each main group of primates in the succession leading to humans illustrated with slides. including speciation. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 or consent of instructor. 245S. Evolution of Mammals. STS One course. regression. 244L. 246. hunting. Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 143 recommended. Instructor: Staff. timing of molecular clocks. One course. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Wall. social structure. One course. C-L: see Biology 274 280L. Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 143 recommended. One course. One course. Comparative Primate Ecology. 243S. The Hominid Fossil Record. culture. Personalities and current controversies in the study of hominid paleontology. NS A survey of fossil primates including early humans. and mechanisms of new social group formation examined from the perspective of their effects on the genetic structure of populations and species radiations. social strategies and systems. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93(D) and 132. dispersal patterns. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisites: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93. R Survey of field methods used in the study of primate ecology. and biological constraints on. intersexual relationships and sexual division of labor. 250. One course. Methods in Primate Field Ecology. Laboratory includes observations of primates at the Duke University Primate Center. introductory statistics course. 247. Models for the evolution in hominids of bipedalism. NS The relationship between resource distribution. One course. theory. anatomy. The Primate Fossil Record. or consent of instructor. technology.archaeological record. Instructor: Staff. R Ecological determinants of. food sharing. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 or Biology 25L. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. NS. R Advanced readings and discussion of current papers and monographs in primate ecology with special emphasis on comparative studies. and phylogenetic relationships of mammals. as inferred from the fossil record. NS. Consent of instructor required. adaptive radiation. 249S. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93. R. NS The origin. and fossils. including the habitat assessment. mapping. Mating systems. and social organization. as well as their mutual relationships. Instructor: Glander or staff. Instructor: Staff. One course. Microevolution and Sociobiology. One course. ranging and foraging. Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 and 143 or 144L or 146. 274. QS. Special Topics Laboratory. Primate Social Evolution. Detailed analysis of adaptive types and cultural developments. Genomic Perspectives on Human Evolution. analysis of variance. One course.

Seminar in Selected Topics. One course is required in each of the following areas: 1) human/primate paleontology or anatomy and 2) primate behavior and/or ecology (see listings in the Handbook for Majors). and 151L Mathematics 31 and 32 Physics 51L and 52L. They must be distributed in the following manner: one course is required in each of the following: 1) human/primate paleontology or anatomy and 2) primate behavior and/or ecology (see listings in the Handbook for Majors).. Instructor: Staff. the names of the faculty comprising the Biological Anthropology and Anatomy (BAA) 171 . theory. Seminar in Selected Topics. Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 or 93D. Psychology. A broader perspective on specific anatomical features provided in the lectures. and Statistics) with the approval of an advisor. One course. One course. Comparative Mammalian Anatomy. NS Special topics in methodology. Instructor: Digby. of which two must be 200 level. 293S. Major Requirements. An emphasis on dissections of a broad variety of mammals. not including the above prerequisites and corequisites. Special Topics Laboratory. theory. One course. NS One course.280S. To earn distinction. At least five courses must be taken in Biological Anthropology and Anatomy.S. and writing of formal research article.B. or 53L and 54L Major Requirements. THE MAJOR For the A. of which two must be at the 200 level. At least one course must involve statistics or quantitative methods (Statistics 100 or Psychology 117. Biology. 287S. Instructor: Staff. One course must be a lab/field experience (research independent study or Primatology internship may count toward this requirement when appropriate). Consent of instructor required.0 overall and 3. students must have a G. Consent of instructor required. NS. For the B.A.P. data collection and analysis. 281L. 281S. or area. Consent of instructor required.5 within Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. students typically spend one year conducting independent research with a faculty mentor and writing a substantial senior thesis. R Advanced independent research in a seminar that provides instruction in proposal writing. One course. literature review. Biology 25L or equivalent. NS A practical survey of anatomical diversity in mammals. Consent of instructor required.g. Advanced Research in Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. hypothesis/ prediction formulation. theory. NS Special topics in methodology. Corequisites. One course. Nine courses are required. One course must be a lab/field experience (research independent study or Primatology internship may count toward this requirement when appropriate).to twoparagraph) description of the honors project. of 3.g. four additional courses may be taken in related departments (e. Degree Prerequisite: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 or 93D. Instructor: Staff. Cultural Anthropology. Earth and Ocean Sciences. Corequisites: Biology 25L (or equivalent) Chemistry 21L. Students must submit a brief (one. Eight courses numbered 100 or above are required (not including the above prerequisites and corequisites).. Biology. or area. Eight courses must be 100 level or above. methods. up to three courses may be taken in related departments (e. 22L. NS Special topics in methodology. Instructor: Staff. Consent of instructor required. Psychology or Statistics) with the approval of advisor. Macroevolution. Degree Prerequisite. or equivalent). five courses must be in Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. Environmental and Ocean Sciences. or area. C-L: see Biology 287S 289L. Departmental Graduation with Distinction To qualify for the graduation with distinction program.

Strain. Willard (molecular genetics and microbiology). NS. and Riginos. by the basic sciences departments in the School of Medicine. Jackson. Kirby (pediatrics). Searles. Brandon (philosophy). fall semester for May graduates). One course. Dong. Goldstein (molecular genetics and microbiology). Additional courses in the biological sciences are offered by the Departments of Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. Stone. Nicklas. D. Adjunct Associate Professors DePriest and M. Sherwood.. and Wright. Pryer. Vogel. Haase. at least two of whom are in the department of Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. THE MINOR Requirements. Research Professors Cook-Deegan (public policy). Knoerr (NSEES). and Yoder. Includes field trips to local environments with an emphasis on impacted environments and their relation to societal activity and policy. Chemistry. Bernhardt. For non-majors. Perz-Edwards. Donohue. and by the Pratt School of Engineering and the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences. and Wilson. McClay. Approved courses for each of the above subfields are listed in the Handbook for Majors. Christensen (NSEES). Sun. Nijhout. Associate Professor Alberts. Hellmers. Instructors Eason and Hill A major and a minor are available in biology. Adjunct Professor of the Practice Hartshorn. and Mercer. Lecturers Grunwald. Reynolds. Sherwood. Tucker. Rittschof (NSEES). and Reid. 10L. Wray. Assistant Professors Baugh. Drea (biological anthropology and anatomy). one course in primate/human paleontology and/or anatomy. this course may count for the area requirement in the natural sciences. Chen. Assistant Research Professor N. Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 93 or 93D. Uyenoyama. Pei. Roth. Willis. For students not majoring in natural sciences.examination committee. Biology 26L (A or B) constitutes the second semester of the typical introductory sequence (following Biology 25L) and satisfies the prerequisite requirement for students planning to major in biology (see below). and Psychology and Neuroscience in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences. Koelle. Gregg. Chair. Magwene. Vilgalys. Johnsen. Nowicki. Forward (NSEES). Associate Professors of the Practice Broverman and Motten. Fluke. Professors Benfey. Noor. C-L: Marine Sciences 172 Courses and Academic Programs . The examination committee should consist of three faculty members. and the signature of the student’s faculty mentor to the director of undergraduate studies secretary by the end of the first week of classes of the student’s nextto-last semester (e. two elective courses numbered 100 or above in Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. Mitchell-Olds. Gillham. STS Physical and chemical aspects of estuarine and marine ecosystems and environments. Crowder (NSEES). Kiehart. Bejsovec. Biology (BIOLOGY) Professor Kiehart. Lutzoni. Wainwright. H. Biology 19 also meets the introductory requirement by advanced placement and Biology 20L by transfer credit. Cunningham. Ward. Marine Biology. Adjunct Professors Eubanks. Rausher. Livingstone. Lemons. Lecturer Grunwald. EI. Rosenberg (philosophy). White. and Williams. and Wilbur. Biology 25L constitutes the normal introductory course for students planning to major in the biological sciences and is a prerequisite for intermediate and advanced courses in biology. Morris. Professors Emeriti Barber. Shaw. Terborgh (NSEES). (Given at Beaufort.g. Adjunct Assistant Professors of the Practice Deinert and Zahawi. Director of Undergraduate Studies. one course in primate behavior and/or ecology. Leal. Smith. Associate Professors Alberts. Clark. Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies. Klopfer. Manos. Kohorn and Lacey. Siedow. Boynton. Assistant Professors of the Practice Armaleo. McShea. Nijhout. Staddon (psychology and brain sciences). The biology major and minor and biology courses in a variety of areas are offered by the Department of Biology. Functional adaptations of marine organisms and the role of man and society on the ecosystems.) Instructor: Staff. Adjunct Assistant Professors Isikhuemhen.

and ecology of dinosaurs and their relatives. Instructor: Motten. One course. Intended for non-biology majors. protists. One course. 26BL. Instructor: Broverman. One course. NS. McClay. NS Exploration. the role of people and culture in the evolution of infectious diseases. genetics. as a human enterprise. The Biology of Dinosaurs. development. and ecology. Principles of Biology. Field trips to distinctive habitats in North Carolina. The historical and social contexts of important scientific discoveries and controversies. practical exercises. including the major lineages of bacteria. One course. energy transport. plants. 20L. Equivalent to Biology 25L as prerequisite. 42. but including laboratory work. STS Introduction to the history of ideas about the anatomy. C-L: International Comparative Studies 46B. Credit for Advanced Placement on the basis of the College Board Examination in biology. biological conservation. One course. Lectures closely coordinated with laboratory exercises emphasizing live material to present ecological and functional anatomical features of representative species. 25L. NS Credit for introductory biology by transfer of college-level work not corresponding to Biology 25L in content. biology of transmission and infection. Lecture and laboratory coordinated to provide both general and specific guides to understanding and interpreting morphological. physiology. NS Introductory course for students planning to major in biology and for students in other majors intending to pursue a postgraduate degree in the life sciences. Organismal Diversity. STS Ecological concepts and their application to global change issues. Instructor: Broverman. hands-on laboratory-intensive format with limited enrollment for first and second-year students. behavior. Instructor: Cunningham and Manos. Global Health 47. One course. and evolution from the start. One course. Not open to students who have taken Biology 26AL. Small class. animals and fungi. 46. and staff. with an emphasis on phylogenetic relationships. Provides an integrated overview of biology. Introductory Biology. plants. Intended for nonscience majors. Global Health 46B. STS Cells. Not open to students who have taken Biology 26BL. The origin and evolution of life on earth as a case study in science. animals and fungi. and student presentations to reinforce and develop lecture-based topics. of the diversity of life by emphasizing evolutionary. and functional aspects of the major lineages of bacteria. STS Same as Biology 46 with added research project of developing a digital textbook on HIV/AIDS in collaboration with students and faculty in Kenya tailored to the needs of African universities. Laboratory includes inventory of organismal diversity. NS. NS Broadly integrated survey of biological diversity. and as a way of knowing. Organismal Diversity. AIDS and Other Emerging Diseases. and write reviews and analyses. 43D. R. General Biology. The inductive-deductive methodology of science is both used to develop and test hypotheses as well as examined itself as an analytical tool. Students learn library research skills as they collect primary literature and images. or Motten. Instructor: Mercer. 26AL. macroevolution. diversity. Instructor: Reid. and human society. May be counted toward Natural Sciences Area of Knowledge. One course. microevolution. NS. Equivalent to Biology 25L as prerequisite. Life's Beginnings. One course. in large class format. AIDS and Other Emerging Diseases: Focus on Kenya. Grunwald. molecules. NS. reasons for the geographic variations in disease. protists.19. CL: International Comparative Studies 46. structural. Intended for nonmajors. STS Explores the interaction of biology and culture in creating and defining diseases through an investigation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other emerging diseases: molecular biology. reproduction. NS. Ecology and Society. developmental and DNA sequence data in the context of the Tree of Life. Instructors: Alberts. Controversies and current research used to illustrate the scientific method as a way of Biology (BIOLOGY) 173 . covering basic principles in cell and molecular biology.

One course.learning about the natural world. STS Biological. and genomic testing. biochemical pathways. Taught in Australia. STS Historical and present interactions between humans and plants like coffee. and evolutionary history. NS. Instructor: Staff. current controversies in vaccination and eradication programs. One course. Focus Program Topics in Biology. C-L: Public Policy Studies 48 49S. concerns related to genomics. and Society: Implications for the 21st Century. physiology. Genetics. social. C-L: Environment 168. sugar. Instructor: Staff. 48. Topics differ by section. Earth and Ocean Sciences 168 103L. Topics in Modern Biology. and developmental biology. the age of the earth. Siedow. Global Diseases. trade. Introduction to Mathematical Biology. Instructor: Broverman. geology. Topics drawn from cell and molecular biology. ethics of foreign agencies and funders prioritizing domestic health programs. natural selection. Instructor: Haga and Hill. medicinal. R A first course applying mathematics to biological problems. Instructor: Staff. One course. For nonmajors. enzyme catalysis. General Microbiology. Intended for non-Biology majors. C-L: see Earth and Ocean Sciences 12 90. test. 52. 174 Courses and Academic Programs . genome organization. First-Year Seminar. Plants and Human Use. genetically modified crops. One course. The Dynamic Oceans. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103 or equivalent. Instructor: Staff. Global Health 104. Intended for nonmajors. genetic discrimination. Instructor: Pryer. 53. and genetics of microorganisms and their roles in human affairs. QS. and refine hypotheses. Instructor: Wray. Social economic. exploration. opium. One course. Instructor: Staff. 105. Case studies of different plant commodities (products) revealing these biological and historical interactions. gene expression. Topics such as plate tectonics. molecular evolution. and parental care in dinosaurs illustrating how scientists draw upon observation and experiment to frame. for first-year students with consent of instructor. 95S. Genomics. genomics of race. Open only to students in the Focus Program. and plant structural and chemical reasons underlying the pivotal roles certain plant species have played in the development of human culture and technology. ethical and policy implications. NS Classical and modern principles of the structure. illustrating major changes in human civilization and cultures as a result. Lutzoni. Genomic sciences and policy science applied to present and future societal. pepper. STS Distribution of plants and animals in space and time as determined by the interaction of geophysics. SS. One course. NS. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Biology. C-L: Global Health 93FCS. Biogeography in an Australian Context. NS. One course. or Vilgalys. One course. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Biology. NS Topics differ by section. proteins. Instructor: Dong. EI. and genetic variation will be interwoven with contemporary issues emanating from the genome revolution such as pharmacogenetics. NS. NS Open only to students in the Focus Program. One course. STS One course. and particularly ethical. 101. Intended for nonmajors. NS. EI. climate. tea. potato and hemp. ethics of global variation in disease burdens. One course. Special emphasis on the unique terrestrial and marine faunas and floras of the Australian continent and on the impact of humans on the distribution of these plants and animals. Instructor: Staff. Foundational topics including DNA. One course. Instructor: Mercer. STS Introduction to the foundation of genomic sciences with an emphasis on recent advances and their social. C-L: Global Health. Prerequisite: one course in a biological science or consent of instructor. NS Occasional seminars in various topics in biology. One course. and cultural factors impacting global disease spread and/or reduction. NS. Not open to students who have taken Biology 118. spiritual. Topics vary each semester offered. 92FCS.

and data analysis and culminates in a research cruise where the students organize into a scientific party. Instructor: Roth. Focus on the origin and maintenance of biodiversity and conservation applications from both the biology and policy perspectives (for example. Cell and Organismal Physiology. C-L: Environment 114L. R Principles of animal structure. NS. Genetics and Molecular Biology. gas exchange. and limitations of biological oceanographic research. and ecological contexts. The theory. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. 109. sensory mechanisms/signal transduction. 117. and cloning. R One course. genetically modified organism. chemical. (Given at Beaufort) Prerequisite: Biology 25L. conversion of the genetic code into a functioning organism. Constraints and adaptations related the evolution of eukaryotes and the evolution of multicellularity. Uyenoyame. and consequences of. suggested: a policy and/or introductory ecology course. STS Introduction to the key concepts of ecology and policy relevant to conservation issues at the population to ecosystems level. or Wilson. emphasizing factors controlling distribution and abundances of organisms. Nijhout. Emphasis on understanding the functional. Topics include cellular architecture. Structure-function relationships explored from molecules and cells to tissues and organ systems. energy metabolism. Fundamentals of Ecology and Evolution. One course. NS The structure. NS. Instructors: Crowder (Beaufort) and Rubenstein (visiting summer faculty). (2) development and. One course (spring). Rausher. Evidence for. Biological Oceanography. 114L. evolutionary and developmental basis for the similarities and difference observed among living vertebrates. C-L: see Environment 110L. STS Explores flow of information from gene to phenotype. function and evolution of the vertebrate body. NS. molecular motors. ionic/osmotic balance. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. (Given at Beaufort. Mechanisms of evolutionary change as an interplay between ecology and genetics. and how those dynamics are influenced by human activities. Mercer. classical transmission (Mendelian) genetics and its relevance to human hereditary disorders. Koelle. 118. Topics include: organization and stability of genomes from bacteria to higher vertebrates (humans). R Physical. Comparative and Functional Anatomy of the Vertebrates. endangered species. habitat fragmentation. The laboratory teaches quantitative methods. reserve design. Instructor: Magwene. captive breeding. Morris. data acquisition. Ecology. motility/locomotion. methods. Variable credit. Prerequisites: Biology 26AL or Biology 26BL or Biology 176L or equivalent course in animal diversity. Conservation Biology and Policy. and biological processes of the oceans. Social implications of modern genetic analysis and the genomic revolution. EI. Principles of Animal Morphology. Instructor: Staff. Interaction between biotic and abiotic forces in shaping the dynamics of ecological systems.108L. Not open to students who have taken Biology 110L or 120. from three different perspectives: (1) function. Instructor: Bernhardt. also C-L: Visual Studies 116A 111L. NS. evolutionary change on both human and geological time scales. data processing. one and one-half courses (summer). Marine Sciences 116. Biology (BIOLOGY) 175 . NS. content of the genome and social implications of genetic knowledge including issues of genetic privacy. ecosystem restoration/rehabilitation). Instructor: Smith. thermal physiology. NS Mechanisms and processes that organisms use to deal with the challenges posed by their physical. Prerequisite: Biology 25L. comparison and analysis of functional data. One course. One course. or staff. STS Fundamental principles of ecology and evolutionary biology. One course. NS. experimental design. Laboratories examining specific problems in the evolution of major organ systems through dissection.) Prerequisites: introductory biology. chemical. One course. eugenics. Not open to students who have taken Biology 119 or Biology 151 or Biology 151L. (3) evolution. C-L: Marine Sciences 110L.

Topics include: structure and function of cellular membranes and organelles. STS Essential biology of sea turtles (evolution. function of the immune system. evolution. The different ways in which each view applies the comparative method. Instructor: Bejsovec. Marine Mammals. evolutionary pattern and process at the molecular level and some of their consequences for organism-level evolution. Prerequisite: Introductory Biology. Eckert. the origin. One course. NS. 125. sirenians. C-L: Environment 135L. Analysis of Ocean Ecosystems. protein targeting and transport. and loss of major features of evolution. NS. Prerequisite: Biology 25L. Cellular and Developmental Biology.) Prerequisite: one year of biology. One course. One course. One course. C-L: Environment 123. Marine Sciences 126. Biology and Conservation of Sea Turtles. and the Cenozoic radiation of mammals. ocean systems in the context of Odum's ecosystem concept. Evaluation of the scientific.) Field trip to Trinidad required. Instructor: K. McClay. STS Laboratory version of Biology 125. Haase. Topics include molecular phylogenetics. and genetic information in forensic studies. Population Genetics. and of developmental control genes. the historicist view which emphasizes historical accident. One course. W A survey of the history of animal life focusing on major revolutions in design such as the Cambrian explosion. C-L: Environment 135. 121. maintenance. 123. genetic regulation of cell growth/division and the relationship to cancer. the role of research in national and international law and policy. Eckert and S.Chemistry 22L or equivalent. 119. and behavior of marine mammals and their interactions with humans. NS Use of genetic sequence analysis to examine aspects of natural populations of humans and other organisms in the past and present. gene function. Basic ecological concepts integrated with related topics including the conservation and management of endangered species. and Biology 118 or consent of instructor. Includes laboratory and field experience with animals and with their habitat requirements. and the veterinary aspects of conservation. and sea otters. gene families. Consent of instructor required. or staff. NS. Exploration of three views of form: the Darwinian view which stresses function. NS The history.) Prerequisite: Introductory Biology. one year of chemistry. Marine Sciences 125L. and heuristic value of the ecosystem. Evolution of Animal Form. (Given at Beaufort. or staff. utility. emphasis on their role in marine ecosystem structure and function. ethical. and the structuralist view that form is mainly the result of fixed mathematical relationships. One course. molecular phylogenetics. genetic control of development processes. Prerequisite: Biology 118. signal transduction. Detailed consideration given to the adaptations that allow these mammals to live in the sea. NS Evolutionary dynamics of genes in populations. behavior. NS The role of genes and proteins in mediating basic cellular and development processes. regulatory genes. (Given at Beaufort. (Given at Beaufort. the evolutionary process at the molecular level. Evolution of genomes. Topics covered include the diversity. structure and function of the earth's major ecosystems. Marine Sciences 124. Mitchell-Olds. One course. Instructor: McShea. One course. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. the Mesozoic radiation of dinosaurs. Molecular Evolution. Sherwood. Perz-Edwards. Instructor: Kiehart. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. D. Instructor: K. Eckert. NS. ecology. Instructor: Uyenoyama. pinnipeds. anatomy. and aesthetic factors influencing societal attitudes toward these animals and of their conservation management in light of domestic legislation and international treaties. R. Instructor: Mercer. Instructor: Staff. the contributions of technology to the management of migratory marine species. role of the cytoskeleton in cell shape and motility. STS The biology of cetaceans. (Given 176 Courses and Academic Programs . 122. Sun. reconstruction of human origins and paleohistory. or consent of instructor. population dynamics) and their conservation needs. life history. Biology and Conservation of Sea Turtles. physiology. Eckert and S.

Marine Biodiversity. C-L: Marine Sciences 133S. seabirds. . STS Laboratory version of Biology 126. sampling techniques. predations. social. larval recruitment. C-L: Marine Sciences 127. ecological. Instructor: Staff. estimating population abundance and distribution. Research Methods in Tropical Biology. Instructor: Staff. pollination ecology. Introduces basic concepts in statistical populations. Fundamentals of Tropical Biology. (Given at Beaufort fall and summer. C-L: Latin American Studies 135L. coral reefs. biogeography. ecology. NS Techniques of molecular biology as they relate to physiological. NS. One course. reef fishes. Laboratory and field exercises consider social organization. Student design and implementation of ecological projects in different tropical ecological zones.) Prerequisite: introductory biology. R Basic ecological principles using coral reefs as examples. One course. Examples from the subcellular to global scale taken from classic and contemporary readings from the primary scientific literature. and Evolution in the Marine Environment. Fundamentals of Tropical Biology. One course. One course. adaptation to environment. and anatomy of local bottlenose dolphins. One course. Impact of human activities and technological advancement on populations. NS Conceptual themes in ecology. Molecular Approaches to Questions of Physiology. Instructor: Staff. bony fishes. and communities found in rocky shores. feeding ecology and human impact. Not open to students who have taken Biology 203L. summer). NS. and their role in ocean food webs. (Taught in Costa Rica. Instructor: Staff. systematics. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. and subtidal areas. nutrient cycling. performing demographic and life history analyses. Ecology. Field activities and independent field research projects. 134L. Prerequisite: introductory biology. NS. Topics include characteristics of marine habitats. Instructors: Crowder or Kirby-Smith (Beaufort). Half course. Relations between ocean dynamics. Each participant in the course presents a critical analysis of the literature on a chosen subject. species interactions. Topics include methods for quantifying and evaluating diversity and biological diversity in major marine habitats. One course. Coral Reef Ecology. 129L. Course structure integrates lectures and field excursions. Extensive underwater studies. Primary literature examples focus on quantifying human impacts and developing conservation measure. Marine Sciences 130L. Topics include: measuring abiotic micro. and policy considerations in the protection of threatened species. R. STS Ecology. large marine animals. and predator-prey coevolution- Biology (BIOLOGY) 177 . competition and the structure of tropical guilds.) Instructor: Staff. C-L: Marine Sciences 132S. C-L: Environment 139L. Topics range from behavioral and physiological adaptation of individuals to processes and patterns in diverse assemblages. behavior. One course. C-L: Environment 133S. (Given at Beaufort. Instructor: Read. including: mutualism and parasitism in the tropics. sharks. beaches. and experimental design and hypothesis testing. tidal flats.and macroclimatic variables. W Factors that influence the distribution. Marine Megafauna. and behavior of large marine animals including giant squid. Economic. communication. competitive. (Taught in Costa Rica. W Field-based course. and evolutionary processes responsible for promoting high tropical biodiversity.) Prerequisite: introductory biology. Half course. R Laboratory version of Biology 134. emphasizing tropical organisms and ecosystems. Prerequisite: introductory biology. Instructor: Read or staff. diseases. and evolutionary questions. R. NS. NS Marine biodiversity in the context of theoretical ecology and environmental physiology. NS. Marine Ecology. island biogeography and the design of biological reserves. mangrove. Marine Sciences 134. Biology of corals. C-L: Marine Sciences 126L. sea turtles.) Prerequisite: introductory biology. R. abundance. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. Instructor: Crowder. primary production. Marine Mammals. NS. and diversity of marine organisms. and marine mammals.at Beaufort. forest dynamics and gap-phase regeneration. investigating mutualistic.

The dominant native plants of each community. the biology and identification of important invasive species. R. One course. Taught at Gómez. NS Overview of plant communities in the mountains. STS Four-week summer course in Costa Rica on the scientific study of subsistence. 141L. One course. students in small groups will design independent projects. liverworts. medicinal. and esthetic use of plants and animals by human societies. top-down and bottom-up control of mammalian herbivores. Sources of taxonomic evidence including morphology. Abrojos Guaymi Indian Reservation. parametric and nonparametric analysis. Each student will work on two of these independent projects. One course. Instructors: Manos. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. and make oral and written presentations of their results. The interdisciplinary nature of plant systematics and its importance in modern society. long-term monitoring. STS Plants as providers of food. roles of fire. Introduces basic concepts in experimental design and hypothesis testing. Plant Diversity. South Africa) Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. collect and analyze data. NS. (Taught in Costa Rica. 147. sampling techniques. drought. Instructor: Staff. One course. Las Cruces Biological Station/Wilson Botanical Garden. vertebrate social systems. piedmont. pollination. South Africa). Required weekend field trip to the mountains. 142L. Lectures and demonstrations in San José. invasive species. Both traditional and modern identification tools. primarily through field trips. C-L: Environment 197 138L. and herbivores in shaping ecosystems. Travel to southern Costa Rica to learn the use of resources in contrasting communities including Zancudo coastal community. C-L: Latin American Studies 136L. and costal plain of North Carolina. One course. Instructors: Pryer. South African Ecosystems and Diversity. Identification of molecular interactions that underlie cellular function using high dimension data acquired through high-throughput 178 Courses and Academic Programs . Prerequisites: Biology 25L or the equivalent. Instructor: Staff. 137. shelter. Instructor: McClearn. anatomy. major research programs in Kruger National Park (taught in Kruger National Park. NS. and ecology of bryophytes (mosses. Systems Biology: An Introduction for the Quantitative Sciences. and hornworts). One course. R Identification. Topics include climate and geology of South Africa. One course. Uses of bryophytes for ecological assessment. Fee for field trip. and DNA. Phylogenetic principles and methods of analysis used to recognize major families of vascular plants. and Guatil. NS Major groups of living plants. STS Conceptual themes in ecology emphasizing savannas. Offered by the Organization for Tropical Studies in Costa Rica from mid-July to mid-August. and measuring patterns of species diversity. 143L. also consideration of fynbos. plant pollination and seed dispersal. and several weekend daytrips. ceremonial. Natural plant communities of the southeastern United States. origin and maintenance of biodiversity. Field Research in Savana Ecology. NS. Plant Communities of North Carolina. An ecological survey of bryophytes in their natural habitats focusing on the skills required to identify bryophytes and use them as indicators of environmental features. their evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships. Prerequisite: Biology 25 or equivalent. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. human presence. Bryophyte Biology and Ecology. consult with faculty. In addition. Introduction to Field Ethnobiology. a Chorotega Indian village. and breeding systems. classification. podocarp forests. NS Introduction to concepts and applications of Systems Biology. highveld. role of rivers in defining savanna characteristics. Instructor: Shaw. Instructor: Shaw. and medicine and as one of evolution's great success stories.ary processes. Each student will participate in several faculty-led research projects. Plant Systematics and Evolution. NS.) Instructor: Staff. NS. evolution. coastal and intertidal zones. W Field-based course stressing student design and implementation of research projects in savana ecosystems. (Taught in Kruger National Park. Flowering plants and the evolution of floral form and function. Field trips. One course. C-L: Environment 198L 140L. Prerequisites: one semester of biology and Spanish.

approaches. analysis techniques. Emphasis on vertebrates.) Prerequisites: Biology 25L and Chemistry 12L or 22L. NS. C-L: see Psychology 135. cement. One course. Neurosciences 155L. W The molecular basis of behavioral and physiological responses of organisms. and concepts of population regulation. Instructor: Grunwald or Johnsen. Field trips include night walks in local environments and marine fossil expeditions to local strip mines involved with production of fertilizer. Includes small group projects in Systems Biology. QS. W Comparative physiology of estuarine and marine animals. math. and responses to special environments. R. and physiological responses of animals to the major environmental drivers of temperature. Research projects using local invertebrates to study behavioral and physiological responses to environmental signals. but many invertebrate systems discussed. Sensory Physiology and Behavior of Marine Animals. organic chemistry is desirable. R. including respiration. and Chemistry 21L and 22L. digestion. and many-species systems. Students with prior training in biological sciences will register for Computer Science 111. evolutionary ecology. and gravel. NS. Variable credit. Fundamentals of Neuroscience. NS. Instructor: Forward.) Prerequisites: Biology 25L. One course (fall). Instructional and independent investigations. food additives. Examples of human population dynamics. One course. Instructor: Rittschof. engineering). Covers solid and fluid mechanics using examples from plants.) Prerequisites: Biology 25L and Chemistry 12L. One course. 150L. Focus on the theory and research methodology used to study the evolution of molecular signaling and control systems. thermoregulation. (Given at Beaufort. one and one-half courses (summer). (Given at Beaufort. differentiation. Prerequisite: Biology 25 or equivalent. C-L: Marine Sciences. Instructor: Rittschof. Population Ecology. and vertebrates. including matrix models. Siedow. Prerequisites: Biology 25L and Chemistry 12L or 22L. Physics and chemistry of estuarine and marine environments and physiological adaptations of animal residents. NS How living organisms interact with the physical world. Molecular Plant Physiology. W Animals as physical and chemical machines. and Biology (BIOLOGY) 179 . NS Principal physiological processes of plants. oxygen. Biochemistry of Marine Animals. circulation. NS. invertebrates. and written reporting of classical environmental physiology research. Intended for students with prior training in quantitative fields (computer science. and operation. STS Processes affecting births and deaths of organisms and the way these processes determine the distribution and abundances of populations. Variable credit. metabolism. salinity. and light. W Sensory physiological principles with emphasis on visual and chemical cues. and factors associated with plant morphogenesis. 149S. C-L: Marine Sciences 156L. respiration. Research proposal and class presentation required. stochastic processes. 152. Focus on theory. Physiology of Marine Animals. One course. their design. photosynthesis. Evolution of molecular endocrinology and signal transduction pathways. R. Laboratories will use behavior to measure physiological processes. neural and hormonal coordination. Instructors: Pei. Animal behavioral decisions. water relations. and Sun. one and one-half courses (summer). One course (fall). 154. physics. NS. water balance/excretion. Instructor: Benfey. Comparative Biomechanics. Physics 53 or equivalent. STS One course. behavioral. Mathematical techniques. C-L: Marine Sciences 151L. one-. Principles of Animal Physiology. statistics. Instructor: Staff. mating. (Given at Beaufort. NS. Neurosciences 160. two-. R. and fundamentals of community ecology. Prerequisites: Biology 25L and Chemistry 12L or 22L. One course. Emphasizes biological principles. Human impacts on animal populations. also C-L: Neurobiology 154. movement. Lectures and laboratories illustrating the approaches and methodology.

Current Research in Biology. Instructor: Staff. C-L: Environment 176AL. C-L: see Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 171. These factors considered in the context of mating systems. May be repeated. Instructor: Staff. For junior and senior majors with consent of director of undergraduate studies and supervising instructor. resulting in a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. and Summer Term II). Evolution of Animal Behavior. and evolutionary bioinformatics. NS. C-L: Marine Sciences 191. Not open to students who have taken Biology 274L. Instructor: Noor. Seminar in Biology. W How animal behavior is shaped by natural selection. parental care. Instructor: Staff. one and one-half courses (Summer Term I). spring. foraging. CZ. One course. Northern blot. C-L: see Philosophy 114 176AL. RT-PCR. NS. One course. One course. under the supervision of a faculty member. STS One course. Tutorial. C-L: Neurosciences. Western blot. R. Questions addressed on protein-DNA binding. Neurosciences 193T.) Prerequisite: Biology 25L. STS. function. and ecological constraints. Topics in Biology. and other current issues in behavior. C-L: see Psychology 120. Half course. Not open to students having taken Biology 110L. Research Independent Study. Leal. the major product of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Research Independent Study. human population genetics. One course. discuss ethical issues in the conduct of biological and biomedical 180 Courses and Academic Programs . R Structure. Instructor: Kirby-Smith. or Noor. Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics. and summer. (Given at Beaufort fall. 167. natural selection. STS One course. Genetics Program 187. also C-L: Neurosciences 171. C-L: Marine Sciences 195. W Application of contemporary molecular techniques to biological problems. NS. Instructor: Alberts. W Students selected for funding for independent research from the Trinity College Research Forum in Biology write and review research proposals. C-L: see Psychology 111 168. One course (fall. Instructor: Staff. Marine Sciences 184L. also C-L: Neurosciences 174.differential equations. Tutorial. Prerequisite: Biology 118 or 119. One course. Instructor: Staff. gel mobility shift assay. 195S. Techniques include genetic transformation. microarrays. Experimental Cell and Molecular Biology. NS Introduction to the principles of evolutionary genetics. Instructor: Armaleo. NS. R. C-L: Marine Sciences. Variable credit. One course. Open to all qualified students with consent of supervising instructor and director of undergraduate studies. Comparative Psychology. protein domain structure and function. STS. Open to all qualified students with consent of supervising instructor and director of undergraduate studies. Continued in Biology 297. 166. One course. Marine Invertebrate Zoology. evolutionary genomics. NS One course. NS Occasional topics in the biological sciences. historical factors. Students learn to write three scientific-style papers on their experiments. Primate Sexuality. Prerequisite: Mathematics 31 or equivalent. For junior and senior majors with consent of director of undergraduate studies and supervising instructor. spring. C-L: Neurosciences 197T. R. Prerequisite: Biology 25L. NS. Philosophy of Biology. NS Instructor: Staff. DNA sequencing. phylogenetic reconstruction. Learning and Adaptive Behavior (B. Genetic variation. One course. Variable credit. EI. R Individual research in a field of special interest. C). Instructor: Wilson. immunolocalization. NS. R Individual research and reading in a field of special interest. C-L: Marine Sciences 199S. and development of invertebrates collected from estuarine and marine habitats. 190. protein localization. will be developed. NS One course. under the supervision of a faculty member. PCR. differential gene expression. neutral theory.

Instructor: Reid or Wright. One course. and genetic screening. Instructor: Roth. Consent of instructor required. STS The development of the mammalian embryo. Consent of instructor required. 207AL. in situ hybridization. How biological processes are affected by biotic interactions. Field work with marine organisms.research. birth defects. NS. and mutant analysis. especially plankton. Includes several field trips. Laboratory training in molecular genetics. 208LS. Mathematics 31. microscopic imaging. 207BL. aspects of comparative vertebrate development. Instructor: Rittschof. NS. Presqu'île de Crozon). Biology 110L. prior or concurrent registration in Biology 119. Half course. NS. STS Intensive field experience on the coast of Brittany. Field Ecology. embryo micromanipulation. NS. 207CL. emphasizing processes that determine species composition and quality of plants and animals. Marine Ecology of the Pacific Coast of California. including human embryos. C-L: Environment 204LS. hypothesis formulation. seaweed harvest (Lanildut). One course. experimental design. including two weekends. fish and other large West Coast vertebrates. the origin of major human teratologies. and mud flat habitats. and physiological ecology of temperate plants and animals through hands-on experimentation. Half course. sampling habitats from the continental shelf to the subtropical gyre. Offered only at Beaufort. Emphasis on human embryology. Experiments include immunochemical localization. ethical and social issues of reproductive biology. with preparation for fieldwork before and analysis and presentation of projects after required one week intensive field experience at sea on an oceanographic vessel. microscopy. R Experimental approaches in development and genetics using animal and plant models. Offered only at Beaufort. genetic screening. R Ecosystem. Prerequisites: Biology 108L or 205L or Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 133L or Biology (BIOLOGY) 181 . with preparation for fieldwork before and analysis and presentation of projects after required one week intensive field experience on the coast of France over Fall Break. Offered only in Beaufort. or consent of instructor. 207EL. STS Ecology of the rocky intertidal. Laboratory sessions examining various vertebrate. One course. polymerase chain reaction. Introduction to marine mammals. Marine Sciences 205LS. and predation using rapid empirical approaches and hypothesis testing. kelp forest. immunochemistry. behavioral and mechanical adaptations to physical stress. data acquisition and processing. NS. regional and national coastal reserves (Le Parc naturel régional d'Armorique. Human Embryology. Prerequisites: Biology 25L. Instructor: Crowder. Prerequisite: Biology 118. including French maritime cultural heritage. Half course. Instructor: Barber. Offered only at Beaufort. Prerequisites: Biology 25L and consent of instructor. and data analysis learned through field investigation. with preparation for fieldwork before and analysis and presentation of projects after required one week intensive field experience on the coast of Panama. Instructor: Staff. shellfish aquaculture (La Tremblade). and present and discuss their own research projects. chemical and biological processes. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Biology 129L and consent of instructor. Instructor: Van Dover. For Seniors and Graduates 204LS. NS. Ocean Ecosystems. Consent of instructor required. Theory and methods reviewed through discussions. The evolution of developmental patterns. NS. with preparation for fieldwork before and analysis and presentation of projects after required one week intensive field experience on the coast of Northern California. 116. and the molecular mechanisms of development. recommended. and tidal energy (La Rance). competition. Experimental Tropical Marine Ecology. R Distribution and density of marine and semi-terrestrial tropical invertebrate populations. Experiments in Developmental and Molecular Genetics. community. Harmony in Brittany: French Use of Marine Environments. or other course in ecology. Half course. STS Interaction of physical. protein chemistry.

Instructor: Lutzoni. based on current literature. Microbial Ecology and Evolution. behavior. CCI. 234S. Topics include global warming. and nomenclature. Marine Sciences 220L.) Instructor: Read. or consent of instructor. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. One course. Prerequisite: Biology 25L. including the primary scientific literature. C-L: see Immunology 244 252. NS Theory and practice of identification. 224L. Prerequisites: Biology 25L and Chemistry 152L. physiology. and microbial genomics. also C-L: Latin American Studies 216. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. examined through selected case studies. disturbed habitats and invasive species in Singapore. Instructor: Vilgalys. STS One course. also C-L: Marine Sciences 219L. Vertebrate and Invertebrate Endocrinology. Biophysics in Cellular and Developmental Biology. NS. Topics to include bacterial phylogeny. C-L: see Environment 218L. 222L. Research on politics. C-L: see Physics 214 215. How Singapore maintains and enhances the quality of life of its citizens while radically modifying its environment. Instructor: Orbach and Rittschof. Coastal Ecosystem Processes. physiological and ecosystem ecology using a variety of sources. NS The biology of insects: diversity. Prerequisites: Biology 25L or equivalent. cosmetics. life history. NS. Local field trips.equivalent. One course. NS One course. the major threat to marine biodiversity. One course. Taught in Beaufort. R Biology of recent amphibians and non-avian reptiles. physiology. NS. bacterial symbiosis. experimental evolution. STS Feedbacks between ecological processes and global environmental change. 217. One course. evolutionary history. Ecology and Global Change. NS. A 182 Courses and Academic Programs . Travel to Singapore required. management or biology. (Taught at Beaufort. One course. 218L. NS. classification. tropical diversity. Marine Conservation Biology. R One course. NS One course. 103L. NS Survey of the major groups of fungi with emphasis on life history and systematics. Conservation strategies and ways that science and policy can be integrated to solve real-world problems. Instructor: H. Applications of endocrinology in pharmaceuticals. R Survey of new advances in the field of environmental and evolutionary microbiology. Systematic Biology. One course. and the application of ecological research to policy. NS. Nijhout. development. biodiversity. STS The mix of human ecology. Tropical Ecology. and ecology. and ecology. C-L: see Philosophy 234S 237. species discovery. Mycology. evolution of drug resistance. NS. 254. One course. NS. Instructor: Leal. STS Comparative study of the major pathways of hormonal regulation from the organismal to the molecular level in vertebrate and invertebrate models. STS One course. Entomology. C-L: Environment 224L. ozone depletion. Field trip to Hawaii required. Instructor: Vilgalys. Principles of Immunology. Permission of instructor required. morphology. SS. C-L: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 208LS 211L. and laboratory exercises. One course. 214. emerging infectious diseases. phylogeny reconstruction. Instructor: Jackson. 244. NS. Instructor: Smith and Wall. NS Ecological effects of fishing. One course. Field and laboratory exercises. Consent of instructor required. R. Prerequisite: Biology 25L or equivalent. land-use change. R One course. 118. discussion. Problems in the Philosophy of Biology. Field trips. and environmental issues. Sojourn in Singapore: Urban Tropical Ecology. Herpetology. Barrier Island Ecology. molecular ecology. recommended: Biology 110L or 116 or equivalent. C-L: see Environment 217.

ozone. One course. C-L: see German 285S 259S. growth factors. Cancer Genetics. STS An exploration of the evolution of genes. tumor suppressors. STS Processes controlling the circulation of carbon and biochemical elements in natural ecosystems and at the global level. CCI. fire. Speciation. natural and human disturbance. making use of likelihood models. NS. STS One course. and bioinformatics. genomes. Lecture and discussion. and Bayesian approaches. applications of genomics to understanding biological problems including biological networks. Exploration of the molecular events that transform normal cellular processes into tumorpromoting conditions. Topics include human impact on and social consequences of greenhouse gases. One course. The role of different types of genetic analysis (quantitative genetics. proteomics. Biology 117 or 119. Darwin's "Autobiography" and Janet Browne's biography as context for readings of some of his major works and works of his contemporaries. or 122. Genomic Perspectives on Human Evolution. Mendelian genetics. Instructor: Benfey or staff. and herbivore exclosures. analysis. comparative anatomy. evolution. biochemical genetics. R Processes responsible for natural biodiversity from populations to the globe. NS Formulation of environmental models and applications to data. NS. C-L: Environment 231L. apoptosis. One course. C-L: Marine Sciences 256S. 272. R.) Instructor: Rittschof. NS. and ecosystem dynamics. One course. One course. Genomics. R. Lab section involving observation and data from large-scale manipulations. climate change. Biogeochemistry.. species interactions. Prerequisites: Biology 118. NS Readings by and about Darwin and his contemporaries. Instructor: Nijhout. STS Human evolutionary history as studied from the perspective of the genome. such as experimental hurricanes. 271. parasitism). and implications for management and conservation. Nature of contemporary genomic data and how they are interpreted in the context of the fossil record. One course. NS. Model development. NS. population growth. signal transduction pathways. Models for Environmental Data. in the context of the mechanisms by which genes affect the traits of individuals. Prerequisites: Biology 118. 257S. One course. and 116. Lab focuses on analysis of data using R. The Life and Work of Darwin. microarray analysis. stem cells. CZ. competition.g. or 124. Prerequisite: Chemistry 12L or 22L or equivalent. 267L. NS. Biodiversity Science and Application. Topics include: tumor viruses. especially Wallace. 119. R. Emphasis on current literature and modern approaches to evolutionary patterns and processes. NS Experimental and phylogenetic approaches to the origin of plant and animal species. with emphasis on soil and surficial processes. One course. STS Introduction to the field of genomics. (Given at Beaufort. 260. Instructor: Clark. Instructor: Clark and Wright. Information Science and Information Studies 270S. cell cycle control. Topics include physiology. C-L: Earth and Ocean Sciences 272 274. Genetics and Evolution of Complex Traits. bootstrapping. ALP. Consent of instructor required. applications to medicine and agriculture. Instructor: Bejsovec. C-L: Environment 257L 268L. R Examination of the genetic changes associated with cancer. Instructors: Alberts and McShea. and metastasis. Social and medical uses and misuses of genetic and genomic information in the context of what can and cannot be deduced from genetic information. human origins. Biology (BIOLOGY) 183 . and interpretation. and heavy metals in the environment. Prerequisites: Biology 118 or consent of instructor. disturbance. developmental genetics) in understanding the inheritance of traits. Instructor: Bernhardt. Prerequisites: basic courses in systematics and genetics. Instructor: Noor and Willis. One course. Science and Technology in Nineteenth-Century German Culture. oncogenes. predation. Topics include species interactions (e. Genomic techniques including genome sequencing. Discussions focus on classical and current primary literature.biochemistry course recommended.

Biology 116 or equivalent. or other course in plant or animal diversity. One course. Prerequisite: Biology 25L. or mathematics. and cultural studies. medicine and society. analysis of evolutionary processes. Population Ecology. Exploration of two philosophical topics: the question of causality in the natural world and the question of determinism in biology. NS. Topics include demography and dynamics of structured populations. Prerequisites: Biology 110L or 116 and consent of instructor. diversification. Instructor: Wray. taste receptors. and discussion of current topics in developmental biology. Readings from the primary literature. Macroevolution. One course. cloning of mammals. Instructors: Morris and Wilson. evolution. and alternative explanations for adaptation and evolutionary trends. 26L. One course. Topics include history and techniques in the study of ion channels. and pharmaceutical protein production in transgenic plants and animals. Prerequisites: Biology 118 and 119 or consent of instructor. sensory channel receptor-related human diseases. lab mice. 284. NS The relationship between genotype and behavioral phenotype. stochastic population dynamics. Recommended co. Social and environmental impacts of biotechnology. One course. Instructor: McClay. 278S. rates of evolution. NS. recommended. and cell and molecular biology. hot and cold receptors. NS Evolutionary patterns and processes at and above the species level. DNA fingerprinting. behavior. One course. For graduate students and undergraduates with interests in genetics. species concepts. NS. and plan sensory signaling network. Short research paper required. 287S. One course. Topics include diagnosis of genetic diseases. Examination of both the origin of modern humans as a distinct species and subsequent migration across the world. Instructor: Uyenoyama. NS Lectures. and disease susceptibility as traits of particular evolutionary interest. calcium imaging. Advanced Topics in Genome Science Research.psychology. 119 or 271. Instructor: Pei. adaptive selection. or consent of instructor. STS Applications of recombinant DNA in medicine and in agriculture. gene therapy. cell surface perception for external signals. extinction. hypothesis testing in molecular evolution. W Exploration of current experimental and computational approaches in genomics and genetics and their applications to contemporary research questions.or prerequisite: independent study in genomics or computational biology. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite: Biology 195S (Genomes. Developmental Biology Colloquium. Molecular Population Genetics. olfactory receptors. Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology. Models of nucleotide and amino acid substitution. NS Explores key questions in population ecology from a theoretical perspective. and life history characteristics. including light receptors. such as electrophysiology. Genetic Basis of Behavior. including papers on humans. estimation of evolutionary parameters. QS. C-L: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 274 275S. Instructor: Alberts. and wild animal populations. seminars. case histories of molecular evolution. Medicine). Instructor: Willard. STS. linkage disequilibrium and joint evolution of multiple loci. C-L: Biological Anthropology and Anatomy 287S 289S. Emphasis on language. crop improvement. Utilizing primary scientific literature. drugs for AIDS and cancer. Prerequisite: Biology 118 or equivalent course. R Recent progress in sensory signal transduction mediated by calcium channels and receptors. phytoremediation. One course. Formulation and design of interdisciplinary research plans with discussion of implications for biology. 118. and hitchhiking. Biology. 280S. including neutrality. Instructor: Sun. students write critical reviews and research proposals. Sensory Signal Transduction. 292. One course. and mechanical receptors. Instructor: Roth. One course. ontogeny and phylogeny. speciation. NS Genetic mechanisms of evolutionary change at the DNA sequence level. 184 Courses and Academic Programs . heart and brain pacemakers. Prerequisites: Biology 118 and/or 119 or equivalent. 279S.

NS Seminar on a selected topic. The eight courses must include one core course in genetics and molecular biology (Biology 118). degree. Instructor: Staff. A minimum of eight full courses in at least eight course registrations in the biological sciences. Biology 25L and 26L (A or B). Degree This degree program is the general liberal arts major program. Knowledge of programming or work within the UNIX computer environment not expected. 295. One course. Special Topics Seminar. Instructor: Staff. Mathematics 25 and 26. Offerings vary each semester. NS Computer programming using C within a UNIX environment applied to ecological and evolutionary problems. Simulating Ecological and Evolutionary Systems. NS Seminar on a selected topic.S. Instructor: Staff. one core course in structure and function (chosen from a list of approved courses). Chemistry 21L and 22L. or equivalent. For the A. Instructor: Staff. 295S. or from approved courses of a basic biological character in related departments. A maximum of two independent study or tutorial courses may be counted toward the eight course minimum. One course. or equivalent. Consent of instructor required.293. Offerings vary each semester. or from approved courses in the basic science departments of the School of Medicine. Topics in Biology. but may be satisfied by a second semester continuation of an independent study. under the supervision of a faculty member. Offerings vary each semester. Individual research and reading of the primary literature in a field of special interest. Variable credit. Consent of instructor required. 297. Prerequisites. two of these courses must include related laboratory experience at the 100 level or above. Consent of instructor required. Topics in Biology.B. the major product of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. These courses are prerequisites to many of the advanced courses in these subject areas. Instructor: Wilson. Special Topics Seminar. Open to juniors and seniors only with consent of supervising instructor. A minimum of fourteen courses is required for this major. At least one of these eight courses must be an advanced course at the 200 level in Biology. One course. Biology (BIOLOGY) 185 . The elective courses acceptable for a biology major with an area of concentration (see below) are defined by the requirements for that concentration. not including the above prerequisites and corequisites or courses specified not for science majors. One course. NS Lecture course on selected topic. Half course. C-L: Marine Sciences THE MAJOR The Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees are offered with a major in biology or in an individually designed interdepartmental concentration approved by the director of undergraduate studies in biology. Major Requirements. 296S. Corequisites. This requirement may not be satisfied by a first semester of an independent study. R Continuation of Biology 191. one laboratory independent study course may be counted toward the laboratory requirement. The remaining courses may be elected from among courses numbered 100 or above in Biology. Research Independent Study. NS Lecture version of Biology 296S. Students contemplating a career in biological or biomedical sciences should elect the program leading to the B. May be repeated. Offerings vary each semester. and one core course in ecology and evolution (Biology 116). Six of these eight courses must be in Biology. Information may be obtained in the office of the director of undergraduate studies. The relationship between simulation and analytic modeling. Instructor: Staff. C-L: Marine Sciences 296.

The remaining courses may be elected from among courses numbered 100 or above in Biology. Degree This is the program in biology for students contemplating a career in biological or biomedical sciences. and Chemistry 151L: Mathematics 31 or 31L and 32 or 32L. and plant systematics. For information on areas of concentration see the director of undergraduate studies. See the director of undergraduate studies for more details. marine biology. A minimum of eight full courses in at least eight course registrations in the biological sciences. but may be satisfied by a second semester continuation of an independent study. A maximum of two independent study or tutorial courses may be counted toward the eight course minimum. the five courses may include any course numbered 100 or above in Biology. Major Requirements. Distinction will be awarded by a three-member faculty committee based on an oral poster presentation and the written thesis. cell and molecular biology. or equivalent. a minimum of three courses must be at the 100 level or above in Biology. For Areas of Concentration Students may elect to complete requirements in specified areas of concentration. Currently available areas of concentration in the biology major are: animal behavior. ecology. The elective courses acceptable for a biology major with an area of concentration (see below) are defined by the requirements for that concentration. Six of these eight courses must be in Biology. or equivalent. not including independent study. At least one of these eight courses must be an advanced course at the 200 level in Biology.S. Additional corequisites may be required for professional schools or particular areas of concentration (see below). Physics 51L or 53L or equivalent. neuroscience. one laboratory independent study course may be counted toward the laboratory requirement. evolutionary biology. Corequisites: Chemistry 21L and 22L. Students may apply if they have a grade point average of 3. genetics.For the B. These courses are prerequisites to many of the advanced courses in these subject areas. not including the above prerequisites and corequisites or courses specified not for science majors. or from approved courses of a basic biological character in related departments. pharmacology. biochemistry. which may include Biology 25L or the equivalent and/or Biology 26L (A or B). Two levels of distinction are offered in biology: Distinction and High Distinction. and one core course in ecology and evolution (Biology 116).Five courses in Biology. A minimum of sixteen courses is required for this major. Departmental Graduation with Distinction Biology majors who achieve excellence in both their studies and a research based thesis may apply for Graduation with Distinction in Biology. Of these. or from approved courses in the basic science departments of the School of Medicine. THE MINOR Minor Requirements. but not including advanced placement credit (Biology 19). usually carried out as an independent study in biology or as an interdisciplinary study that includes biology. at the time of application.0 or above in Biology courses. A maximum of one course from approved courses in the basic science departments of the School of Medicine or from approved courses of a basic biological character in related 186 Courses and Academic Programs . The award of distinction requires the maintenance of this grade point average and completion of an original research project. two of these courses must include related laboratory experience. The eight courses must include one core course in genetics and molecular biology (Biology 118) one core course in structure and function (chosen from a list of approved courses). This requirement may not be satisfied by a first semester of an independent study. or equivalent. The application for distinction must be endorsed by the student's research supervisor. Prerequisites: Biology 25L and 26L (A or B).

politics. Topics differ by section. the historic economic and social development of the regions. economic and cultural interactions among the regions. CCI. One course. One course. Assistant Professors Fenn (history) and Shanahan (sociology). Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Canadian Studies. genetics. Currently available areas in the biology minor are: animal behavior. its physical features. Kornberg (political science). Smith (sociology). C-L: International Comparative Studies 151ES 150. society. Instructor: Staff. evolutionary biology. ecology. One course. marine biology. Professors Gereffi (sociology). Director. C-L: History 98. Goodwin (economics). For more information on the courses approved for each area of concentration see the director of undergraduate study. Instructor: Staff. Biomedical Engineering For courses in Biomedical Engineering. or to complete a second major in Canadian Studies. Independent studies may also be arranged with Canadian Studies faculty. Special Topics in Canadian Studies. The program in Canadian Studies seeks to provide the student with an understanding of Canada. 170S. 103S. topography. One course. Political Science 98. SS History. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Canadian Studies. Completion of the requirements for an area of concentration will be noted on the student's transcript. Sociology 98. Special Topics in Québec Studies. One course. cell and molecular biology. Canadian Studies may also be an area concentration in the comparative area studies major. or as part of an interdepartmental concentration. Topics differ by section. One course. Professor Emeriti Cahow (history). Topics vary each semester. or under Program II. 98. Geography of Canada. For Areas of Concentration Students may elect to complete the requirements for the minor in specified areas of concentration. Students may undertake the program to supplement another major. The courses are described in the departmental and interdisciplinary listings. 50. Instructor: Staff. Special Topics in North American Issues. Instructor: Staff. One course. CCI Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff. Topics vary each semester offered. SS A regional geography of Canada. the major. Introduction to Canada. 160S. Tiryakian (sociology). A maximum of one independent study or tutorial course may be counted toward the five courses. described elsewhere in this bulletin. and Wood (history). see “Biomedical Engineering (BME)” on page 584 Canadian Studies (CANADIAN) Professor Moss (Colby College). International Comparative Studies 98 100. Vidmar (law). See sections below on the program. Instructor Wittmann (geography) A second major or a minor is available in this program. economy. and institutions of Canada. Instructor: Staff. OTHER COURSES The following courses count as one course in the five required for the minor in Canadian Studies and in the ten required for the major in Canadian Studies. O'Barr (cultural anthropology). Associate Professor Mayer (public policy studies and political science). Thompson (history). and the minor. Instructor: Staff. and Peck (history). climate.departments. Canadian Studies (CANADIAN) 187 . plant systematics.

Corequisite: Completion of another major. In special cases. Francophone Literature Asian and African Languages and Literature 168S. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective French 135. International Trade 268S. Five courses with Canadian content. Mass Media 171. Francophone Literature 201BS. France's Cultural Legacy in the New World: Quebec 161S. and Postnational Literature History 162S. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective 170. seven of which must be at the 100 level or above. an aboriginal or "heritage" language may be substituted for the French requirement.African and African American Studies 138S. Some of the course requirements may be fulfilled by independent study or special readings courses. Topics in Migration. including Canadian Studies 98 and 184S and eight additional courses. contact the director. Literature. courses must include Interdisciplinary Canadian Studies 98 (Introduction to Canada) and 184S (Canadian Issues). For further information. THE MINOR Requirements. Politics and Media in the United States 277. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective THE MAJOR Prerequisite: Canadian Studies 98. Francophone Literature 169. Canada from the French Settlement International Comparative Studies 110CS. Current Issues in International and Development Economics 201E. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective 160D. two years of college-level French. Transnational Writers. Comparative Party Politics Linguistics 120. North of the Border: The Novel in French Canada 371. No more than four courses required for the first major may be counted for a Canadian Studies major. Ten courses with Canadian content. Francophone Literature 183S. Francophone Literature Cultural Anthropology 110. three must be at the 100 level or above. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective Economics 265S. Comparative Health Care Systems Visual Studies 110E. Comparative Health Care Systems Sociology 160. 188 Courses and Academic Programs . Major Requirements. Strong encouragement for equivalent of two years of college-level French. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective Political Science 203S. Comparative Party Politics Public Policy Studies 178. Current Issues in International and Development Economics English 120.

Lochmüller. EI. 49S. Instructor: Staff. and Reichert. Ramsay-Shaw. NS Emphasizes stoichiometry and atomic and molecular structure. and communication of results of research. One course. Palmer. One course. Fischer.Cell Biology For courses in cell biology. Laboratory work includes both qualitative and quantitative analysis. Senior Lecturing Fellows Sebahar and Woerner. with emphasis on applications to related fields such as biology and materials science. McClendon. Chilkoti. placement may be for Chemistry 22L. One course. Laboratory work includes both qualitative and quantitative analysis. Toone. STS Presents the curriculum of general chemistry in a "topics" approach. Fitzgerald. NS Emphasizes thermodynamics. Prerequisite: one year of high school chemistry. NS. Accelerated General Chemistry. Beratan. Associate Professors Craig. Instructor: Staff. Franz. and consent of DUS. Chair. Prerequisite: two years of high school chemistry. R Active participation in chemistry (or chemistry related) research group. Smith. Professors Emeriti Arnett. One course. One course. 4. and Zhou. One course. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21L or 23L or 41L or 19. accompanied by seminar classes covering research methodologies. Students may not receive credit for both Chemistry 22L and Chemistry 23L. Instructor: Staff. Assistant Professors Akhremitchev. Honors General Chemistry II. STS Continuation of Chemistry 41L. covering in one semester the major topics of Chemistry 21L and 22L. a series of discussions covering current research efforts used to illuminate the various fundamental concepts of chemistry. Laboratory work includes both qualitative and quantitative analysis. Stapleton. McPhail. McCafferty. and on the environment. Therien. Instructors: Staff. Professor Bonk. NS An intensive introductory course for wellprepared students. Wells. or 151L. British Advanced Level. Research Assistant Professors Chen. and MacPhail. Introduction to Research in Chemistry. Associate Professor Oas. Instructor: Staff. 23L. International Baccalaureate. Prerequisite: Chemistry 41L or consent of DUS. 22L. Honors General Chemistry I. 42L. and Wilder. 19. 23L. Instructor: Staff. Chesnut. 41L. Chemistry (CHEM) 189 . Quin. Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies. Instructor: Staff. Liu. and Hong. Chemistry (CHEM) Professor Warren. the growth of technology. One course. Topics vary each semester offered. case studies of ethical issues in chemistry. Simon. First-Year Seminar. or consent of the supervisor of first-year instruction. a score of 610 on the Mathematics SAT or its equivalent. see Biology and Medicine (School)—Graduate (School) Basic Science Courses Open to Undergraduates. General Chemistry. chemical kinetics and equilibrium with emphasis on applications to related fields such as biology and materials science. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21L or consent of the supervisor of first-year instruction. 42L. Assistant Professors Mukundan. Crumbliss. General Chemistry Credit. NS. One course. General Chemistry. Associate Professor MacPhail. or 5 on the Chemistry Advanced Placement Examination or a satisfactory score on a Dukeadministered chemistry placement examination. Secondary Appointments: Professors Agre. Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies and Supervisor of First-Year Instruction. and LaBean. Associate Chair and Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies. Professors Baldwin. Warren. Normally followed by Chemistry 42L. 21L. Widenhoefer. Prerequisite: score of 3. Ke. 680 on mathematics SAT. Coltart. NS. Instructors Box and Lyle A major or minor is available in this department. Pre-matriculation credit awarded on the basis of national/ international examinations in chemistry such as College Board. 26S. Depending on examination performance. Bonk. Lecturer Roy. and Yang. Vo-Dinh. and the impact of such concepts on society. Adjunct Professor Langley.

thermodynamics. 152L. Societal issues relevant to chemistry outreach will be examined. Corequisite: Chemistry 131. Instructor: Staff. and practice related to staging effective demonstrations. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Chemistry. Corequisite: Chemistry 133L. One course. NS Organic reaction mechanisms including fundamental techniques and specific mechanistic classes. Activities include readings. Prerequisites: Chemistry 21L or 23L or 19. Instructor: Staff. and their application to writing a review article. NS. Inorganic Chemistry. and common separation techniques. discussion. NS Fundamentals of qualitative and quantitative measurement with emphasis on chemometrics. Instructor: Staff. W Laboratory experiments designed to accompany Chemistry 161. One course. Special Topics In Chemistry. and environmental chemistry that enable citizens to utilize the inductive-deductive methodology of science to better evaluate the potential benefits and risks associated with selected existing and proposed technologies. and Physics 42L or 52L or 54L or 62L or consent of instructor. 110. NS. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Intended primarily for nonmajors. Instructor: Staff. 105S. Prerequisite: Chemistry 22L. Instructor: Staff. Includes instruction and practice in writing the laboratory notebook and formal laboratory reports. NS. Topics differ by section. Chemical Information Retrieval. Instructor: Staff. 131. Physical Organic Chemistry. STS Science. NS Laboratory experiments designed to accompany Chemistry 131. One course. 93S. Instructor: Staff. One course. quantitative spectrometry. or 42L or 19. 151L. Mathematics 32L. Seminar on special topics in chemistry and chemistryrelated areas. NS. Prerequisite: Chemistry 161 or 166. molecular structure. Chemistry. Prerequisites: Chemistry 22L or 23L or 42L or 19. NS Principles of chemistry outreach with emphasis on chemical demonstrations. Analytical Chemistry. One course. and background topics from chemistry. Instructor: Staff. structures. Prerequisites: Chemistry 152L and one semester of physical chemistry. Organic Chemistry. Prerequisite: (or corequisite) Chemistry 161. Organic Chemistry. One course. molecular spectroscopy. Content varies by semester. 133L. electrochemical methods. Instructor: Staff. or 23L. the scientific method. Prerequisite: Chemistry 151L. 158. One course. Half course. as well as structured service learning experiences in local schools and other venues. Laboratory: techniques of separation. along with assessment and pedagogical strategies. Instructor: Staff. 109. Instructor: Staff. Prerequisite: Chemistry 163L or 167L. and Society. 83. One course. 190 Courses and Academic Programs . One course. One course. Technology. W Techniques for manual and on-line searching of the major sources of chemical information. 117. NS Survey of physical chemistry including quantum chemistry. STS The structures and reactions of the compounds of carbon and the impact of selected organic compounds on society. NS. Instructor: Staff. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Chemistry Outreach: Sharing Chemistry with the Community. One course. Consent of department required. and kinetics. Instructor: Lyle. Participation in service learning is required. One course. Instructor: Staff.50. or consent of director of undergraduate studies. biochemistry. Half course. Half course. Seminar on special topics in chemistry and chemistry related areas. Elements of Physical Chemistry. STS Continuation of Chemistry 151L. 161. 100. and reactions of inorganic compounds studied through physical chemical concepts. Topics differ by section. Special Topics in Chemistry. Instructor: Staff. organic reactions and preparations. 163L. NS Bonding. Content varies by semester. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Chemistry. and systematic identification of compounds by their spectral and chemical properties.

the chemical literature. high or low temperature. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Includes preparation of the research thesis. Research Independent Study. 191B. R See Chemistry 191B. One course. 193. Graduation with Distinction in Chemistry. Emphasizes thermodynamics and kinetics. Prerequisite: (or corequisite) Chemistry 117. Emphasizes quantum chemistry. 197. ultraviolet-visible spectra. Physical Chemistry. infrared spectra. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. One course. Instructor: Staff. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. 180L. 198. Half course. optical rotation. preparation and presentation of a poster describing student's research. One course.165. Half course. and/or mass spectra. Prerequisite: Chemistry 161 or 165. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. 191A. Half course. 168L. NS Fundamentals of physical chemistry. Prerequisite: (or corequisite). One course. or Biochemistry 227 (or Chemistry 175) or consent of instructor. Half course. Introduction to Research Independent Study. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. Characterization of products from measurements such as electrical conductance. Pass/fail grading only. and use of. 167L. W Laboratory experiments designed to accompany Chemistry 165.or co-requisite: two semesters of research independent study. and molecular spectroscopy. or 42L or 19. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. 166. and Physics 42L or 52L or 54L or 62L or consent of the instructor. Instructor: Staff. Students may not receive credit for both Chemistry 176 and 196S. Lecture/discussion. Course for majors who are candidates for graduation with distinction in chemistry. R See Chemistry 191B. 192. Instructor: Staff. W Laboratory experiments designed to accompany Chemistry 166. Includes instruction and practice in writing the laboratory notebook and formal laboratory reports. NS Includes research methodology. Research Independent Study. Instructor: Staff. Physical Chemistry. Co-requisite: registration for a first course in research independent study in chemistry (191B) or a related area. Mathematics 103. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Research Independent Study. Instructor: Staff. One course. NS Synthesis of less common substances by techniques such as high or low pressure. Lecture/ discussion. NS The physical chemical principles of and experimental methods employed in the study of biological macromolecules. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Instructor: Staff. molecular structure. Chemistry 167L should be taken concurrently with Chemistry 165. R See Chemistry 191B. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Half course. Pre. One course. Research Independent Study. Pass/fail grading only. Instructor: Staff. and oral defense of the research thesis. Prerequisite: (or corequisite) Chemistry 165. Fundamentals of physical chemistry. Research Independent Study. Biophysical Chemistry. 176. Chemistry (CHEM) 191 . safety in the research laboratory. NS. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Chemistry 168L should be taken concurrently with Chemistry 166. Chemistry 166 or consent of instructor. 194. Instructor: Staff. and/or inert atmospheres. Prerequisite: Chemistry 165 or consent of instructor. Prerequisites: Chemistry 22L or 23L. retrieval techniques for. and the ethical conduct of research. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Instructor: Staff. NS Continuation of Chemistry 165. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. NS. Advanced Laboratory Techniques. Instructor: Staff. One course. Half course.

Chemistry 117. Mathematics 103 (for options one and two). 152L. One of the following: Chemistry 117. Mathematics 103. 131.S. 2. Physics emphasis. Degree Prerequisites. or two approved independent study courses in a science department in Trinity College. Biology 152. Biology 184L. b. 62L). Plus two courses of independent study: Chemistry 191B. Instructor: Staff. or 23L.198S. Half course. Physics 182. 195S. 42L or 51L. c. substitutions may be made for courses outside the chemistry department with consent of the director of undergraduate studies. 151L. Major Requirements. 157. Biology emphasis. Instructor: Staff. Mathematics 31L. or a basic science department in the School of Medicine. (3) organic chemistry. preparation and presentation of a poster describing student's research.196S. or 41L and 42L. 62L). NS Same as Chemistry 275. Biochemistry 227. plus Chemistry 191B and 192 or the equivalent in a natural science. (2) inorganic chemistry. Major Requirements. 276. 32 (or 31L. Graduation with Distinction Seminar. Chemistry 21L and 22L. 176. One course. 167L. Half course. Includes preparation of the research thesis. Recommendations. mathematics. 133L. Instructor: Staff. Mathematics 31. 42L or 51L. Degree Prerequisites. For Seniors and Graduates 275. For the B. Biochemistry 227 plus two of the following: Biology 118. 166) and 163L (or 167L) plus one of the following three course options: 1. 52L (or 53L. Biology 185L. Certified by the American Chemical Society. 151L. or 19. and Chemistry 166 (or 176). 32L or 41). engineering. 32L (or 41). Biochemistry 227. 3. 168L. 180L. Advanced Studies. Open to especially well-prepared undergraduates by consent of director of undergraduate studies. and (4) physical chemistry. Seminar for seniors who are candidates for Graduation with Distinction in Chemistry. Mathematics emphasis. or the Pratt School of Engineering. Chemistry 166 (or 176) plus either of the following pairs of courses: Mathematics 104 and Mathematics 131. Option One. 228. or Mathematics 107 and Mathematics 108. Chemistry 131 and 133L. Note that only options one and two are certified by the American Chemical Society. 166. 157. Biology 119. 161 (or 165. Computer Science 6 or Engineering 51. Physics 41L. Biochemistry 227. 158. Biology 151L. 52L (or 53L. and Physics 41L. or 23L. For the A. 176. Three of the following: Chemistry 117. the Medical School. Chemistry 21L and 22L. In certain cases. Students planning graduate study are advised to take these recommended courses and to consult with advisors regarding appropriate additional courses. Advanced Studies. Chemistry 166 (or 176) plus two of the following: Physics 143L. One of the following: a. plus three additional courses selected according to one of the following four options. 54L or 61L. 166. the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences. NS (1) Analytical chemistry. 158. 192. Pass/fail grading only. 165.198S. Biology 244. except carries only half course credit. or 19. 192 Courses and Academic Programs .B. Physics 181. 54L or 61L. or 41L and 42L. and oral defense of the research thesis. 152L. 166.

B. Chemistry 117. 119. 275 or 276. 228. advanced courses in biochemistry. the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences. 152L. 228. Major Requirements. Chemistry 21L and 22L. degree in chemistry with concentration in biochemistry. or two approved independent study courses in a science department in Trinity College.B.B. 52L (or 53L. the Medical School. Degree with Concentration in Pharmacology Prerequisites. 32L or 41). Option Four. At least one of the following: Chemistry 191B or 192. Recommendations.Option Two. 32L or 41). 167L. and Biochemistry 227. or the Pratt School of Engineering. 32 (or 31L.S. Plus two courses of independent study: Chemistry 191B. Biochemistry 227. 192. 52L (or 53L.B. 195S. Not certified by the American Chemical Society. plus one of the following: Chemistry 191B or Biochemistry 210. 32 (or 31L. or 19. or the Pratt School of Engineering. Mathematics 103.S. For the B. Biochemistry 227. the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences. the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences. * Majors who wish to earn a B. 161. 42L or 51L. The Concentration in Pharmacology In conjunction with the Department of Pharmacology in the Duke Medical Center. and 32 or 32L. 151L. 52L (or 53L. or 23L. 197. Biology 184L. Chemistry (CHEM) 193 . 176. 176. or 19. and Biology 25L. or 23L. 275 or 276. Chemistry 180L*. 192. One of the following: Chemistry 158. Not certified by the American Chemical Society. Physics 41L. Certification of the concentration is designated on the official transcript. 62L). Chemistry 131/133L. 62L). 163L (or 167L*). or equivalent. Chemistry 21L and 22L. and 103. Biochemistry 227. Certified by the American Chemical Society. or the Pratt School of Engineering. 166. For the A. 195S. Plus one of the following: Chemistry 158. 151L. 42L or 51L. or 41L and 42L. or 23L. plus one of the following: Chemistry 191B. the Medical School. 195S. the Medical School. Biology 25L. Physics 41L. and Biology 25L. 180L. or 41L and 42L. degree in chemistry with a Concentration in Pharmacology. 152L. 168L. Plus one approved advanced lecture course in a science department in Trinity College. Plus one (or none) of the following: Chemistry 158. The Concentration in Biochemistry In cooperation with the Department of Biochemistry in the School of Medicine. Mathematics 31 or 31L. For the A. 54L or 61L. 192. 62L). 176. Biology 191. 161 (or 165. 166). Option Three. Certification of this concentration is designated on the official transcript. 176 (or 166*). and a B. Note: Chemistry 165 has a prerequisite of Mathematics 103. or Biochemistry 210.S. the Chemistry Department offers both an A. or 19. Degree with Concentration in Biochemistry Prerequisites. 163L (or 167L). Chemistry 21L and 22L. the Chemistry Department offers both an A. Degree with Concentration in Biochemistry Prerequisites. Major Requirements. 54L or 61L. Biochemistry 227. 131/133L. Mathematics 31. (or 165*). Biology 118. Mathematics 31. Physics 51L.S. 275 or 276. in chemistry that is certified by the American Chemical Society must include Chemistry 165. or 41L and 42L. 54L or 61L. and a B. 195S. Plus one course of independent study: Chemistry 191B or an approved independent study course in a science department in Trinity College.

Degree with Concentration in Pharmacology Prerequisites. Official recognition of the completion of the requirements given below will appear on the permanent transcript of a major. plus one of the following: Chemistry 191B*. Chemistry 21L and 22L. Degree with Concentration in Environmental Chemistry Prerequisites. Physics 53L-54L. 52L (or 53L. Mathematics 31. Any two of the following: Environment 179. Degree in Chemistry with Concentration in Environmental Chemistry Prerequisites. 197. and a B. 131/133L. plus 2 semesters of independent study involving some aspect of pharmacology (Chemistry 191B. 151L. or 19. 166). 242. Recommendations: Mathematics 103. 32 (or 31L. 152L. submission of a high quality research thesis based upon the results of independent study. Chemistry 21L or 41L.B. or 19. 152L. or 19. 176 (or 166*). nomination for the honor by the research advisor. Plus one of the following: Chemistry 191B* or Environment 191 OR CE 197 For the B. THE MINOR Requirements. and Mathematics 103 for those electing Chemistry 165). or 41L and 42L. or 23L. Physics 41L. enrollment and participation in Chem 198 (Graduation with Distinction in Chemistry). 234. 194 Courses and Academic Programs . 243. 32L or 41). 151L. plus 2 semesters of independent study (Chemistry 191B. 161/163L.S. or 41L and 42L. 240. 243.S. Major Requirements: Chemistry 117. 151L. presentation of a poster on the research project. Pharmacology 150 and 160. 166**). 163L (or 167L*). and Environment 160 OR CE 120L Major Requirements. degree in Chemistry with Concentration in Environmental Chemistry. 180L. Mathematics 31. 163L (or 167L). 152L. 298).S. Mathematics 31. 152L. 151L. 167L. 161 (or 165. 242. 32L or 41. Pharmacology 150 and 160. Note: Chemistry 165 has a prerequisite of Mathematics 103. any four of the following courses: Chemistry 22L or 23L or 42L. 192 or Pharmacology 297. Physics 53L-54L. 62L). The Concentration in Environmental Chemistry In conjunction with the School for the Environment of Duke University. Chemistry 180L*. For the B. plus Biology 25L. or 23L.S. 131/133L. Environment 191 OR CE 197 Departmental Graduation with Distinction The department offers a program for Graduation with Distinction in Chemistry. 161/163L (or 165*/167L. or 61L-62L. Biology 25L. Biochemistry 227. 32L or 41. 161 (or 165*). 240. Chemistry 21L and 22L. Plus two of the following: Environment 179. and Biochemistry 227. Chemistry 131. 42L or 51L. 54L or 61L.Major requirements: Chemistry 131/133L. 166. B. Biology 151L. 32 (or 31L. Chemistry 21L and 22L. and an oral defense of the research thesis. or 19. and 254. Pharmacology 160. in chemistry that is certified by the American Chemical Society must include Chemistry 165. satisfactory completion of at least two courses of research independent study in chemistry (or in an approved chemistry-related area). For the A. 166). 192 or Pharmacology 297. Selection for the honor by the Chemistry Department Undergraduate Awards Committee is based on fulfilling the following requirements: at least a B average in chemistry courses at the time of application and at graduation. or 23L. 32 (or 31L. 298). 176 (or 165/ 167L. 168L. 133L. plus Biology 25L. any Chemistry courses at the 100 level or above. and Environment 160 or Civil Engineering 120L Major Requirements. or 61L-62L. * The ** independent study project must involve some aspect of environmental chemistry. or 41L and 42L. Chemistry 117. Majors who wish to earn a B. the Chemistry Department is pleased to offer both an A. and Mathematics 103 for those electing Chemistry 165).

150. R. in which the students will work closely with a faculty member to produce an original. One course. Children in Contemporary Society (CCS) Assistant Professor Gibson-Davis. Pharmacology 150. One course. the certificate will allow students the opportunity to study issues by incorporating the perspectives of numerous disciplines. Specific topics to be determined by students and instructor. The methods course can either be Social Science Policy Research 1 (cross-listed as PUBPOL 183AS and PSY 160BS) or a methods course in the students home department. Instructor: Gibson-Davis. SS Topics vary but pertain to the development and social and economic well-being of children and their families. The research course can be Children in Contemporary Society 190S. and public policy. for example. Interdisciplinary in nature and drawing material from disciplines such as sociology. Because of the complexity of these problems. and one methods course. and gender). multi-disciplinary study of the psychological. children. In order to complete the certificate. one research course. Director A certificate. Research Seminar: Children in Contemporary Society. and political factors that affect American children and families. Examples of topics that could be pursued with this certificate include social and economic inequalities in schooling. Required for the certificate program Children in Contemporary Society. Capstone course required for the Children in Contemporary Society certificate program. Instructor: Gibson-Davis. and adolescents. minor. or the civic and social responsibilities of public education. Children in Contemporary Society (CCS) 195 . SS An integrative. R. 195. and education. One course. Biology 155L. class. the pervasiveness of gang violence in high schools. 160. The goal of the certificate in Children in Contemporary Society is to provide undergraduates with the opportunity to engage in interdisciplinary inquiry to solve problems facing today's children and families. schools. Consent of the Director of the Children in Contemporary Society certificate program required. but not a major. the implications of different family structures on infants. Children in Contemporary Society. Application of theory to solving complex societal problems (often involving issues of race. 191. or other certificate program. Individual and group research projects required. is available in this program. R. sociology. SS Major developmental stages of childhood and influences in a child’s life: parents/family life. C-L: Public Policy Studies 124 190S. scholarly research paper. social. students must take six courses: the introductory course Children in Contemporary Society 150 and the capstone course Children in Contemporary Society 191. Both the research course and the methods course must be approved by the program director. The certificate will culminate in an empirical research seminar. or completion of an honors thesis in the student’s home department.duke. No more than two courses that are counted towards this certificate may also be used to satisfy the requirements of any major. sociology. or the economic costs of childhood obesity. Utilizes material and methodologies from psychology. More information is available at www. Environment 240. 242. 241.childandfamilypolicy. Biochemistry 228.Biochemistry 227. economics. an independent study. Consent of Director of that certificate program required. public policy.edu/certificate. Instructor: Gibson-Davis or Muschkin. the behavioral and economic consequences of juvenile delinquency. 233. SS Original research on a specific project with a faculty mentor culminating in a scholarly written project. Multidisciplinary Approaches to Contemporary Children's Issues. including psychology. but open to all undergraduate students. two electives. and neighborhoods and communities. economics. Selected Children in Contemporary Society Topics. Required for the certificate program Children in Contemporary Society. The two electives may be drawn from a list of pre-approved electives. R.

If a student wishes to take a course for Certificate credit that is not on the pre-approved list. Children's Peer Relations 206S. Schools and Society 271S. One course.psychology. Gender. Issues in Language Development 154S. Instructor: Staff. Infancy. Interdisciplinary in nature and drawing material from disciplines such as sociology. Urban Education 148S. 264. Child Observation 205S. 195S. Advanced Children in Contemporary Society Seminar Topics. SS Seminar version of Children in Contemporary Society 195. Selected Children in Contemporary Society Seminar Topics. and education. Urban Education Economics 208S. public policy. Schools and Society 118. Childhood in Social Perspective 118. and Educational Programs 125S. SS Seminar version of Children in Contemporary Society Topics 264. One course. Infancy 183BS. ELECTIVES Students will choose two electives from the following list of pre-approved courses. Social Development 137. Educational Psychology 121S. Issues in Language Development Psychology and Neuroscience 108A. An elective course for students pursuing Children in Contemporary Society certificate. Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies 117. Instructor: Staff. and Society 119. public policy. Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies 147. Contemporary Issues In Education 147. Instructor: Staff. Economics of the Family Education 112S. Children. Schools and Social Policy Sociology 11. 264S. and education. Juvenile Delinquency 196 Courses and Academic Programs . Unrecognized Talent: Minority Children and Gifted Education 137. Contemporary Social Problems 116. psychology. Adolescence 145S. An elective course for students pursuing Children in Contemporary Society certificate. Sex. Educational Psychology 119B. Children. SS Topics vary but pertain to the development and social and economic well-being of children and their families. Achievement Motivation 174S. Pediatric Psychology Public Policy Studies 109S. Child Clinical Psychology 131. One course. Instructor: Staff. economics. Learning to Read 147S. One course. Advanced Children in Contemporary Society Topics. then the Certificate director will decide on the appropriateness of that course on a case-by-case basis. The Developing Mind and Brain: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience 153S. Learning to Read Linguistics 153S. Regularly Scheduled Courses African and African American Studies 116. R. economics. Early Childhood.

Infancy Women's Studies 208S. and thought of antiquity. Economics of the Family Special Topics Courses Offered Periodically Psychology and Neuroscience 170NS. Not open to students who have had.127. Not open to students who have taken or are taking Classical Studies 54/154. Richardson. as well as an appreciation of the problems of interpretation and the varieties of evidence upon which interpretation may be based. philosophy. philosophy. and religion. CZ The culture of the ancient Romans from their beginnings to Constantine: art. The Changing American Family Visual Studies 124ES. and other ancient subjects will hone their intellectual abilities well for any profession. history. One course. and Davis. courses in classical civilization offer a means of assessing the culture and the material remains of Greece and Rome in their own rich and varied context. Roman Civilization. and Stanley Majors and minors are available in this department. Social Sciences and Policy Research Chinese For courses in Chinese. classical civilization). The experience of analyzing language. Burian. For students interested in history. Social Science and Policy Research Public Policy Studies 195S. Director of Undergraduate Studies. Newton. Classical Studies (CLST) 197 . literature. Concentration in the languages offers students opportunities to explore at first hand the literature. Courses offered at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome are listed at the end of each section below. CCI. Professors Antonaccio. the department offers courses in three areas (Latin. One course. or are taking. Child Development and Public Policy 196S. artifacts and architecture. or archaeology. In the process of learning Greek and/or Latin. CCI. The objective of classical studies is to increase knowledge and understanding of the civilizations of Greece and Rome. and religion. Assistant Professor González. Students considering careers not in classical studies or a closely related discipline will also enjoy the benefits from either major offered by the department. see “Civil and Environmental Engineering (CE)” on page 593 Classical Studies (CLST) Professor Antonaccio. students will gain a deeper insight into language itself. Associate Professor Sosin. The Latino Population in the United States 136. Greek Civilization. see “Asian and African Languages and Literature (AALL)” on page 152 Civil and Environmental Engineering For courses in Civil and Environmental Engineering. ancient art. Children. Instructor: Staff. Greek. history. part of the roots of Western culture. Associate Professors Janan Sosin. Instructor: Staff. and classical studies) and two majors (classical languages. and Public Policy 196. CZ The culture of the ancient Greeks from the Bronze Age to Alexander the Great: art. 12S. Rigsby. CLASSICAL STUDIES (CLST) 11S. literature. Toward this aim. Chair. Poverty. Professors Emeriti Clay. history. Urban Education 150. literature. and Woods. Classical Studies 53/153. Boatwright.

C-L: History 178A 103.-A. CCI Topics in classical literature and/or art and archaeology vary each semester. One course. politician. 14). Lucan. Song of Roland. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 116S 117. rework it. Myth. and novel--for contemporary audiences. Terence) with emphasis on political. biographical. and Rome. Instructor: Staff.D. Science and Technology in the Ancient World. The Pagan World of the Divine Comedy. Drama of Greece and Rome. and remodel it through various media--video game. One course. Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. CCI. First-Year Seminar. The World of the Greek Theater. Topics in Classical and Medieval Culture. Instructor: Burian. his other major works (the Vita Nuova and De Monarchia). Ancient Myth in Literature. CCI. Instructor: Woods. C-L: Art History 123 198 Courses and Academic Programs . CZ One course. CCI. History of Ancient Philosophy. One course. Ancient and Modern Liberty. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Classical Studies. Sophocles. C-L: see Philosophy 100 101. Open only to students in the Focus Program. and limits. CZ One course. the plays as indicators of social values.C. 1200 to 480 BCE. One course. CZ Augustus (63 B. CCI Topics in classical literature and/or art and archaeology differ by section. Ovid. social. Plautus. How modern societies "consume" the past. its coinage. and cultural developments. Ancient and Medieval Epic. Euripides. 100. ALP Introduction to ancient and medieval texts constituting the primary sources for knowledge of pre-modern mythical and imaginary worlds. Augustine his perspective on pagan poets. economic. 86FCS. ALP. and Vision: Imaginary Worlds. CZ. 49S. ALP. ALP. C-L: Theater Studies 117. and literary writings. and on the architecture of his new empire. and Statius) and the Christian theory of biblical criticism that gave St. One course. ALP. SS One course. CZ. the literary consciousness of authors and audience. His impact on contemporary historical. ALP. CCI Reading in translation selected tragedies (Aeschylus. Instructor: Antonaccio. Vergil's Aeneid) and the European Middle Ages (Beowulf. One course. the person. contemporary theatrical practice. debates. ALP. Seneca) and comedies (Aristophanes. One course. Instructor: Staff. C-L: see Visual Studies 101A 105. 123. ALP. Age of Augustus. emphasizing the changing definition and concept of the hero. CCI Myth in classical and medieval writers from Hesiod to Boccaccio. One course. 106. Dante's Inferno). EI. Janan. Instructor: Burian or staff. One course. 85FCS. One course. and his own portraiture. CZ. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Menander. W Greek material culture in its social. CCI. and genius of a new age. Instructor: Clay. Greece. CCI Dante's Commedia and the texts that place it in a context: the history of thirteenth-century Florence and Dante's life. Instructor: Woods. 50. Early Greek Archaeology: From the Fall of Mycenae to the Persian Wars. film. Dream. and historical contexts. Instructor: González. Representing Women in the Classical World. One course. CZ The tragedies and comedies of the fifth-century theater as a window on Athens: the conventions and public context of performance. CCI. Instructor: Staff. CCI Reading the major epics of antiquity in translation (Gilgamesh. Visual Studies 108A 116S. One course. or staff. Focus Program Topics in Classical and Medieval Culture. STS Technical innovation and scientific thought in the ancient Near East. C-L: see Political Science 85GFCS 87FCS. Open only to students in the Focus Program.45S. CCI. and influence on later European drama. CCI. Instructor: Staff. the pagan poets whom Dante incorporated into his Commedia (Vergil. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 117A 119.

CCI. EI One course. CZ. C-L: see Art History 106 145. social allegiances. also C-L: Art History 139. ALP. CCI. Taught in Rome as part of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies program. Instructor: Antonaccio or staff. C-L: see Art History 125A 128. the Papacy. CZ On-site study of the development of Rome's urban plan and its major monuments through the ages. Art and Archaeology. One course. Not open to students who have taken or are taking Classical Studies 12S or Classical Studies 54. and works of art. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 198S 153. One course. C-L: see Medieval and Renaissance Studies 114S. ALP. ALP. CCI Instructor: Staff (Study Abroad). History 116S. Students must register for both 148A and 148B. Art and Archaeology of Ancient Athens. W One course.. 185S. CCI. C-L: see Visual Studies 150 141. CCI. English 123C 139S. SS. cultural. Roman History.g. Instructor: Antonaccio or staff. and political history. CZ. CCI. (Summer program in Italy. W From the founding of Rome by Romulus to the founding of Constantinople by Constantine: social. Aspects of Medieval Culture. CZ One course. This course was previously taught as Classical Studies 54. English 123CS 140. Consent required. ALP. C-L: Art History 126A. ALP. The Living Middle Ages. CZ. CL: Art History 124 126. Social. C-L: see Art History 105 139. History 116. ALP. CZ Instructor: Staff (Study Abroad). CCI.C. CZ. One course. CZ Application of archaeological techniques and procedures to problems in the development of the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations. painting and sculpture). Interpretation of literary texts with a Venetian setting: Shakespeare.D. C-L: see Medieval and Renaissance Studies 114. CCI. This course was previously taught as Classical Studies 53. One course. CCI Instructor: Staff. CCI. The Ancient City. as well as literary sources. EI One course. inscriptions. CCI. Greek History. sculpture. dominant Mediterranean cultures. Greek Art and Archaeology II: Classical to Greco-Roman. change and continuity in artistic forms and daily life. ALP. and mosaics from the classical to the Greco-Roman period (fourth century B. the influence of the ancient Republic and Empire. ALP. Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World. One course. Hellenistic Architecture. CCI. C-L: History 121B 154. Ancient Political Theory. C-L: History 121A 155. Instructor: Sosin or staff. CZ Formation and development against the background of earlier.) Instructor: Boatwright. Instructor: Boatwright. and the modern secular state. Ancient and Modern.) Instructor: Davis. Construction of male and female in antiquity. ALP. Art of the Roman Empire. 148B. R Ancient Greek and Roman conceptions of gender and sexuality as illuminated by erotic poetry and prose texts and evidence from material culture (e. Special Topics in Classical Studies. (Taught in Venice. C-L: see Art History 128 132. 151S. Classical Studies 11S and/or Classical Studies 53. Art in the Hellenistic Age. One course. also C-L: Art History 139S. W Architecture. CZ One course. Classical Studies (CLST) 199 . Venetian Civilization and Its Mediterranean Background. ALP. and of national agendas. CZ. ALP. CCI. ALP. CCI. 148A. C-L: see Political Science 150D 180. Not open to students who have had. One course. ALP. CCI. Instructor: Staff. or are taking. CCI. Political. CZ One course. Rome: History of the City. The Aegean Bronze Age. CZ The political and intellectual history of the Greeks from earliest times to the death of Alexander the Great. Goldoni. CCI Examination of the archaeological monuments of Rome and other Italian sites. Mann. EI. to first century A.124. CZ One course. CZ One course. CZ One course. CCI. painting. and Cultural Context. Roman Spectacle. One course. C-L: Art History 114 157D. ALP. History 101F 148. CCI. One course.). 149. and ethnic/racial identity. The Discovery of the Old World: Utopias.

social. Independent Study. the paper or project may partially fulfill the requirements for graduation with distinction. CZ One course. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or project containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. and political aims. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Instructor: Janan. CZ. for seniors. One course. Instructor: Boatwright. W See Classical Studies 195S. Instructor: Staff. 192. CCI. Topics in Greek Art. CZ One course. Instructor: Antonaccio or staff. Research Independent Study. CZ. SS One course. religious. One course. The Roman Republic. CCI. Instructor: Staff. Ancient Political Philosophy. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors. One course. or myth. C-L: History 266 228. CZ. ALP. 193. the political. The Roman Empire. art and architecture--in subsequent ages. Instructor: Dillon. the paper or project may partially fulfill the requirements for graduation with distinction. One course. One course. intellectual. Greek Sculpture. Instructor: Staff. under the supervision of a faculty member. CZ. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or project containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Research Independent Study. One course. The Legacy of Greece and Rome. Instructor: Staff. R The rise of Rome. CZ The reception of classical antiquity-its literature. One course. to its mastery of the Mediterranean. C-L: see Philosophy 211S 217S. and cultural consequences. CZ. and transformation of Roman rule from Augustus to Diocletian. Prerequisite: some background in Greek history. Plato. CZ. CCI. resulting in an academic and/or artistic product. Instructor: Antonaccio. C-L: see Political Science 223 207.300 B. Instructor: Boatwright. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. R. ALP. resulting in an academic and/or artistic product. One course. R The institutional. EI. One course. C-L: History 259 224. One course. ALP. R Greece and the Near East from the end of the Bronze Age to the Persian Wars. CCI. Independent Study. R Greek religion from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period through literary. Instructor: Boatwright. R Free-standing. CZ. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. C-L: see Philosophy 217S 220S. and social transformation of the late Roman Empire. C-L: Art History 238S 200 Courses and Academic Programs . for seniors. Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic. C-L: Women's Studies 188S 191. Ancient Greek Religion: 1200 . relief.C. CCI. CCI. CCI. C-L: see Art History 201S 221. CCI. Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. representing changing aesthetic.Emphasis on research methods of classical studies. One course. 203. Aristotle. CL: History 263 225. R The foundation. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. and archaeological sources. One course. CZ. 196S. ALP. Consent of instructor required. 211S. art. One course. Instructor: Staff. Archaic Greece. and architectural sculpture from the Archaic period to the Hellenistic age. under the supervision of a faculty member. C-L: History 264 226. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. 194. ALP. Instructor: Woods. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 228 231S. from the early medieval period to the present day. epigraphic. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors. Junior-Senior Seminars in Classical Studies. consolidation. R One course. CCI. Late Antiquity. CCI. social.

One course. and pronunciation). Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. FL Herodotus and Thucydides. Instructor: Staff. Research Independent Study. and use in decoration. Consent required. One course. culminating in a substantive paper or project containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. with emphasis on archaic and classical Athenian vase painters. ALP. 2. CCI. 102S. CCI. CZ. 192. Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic. ALP. Instructor: Burian or staff. R From the Late Bronze Age to the fourth century B. 103S. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or project containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. CCI. Taught at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome.232S. under the supervision of a faculty member. Independent Study. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. Studies in Greek Literature I. Prerequisite: Greek 63 or the equivalent. Instructor: Staff. 76. vocabulary. One course. Greek Literature II. Research Independent Study. Roman Painting. for seniors. FL Readings vary. CCI. 63A. introduction to reading. 191. Greek Painting. Advanced Intermediate Greek. ALP. One course. the paper or project may partially Classical Studies (CLST) 201 . CCI. Intensive Elementary Greek. Instructor: Staff. resulting in an academic and/or artistic product. One course. Advanced Intermediate Greek. FL Second half of Greek 1. 102A. Prerequisite: Greek 1. CZ. resulting in an academic and/or artistic product. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. One course. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. FL Topics differ by section. Instructor: Staff. 100. FL Review of grammar. reading of selected texts. CZ. Consent required. 14. One course. Advanced Greek. 63. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Greek. under the supervision of a faculty member. One course. CZ. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors. syntax. One course. Independent Study. FL Review of grammar. ALP. ALP. 194. Elementary Greek. reading of selected texts. Instructor: Burian or staff. 76A. Instructor: Staff. Intermediate Greek. FL First year of ancient Greek in one course. One course. CCI. One course. Two courses. One course. Consent required. One course. Taught at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. R Techniques. iconography. FL Introduction to Athenian Drama. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: González or staff. the paper or project may partially fulfill the requirements for graduation with distinction. Taught at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. C-L: Art History 237S 236S. Elementary Greek. FL The "Odyssey" and selections from Greek lyric. CZ. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required.C. Instructor: Staff. FL Structure of the language (grammatical forms. CZ. One course. C-L: Art History 227S GREEK (GREEK) 1. for seniors. One course. Intermediate Greek. 193. 2. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors. Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Instructor: Staff. FL Readings in classical Attic prose literature. Prerequisite: Greek 2 or equivalent.

as the grandest Roman anthology of myths. ALP. concentrating on Horace and Juvenal. Life in the Late Republic: Scandal and Sensuality. ALP.fulfill the requirements for graduation with distinction. CCI. ALP. or staff. One course. FL Second half of Latin 1. 201. Homer. Instructor: Boatwright or staff. 103S. CCI. Instructor: González . One course. One course. and poetry. selected readings in prose and poetry. 209. Instructor: Staff. CCI. Literature and life in the Roman Empire: selections from the epigrams of Martial and the letters of Pliny the Younger. FL Politics and thought in the late Republic: Caesar and Cicero. vocabulary. Thucydides. ALP.. 211. Greek Literature in the Roman Empire. and the dramatic cultural changes and explosive passions taking place on the eve of the Republic's disintegration. Instructor: Staff. One course. CCI. Prerequisite: Latin 1. 205. Instructor: Staff. CZ. 207. FL Readings in Livy and in Horace's "Odes" to illuminate Augustan culture's self-aware revision of the past as a blueprint for the future. One course. One course. One course. Ovid: The Metamorphoses. Transition to Advanced Latin. Instructor: Davis or Janan. philosophical and scholarly treatises. Greek Lyric Poets. CCI. CZ. ALP. or staff. 203. forms. drama." Prerequisite: Latin 63 or equivalent. and Xenophon. Elementary Latin. ALP. their literary strategies and ethical arguments. One course. selected odes of Pindar and Bacchylides. 102S. FL Cicero's "Pro Caelio" and poems by Catullus. ALP. 106S. CZ. ALP. EI. FL Fragments of the early lyric poets. One course. CZ. FL Reading and interpretation of selected plays relating to cultural values of Ancient Greece. Instructor: Sosin or staff. 91. LATIN (LATIN) 1. 63. FL For first-year and sophomore students who have received credit for Latin 85 and are enrolling in their first college Latin course. FL A survey of the genre. CCI. and pronunciation). FL Instructor: Staff. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. 200. One course. philosophy. ALP. Advanced Intermediate Latin. FL Problems of language. the novel. One course. One course. CZ. Instructor: Staff. CZ.e. FL Instructor: Staff. FL Study of the structure of the language (i. Instructor: Sosin or staff. Instructor: Burian. ALP. CCI. The Age of Augustus: Retrospection and Reform. The Dramatists. including historical narratives. ALP. Instructor: Burian. 76. This number represents course credit for a score of 4 or 5 on one or more of the College Board Advanced Placement tests in Latin. structure. One course. 2. One course. 105S. FL The culture of Augustan Rome: readings in Vergil's "Aeneid. combined with extensive grammar review. history. 85. Intensive Readings in Greek Literature. 2. González. Roman Satire. Instructor: Staff. One course. The Historians. Elementary Latin. One course. and poetry. EI. Readings in Greek Literature. FL Readings in the Second Sophistic. present state of Homeric scholarship and authorship. FL The poem studied as narrative. CCI. González. Instructor: Janan or staff. Introduction to Hellenistic Literature. and as Ovid's statement on Augustanism. CCI. 222. CCI. Instructor: Burian. One course. Instructor: Boatwright or Janan. Instructor: Staff. syntax. One course. CCI. 202 Courses and Academic Programs . FL Readings in selected texts of the period from Alexander to Augustus. FL Readings and studies in the major Greek historians Herodotus. CCI. Introduction to Literature. Intermediate Latin. documents. ALP. and interpretation in the Iliad. One course.

FL Introduction to the conventions of Latin love elegy and their development in Propertius. 206S. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Special Topics in Latin Literature. for seniors. Epic of the Silver Age. 111S. FL Representative plays of Plautus and Terence with studies of the genre and its Greek forebears. and Tacitus. One course. Instructor: Boatwright. Latin Prose Syntax and Style. 211S. Nero and His Time. Readings in Latin Literature. Classical Studies (CLST) 203 . R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. ALP. FL. and comparative Greek historians (in translation). 112S. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or project containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. One course. Instructor: Davis or Janan. 192. Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic. depending on the topic. 193. from Cato to Ammianus Marcellinus. social) of the Augustan period. W Historical texts focusing on Nero and illuminating his age (Suetonius. FL Prerequisite: the completion of second-year or third-year Latin. CCI. FL Instructor: Staff. CCI. FL Latin prose composition combined with analysis of the style and syntax of select Latin prose authors. Independent Study. One course. Independent Study. CCI. Research Independent Study. Research Independent Study. under the supervision of a faculty member. ALP. CCI. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors. Caesar's Gallic Wars. Instructor: Davis or Janan. CCI. Instructor: Staff. Roman Comedy. CZ. resulting in an academic and/or artistic product. Instructor: Davis or Janan. Agricola. FL Investigation of the Roman concept and practice of writing history. Latin Love Elegy I. Readings include Sallust. Instructor: Staff. ALP. Livy. the paper or project may partially fulfill the requirements for graduation with distinction. 191. Instructor: Janan. Annals 14) discussed with other readings from and about the era. and Ovid. Instructor: Boatwright or staff. the paper or project may partially fulfill the requirements for graduation with distinction. Tibullus. FL Analysis of erotic themes in the works of Propertius. ALP. CCI. 204. for seniors. One course. ALP. and their relation to other phenomena (historical. Instructor: Staff. One course. One course. Instructor: Boatwright. Latin Love Poetry II. resulting in an academic and/or artistic product. FL Lucan to Statius. Close attention to the stylistics of the poems. ALP. Juvenal. plus examples of ''proto-elegy'' by Catullus. One course. CCI. One course. One course. CZ. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Life of Nero. One course. Cicero. 170. The Historians. CCI. CCI. 201. their place in the traditions of Latin love elegy. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or project containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. 214S. ALP. One course. political. FL Readings in the works of Catullus and Horace. FL. CCI. One course. ALP. under the supervision of a faculty member. CCI. Instructor: Richardson. 217S. inscriptions documenting grants of Roman citizenship. Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic. CCI. Tibullus. ALP. Instructor: Staff. FL Instructor: Staff. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Tacitus. 216S. One course. Lyric Poetry. Instructor: Staff. 140S.108S. One course. and Ovid. 194. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Tacitus. R Latin texts and inscriptions relating to Roman "provincials" and their integration as "Romans": for example. Instructor: Staff. One course. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. The Roman Provincial.

Taught at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. FL Review of grammar. Taught at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. or at the College Year in Athens or Arcadia University study program in Greece. history. For double majors in classical civilization and classical languages. FL Readings vary. For double majors in classical languages and classical civilization. For students not able to spend a semester abroad. Consent required. and archaeology taken at these institutions are counted toward major requirements. Courses in Greek. of which eight must be at the 100 level or above. ancient history. Archaeology) Prerequisites. One course. in translation or in the original language at or above the 100 level. One course. Majors are eligible for nomination to one semester of study. They are also reminded that reading knowledge of German and French is a requirement for advanced degrees in this field. Advanced Latin. Departmental Graduation with Distinction Graduation with distinction is available to majors. The department also facilitates participation in archaeological digs in Greece and Italy. Classical Languages (Greek and Latin) Major Requirements. or two courses in Greek or Latin below the 100 level. For further information on opportunities for study abroad. philosophy. The cost of a semester at either institution is comparable to that of Duke. 102A. Consent required. reading of selected texts. Instructor: Staff. Literature. Consent required. 76A. two courses in classical studies at or above the 100 level. typically during the junior year. Those contemplating graduate study in classics or related disciplines should consider completion of three college years of one ancient language and two years of the other. Instructor: Staff. Financial assistance usually can be transferred. Culture. including the capstone course (Classical Studies 195S or 196S). Special Topics in Latin Literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Classical Civilization (Ancient History. Classical Studies 11S or 53/153 and 12S or 54/154. reading of selected texts. Major Requirements. Topics change each semester offered. no more than two courses in Greek and/or Latin may be counted toward both majors. ALP. or equivalents. FL Review of grammar. at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. One course. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 239S The following courses in Latin are offered at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. one of which will be the capstone course (Classical Studies 195S or 196S). THE MAJOR Students may major in classical languages and classical civilization. Courses must be in at least three separate areas (literature. Latin. CCI. Duke regularly offers summer programs in Greece and Italy.5 grade point average in the major on beginning their project. Advanced Intermediate Latin. as a minimum. of which six will be at or above the 100 level. Instructor: Staff. One course. see the section on Off Campus Opportunities in this bulletin. Taught at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. Intermediate Latin: Caesar's Civil War. Minimum of ten courses. Eligible students have a 3.240S. and arrangements are made through the university. and may be taken there for Duke credit: 63A. Instructor: Staff. A committee of three 204 Courses and Academic Programs . which Duke manages. art and archaeology). Knowledge of both Greek and Latin through the second-year level (Greek 76 and Latin 76 or the equivalent) with a total of at least eight courses in Greek and/or Latin. no more than two courses in Greek and/or Latin may be counted toward both majors. Eight classical studies courses at or above the 100 level. In the context of an honors research course (193 or 194) the candidate writes a major research paper.

and Sorin. Professors Emeriti Biermann. web programming. Kedem. Hartemink.faculty members votes on awarding Distinction. Associate Professors Board. Parr. 1. Lenoir. Ellis. Cox. biology. One course. the courses must be in at least two areas (literature in the original language at the 100 level or above in translation. QS Programming and problem solving in a specific domain such as robotics. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 4. Five courses in ancient art and archaeology. Five courses in Latin. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies Computer Science (COMPSCI) 205 . Reif. In most courses students make extensive use of the available computing facilities. Assistant Professor of the Practice Forbes. and uses. Mukherjee. Majors interested in applying are encouraged to consult the director of undergraduate studies by the spring of their junior year. and Yang. Associate Research Professor LaBean. Director of Undergraduate Studies. Donald. Lebeck. QS. THE MINOR Four minors are offered by the department. The Department of Computer Science provides courses on the concepts of computing and computers. Conitzer. and at least three in the Classical Studies Department. Classical Civilization Requirements. Professors Agarwal. at least three at the 100 level or above. Instructor: Staff. Instructors: Forbes. Classical Archaeology Requirements. Harer. Patrick. computer systems. their capabilities. as listed below. Research Scientist Brady. Professor of the Practice Astrachan. One course. as part of their general education. algorithms. Rose. Comparative Literature For courses in comparative literature. Tomasi. Programming and Problem Solving. Director of Graduate Studies. Lecturer Duvall A major or a minor is available in this department. or 6. Not open to students having credit for Computer Science 6 or higher. Henriquez. symbolic and numeric computation. Roy Choudhury. Maggioni. Chase. Students learn the basics of programming by studying problems in one application area. STS An overview for students not intending to major in computer science. Associate Professor of the Practice Lucic. at least three at the 100 level or above. Computer programming. Munagala. Ohler. virtual worlds. No courses used to fulfill the requirements of one minor may be used for another. or computer science. genomics. Latin Requirements. basic theoretical foundations. history. Assistant Research Professors Furey and Pitsianis. Starmer and Wagner. Dwyer. Five courses in the Classical Studies Department. philosophy. Five courses in ancient Greek. Greek Requirements. Associate Professors of the Practice Lucic and Rodger. Chair. Ramm." Computer Science (COMPSCI) Professor Agarwal. art and archaeology). and Trivedi. Principles of Computer Science. usually elect either Computer Science 1. or Highest Distinction for the work. Students who wish to take a single introductory course. Professor of the Practice Astrachan. Associate Chair. Edelsbrunner. at least three at the 100 level or above. Sun. at least three at the 100 level or above. Adjunct Professors Arge and Lombardi. Assistant Professors Babu. Gallie. see listing in this chapter under "Literature. Loveland. High Distinction. and the effects of computer and information technology on society. Professor Chase. 4. or for the majors in classical languages or classical civilization.

SS. EI. 6. Instructor: Rodger or staff. Course may be repeated once. Computer Science Education Research Seminar. QS Seminar version of Computer Science 96. Minds and Computers: Foundations of Artificial Intelligence. Topics in Computer Science. modifying. One course. and computational models. Introduction to Computational Genomics and Computer Science. Consent of instructor required. functions. and IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) standards. Instructor: Staff. One course. 96. Forbes. and educational techniques in general. Technical and Social Analysis of Information and the Internet. Mathematics 31 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently). QS Techniques for solving computational problems in groups and individually. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 6L. Analysis of issues from a technical perspective with an emphasis on the role of software and the relationship of standards to social and ethical issues. loops. STS The role of computation in prior and current biological research. One course. or Rodger. QS. analysis of programs and algorithms. reading. QS A project-based course involving computer science education. Topics in Computer Science. One course. sets. One course. C-L: see Information Science and Information Studies 72. QS Same as Computer Science 6 but also requires a lab. data structures including arrays. intellectual property. Technical and social implications of genomics and genome studies made possible by advances in algorithms. 206 Courses and Academic Programs . Topics differ by section. Introduction to Program Design and Analysis I. computational methods. Instructor: Astrachan. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Computer Science. and Evolution. Program Design and Analysis I. Instructor: Staff. QS Instructor: Staff. changing each year. Introduction to specific algorithms. Instructor: Staff. QS. Consent of instructor required. May be repeated. STS One course. Prerequisite: familiarity and experience with programming using variables. Intended as an introduction for majors and those interested in programming and computer science with applications in the sciences. Co-requisite: Enrollment in Computer Science 4 or Computer Science 6. patents. Not open to students who have taken Computer Science 82s or 182s. both in large-scale genomics projects such as the human genome project and in basic biology and medical research. Topics vary every semester the course is offered. Instructor: Forbes. One course. 97S. Culture. Artificial Life. Object-oriented programming using Java. dynamic programming. Introduction to Problem Solving. Honors Program Design and Analysis I. web protocols. One course. tools. and arrays. QS Design and implementation of programs to solve problems in computer science. but faster paced and more challenging. Examples from physical and life sciences. Instructor: Astrachan. 90. One course. 89S. Introduction to programming possibly including scripting. issues on computer science curricula. and designing classes. 49S.4G. 96S. and natural sciences. One course. CGI programming. topics from various areas of computer science. and resources for biological research including genome sequence alignment and database design and mining. R The project of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the idea of understanding the mind/brain as a computing machine. Instructor: Staff. Forbes. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Astrachan or Furey. also C-L: Visual Studies 72A 82. 18S. QS Similar to Computer Science 6. Duvall. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 72. One course. Topics vary each semester offered. Examination of neural network models built to understand the workings of the brain. Half course. Elementary ideas both in computational theory and in programming (for example. The role of software as it relates to law. LISP). QS. 6X. First-Year Seminar. Students should have experience in teaching or tutoring Computer Science. STS The development of technical and social standards governing the Internet and Information Technology in General. and maps. QS. engineering.

or Tomasi. or Rodger. QS Same as Computer Science 100. Instructor: Astrachan. QS Mathematical notations. Introduction to Computer Networks. Case studies from biology and economics. maintainable and useful software systems. Computer Organization and Programming. QS Techniques for design and construction of reliable. One course. Duvall. QS Computer structure. logic design. and continuous models. machine language. Reif. combinations. and analyzing computational models for problems in the sciences and social sciences. microprogramming. Intuitive and rigorous analysis of algorithms. discrete. QS Introduction to techniques for developing. Instructor: Astrachan. object-oriented programming. Prerequisites: Computer Science 100 and 104. for students who have taken Engineering 53. Internet routing. counting. Advanced data structures including balanced trees. database design theory. instruction execution. Open only to students in the Focus Program. 114. Computer Science 6. Instructor: Chase or Cox. Edelsbrunner. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 116. such as the idea of Turing Test. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 100E. Instructor: Tomasi. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 100. logic. Programming paradigms and tools for medium to large projects: revision control. security. QS Basic concepts and principles of multiprogrammed operating systems. QS. permutations. file systems. R Databases and relational database management systems. 32. R Networking and distributed systems. software engineering. Processes. 100-level Statistics. Objectoriented design and programming using a language like Java emphasizing abstract data types and their lower-level implementations. or Rodger. protection mechanisms. One course. Forbes. parameter estimation. deadlocks. mutual exclusion. number theory. Program Design and Analysis II. link layer protocols (such as Ethernet). interprocess communication. GUI. Data modeling. proofs of correctness. I/O devices. geometric structures. Prerequisites: Mathematics 31 and 32. and evaluation of debates between AI researchers and their critics. One course. Prerequisite: Computer Science 100 or consent of instructor. Computer systems organization. Instructor: Staff. Principles underlying the design of our network infrastructure and the challenges that lie ahead. Instructor: Astrachan or Duvall. trees. Prerequisite: Computer Science 100. game playing and autonomous robotics. Software Design and Implementation. One course. One course. QS A continuation of Computer Science 6. Prerequisites: Computer Science 108 and 110 or equivalent. Instructor: Kedem or Lebeck. and digital representation of data. One course. 111. UNIX tools. advanced topics from algebraic structures. complexity. discrete probability. One course. 104. naming network file systems. wireless networks. 108. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 110. Introduction to Computer Modeling. graphs. Symbolic coding and assembly systems. linear and matrix algebra. and algorithms. deterministic. and computability. and interpreters. digraphs. and proof. Forbes. Forbes. Overview of advanced data structures and analysis of algorithms. graphs. addressing techniques. Introduction to Database Systems. hash tables. Prerequisite: Computer Science 6. QS. evaluating. documentation. and transport protocols (TCP). The socket API. Discrete Math for Computer Science. data definition and Computer Science (COMPSCI) 207 . data abstraction and abstract data types. perturbation theory. performance analysis. Prerequisites: Math 31. One course. One course. issues in the philosophical foundations of AI.and major AI projects in knowledge representation. Stability of numerical approximations. Duvall. testing. Network infrastructure support for distributed applications ranging from email to web browsing to electronic commerce. Instructor: Agarwal. Stochastic. Markov models. Introduction to Operating Systems. combinatorial optimization. 102. Program Design and Analysis II. Also taught as Electrical Engineering 153. Hands-on programming assignments covering issues in distributed systems and networking. memory management. CPU scheduling. Instructor: Staff. representations.

Mungala. graphics pipeline. supersampling. motivation. Selected laboratory work. minimization of functions. QS Theory. concurrency control and recovery. Students to learn computational approaches to 208 Courses and Academic Programs . recommended: Computer Science 108. Introduction to Computational Genomics. 148. and history. A-buffer. Consent of instructor required. OpenGL and OpenInventor. radiosity. numerical solution of nonlinear equations. the language hierarchy from regular sets to recursively enumerable sets. 104 or 111. surface details. NS. Instructor: Cramer or Marinos. data integration and dissemination. fast multiplication. animation. Introduction to Switching Theory and Logic Design. synchronous and fundamental mode sequential circuit design. 3d object representation. Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. different color models. and special properties of switching functions are covered. QS Seminar version of Computer Science 150. QS Design and analysis of efficient algorithms including sorting. Instructor: Rose or Sun. C-L: see Information Science and Information Studies 170S. Pixel 5. C-L: Visual Studies 109A 130. Mathematics 31. also C-L: Philosophy 150 149S. and the clustering and classification of genes and tissues using gene expression data. One course. Topics include genome sequence assembly.manipulation languages. z-buffer. One course. Prerequisites: Computer Science 108 and Mathematics 104. Instructor: Astrachan. QS A computational perspective on the analysis of genomic and genome-scale information. antialiasing. C-L: see Mathematics 188. local and global alignment. algorithms. Current research issues including XML. Prerequisites: Computer Science 100 and Mathematics 103. data mining. 140. storaging and indexing techniques. constructive solid geometry. illumination and shading models. database programming interfaces. and numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. Hands-on programming projects and a term project. One course. solving. or Reif. Instructor: Edelsbrunner. nondeterministic algorithms and computationally hard problems. color specification. achromatic light. Instructor: Agarwal or Duvall. One course. Half course. Introduction to Numerical Methods and Analysis. Constructing Immersive Virtual Worlds. One course. approximation and interpolation of functions. 150S. Prerequisite: Computer Science 100. query processing and optimization. QS One course. Boolean algebra. web data management. Introduction to Numerical Methods and Analysis. Algorithmic and programming language tool kits. searching. drawing routines. QS An introduction to theoretical computer science including studies of abstract machines. and software that concern numerical solution of linear equations. spatial data structures. hidden-surface-removal algorithms. QS Overview. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 120L. dynamic programming. QS Techniques for attacking. Computer Graphics. One course. and complexity theory. Prerequisite: Computer Science 6. Logic and Its Applications. Problem Solving Seminar. QS Techniques for the analysis and design of combinational and sequential networks. Prerequisites: Computer Science 100 and 102. Focus on exploration and analysis of large genomic sequences. One course. Instructor: Babu or Yang. coordinate systems and geometric transforms. Introduction to the Design and Analysis of Algorithms. 32. and writing computer programs for challenging computational problems. Also taught as Electrical Engineering 151L. graph algorithms. 150. levels of detail. protein threading and folding. also C-L: Visual Studies 120CS 124. 160. binary arithmetic. QS One course. 122S. noncomputability. design with MSI and LSI components. but also attention to issues in structural and functional genomics. colorimetry. gene and motif finding. and others. Discrete mathematical systems. Instructor: Reif or Rodger. SGI reality engine. Course may be repeated.

190. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. equilibrium notions. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 189S. issues on computer science curricula. One course. QS. Half course. Instructor: Hartemink. the central goal of which is a substantive paper. Instructor: Staff. One course. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Research Independent Study. One course. 195. R. Consent of Instructor required. the central goal of which is a substantive paper. Computer Science Seminar. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Instructor: Staff. Written analysis of issues from a technical perspective with an emphasis on the role of software and on how standards relate to social and ethical issues. Prerequisite: Computer Science 100. and educational techniques in general. planning. Instructor: Astrachan and Forbes. Students should have experience in teaching or tutoring Computer Science. Independent Study. or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. analyzing. QS Algorithms and representations used in artificial intelligence. One course. Prerequisites: Computer Science 104 and 108. Prerequisites: 100-level Statistics and 100-level Mathematics or consent of instructor. Instructor: Staff. One course. Research Independent Study. Instructor: Staff. Computer Science Education Research Seminar. Instructor: Parr. Topics differ by section. computing equilibria. One course. The methods of critical inquiry and scholarly research reinforced with regular written analysis. 181S. Computational Microeconomics. QS Use of computational techniques to operationalize basic concepts from economics. R. Introduction and implementation of algorithms for search. project. and visualizing information at a genome-scale. winner determination problem. Instructor: Staff. intellectual property. Prerequisites: Computer Science 100 and 104. C-L: Markets and Management Studies. The development of technical and social standards governing the Internet and information technology in general. seminar-style presentations and collaborative research projects. automated mechanism design. decision. QS. Mechanism design: auction theory. One course. One course. W In-depth exploration of specific areas in computer science. A project-based course involving computer science education. Requires a significant technical project. 191. Introduction to Artificial Intelligence. May be repeated. 192. including a substantive paper containing significant analysis and interpretation on a computer science-related topic. project. W Technical version of Computer Science 82S. Instructor: Conitzer. Meets as a seminar with an additional weekly meeting to accommodate guest lectures. One course. SS. 170. Game theory: normal and extensive-form games. Bayesian networks. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 173. Information Science and Information Studies 182S. Open to computer science majors engaged in industrial work experience only. Technical and Social Analysis of Information and the Internet. and IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) standards. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Computer Science. Instructor: Staff. Computer Science Internship. A faculty member will supervise a program of study related to the work experience. or written report covering a previously approved topic. Instructor: Staff. Consent of director of internship programs required. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Computer Science (COMPSCI) 209 . 193.genomics as well as to develop practical experience with handling. Prerequisites: Computer Science 108 and recommended Computer Science 116. R See Computer Science 191. robotics and machine learning. Not open to students who have taken Computer Science 82S. patents. Expressive marketplaces: combinatorial auctions and exchanges. Individual work in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. The role of software as it relates to law. STS. logic. theory. One course. Half Course.

Prerequisite: knowledge of the C programming language. caches (memory hierarchies). Advanced Computer Architecture II. Prerequisites: An introductory database course or consent of instructor. QS Parallel computer architecture design and evaluation. R Topics from various areas of computer science. Kedem. One course.196. 215. Instructor: Staff. Advanced Computer Architecture I. data warehousing. Statistical Data Mining. One course. technology trends and future challenges. Topics in Computer Science. or Sorin. The TCP/IP protocol suite and the Berkeley sockets application programs interface. Lebeck. 197. 196S. symmetric multiprocessors. One course. One course. Programming projects required. QS. One course. web and semistructured data. C-L: Electrical and Computer Engineering 252 221. Instructor: Staff. Possible topics include access methods. One course. Operating Systems. changing each year.g. Topics include advanced distributed file systems. search engines. simulation techniques. R Advanced database management system design principles and techniques. or consent of the instructor.. pipelining. Topics in Computer Science. Prerequisites: Computer Science 110 or 210 and Computer Science 214. and benchmarking. Wireless Networking and Mobile Computing. QS Fundamental principles of operating system design applied to state-of-the-art computing environments (multiprocessors and distributed systems) including process management (coscheduling and load balancing). QS. C-L: see Statistics and Decision Sciences 218 220. Instructor: Babu or Yang. replication. Instructor: Staff. and synchronization. Includes research intensive work exposing the student to computer science research methodology and resulting in a major document or project. Instructor: Staff. the Internet). ranging from high-speed clusters to globalscale networks (e. Distributed Information Systems. reliable update and recovery. Prerequisite: Computer Science 104 or Electrical and Computer Engineering 152 or equivalent. storage systems. C-L: Computational Biology and Bioinformatics 233 219. interconnection networks. Instructor: Chase or Cox. Topics include processor design. caching and consistency. R Basic systems support for process-to-process communications across a computer network. message passing. query processing and optimization. Instructor: Chase. Advanced Database Systems. Topics in Computer Science. transaction processing distributed databases. For Seniors and Graduates 210. and issues of scale and security for Internet information services. QS. 214. QS Seminar version of Computer Science 196. Development of network application programs based on the client-server model. object-oriented and object relational databases. C-L: see Electrical and Computer Engineering 256 216. Materials drawn from both classic and recent research literature. 212. Evaluation topics include modeling. One course. distributed programming environments. One course. changing each year. Remote procedure call and implementation of remote procedure call. cache coherence. out-of-order execution. distributed shared memory. shared memory. memory consistency models. QS One course. simulation. Prerequisite: Computer Science 100 or equivalent. R Fundamental aspects of advanced computer architecture design and analysis. Computer Networks and Distributed Systems. Design topics include parallel programming. shared memory management (data migration and consistency). Instructors: Board. One course. QS. superscalar. QS Topics from various areas of computer science. data mining. Prerequisite: Computer Science 100. virtual memory. cache coherence. Principles and techniques for sharing information reliably and efficiently in computer networks. and distributed file systems. Prerequisite: Computer 210 Courses and Academic Programs . transactional concurrency control.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 230 or equivalent. Prerequisite: Computer Science 140 or equivalent. searching. Randomized Algorithms. Probability for Electrical and Computer Engineers. alternation. Prerequisite: Computer Science 230. derandomization. Edelsbrunner. numerical differentiation and integration. C-L: see Electrical and Computer Engineering 255. Reeb graphs. Instructor: Markas or staff. and game theory. Markov and Chebyshev inequalities and their applications. Available compression technologies and the existing compression standards. dynamic structures. co-NP. polynomial time hierarchy. locality sensitive hashing. NP completeness. complexity measures. QS. Instructor: Edelsbrunner or Harer. Computational Topology. 240. algebraic methods in complexity theory. randomized geometric algorithms. rapidly mixing Markov chains. and the loss of information with respect to the human visual system (for image data). discussion of simplicial complexes. randomized algorithms for graph problems. convex hulls. One course. and how they can be effectively removed to achieve compression. emphasis on Delaunay and alpha complexes and on homology groups. One course. One course. QS Emphasis on the redundancies found in textual. reduction and completeness. QS Introduction to topology via graphs. Chernoff bound and its applications. RSA cryptosystem. expanders. Algorithmic paradigms. Prerequisites: Computer Science 130 and 208 or Computer Science 254 or Electrical Engineering 282. QS Turing machines. One course. NP-Completeness. Instructor: Lebeck or Sorin. representing triangulations. Topics in Data Compression. C-L: Electrical and Computer Engineering 259 225. QS. randomized data structures. Computational Complexity. Instructors: Agarwal and staff. proximity problems. storing and manipulating orthogonal objects. Instructor: Agarwal. recursive function theory. Instructor: Agarwal. One course. Las Vegas and Monte Carlo algorithms. One course. Fault-Tolerant and Testable Computer Systems. applications and extensions. orthogonal and simplex range searching. Markov chains and random walk. Prerequisites: knowledge of an algorithmic Computer Science (COMPSCI) 211 . beyond NP. graph algorithms. facts about curves and surfaces. relativized complexity. R Error analysis. 236. or Reif. the vulnerability of compressed data to transmission errors. NP. Additional topics may include information theory. electric networks and random walks. 250. probabilistic methods. number theoretic algorithms. computational via matrix reduction. 234. Instructor: Munagala. Computational Geometry. and voice data. circuit complexity. QS Design and analysis of efficient algorithms. embeddings. Computationally hard problems. Design and Analysis of Algorithms. 232. Prerequisite: Computer Science 230. One course. planar point location. linearity of expectation. Prerequisite: Computer Science 100 or equivalent. Arge. Applications include sorting. dimensionality reduction. arrangements. One course. QS Models of computation and lower-bound techniques. The compression effects in information processing. Morse functions. and ordinary differential equations. or Reif. stillframe images. One course. C-L: Computational Biology and Bioinformatics 234 235. video. One course. interpolation and spline approximation. C-L: see Electrical and Computer Engineering 254 226. development of persistent homology. randomized algorithms. nonlinear equations.Science 220 or Electrical and Computer Engineering 252 or consent of instructor. solutions of linear systems. QS Cover traditional approximation algorithms with combinatorial and linear programming techniques. extended survey of cut problems and metric embeddings. linear programming and parametric search technique. Approximation Algorithms. parallel and randomized computation. proof of stability. communication complexity. probabilistic and incremental algorithms. C-L: Mathematics 264 237. Numerical Analysis. PL functions. undecidability. Instructor: Agarwal. R Models of computation. also C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 230.

297. Computational Biology of Gene Regulation. provable approximation algorithms.. NS. QS. One course. Explores modeling basic biological processes (e. Minimal overlap with Computer Science 270. rational drug design. computational quantum mechanics and visualization. image motion analysis. Introduction to Computer Vision. and activity recognition and retrieval.g. Prerequisite: Computer Science 100. Advanced Topics in Computer Science. molecular interactions. Instructor: Hartemink or Ohler. consent of instructor. Emphasizes probabilistic approaches and machine learning methods. One course. Computational Systems Biology. and protein-ligand docking. splicing. 271. R Introduction to algorithmic and computational issues in structural molecular biology and molecular biophysics. One course. translation. Instructor: Parr. computational structural biology. Formal analysis of techniques used for search. Statistics and Decision Sciences 250 258. proteomics. and computer programming. and machine learning. QS. Prerequisite: Computer Science 100 and Computer Science 130. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of algorithm design (Computer Science 230 or equivalent). and reinforcement learning. Instructor: Donald. One course. numerical linear algebra or equivalent. Instructor: Parr. QS. C-L: Computational Biology and Bioinformatics 263. QS Introduction to scientific computing and its applications to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborative research. molecular dynamics. and protein design. One course. decision theory. probability and statistics (Statistics 213 or equivalent). R Provides a systematic introduction to algorithmic and computational issues present in the analysis of biological systems. planning. NS. consent of instructor. Instructor: Tomasi. high dimensional optimization. fast transforms. logic. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of algorithm design (Computer Science 230 or equivalent). Emphasizes geometric algorithms. basic linear algebra. R One course. object. R Advanced topics from various areas of computer science. Structural Biology and Biophysics 263 264. Bayesian networks. image. replication. Computer Science 6. NMR and X-ray data. decision trees. computational biophysics. molecular biology (Biology 118 or equivalent). molecular biology (Biology 118 or equivalent). and Mathematics 104. Includes research intensive work exposing the 212 Courses and Academic Programs . Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 or 107. cell cycle. Lectures and discussions of primary literature. robotics. Artificial Intelligence. C-L: see Computational Biology and Bioinformatics 231 262.programming language. QS Theoretical and practical issues in modern machine learning techniques. Alternatively. Alternatively. Instructor: Rose or Sun. probability and statistics (Statistics 213 or equivalent). Study high performance algorithms in finite elements. One course. Brief intro to contemporary high performance computer architectures. intermediate calculus including some differential equations. stereo vision. Advanced Topics in Computer Science. C-L: Mathematics 221. Topics include statistical foundations. C-L: Computational Biology and Bioinformatics 262 263. One course. 296. supervised and unsupervised learning. programming languages and widely available software packages. One course. QS. Instructor: Staff. transcription. evolution) from a systems biology perspective. One course. Mathematics 104. changing each year. and Statistics 103 or consent of instructor. Image formation and analysis. Machine Learning. Parallel lab sessions by experts offer further specialization. Introduction to Computational Science. 261. QS Instructor: Staff. calculus. and computer programming. protein complexes. localization and transport. 274. Nonlinear Dynamics. feature computation and tracking. Mathematics 135 or Statistics 104. C-L: see Physics 213 270. neural networks. Explores computational methods for discovering new pharmaceuticals. Algorithms in Structural Biology and Biophysics. hidden Markov models. numerical analysis. Prerequisite: programming experience in Fortran or C. QS Design and analysis of algorithms and representations for artificial intelligence problems.

Candidates for a degree with distinction.B.cs. Requirements. Computer Science 100. Electrical Engineering.or 200-level electives: one in Computer Science (not an independent study course) and two in Computer Science. Computer Science 100. Major Requirements. at least four of which must be at the 100 level or above. THE MINOR Computer Science Five courses in computer science (including the prerequisite). and 130. these courses must include at least one course at the 200 level.edu/cseducation/undergrad/ba. and 150.student to computer science research methodology and resulting in a major document or project. Graduation with high or highest distinction is typically awarded for projects that are of publishable quality. Instructor: Staff. Computer Science 104. Computer Science 102 or both Mathematics 135 and one of Mathematics 124 or Math 187. 130. or any 200-level course. 150. 104. or highest distinction must apply to the director of undergraduate studies and meet the following criteria. Major Requirements. 170. see: http://www. Two 100or 200-level electives: one in Computer Science (not an independent study course) and one in Computer Science. 104. Departmental Graduation with Distinction A program for Graduation with Distinction in computer science is available. 110. Mathematics 31. additional courses from the following: Computer Science 108. or in a related area approved by the director of undergraduate studies. Mathematics 31. high distinction.S. Computer Science 100E. Degree Prerequisites. see: http://www.5 or higher in those computer science courses related to the area of research. A presentation of the project must be made to a committee of three faculty members.html For the B. 103. Candidates must complete a substantial project. 108. For the previous curriculums.duke. Computer Science 102 or both Mathematics 135 and one of Mathematics 124 or Mathematics 187. 110. 130. Mathematics. Three 100. Statistics. 108. Candidates for Graduation with Distinction must have a grade point average of 3.cs. 32. Mathematics.edu/cseducation/undergrad/ba. Statistics. THE MAJOR For the A. Computer Science 6. Computer Science (COMPSCI) 213 . Graduation with high or highest distinction is awarded at the discretion of the faculty committee in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. or in a related area approved by the director of undergraduate studies. 110. Electrical Engineering. The project should represent a significant intellectual endeavor including the writing of a report. One course. representing at least one year's work and including at least one independent study. Computer Science 6. candidates for a degree with high or highest distinction should have a grade point average of 3. 140. under the guidance of a faculty member in computer science who oversees and endorses the project. In addition.html. 32. 104. two of whom will normally be from computer science although for interdisciplinary projects this restriction can be relaxed. For the previous curriculums. or both Computer Science 6 and Computer Science 100.duke. Prerequisites. Degree Prerequisites.0 or higher in computer science courses numbered above 100.

an independent study in an area related to bioinformatics or computational biology. one biology course from the following: 119. Approval for Computer Science 195 must be obtained before the internship begins. the bases of ideological persuasion and resistance. and Piot. students must take Computer Science 104 and 108. or as approved by the director of undergraduate studies in computer science. Cultural Anthropology (CULANTH) Associate Professor Baker. Cultural anthropology is a comparative discipline that studies the world's peoples and cultures. and Starn. and Quinn. music. histories of race and racism. Makhulu. language use in institutional contexts. with an emphasis on power. Five courses at the 100 level (not including the prerequisites). Biology 118. Director of Undergraduate Studies. and Stein. 237. The internship period is a two-semester leave consisting of one summer plus the spring semester before or the fall semester following. 170. 270S. history. Department of Computer Science. and a faculty mentor associated with this course must be designated at this time. Assistant Professors Holsey (African and African American Studies). popular culture. film. Associate Professors Baker. and other. This period can be extended by one additional semester. and to build on this knowledge upon their return. or any 200-level computer science course. 205L. Adjunct Assistant Professor Thompson (documentary studies) A major or minor is available in this department. and social justice.Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Prerequisites. Associate Professor Tetel (English) and Wilson (Women’s Studies). Silverblatt. culture. Mignolo (romance studies).g. Mathematics 31. It extends perspectives developed from anthropology's initial encounter with the "primitive" world to studies of complex societies including rural and urban segments of the Global South and contemporary industrial countries. one computer science course from the following: 100/100E. Friedl.124. contact the director of the Internship Program. Litzinger. and advertising. Professors Emeriti Apte. identity. Requirements. e. gender ideology. and the relations among them. Ewing. Chair. 32. An application for the CSIP program should be completed at the beginning of the semester prior to the internship period to allow time for interviewing with companies. and 100-level statistics course. class formation and political consciousness. 184L. with special strengths in Africa and 214 Courses and Academic Programs . The department also offers courses that introduce the various traditional subfields and methods of cultural anthropology. mass media. and discourse. Computer Science 160. and the creation and use of ethnic and national identities. peace-making. Associate Professor Nelson. Butters (English). and declare computer science as their first major. Assistant Professor Davis. O'Barr. To participate in the CSIP program. Faculty draw on their fieldwork in various geographic areas. Cultural anthropologists at Duke concentrate on political economy. war. integrative courses on world areas. and human rights. Nelson. Secondary Appointments: Professors Andrews (Slavic languages). the politics of representation and interpretation. as follows: Computer Science 111. ideology. Meintjes. One credit can be earned in the semester following the internship period through the independent study course Computer Science 195. 238. three from Computer Science and two from Biology. For further information. and Reddy (history).. INTERNSHIP PROGRAM The Computer Science Internship Program (CSIP) provides undergraduate computer science majors the opportunity to apply knowledge gained in the classroom to a job. 271 or as approved by the director of undergraduate studies in computer science in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies in biology. These concerns lead them to such specific research and teaching interests as: colonialism and state formation. Professors Allison. 150.

Latin America. CCI. One course. CCI. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. CCI Topics differ by section. or Litzinger. 49S. 101. Focus on two themes: cultural differences as well as similarities within and between ethnic groups. CCI. One course. SS A cross-cultural study of how images and stories that are mass produced affect the world view. Instructor: Baker. SS One course. One course. also CL: English 111. First-Year Seminar. SS How American culture shapes the everyday lives of people in the United States. One course. Japan. Instructor: Litzinger. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. CZ. One course. and global relations on all Americans. Instructor: Allison. 94. SS One course. C-L: see Linguistics 104S. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 160. Open only to participants in Focus. China. Instructor: Ewing. Introduction to Linguistics. One course. One course. Instructor: Staff. 104. religious movements. Particular emphasis on gender relations. CZ. Fantasy. 80FCS. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. SS. Anthropology and Film. CL: Film/Video/Digital 106. One course. Selected topics vary each semester. and the impact of history. R. Visual Studies 110A. EI. 50. One course. Instructor: Staff. Anthropology and Film. imperialism. International Comparative Studies 108. CZ. Religion 144. International Comparative Studies 102S. application of specific approaches to case material from present and/or past cultures. Muslim World: Transformations and Continuities. Topics vary each semester offered. Special Topics in Focus. and Popular Culture. C-L: International Comparative Studies 151A 107. SS Same as Cultural Anthropology 94 except instruction is provided in lecture and discussion group each week. SS Theoretical approaches to analyzing cultural beliefs and practices cross-culturally. Life in America: Identity and Everyday Experience. CCI Topics differ by section. CCI. Introduction to the Civilizations of Southern Asia. Mass Media. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Cultural Anthropology. Instructor: Ewing. C-L: see Linguistics 101. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Introductory Special Topics in Cultural Anthropology. One course. CZ. Students without prerequisites for a course may ask the instructor for admission. CCI. also C-L: English 113S 103A. Instructor: Staff. One course. SS Opportunities for first-year students to engage with a specific issue in cultural anthropology. with special attention to ethical issues surrounding control of alcohol use.'' and the political and social agendas of researchers and caregivers in a range of societies. Topics vary each semester offered. Local field research (on and off campus). with emphasis on student writing. C-L: International Comparative Studies 100. SS Examination of cultural and social dimensions of alcohol use cross-culturally. CZ One course. Instructor: Staff. Film/Video/Digital 104D. Jackson. Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics. Documentary Studies. Studies in Special Topics. frameworks for judging ''abuse. CCI. identities. also C-L: History 193. and cultural interaction. and social change. and the United States. Open only to students in the Focus Program.the African diaspora. SS The study of feature films and documentaries on issues of colonialism. CCI. C-L: International Comparative Studies 101C. Alcohol and Culture. and desires Cultural Anthropology (CULANTH) 215 . diaspora communities. Middle East. One course. large institutions. SS Same as Cultural Anthropology 104 except instruction is provided in lecture and discussion group each week. An introduction to critical film theory and film production in non-Western countries. war and peace. 20S. C-L: International Comparative Studies 90B 94D. 81FCS. CCI. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff. W The diversity of social practices within the community of Islam. R.

Documentary Studies 109. Russian 117. Instructor: Staff. CCI. Case materials drawn primarily from contemporary American advertising. to the nature and complexity of gender. Global Culture. relation to political and economic structure. C-L: Sociology 160D. Italy. One course. CCI. and selected other countries. Linguistics 120. and to the history and place of advertising in society and culture. CCI. C-L: Visual Studies 110FS. One course. Consent of instructor required. Emphasis on American society complemented by case studies of advertising in Canada. One course. Canadian Studies. CZ Study of the representation of non-US cultures in the genre of major motion pictures (as opposed to ethnographic film).of their consumers. South Asia. SS One course. CZ Seminar version of Cultural Anthropology 109. Instructor: O'Barr. Anthropology and the Motion Picture. Linguistics 120D. Gender and Culture. Mexico. CCI. C-L: see Linguistics 102. Focus will be on films about Kenya. Current Topics in Linguistics. Instructor: O'Barr. SS Advanced study of an area of linguistics or grammar. Anthropology of Law. Languages of the World. Film/Video/Digital 117. 112. Visual Studies 110E. CCI. Discussions focus on critical film reviews. the export of political ideologies. Examination of motives for foreign travel and experiences of living abroad as depicted in films. CCI. Anthropology and the Motion Picture. the globalization of TV culture. advertising as a reflector and/or creator of social and cultural values. Women's Studies. International Comparative Studies 102E 116S. CCI. Sociology 160. and the South Pacific. Instructor: O'Barr. One course. 110. Study of Sexualities. law-making institutions and processes. Instructor: O'Barr. C-L: International Comparative Studies 101E. Visual Studies 110B. Western Europe. One course. One course. Markets and Management Studies. C-L: International Comparative Studies 103E. issues of anthropological theory and the theory of representation. Markets and Management Studies 111. dispute resolution. SS Explanation of differing beliefs about gender crossculturally. Instructor: Allison. Consideration of how other cultures are romanticized and orientalized in movies. and values. Women's Studies 117. and advertising and world culture. Films about each of the cases to be screened. 216 Courses and Academic Programs . SS Globalization examined through some of its dominant cultural forms—the marketing of pop music. 113. C-L: Visual Studies 110C 109S. as well as students' own insights. Policy Journalism and Media. advertising and language. English 120D. Women's Studies 114. Consideration also given to representations of femininity in advertising. Independent ethnographic research on a phenomenon in mass culture required. Policy Journalism and Media. Instructor: O'Barr. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective. Instructor: Allison or Silverblatt. CCI. Markets and Management Studies. Advertising and Masculinity. SS Same as Cultural Anthropology 110 except instruction is provided in lecture and discussion group each week. CCI. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective. Instructor: O'Barr. Japan. Policy Journalism and Media. SS Gender representations in advertising. women. focusing on masculinity. Film/Video/Digital 110D. ALP. and ethnic minorities. by comparison with dominant themes about gender in our own cultural history and contemporary ideological struggles. the spread of markets and commodities. Women's Studies. and the relation of law to politics. with examples from other time periods and other national advertising traditions. advertisements as cultural myths. ALP. SS History and development of commercial advertising. Special focus given to the way in which these forms both affect and are transformed by local cultures in Africa. SS Comparative approach to jurisprudence and legal practice. International Comparative Studies. One course. Russia. culture. also C-L: English 114. C-L: English 120. Study of Sexualities. One course. effects on children. One course.

ALP. regional diversity. Sociology 125. films. SS Key themes in Latin American societies. SS Constructions of gender and sexuality in different African societies.East Asia. and travel. Christianity. history. R. ALP. CZ. EI. Global Health 126. Global Health. Religion 161U. sex and gender. SS Introduction to the study of contemporary China. and reform. SS One course. Women's Studies 128. International Comparative Studies 102F. CCI. Instructor: Litzinger. Travelogues. Culture and Politics in Latin America. literature. also C-L: History 137. One course. One course. CCI. The Cognitive Science of Religion & Morality. Muslim World: Transformations and Continuities. CZ. Documentary Studies 132. EI One course. including art. CL: Visual Studies 110G. Political Science 125. and Latin America. CCI. C-L: see Dance 110A. C-L: African and African American Studies 108S. Comparative Approaches to Global Issues (B. also C-L: Religion 161V. One course. Film/Video/Digital 138S. or Starn. SS The diversity of social practices within the community of Islam. and rebellion and revolution. also C-L: Visual Studies 104B. and social change. C-L: English 101CS. and (post) colonialism. CCI. Gender and Sexuality in Africa. One course. West African Rootholds in Dance. Readings on identity. C-L: see Music 133S. One course. Litzinger. diaspora communities. Instructor: Nelson or Starn. also C-L: African and African American Studies 131S 134S. Related issues of power and inequality. violence. gender. History 150BS. violence and human rights. Key themes include family and kinship. Culture and Politics in Africa. CZ. One course. C-L: see Dance 110B. Instructor: Holsey. SS One course. ALP One course. literature. Visual Studies 117KS. orientalism. CZ One course. West African Rootholds in Dance. Asian and African Languages and Literature 110A. Particular emphasis on gender relations. CZ. Representing the Middle East. Culture and Politics in China. C-L: see Documentary Studies 105S. Instructors: Goknar and Stein. CCI. Instructor: Allison. economic development. the politics of modernity. CCI. CCI. International Comparative Studies 120A. film. International Comparative Studies 101F. & Islam. Instructor: Ewing. Piot. ALP. CZ. also C-L: Film/Video/Digital 139S. One course. SS Diverse representations of the Middle East by communities inside and outside the region. C-L: see African and African American Studies 183S 125. Asian and African Languages and Literature 110B. African Mbira Music: An Experiential Learning Class. Visual Studies 103CS Cultural Anthropology (CULANTH) 217 . Thinking About God: The Nature of Religious Belief at the Crossrds of Judaism. SS One course. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 102G. Turkish 133 120B. Visual Studies 110H. C-L: see Philosophy 135. Public Policy Studies 105S. International Comparative Studies 141B. including Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora. CCI. C-L: International Comparative Studies 130A. CCI One course. Africa and the Slave Trade. D). EI. Political Science 156S. CZ. and the representation of Chinese identity through popular media. Religion 161A 129B. C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 132. revolution. Turkish 132. CCI. C-L: Religion 119. C-L: see International Comparative Studies 125. Religion 183. History 131B. photography. religious movements. ethnic minority relations. C-L: International Comparative Studies 122. The Documentary Experience: A Video Approach. also C-L: African and African American Studies 110B. C-L: see African and African American Studies 122. ALP. International Comparative Studies 122A. SS One course. CCI. C-L: see Philosophy 132. Islamic Studies 133S. newspapers/media and memoir from the late nineteenth-century Ottoman context to the modern Middle East. Turkish 136 121. Documentary Studies 129A. also C-L: African and African American Studies 110A. CCI One course. Documentary Film/Video Theory and Practice. Religion 161B 131S. Women's Studies 188 122B.

also C-L: African and African American Studies 140S. CCI. How the various situations of Muslim minorities can contribute to anthropological understandings of identity. with particular attention to local debates and controversies focused on Muslims. Religious Movements. EI One course. secularism. especially post 9-11. and diaspora. CCI. CZ One course. CCI. SS The nature of human social identities. ALP. SS Religious responses to modernity and colonialism. Marxism and Society. Medieval and Renaissance Studies 147A. CCI. History 115C. ALP. C-L: Religion 173 139. CCI. and the nature of human rights. Dance and Dance Theater of Asia. EI One course. SS The varieties of Muslim experience in Europe and North America. CZ One course. also C-L: Documentary Studies 147. also C-L: International Comparative Studies. Instructor: Staff. CZ. Instructor: Ewing. FL One course. SS One course. CCI. International Comparative Studies 141A. International Comparative Studies 170E 149B. also C-L: History 102G. International Comparative Studies.135. Visual Studies 126BS 141. Ethics 149. CCI. CCI. unexamined understandings of religion. CCI. Asian and African Languages and Literature 154 149C. International Comparative Studies 132S 136. C-L: see Dance 149. Sociology 139. Social Life. Theater Studies 132. CZ One course. ethics of racism. CZ. Medieval and Renaissance Studies 146A. also C-L: Education 139. Documentary Studies 145B. Religion 161N. C-L: see Literature 181A. CZ. folk-concepts of race. ALP. also C-L: English 180. CZ One course. CCI. Includes visits to local mosques. One course. International Comparative Studies 102A 218 Courses and Academic Programs . C-L: see Religion 147. CZ One course. How Muslim practices can affect Western common. Information Science and Information Studies. 145A. also C-L: History 101G. ALP. CCI. Religion 161C. ethnicity. What's Lost in Translation? Latin American Theater in English. CZ One course. Religion and social change in complex societies. World Music: Aesthetic and Anthropological Approaches. CCI. One course. C-L: see Dance 158. C-L: see Portuguese 140S. International Comparative Studies 140AS. Introduction to Islamic Civilization. also C-L: Women's Studies 111. C-L: see Spanish 129S. the contexts in which they are shaped. Ethics 148. C-L: see Religion 146. CCI. ALP. and the processes by which they change. also C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 136. C-L: see Dance 175. C-L: see African and African American Studies 107. African and African American Studies 158. One course. C-L: Psychology 113A. CZ. The psychology and politics of conversion. Self and Society. Women's Studies 144. CZ. C-L: see Music 136. C-L: Religion 161T 135S. Instructor: Ewing. CCI. also C-L: Theater Studies 133. One course. SS Human variation and the historical development of concepts of race. and the political and economic causes of racism. ALP. ALP. ALP. science and scientific racism. CZ. EI. Dance and Religion in Asia and Africa. W One course. Introduction to Islamic Civilization. Introduction to African Studies. The Anthropology of Race. History 186. Music. Instructor: Ewing. C-L: see Dance 147. History and Practice of the Dance and Dance-theatre of India. Political Science 174 138. ALP. and Scenes. CZ One course. Gender in Dance and Theatre. R. Theater Studies 134. Asian and African Languages and Literature 176. Muslims in the West. Asian and African Languages and Literature 149. CCI. also C-L: Religion 161J. Brazilian Popular Culture. also C-L: Theater Studies 127S. International Comparative Studies 170C 149A. May include an optional servicelearning component. C-L: see Music 137.

Instructor: Kirk. Arab-Israeli Conflict. Gender and Language. Early Childhood Education 166. the effect of language on thought. foreign policy and international humanitarian law. politics. and cultural issues. EI. SS The influence of society on human personality and cognition. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 161. EI. also C-L: Documentary Studies 165. Directed Study on Contemporary China. Palestine. R One course. Israel. Islamic Studies 153. One course. CCI. Magical Modernities. R. Islamic Studies 160D. SS Introduction to the foundations and development of the human rights movement. Required participation in service learning. also C-L: Religion 161F. SS Introduction to Israeli and Palestinian culture. Political Science 100G. sexuality. The Anthropology of Hinduism: From Encounter to Engagement. and the challenges of justice and reconciliation around the world. Ethics of both the Israeli occupation and the Palestinian resistance struggles against occupation. emotions. CCI. Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Development: A View from Japan (C. SS One course. CCI. SS One course. Women's Studies 151 161S. SS One course. Human Rights Activism. CCI. CZ. in China. CZ. From early Zionist settlement in Palestine in the late nineteenth century and concluding with the 'Peace Process' of the 1990s. C-L: Psychology 113B. CCI. Documenting Religion. CCI. parent-child interaction. C-L: History 163G. also C-L: Political Science 100GA 164S. Psychological Anthropology (C.S. D). Linguistics 174 Cultural Anthropology (CULANTH) 219 .150. R. CZ. Theoretical and ethnographic studies used to explore topics that may include gender. Explore themes related to mass violence and social conflict. ALP. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 101G 168S. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 111 154D. also C-L: Film/Video/Digital 111H. C-L: Political Science 124S 162AS. Instructor: Stein. Farmworkers in North Carolina: Roots of Poverty. One course. C-L: see Documentary Studies 164S 174. C-L: see Turkish 135. ALP. C-L: see History 160D 161. R. C-L: see African and African American Studies 150. Themes in Chinese Culture and History. One course. CCI. Jewish Studies 140. and society and the central historical events of the Israel/ Palestinian conflict. W One course. Visual Studies 103GS 162S. C-L: see History 154CD 155. C-L: see Documentary Studies 162S 163. CZ. C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 159. C-L: see Russian 174. also C-L: Religion 161QS. P). CCI. CZ. C-L: see Documentary Studies 168S. Contemporary Israeli Cinema. ALP. R. Emphasis on the changing nature of human rights work and the expanding. Roots of Change. SS One course. C-L: see Chinese 193. EI One course. and the Israeli military reoccupation of the Palestinian territories. CCI. R One course. also C-L: English 115. International Comparative Studies 152. The History of Emotions. SS One course. CZ. CCI. History 141A. Women's Studies 174. D. C-L: see Psychology 132B. The Turks: From Ottoman Empire to European Union. Who Cares and Why: Social Activism and its Motivations. W One course. W One course. C-L: see Religion 164S. and the universality of the 'self. social. One course. the second Palestinian uprising (Intifada). Religions of the African Diaspora. R One course.' Instructor: Ewing or Quinn. CZ One course. U. FL. Jewish Studies 155. C-L: see African and African American Studies 153. Literature 112M. (Taught in China) Instructor: Staff. EI. contested boundaries of the struggle to protect basic human dignity both at home and abroad. The History of Romantic Love. SS. both historical and contemporary. also C-L: Religion 160. SS An interdisciplinary approach to explore political. ALP. International Comparative Studies 163A. CCI. CCI. CCI. CCI. CCI.

social movements. R. Current Issues in Anthropology. How cultural forms relate to political and historical processes. who speaks for nature and to what ends. Dynamics of race. One course. FL One course. 186B. 187. Independent Study. Current Issues in Anthropology. C-L: International Comparative Studies 191AS. Latin America. national. STS One course. One course. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 183. how relations among natures. Literature 163MS 191C. and transnational organizations manage the environment. Contemporary European Issues. Research Independent Study. CCI. SS. Normally taken in junior year. gender. Instructor: Baker. SS Major schools and theories of cultural anthropology. Twentieth Century. Wars and political conflicts. C-L: see Spanish 133S. The Middle East in Popular Culture. commitment. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. music. Selected topics in methodology.175. the differences between capitalist and socialist approaches to the environment. CCI. CCI. SS One course. One course. One course. sexuality. individuals. study of new theoretical writing on the relationship between humans. 180S. covering a variety of cultural forms. One course. theory. East and Southeast Asia. individually designed research project involving conduct and analysis of interviews about marriage. STS Exploration of several themes: how local. CCI. also C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 179S 180. Case studies from Africa. Instructor: Staff. Anthropology of Sports. One course. Same as Cultural Anthropology 180 except instruction is provided in seminar format. With consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies. SS Americans' cultural understandings of marriage and its central place in American life and relation to American ideas about fulfillment. 191ES. commercial and mass media. mythmaking and the culture of celebrity. CZ. CZ. nations. Attention given to the texture of (debates within) the African American intellectual community. CZ. and ethnicity. gender. C-L: see Visual Studies 184S. sexuality. One course. American Marriage: A Cultural Approach. and institutions have changed over time. History 176B 179S. CCI. ''Classic'' texts from each decade of the twentieth century. culture. Theoretical Foundations of Cultural Anthropology. International Comparative Studies 151C 190. C-L: see Linguistics 187. 186A. Interdisciplinary readings. SS The role of sports in different cultures in the contemporary world. Global Environmentalism and the Politics of Nature. One course. discuss it. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 158S. India. CCI. Explore the location of the authors' work within its historical and political contexts. protect and defend it. Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic. CCI. W Ideas about race. Instructor: Stein. and identity still shape strategies for African American empowerment and securing the ideals of democracy in the United States. CZ. Variety in Language: English in the United States. Instructor: Staff. race. autonomy. 220 Courses and Academic Programs . ALP. African American Intellectual History. Instructor: Staff. under the supervision of a faculty member. CZ. study it. Instructor: Starn. resulting in an academic product. also C-L: English 187. and the United States. and gender roles. and comic books. One course. fantasy and desire. 182. including film. love. Instructor: Quinn. C-L: African and African American Studies 178. or area. SS Popular culture in the Middle East and images of the Middle East in United States' popular culture. One course. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. With consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies. Visual Cultures of Medicine.

ideologies. South and East Asia. Gender and Sexuality in Latin America. Literature 132BS. drawn from Latin America. Medical Anthropology. China. migration. Various societies' organization of health care specialists. Japan. Focus on the interrelationship between the analysis of globalization and policy formulation on such topics as social justice. Case studies from the United States. Gender. International Comparative Studies 130B. Nineteenth-century travel and imperialism. colonialism. SS Sexual practices that involve transactions of money in different cultural and historical settings. ethical systems. Relations among men. running amok. Turkey. "mestizos. CCI. Globalizing Consumer Cultures." revolutionaries." Malinches. capital. One course. Latin American Studies." "virgenes. ecologically sensitive use of environmental resources. The historic emergence of a middle class in the United States and elsewhere in the world. STS Cross cultural experiences and understanding of health and illness. SS The politics and process of globalization in light of the responses. Study of Sexualities 191N. Sex and Money. One course. C-L: see African and African American Studies 192H." "travestis. and shamans. the relationship between leisure and power. Instructor: Stein. including "regular" marriage practices that involve exchanges of money and goods as well as extramarital practices where one party is selling bodily acts. One course. globalization and consumption. and globalization. One course. and citizenship. India. Reading materials on sexual practices in different cultural contexts (including Tonga. labor. Travel. and theoretical analyses. Women's Studies 181S 191R. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 191J. EI." "machos. One course. Class. sophisticated political and religious structures. CCI. CZ. film. and Power. Cultural Anthropology (CULANTH) 221 . 191T. C-L: International Comparative Studies 101H 191QS. CZ. attention deficit disorder). Indonesia). The African Diaspora. Instructor: Litzinger. SS The global spread of forms of consumer culture and their local appropriations. CCI. C-L: Women's Studies 189. Africa. and gender inflected experiences of health. politics. its complex economic organization. 191P. CZ. Brazil. religion. Instructor: Nelson. The role of stereotypes. nationalism. and magnificent architecture and material culture." "mujeres Mayas. and nature. including ethnography. The Inca Empire and Colonial Legacies. SS. SS Gender and sexuality as strands within complex fabrics of identification. CCI. Instructor: Fehervary. class. CCI. the possibility of specific gender formations in that geographical region. How gender and sexuality affect and are affected by other forms of identification such as race and ethnicity. race. sex and exploitation. Culture-specific sickness (like envidia. C-L: History 179BS 191H.technology. CCI. One course. SS Focus on the history of the Inca empire. "cochones. CCI. gringos and gringas. Examination of the ethics and politics of these exchanges questioning who benefits from them (and who not) and how to also assess other bodily transactions including prostitution and surrogacy. The way local requirements for social respectability and "normalcy" are increasingly defined by the imagined lifestyles of average citizens in so-called "first world" countries. poverty. Anthropological case studies. SS One course. Comparisons made in terms of culture. Russia. and economy. natural resource management. women. How the empire's descendents accommodated and challenged the forces of Spanish colonialism. Instructor: Davis. CZ. C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 157S. Instructor: Allison. Instructor: Silverblatt. the role of gender. Ghana. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 191FS. One course. Globalization and Anti-Globalization. particularly the phenomenon of a globalizing "middleclass" culture and its local variations world wide. throughout the whole continent of the Americas. One course. Thailand. voudon priestesses. the body and non-biological aspects of medicine. and practices of the anti-globalization movement. Latin America. including biomedical doctors. contemporary tourism. and Europe. Instructor: Litzinger.

One course. R One course. and cultural biography. 198S. and required for credit for 195S. R One course. SS Popular culture in Bolivia examined through documentary study and field work. CCI. Anthropology and Psychology (C. C-L: see Russian 202. SS. CCI.191U. observation. ethnohistory. One course. W Anthropology as a discipline (a field of study) and the site where anthropologists work: the field. W Same as Cultural Anthropology 191T except taught in writing intensive manner. one of the social sciences. Medical Anthropology. CZ. C-L: Psychology 249S 254. SS Same as Linguistics 199 except instruction is provided in a seminar format. SS Recent scholarship that combines anthropology and history. One course.) Instructor: Staff. SS One course. Special Topics in Linguistics. C-L: see Linguistics 213S. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 253. One course. FL. Linguistics and Law. or graduate standing. Instructor: Reddy. STS. R. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 260. also CL: English 206 203S. CCI. Consent of director of undergraduate studies required. 194. Fieldwork Methods: Cultural Analysis and Interpretation. C-L: see Linguistics 203S 213S. psychoanalysis. including applications of social psychology. Instructor: Nelson. or comparative area studies. One course. also C-L: English 215S 249S. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 222 Courses and Academic Programs . the study of mentalité. Taught in Bolivia. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 262. Instructor: Staff. Consent of director of undergraduate studies required. CCI. communication. SS One course. Instructor: Staff. One course. For Seniors and Graduates 200. Instructor: Staff. EI. ALP. and trans-cultural psychiatry to anthropological questions such as culturally expressed psychic conflicts and pathologies. rationality. R One course. CZ. affect. 202. P). CZ. CCI. Prerequisite: major in history. and motivations. One course. C-L: Global Health 195S. Combines theories of anthropological fieldwork methods with practice. SS Theoretical and methodological guidelines for the construction of a genuine Andean anthropology according to contemporary sociocultural rules. EI. One course. CCI. Modern Japanese Literature and Culture. SS. and interviews. gender and sexuality. Senior Seminar Distinction Program Sequence. (Taught in Bolivia. Instructor: Staff. Anthropology and History. Senior Seminar Distinction Program Sequence. Instructor: Staff. African Modernities. ALP. One course. Instructor: Staff. This requirement may also be satisfied by taking Cultural Anthropology 100 Duke in Ghana Anthropological Field Research. Semiotics of Culture. R. W Continuation of Cultural Anthropology 195S. Workshop on Popular Culture. CCI. structural history. especially using oral history. 199H. including culture history. The value of the concept of culture to history and the concepts of duration and event for anthropology. Students undertake original research in a local fieldsite of their choice and produce their own mini-ethnography. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Cultural Anthropology. SS One course. 196S. C-L: History 210S 208S. CCI. Language Evolution and Acquisition. ALP. CCI Topics differ by section. One course. R No credit for Cultural Anthropology 195S without satisfactory completion of Cultural Anthropology 196S. Andean Anthropology. also C-L: International Comparative Studies 207S. including participation. C-L: see African and African American Studies 213S. East Asian Cultural Studies. SS Cross-cultural approaches to the psyche. 199J. Instructor: Staff.

CCI. performed and inhabited. R. Readings in the work of Lefebvre. Tracking the theories of contemporary scholars of the global. 287S. ethnic. SS. subaltern. R. women's studies. and the geographic and cartographic histories of imperialism. race and gender. and political protest in the United States and around the world. Anthropological frameworks and related disciplinary approaches to the multiple cultural productions and lived experiences under divergent forms of capitalism in the new millennium. political and psychodynamic terms within colonial and modernizing contexts. Masculinities. consumption. social movements. CZ One course. CZ. Instructor: Piot. SS Modernization and ideologies of progress and nationalism. Consent of instructor required for undergraduate students. cultural studies. and justice for all. Instructor: Stein. Special topics in methodology. Pratt. Instructors: Allison and Litzinger. Instructor: Silverblatt. Role of scholarship and the media in constituting hegemonic. globalization and anti-globalization movements. CCI. SS One course. One course. revolution. One course. Theories of capitalism. sexuality and sexual identity. nature and the virtual. Spatial components of globalization. and examining new multisited strategies of method. Millennial Capitalisms: Global Perspectives. 281S. One course. also C-L: African and African American Studies 200S. Seminar in Selected Topics. how identities are forged out of space. SS Examines relationship between space and power by studying how communities make and negotiate spaces. C-L: History 287BS. Women's Studies 225S. Ethnohistory of Latin America. female.264S. CCI. Research Methods in Japanese. and Democracy. C-L: African and African American Studies 279S 280. and stigmatized masculinities. SS Analysis of what can be known about nonwestern cultures described in texts written by European colonizers. Focus on East Asia. Development. Selected Topics. Aims to develop a critical. SS Critical examination of the problematic of capital from the late nineteenth century until the present moment. CCI. theory. One course. Space. Instructor: Staff. Place. also CL: History 292. and disciplinary practices of the body. and the relationship between cultural and spatial practices. Literature 200S 290. CZ. Harvey. SS Critical examination of issues in transnational studies in anthropology and beyond. CZ. Interdisciplinary readings from disciplines of geography. Instructor: Starn. Foucault. CCI. C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 230S. One course. "imaginaries" and fantasies. democratic freedom. R. anthropology. and Power. Some prior background in cultural anthropology or social theory preferred. Literature 287S 286S. Modernity. SS How masculinities are constructed. W The paradox of racial inequality in societies that articulate principles of equality. Instructor: Staff. Seminar in Asian and African Cultural Studies. Literature 287BS 288S. Transnationalism and Public Culture. 285S. Focus on native peoples whose lives were transformed by Spanish colonialism. we explore the emerging ethnographic landscape of the global and the role transnational studies is playing in a revitalized anthropology of the twenty-first century. CCI. Instructor: Ewing. C-L: International Comparative Studies 221BS 279S. Theorization of the masculine subject in sociocultural. CCI. CCI. Stoler. C-L: see Japanese 291. 280S. One course. and Social Movements. Political Science 291. C-L: Women's Studies 281S 284S. urban studies and others. Racism. One course. theoretical approach to space and spatiality. Sociology 291 Cultural Anthropology (CULANTH) 223 . or area. Race. with particular attention to post-Inca Andean Societies. C-L: see Asian and African Languages and Literature 200S. Issues of gendered citizenship. and others. One course. Same as Cultural Anthropology 280 except instruction provided in seminar format. One course. Instructor: Baker.

schedule the oral defense for some time in early or mid-April. and one additional course at any level (this may include courses taken in the Focus Program). and 194. Related courses in other departments are strongly advised. also C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 207S.3 grade point average in the major. In addition. Due in April of the senior year. A total of ten courses distributed in the following manner: Cultural Anthropology 94. and present their findings to the public. Russian 203S. archival or library research. where they will learn about research methods and prepare a thesis. It should consist of three faculty members who offer the student advice and support in preparing the thesis. The thesis can be based on original fieldwork on a topic of the student's choice. the thesis must be judged of at least B+ quality by the supervisory committee to receive distinction. complete the research and writing by April and submit the final draft to the supervisory committee. three courses at the 100 level or above. Each student's advisor will recommend a program of related work to complement the student's concentration and interests in cultural anthropology. Suggested Work in Related Disciplines. To pursue distinction. students must then enroll in the senior seminar. six courses at the 100 level or above. defend the thesis in an oral examination given by the supervisory committee. German 264S 299S. including at least one at the 191 level or above. music in the African diaspora (drawing on summer study in Ghana). THE MINOR Requirements. CCI. Qualified juniors will be notified each year by the director of undergraduate studies about their eligibility. one additional cultural anthropology course at any level. and the consolidation of Korean-American identity through the 1992 Los Angeles rebellion. the student must pass an oral examination on the thesis. 224 Courses and Academic Programs . Students must take at least five of their ten courses with instructors whose primary appointment is in the Department of Cultural Anthropology.291S. or some combination of various anthropological methods. which is given on its completion by the supervisory committee.0 grade point average overall and a 3. Students who fulfill the above requirements graduate with distinction in cultural anthropology. take the senior seminar in fall and spring. At least two of the members must be faculty from the cultural anthropology department. No more than three courses may be transferred from other institutions or study abroad. 190. One course. both of which must be maintained to graduation for the student to be eligible for distinction. patterns of socialization of Mormon youth in Utah. Cultural Anthropology 195S and Cultural Anthropology 196S. form a supervisory committee. Romance Studies 202S. Admission to the program requires a 3. Instructor: Staff. C-L: see Latin American Studies 202S. THE MAJOR Major Requirements. Previous topics have ranged from studies of the influence of feminism in cultural anthropology to causes of revolution in Latin America. who research and write a senior thesis on a topic of their own choice in close collaboration with members of the cultural anthropology faculty. Departmental Graduation with Distinction The department offers an intensive and personalized Graduation with Distinction program to qualified seniors. The student also forms a supervisory committee for the thesis during the fall of the senior year. in the fall and spring of their senior year. A total of five courses distributed in the following manner: Cultural Anthropology 94. Special Topics in Linguistics. CCI One course. SS Same as Linguistics 299 except instruction is provided in a seminar format. A typical sequence would be: select a research topic. Research Methods In International Area Studies. Credit for Cultural Anthropology 195S and Cultural Anthropology 196S is given for a passing grade whether or not the student is awarded distinction.

Half course. Half course. Instructor: Dickinson. Khalsa. Khalsa. Modern Dance IV. Continuation of Dance 62. Prerequisite: Dance 60 or equivalent. Students are encouraged to enroll in a summer session with the American Dance Festival. Prerequisite: Dance 62 or equivalent. Ballet Fundamentals. Khalsa. 63. Professor of the Practice Emeritus Taliaferro. Courses in technique and performance may be repeated for credit. or staff. improvisation. Cultural body behaviors are the movement vocabularies from which dance forms are made. creation.Dance (DANCE) Associate Professor of the Practice Khalsa. and physical capabilities. the Dance Program emphasizes a balanced integration between the creative/performance and the historical/theoretical aspects of dance. Through the Duke in New York Arts Program a student has the opportunity in the fall semester of the junior or senior year to pursue the study of dance in New York City. No previous dance experience necessary. expressive. and provides a learning environment that challenges the student's intellectual. 62. Director of the Program. Modern Dance III. Modern Dance V. body alignment. 66. Because dance integrates the physical. . 64. A culture's values are embodied (literally and figuratively) in its dance forms. Increased complexity of movement sequences and greater emphasis on clarity of expression and quality of performance. Khalsa. Assistant Professors of the Practice Shah and Vinesett. A movement course exploring modern dance through technique. Modern Dance I. Modern Dance II. creative. and culturally specific dance forms both contemporary and historical. Prerequisite: Dance 63 or equivalent. Half course. The field of dance includes the practice. or staff. vocabulary. Khalsa. or staff. The aim of the program is to develop students who are sensitive and articulate physical and verbal communicators of the visual art of dance and who are proficient in the analysis of dance in its cultural manifestations. and analysis of theatrical. A maximum total of four course credits (made up of partial credit courses) in technique and performance courses may count toward the thirty four courses required for graduation. 61. The observation and analysis of dance in its cultural context is central to the study of cultures and a vital aspect of exploration in cross-cultural inquiry. and for most civilizations of the world. Courses in technique and performance (partial credit courses) and theory courses (full course credit) are offered. Half course. and composition. observation. Assistant Professor of the Practice of Ballet Walters. Half course. Associate Professor of the Practice Emeritus Dorrance A major or minor is available in this program. emotive and intellectual spheres. One course credit earned at the American Dance Festival may be counted toward the requirements of the major or minor. social. Instructor: Dickinson. Instructor: Dickinson. Choreographic and developmental processes and technical disciplines are the foundations that define every dance form. Courses in Technique and Performance (half-credit courses) 60. and musicality for the absolute beginner. dance is one of the most important expressions of their worldview. Director of Undergraduate Studies. Associate Professor of the Practice Dickinson. Barre and center exercises included. Prerequisite: Dance 61 or equivalent. Instructor: Dickinson. Dance (DANCE) 225 . Basic classical ballet technique. Instructor: Walters. or staff. Instructor: Dickinson. Half course. Appropriate courses taken at New York University may fulfill a requirement of the major or minor.

and tours included in allegro combinations. 77. Half course. Half course. like all classical dances of India. An introduction to Kathak. Jazz Dance II. Emphasis on greater technical proficiency. style. Continuation of Dance 73. Senegal. Instructor: Walters or staff. Instructor: Vinesett. Prerequisite: Dance 73 or equivalent. Prerequisite: a semester of ballet or equivalent. 84. The study of choreography and performance through participation in the mounting of a dance work from inception through rehearsal to performance. the dynamic art form that emerged in Brazil during the era of the Atlantic Slave Trade and blends music. Daily training for the performing student at the advanced/professional level. Intermediate/Advanced Tap Dance. Half course. acrobatic movement. 70. Barre work concentrating on body alignment and correct placement within the ballet vocabulary followed by center adagio and allegro sequences. Half course. Repertory: African Dance. Ballet II. Instructor: Walters or staff. which. occupational and religious functions. 226 Courses and Academic Programs . Individual Dance Program: Special Topics. 68. 82. clarity of expression and quality of performance. 83. Half course. The study of choreography and performance through participation in the mounting of a dance work from inception through rehearsal to performance. 85. ritual. Ballet I.67. Half course. The study of choreography and performance through participation in the mounting of a dance work from inception through rehearsal to performance. Introduction to African dance styles and related rhythmic structures from selected countries such as Guinea. pirouettes. Prerequisite: Dance 68 or equivalent. African Dance Technique I. No previous dance experience required. and religious functions. Repertory: Ballet. 73. Taught in the context of their social. Half course. Capoeira: Brazilian Dance/Martial Art. Fundamentals of Kathak's facial expressions. Progression of Dance 71 with increased emphasis on line. Nigeria and Cote d'Ivoire. 74. and intricately complex footwork which creates rhythmic sound patterns using ankle bells. Half course. Prerequisite: Dance 70 or equivalent. Instructor: Medler. Half course. 81. Instructor: Dickinson. Instructor: Walters. Half course. 69. Consent of instructor required. Half course. Half course. Half course. and performance-level quality and technique. Instructor: Shah. Repertory: Modern. 72. Half course. Ballet III. Continuation of Dance 78. African Dance Technique II. 78. and combat. Instructor: Vinesett. Ballet IV. Instructor: Walters or staff. Dances from selected African ethnic groups providing increasingly complex movement sequences and rhythmic structures. 80. Instructor: Staff. Half course. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. The study of choreography and performance through participation in the mounting of a dance work from inception through rehearsal in performance. graceful movements of the arms and torso. synthesizes physical energy and spiritual power. 79. Instructor: Wheeler. Prerequisite: Dance 69 or equivalent. Consent of instructor required. Kathak: Classical Dance of North India. Jazz Dance I. Half course. Instructor: Walters or staff. Taught in the context of their social. Diverse batterie. occupational. Khalsa. Introduction to Capoeira. Instructor: Wheeler. Instructor: Staff. 71. Prerequisite: Dance 78 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Shah. Barre work concentrating on body alignment and correct placement within the ballet vocabulary followed by center adagio and allegro sequences. Greater complexity of barre and center sequences with increased emphasis on correctness of style and quality of performance. Ballet V. Prerequisite: previous training at the intermediate level. Instructor: Staff. Repertory Kathak: Classical Indian Dance. Half course. Consent of instructor required. or staff. Prerequisite: Dance 71 or equivalent.

development and core elements of hip-hop dance culture. C-L: see Religion 114 128. the function of dance in various cultural settings. Lab component introduces students to the complex footwork. Tharp. 88. Asia and Africa. and American modern dance). fashion. inhabitants of Spain. Half course. C-L: African and African American Studies 110A. Daily movement. One course. personal and group identity. One course. Instructor: Green. Nijinski. Balanchine. notation. CZ One course. Repertory: Jazz Dance. CCI Same lecture as Dance 110A but dance laboratory requires a prerequisite. influenced. Topics vary each semester offered. and the intentions of the dance-makers. a dance and music form of southern Spain forged by a remarkable intercultural exchange among Arabic. One course. and other major choreographers in the classical idiom. and a reflection of cultural change. 110A. ALP. Half course. Instructor: Vinesett. videos. to analyze movement. baile (dance). aesthetic values. and Iberian cultures. Study of choreography and performance through participation in the mounting of a dance work in the jazz idiom from inception through rehearsal to performance. ALP. West African Rootholds in Dance. and how they initiated. Introduction to Dance. language. Instructor: Santana. and their relationship to movement and dance. A studio course to learn the "lindy-hop" (jitterbug) and a variety of related steps and partnering including simple lifts. ALP Works by Fokine. Religion 161A 110B. First-Year Seminar. Theory Courses 49S. musicality. Flamenco's place in the cultural life of Spain and its evolution to contemporary forms. Hip-Hop. Using dance as a time-line the course explores the history. C-L: see Theater Studies 95FCS 101. Half course. The Art and Cultural History of Flamenco. music structures. along with written assignments. classical dances of Europe. West African Rootholds in Dance. Cultural Anthropology 129B. Ballet Masterworks of the Twentieth Century. Instructor: Dickinson or Shah. dance as an educative force. One course. Dance examined through the historical and aesthetic frames. Practical emphasis on rhythmic analysis. absorbed and responded to modernist and post-modernist Dance (DANCE) 227 . Asian and African Languages and Literature 110B. ALP. CCI A lecture and dance laboratory course that explores three West African traditional dance forms and their relationship to the religious and social life in Africa and the Diaspora. Introduction to some of the major forms of world dance (for example. and physical style of flamenco. CCI Dance as a reflection of historical and current cultural values. rhythms. 95FCS. CZ A lecture and dance laboratory course that examines the history of Flamenco. how dance forms illuminate and define gender. ALP One course. Tudor. One course. research project. 87. One course. in terms of its affect on the continuity and transformation of physical texts as cultural heritage. ALP. Forsythe. Hip-Hop. Cultural Anthropology 129A. CCI. T'ai Chi and Chinese Thought. Swing Dance. C-L: International Comparative Studies 104A 104. Taught in English. and to read the text of dance structure. Instructor: Staff. mindful listening. rhythm and/or choreographic exercises. political and religious status. Instructor: Vinesett. a facilitator of cultural acquisition. music and dance styles. Examination of the three elements of flamenco: cante (song). Music and Movement. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. Judaic. C-L: African and African American Studies 110B. The Art of Transformation: A Workshop in Movement and Theater. Instructor: Hanks. as inner-city culture that has created its own art. C-L: Spanish 128 130. Religion 161B 114. Instructor: Badu. how to look at dance. and choreography/composition. ALP Exploration of elements of music. Guest lecturers. and subsequently enriched by rhythms and influences from the East Indian gypsies and from Latin America. Asian and African Languages and Literature 110A. Prerequisite: Dance 78 or equivalent.86. and toque (guitar). CCI. Useful for dance students and others interested in the dance/music connection.

One course. lighting and costuming. International Comparative Studies 170C 151. Religion 161J. R Continuation of the basic elements of movement. CCI Modern dance as an art of individuals who created new dance styles that challenged established systems of culture and pushed the boundaries of good taste. sets. C-L: see Theater Studies 140S 147. Advanced Dance Composition. Experimentation with devices for movement manipulation and choreographic forms through longer movement studies. Instructor: Shah. 140S. and joints) as specifically applied to dance technique approached through observation. Concepts of efficient use and questions of misuse of the body in motion or at rest. weight. ALP. German expressionism and the religions of Asia. One course. The Americanization of theatrical dance in the bicultural environment of the United States during the 1930s and '40s. Instructor: Staff. Thailand and Cambodia. Rasa theory of aesthetic rapture and audience reception. flow) and their choreographic applications explored through structured improvisation. which reinstructed what kinds of movements were considered ''dance'' and what kind of dance was considered art. dance as an integral component of the national and regional identity of the people. bones. ritual. Instructor: Dickinson or Khalsa. new anthropological studies. CZ Asian dance and dance theater performance genres and the cultural aesthetics that inform them. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 149B. One course. Native Americans and African Americans. videos. One course. 1890-1950. short movement studies. R The basic elements of movement (time. ALP The functional anatomy of the musculoskeletal system (muscles. or African) or consent of instructor. ALP. Asian and African Languages and Literature 154 149. 135S. fostering the rebirth of modern dance in Europe between 1970-90. Korean. Instructor: Dickinson or Khalsa. spiritual importance of disciplined training. CCI. Cultural traditions of China. ALP. Indonesia. CCI. 228 Courses and Academic Programs . analysis. and movement exploration. ALP. ALP. One course. Videos of dancing. History and Practice of the Dance and Dance-theatre of India. and dance demonstrations.ideas and trends. embracing performance art and film. Asian and African Languages and Literature 149. Social forms of entertainment in their cultural context. 1950-2000. folk and royal court forms of artistic performance. Instructor: Shah. Ancient treatises on Indian dramaturgy. The transformation of the classical aesthetic through the century. ALP. 132S. The Victory of the Iconoclasts: Postmodern Dance. and selected readings. Guest artists. W An examination of American modern dance since the 1950s. and now re-absorbing and recycling the new forms it helped to create. Prerequisite: Dance 135S or consent of instructor. Iconoclasts and Visionaries: Modern Dance. international influences from France. Colonialism and nationalism in relation to classical dance. 131S. the intercultural translation and adaptation of Asian performance disciplines to the West. Solo Performance. legends and symbolic interpretations that underlie the thematic core of these performance traditions. Choreographing and directing ensembles. Prerequisite: a beginning level dance technique course (modern. space. Dance and Dance Theater of Asia. choreographic devices and forms explored in 135S. The mythology. One course. Instructor: Walters. dance as an emerging public culture in post-independence India. India. and the expressive interpretation of the poetics in the traditional forms of performance. theater and hip hop. W One course. viewing of videotaped dances. The use of props. Theater Studies 133. jazz. ALP. Functional Anatomy for Dancers. the relationship of music to dance. One course. Indian dance in Diaspora. Theater Studies 134. workshops. One course. Reflection and commentary on contemporary mores and events. CZ National and regional forms of dance and dance-theatre of India. Dance Composition. Japan. Religion 161C. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 149. Postmodern dance as iconoclastic and inclusive. Instructor: Dickinson or Shah. ballet. performances. Religious. Instructor: Shah. guests. 136T.

development of interpretive abilities beyond the mastery of technique and style. Dance (DANCE) 229 . Overview of the basic philosophy of Sikh Dharma and the development of Sikhism and Kundalini Yoga in the Western Hemisphere. One course. ALP. and Roualt. Nijinska. 188S. Benois. Movement for the Theater. Instructor: Shah. ALP One course. C-L: Music 188S 191. The Diaghilev Ballet:1909-1929. One course. Beyond Technique: The Art of Performance. Readings in the literature of performance and imaging. Consent of instructor required. One course. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Theater Studies 132. Religion 161N. Dance 136T. 181S. Instructor: Staff. Satie. Cultural Anthropology 149C. One course. Study of Sexualities 181. Asian and African Languages and Literature 135. CCI. Research Independent Study. ALP. Consent of instructor required. CCI. composers Stravinsky. C-L: see Theater Studies 152S 175. Content to be determined each semester. C-L: Religion 161H. International Comparative Studies 102A 159S. Special Topics. One course. R Examination of the complex artistic process of performance necessary to realize the choreographer's intent. writing and discussion. CZ Dance and dance-theatre forms in relation to religious beliefs. Interprets these historically constituted social formations through an examination of the diverse cultural constructions of gender meanings. Prerequisites: Dance 135S. CZ. and mystic practices within Asian and African cultures. and how spiritual power and energy is symbolically transmitted to the dancer through religious practices. One course. Instructor: Staff. lecture. Instructor: Dickinson and Walters. Diaghilev's Ballets Russes as a creative forum for seminal figures: choreographers Fokine. Nijinsky. and Prokofiev. CCI. R Advanced study in dance composition designed to develop the student's personal mode of expression. the concept of the male embodied Onnagata. R. R See Dance 191. classic and contemporary approaches to embodying content. and Balanchine. One course. Massine. Prerequisite: intermediate/advanced level of modern. One course. One course. Instructor: Staff. One course. representations and ideologies as interpreted and expressed in dance and theatre. or African dance technique. Asian and African Languages and Literature 176. written analysis of performance. 182T. artists Bakst. CCI. CZ Introduction to Kundalini Yoga and meditation and yogic lifestyle as taught by Yogi Bhajan through practice. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Ravel. Choreography. Gender in Dance and Theatre. ALP. ALP. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Instructor: Shah and Vinesett. Content to be determined each semester. 192. vigorously coached rehearsal sessions. W The Diaghilev Ballet as a focal point for modernist movements in the arts and a revitalizing force for ballet in the West. Gontcharova. Instructor: Khalsa. Instructor: Dickinson. CZ Ways in which gender and sexuality are conceptualized in selected performance cultures. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Impact of colonialism and globalization on traditional religious performances. Kundalini Yoga and Sikh Dharma. Dance and Religion in Asia and Africa. ALP. and the notion of the female embodied Otokoyaku in the dance-theatre of Japan. International Comparative Studies 170E. Cultural Anthropology 149A. CL: Women's Studies 111. ALP. and consent of instructor. African and African American Studies 158. Research Independent Study. ballet. concepts. Instructor: Staff. Symbolic meanings of gender in relation to forms of social life and theatrical experience. How religion shapes the way the body is perceived. Instructor: Dickinson or Khalsa. International Comparative Studies 170H 158. 162S.155. Picasso. C-L: Asian and African Languages and Literature 136. The Devadasi in India. Special Topics.

10 course credits A. The Diaghilev Ballet. and issues of objectivity in ethnographic research. and therapy in dance. CZ. Open only to seniors earning a major in dance and with permission to seniors earning a minor in Dance. Research Methods in Dance Studies and Choreographic Performance. Dance and Religion 175. Instructor: Shah. I. Iconoclasts and Visionaries: Modern Dance. History of Performance Art 188S. 65 or 70. participatory experience. THE MAJOR Major Requirements: To major in Dance. history. 104. West African Rootholds in Dance 114. education. Consent of instructor required. The Victory of the Iconoclasts: Postmodern Dance. 135S. project. Ballet Masterworks of the Twentieth Century 131S. CCI. Ballet Masterworks of the Twentieth Century 131S. Two courses chosen from one of the following three concentrations: 1. created. 110A and 110B. the process of creation in accordance with the guiding metaphor that drives the choreography. or one course chosen from Music 55. History and Practice of Dance of India 149. Students develop and submit a research paper that formulates and researches an extensive individual project completed in 200T (Senior Project). R A research paper. Consent of instructor required. Dance 101. W Choreographic project to be researched. ALP. Gender in Asian Dance and Dance Theatre Performance 188S. Dance and Dance Theater of Asia 158. 1890-1950 132S. and one additional course in dance history. Open only to seniors earning a major in dance and with permission to seniors earning a minor in Dance. and the place of the work within contemporary artistic trends. Consent of instructor required. E. theory. Introduction to Dance B. A History of Ballet before 1900 130. One course. 1890-1950 132S. 1950-2000 179. ALP. The Art and Cultural History of Flamenco 129S. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing. a student must take a minimum of twelve courses. ALP. Music and Movement. or world cultures of dance selected from the following list. or program (with appropriate written documentation) under dance faculty supervision. 1950-2000 147. and performed at the end of term. One course in dance history.199S. Dance and Human Movement in its Cultural Context 110A and 110B. Dance of the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries 95FCS. an accompanying written research paper that presents the themes of the choreographic project. One course. produced. R. Dance Composition C. 1909-1929 2. Students cannot select a course that is also listed under their chosen concentration (below). choreography/practice. T'ai Chi and Chinese Thought. Theory courses . Iconoclasts and Visionaries: Modern Dance. 101. ethnography. 230 Courses and Academic Programs . Instructor: Staff. W Theory. Senior Project. R. 1909-1929 D. The Art of Transformation (Focus Program) 130. Readings in methods of interviewing and documentation. 200AT. One course. Instructor: Staff. Senior Project. The Victory of the Iconoclasts: Postmodern Dance. The Diaghilev Ballet. 200T. West African Rootholds in Dance 128. theory or world cultures of dance.

Ballet Masterworks of the Twentieth Century 131S. Functional Anatomy for Dancers. History and Practice of Dance of India 149. Senior Project H. THE MINOR Requirements. 1909-1929 The student is expected to attain and/or maintain the intermediate level of at least one of the following: modern dance. Dance Science: An Evolutionary Approach to Functional Anatomy. The Victory of the Iconoclasts 147. with clear documentation of their intellectual value to the overall goals of the major. This may be completed at any time during the four-year undergraduate experience. 82. Twenty hours total of crew and production work are required of each student. Ballet II. and two additional courses in dance at the 100 level or above. students take six course credits: two semesters (equivalent of one course credit) of repertory chosen from Dance 81. The Art and Cultural History of Flamenco 147.Two courses in repertory chosen from Dance 81. A History of Ballet before 1900 130. Jazz II). Choreography and Performance 111. B. 84 and five full-credit courses including 101 (Introduction to Dance). Dance and Dance Theater of Asia 158. 1890-1950 132S.g. Technique and performance half-credit courses—equivalent to two course credits A. 159.The Diaghilev Ballet. Research Methods in Dance Studies and Choreographic Performance G. one course in dance history. History and Practice of Dance of India 149. theory or world cultures of dance: 110A and110B.Two courses (one in each of two different dance forms) in dance technique at the second level or above (e.. 83. The Art and Cultural History of Flamenco 129S. 136T. Modern Dance II. 199S. Advanced Dance Composition. Iconoclasts and Visionaries: Modern Dance. To earn the minor in dance. 82. Choreography. Kundalini Yoga and Sikh Dharma 158. This may be completed at any time during the four-year undergraduate experience. Courses in dance history. Students majoring in Dance are expected to attain and/or maintain the high intermediate level of modern dance or ballet or African dance technique. students may petition for credit for courses offered in other programs and departments. Dance and Dance Theater of Asia 155. or world cultures of dance selected from the list below. II. Dance 135S (Dance Composition). F. Gender in Asian Dance and Dance Theatre Performance 188S. West African Rootholds in Dance 128. With the permission of the student’s dance Dance (DANCE) 231 . Gender in Asian Dance and Dance Theatre Performance 3. Two additional full-credit courses in dance. Twenty hours total of crew and production work are required of each student. theory. In addition. Dance and Religion 175. Beyond Technique: The Art of Performance 182T.128. ballet or African dance technique. 200T. 151. 83 and 84. African Dance II. Dance and Religion 175.

oral history. but not a major. Instructor: Staff. filmmakers. An active advisory procedure assists students in planning fieldwork projects and other learning opportunities. First Year Seminar. History. filmmaking. ALP. African and African-American Studies. A major goal of this program is to connect student experience and creativity to community life. 49S. Stresses aesthetic. Visual Culture and Photography. One course. folklorists. incorporating the tools of documentary photography and writing. video. and ethical considerations involved in representing other people and cultures. audio. Achievement of the program's goal is facilitated by an integrated curriculum of required and elective courses that allow students to specialize in one or more areas of documentary work. Topics vary each semester offered. During the seminar. working towards an exhibit of photographs at the end of the semester. Introduces students to a range of documentary idioms and voices. Electives chosen by the student under the guidance of the program co-director should facilitate the completion of the final project. with an emphasis on twentieth-century practice. Documentary Studies (DOCST) Associate Professor of the Practice Rankin and Adjunct Assistant Professor Thompson. The Center for Documentary Studies also houses a number of documentary projects that address issues of literacy. four related courses from the approved courses (including electives) listed in this undergraduate bulletin. These include a required survey course titled Traditions in Documentary Studies. Permission required. CoDirectors A certificate. C-L: Visual Studies 103A 102. Students will work outside class with a child who is ill and teach them how to use a Polaroid camera. A certificate is available for students who complete program requirements. SS An exploration of how children cope with illness. and a required capstone course. One course. students are expected to bring to completion one major documentary project (using audio. Art. Instructor: Moses. Participation in documentary studies courses.faculty advisor and the director of undergraduate studies. radio documentarians. oral history. musicologists. scholarly. C-L: Public Policy Studies 100S. folklore. C-L: see Visual Studies 193 232 Courses and Academic Programs . One course. photos. and farmworker advocacy that students will be exposed to through their affiliation with this program. Courses in this area are offered through the Center for Documentary Studies. and ethnographic writing. a student may be allowed to substitute other dance courses for the above requirements. CCI Traditions of documentary work seen through an interdisciplinary perspective. 100S. Documentary Studies courses teach an arts-and-humanities-based fieldwork research methodology. with the exception of the capstone course. Film/Video/Digital. Cultural Anthropology. and Public Policy Studies. including the work of photographers. Seminar in Documentary Studies. Instructor: Staff. oral historians. and to complete a major documentary project under the guidance of participating faculty members. Traditions in Documentary Studies. Children and the Experience of Illness. is available in this program. The Certificate in Documentary Studies is awarded to students who successfully complete six courses approved as part of the Documentary Studies program. Visual Studies 103IS 101. No prerequisites. broaden. and enhance the technical skills and the theoretical and ethical awareness of students who specialize in one or more of the following modes of community-based fieldwork: photography. and writers. is available to all undergraduates whether or not they seek the certificate. The Seminar in Documentary Studies is designed as the culminating experience of the certificate program and is therefore open only to students enrolled in the program. ALP One course. and/or ethnographic writing methods) and to present this project to an audience outside the classroom by the semester's end. collaborative photography. The goal of this interdisciplinary program is to introduce.

and style of factual narrative-including exercises in redrafting and editing-culminating in a final piece of documentary writing based on students' fieldwork experience. CZ. Consent of instructor required. Visual Studies 103BS 105S. including debates within the discipline. with focus on changing physical and social landscapes of North Carolina. English 101A. Oral history theory and methodology. Introduction to Photography. ALP. ALP. Tyson or staff. Instructor: Tyson. ALP Advanced black and white photography course exploring unique creative latitude of large negative format. One course. ALP Topics focusing on technical basis and aesthetic motivation of sound recording and sound exploitation. interviews. SS A documentary approach to the study of local communities through video production projects assigned by the course instructor. ALP The intersection of documentary photography and the medical community. W Techniques of independent field research and reporting in the documentary tradition. Prerequisite: Theater Studies 174. Consent of instructor required. Large Format Photography. acoustic signature. C-L: African and African American Studies 112S. or its equivalent. digital recording. CCI. R. Documentary Writing: Creative Nonfiction Through Fieldwork. Instructor: Hawkins. using fiction. Producing narratives using documentary research. CZ Documentary writing course focusing on race and storytelling in the South. A Digital Approach to Documentary Photography: Capturing Transience. Digital darkroom techniques include digital capture. Instructor: Staff. Freedom Stories: Documenting Southern Lives and Writing. autobiography. Focus on twentieth-century racial politics. also C-L: Art History 122. C-L: Public Policy Studies 104S. Photoshop. Technical demonstration and student exercises explore the mechanics and dramatic and psychological implications of formats. Components and problems of oral history interviewing as well as different kinds of oral history writing. Instructor: Satterwhite. R Introductory oral history fieldwork seminar. Public Policy Studies 105S. Class learns to make a printable exposure using black-and-white film. Political Science 156S. Instructor: Post-Rust. Special Topics in Sound Technology. Instructors: Thompson. mixing. as well as other methods of dissemination offered in digital age. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 134S. film scanning. History 150BS. microphone placement. Literature 110. C-L: Visual Arts 114S. One course. ALP. Students complete an edited video as their final project. Consent of instructor required. Not open to students who have taken this course as FVD 105S. R. and traditional history books. One course. Visual Arts 115. Film/Video/Digital 139S. development. Emphasis on structure. Visual Studies 103CS 107. Instructor: Staff. ALP. Instructor: Moses. double system. and sound editing. students explore issues or topics of concern to the community. Introduction to Oral History. Working closely with these groups. ALP Foundation class in black-and-white photographic process as the basis for using photography as a visual language. CCI One course. make a "proper proof" and an 8 x 10 Documentary Studies (DOCST) 233 . The Documentary Experience: A Video Approach. One course. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 104S. and personal memories. Includes advanced printing/ toning techniques and alternative processes such as platinum/palladium. Information Science and Information Studies 114S. One course. Medicine and the Vision of Documentary Photography. Visual Studies 103JS. One course. Introduction to Documentary Film. History 150ES 113S. ink-jet printing. C-L: English 101ES 112S.103. ALP Investigates subjects in transition. Prerequisite: DOCST 115. Literature 120E. One course. Visual Studies 103KS 115. C-L: History 128S 111S. C-L: see Film/Video/ Digital 102. Historical development of documentary writing in relation to the diverse cultures that produced it. Consent of instructor required. leading to an individually produced sound design for live action or animation film/video. Visual Studies 117C 110S. Digital photographic impermanence as well as social transience discussed in unison. One course. C-L: Visual Arts 112S.

Instructor: Biewen. Documentary Photography and the Southern Culture Landscape. cultural and material symbols of the dream. theory and practice of oral history documentary methodology. along with documentary films. also C-L: Political Science 156A. ALP. Instructor: Staff. dissemination. Contemporary Documentary Film: Filmmakers and the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival. STS One course. C-L: Visual Arts 117. copyright. Southern literature. One course. oral histories and testimonies of living persons. using National Public Radio-style form. Consent of instructor required. and local culture play in the making and dissemination of photographs. SS A documentary and sociological approach to the idea of the American Dream. R. Documentary Research Methods. ALP. and visual sociological research. Behind the Veil: Methods. politics. and historical and autobiographical writing. The role such issues as objectivity. ALP. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 234 Courses and Academic Programs . Visual Studies 103PS 125S. also C-L: Visual Arts 138S. Alternative Photographic Processes. civil rights photography. ALP Survey of historic photographic processes. and other legal matters. The techniques of black-and-white photography—exposure. and secondary reading materials. CZ Focus on present-day and historical documentary traditions in American South. fundraising. development. Visual Studies 103M 118S. Includes historical texts. autobiography. releases. Instructor: Hunter. Kalotype and Platinum/Palladium printing. Introduction to Audio Documentary. One course. One course. One course. C-L: Visual Arts 115. Visual Studies 103L 117. death and dying. The South in Black and White. processing. focusing on a particular social concern such as war and peace. CCI. Cyanotype. Various approaches to audio documentary work. including Gun Bichromate. CCI. Instructor: Hunter. clarity. from the journalistic to the personal. and as performed in music and theater. CCI. and a final portfolio that embodies a single visual idea. photography. films. oral histories. Assignments include portraits. Visual Studies 103NS 120S. History 129S 129. photographs. CCI Emphasis on the tradition and practice of documentary photography as a way of seeing and interpreting cultural life. One course. Field-based course. Visual Research and the American Dream. memory. Focus on the "Behind the Veil" oral history collection. with an emphasis on call and response between black and white cultures. C-L: Sociology 128S. using readings. ALP One course.Producing Film. promotion. narrative. archives. R Oral history methodology and documentary techniques. R Introduction to documentary research methods for film. C-L: see Film/Video/ Digital 133S. R Recording techniques and audio mixing on digital editing software for the production of audio (radio) documentaries. and writings from people in Durham and elsewhere in the region. Collaborative project about North Carolina's past and independent project on student's own research interests. Instructor: Rankin. and portrayed in documentary films. audio. C-L: History 150CS 122S.enlargement. preservation. One course. Public Policy Studies 171 132. One course. Consent of instructor required. Demography. audio. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 103. alternative techniques. C-L: African and African American Studies 131 133S. One course. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Tyson. photographs. Fieldwork with community resources. civil rights. documents. Instructor: Staff. C-L: African and African American Studies 125S. Adapting Literature -. Stories told through audio. Information Science and Information Studies 135S. use of fieldwork to explore cultural differences. Instructor: Staff. C-L: Visual Arts 122AS. landscape. video. centered on the Jim Crow South. CZ. artifacts. The arts and humanities as imbedded in particular histories and cultures found in the South. ALP. Ideology of attainable prosperity by different groups of people. photography. ALP. ALP. and printing—diverse ways of representing the cultural landscape of the region through photographic imagery.

alternating each week. Includes visiting lecturers who are practicing artists. Visual Studies 103QS 146S. R Historical documentary film preparation through narrative. ALP A studio course exploring the history of photographic portraiture --which has described and helped define notions of identity. One course. Focus on the preproduction activities and principles that lead to a treatment that is the foundation for an efficient shooting schedule. ALP. One course. framing a logical sequence of events structured for dramatic effect. Consent of instructor required. Small Town USA: Local Collaborations. Students working in collaboration with one nearby small town complete a documentary photographic study of one individual or group within that town. race. SS Documentary photography used as a tool to see the world through a sociological lens. as well as independent work on students' own audio productions resulting in a broadcast quality piece suitable for radio or pod-casting. Collaborative Art: Practice and Theory of Working Within a Community. R Intermediate to advanced audio documentary techniques. C-L: Visual Arts 144S. ALP. Information Science and Information Studies 150S. One course. Sociology through Photography. experiences. photography. Children's Self Expression: Literacy Through Photography. Visual Studies 103RS 147S. character-driven stories. Intermediate Documentary Filmmaking. Instructor: Biewen. C-L: Visual Arts 147S. One course. developing honest relationships with subjects. Instructor: Staff. Includes internship in elementary/ middle school classrooms. Editing the TV Documentary: From Creativity to Collaboration to Negotiation. One course. Visual Studies 103TS 148S. C-L: Education 144S. ALP One course. Includes analysis of the documentary tradition. CCI. Planning the Documentary Film: From Concept to Treatment. Prerequisite: Documentary Studies 135S or equivalent. Visual Studies 103VS. EI. Field work with a community institution or small group in Durham to produce collaborative work in a medium of students' own choosing. and methodology of Literacy Through Photography. ALP. C-L: Sociology 152S. Visual Studies 103FS 145S. building visual narrative. Photo Documentary Studies (DOCST) 235 . generic components of social organization (codes of conduct. The history. Information Science and Information Studies 155S. and documentary work.as well as the work of contemporary portrait artists working in a post-modern age where representation and identity are deconstructed. responsibility to subjects and their communities. Focus on the reading and critical interpretation of images. particularly as it relates to locally situated work and to selected individual projects. Instructor: Ewald. R Theory and practice of documentary photography in a small-town context. Visual Studies 103US. history and culture). The Photographic Portrait: The Practice of Representation. Open to students from Duke and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and conducted on both campuses. Instructor: Hyde. and social identities (how they're formed in relation to structures. also C-L: Visual Studies 117LS 144S.141S. Instructor consent required. SS Children's self-expression and child development through writing. C-L: Public Policy Studies 182S. One course. ALP. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 158S. Technical skills as well as conceptual strategies emphasized. mechanisms of social control). Instructor: Staff. Hearing is Believing: Intermediate Audio Documentary. power relations and social inequalities. Includes instructor-supervised fieldwork with an audio recorder in a variety of cultural settings on a particular issue. Using the raw material of real life. One course. philosophy. students organize the conceptual process for historical documentary films. and engaging with and portraying a community as an outsider. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 141S. ALP Approaches of various contemporary artists to creating collaborative work resulting in artworks that express a variety of social and aesthetic positions and include progressive educational philosophies and radical democratic theory. and gender -. Photographs and the social construction of reality. Instructor: Hyde. Consent of instructor required. C-L: Film/Video/Digital 140S.

Instructor: Harris. Rankin. Public Policy Studies 176S. SS Focus upon those who bring food to our tables.elicitation and editing techniques. Attention to various areas of social change. Students learn to choose. SS An advanced course for students who have taken Public Policy Studies 176S or have had substantial experience in documentary fieldwork. pilgrimage. or area in seminar format. gifts. and the effectiveness of. One course. Students complete an individual photographic project and study important works within the documentary tradition. Visual Studies 103XS. Focus on societal and personal questions regarding motivations for. ALP. C-L: Visual Arts 178S. and regeneration. ALP. C-L: Religion 161QS. Documenting Religion. Instructor: Thompson. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 118S. bodies. emphasizing color photography as a documentary tool. One course. Film/Video/Digital. a religious community of the student's choosing. CCI. One course. CCI. identity. Instructor: Thompson. particularly those who labor in the fields of North Carolina and the Southeast. C-L: Visual Arts 119S. Cultural Anthropology 162AS. Instructor: Harris. good works in several cultural settings. magazine. Instructor: Post-Rust. and environmental activism. international activism. Instructor: Thompson. Visual Studies 103WS 162S. Instructor: Harris or Sartor. Instructor: Harris. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 168S 168S. Consent of instructor required. Who Cares and Why: Social Activism and its Motivations. or staff. The language of color photography and the work of contemporary color photographers studied as a catalyst for students' own color documentary projects about local social landscapes. Color Photography: Fieldwork and Digital Color. evil. exhibition. labor rights. and webbased). Documentary work and its contributions to farmworker advocacy. R. One course. ALP The ways in which particular photographers have created photographic essays that communicate to a wide audience. according to the format of their final presentation (book. C-L: Visual Arts 158S. Farm work from the plantation system and slavery to sharecropping. Farmworkers in North Carolina: Roots of Poverty. Visual Studies 103ZS 180S. SS Theory and practice of documentary photography. Advanced techniques of Photoshop and pigment printing. including human rights. Roots of Change. Students complete a documentary photographic study of a community outside the university. theory. Fieldwork off campus required. American Communities: A Photographic Approach. W Documentary fieldwork-based research on the lives of people who have committed themselves to changing society. and to the migrant and seasonal farmworker population today. Instructor: Staff. C-L: Visual Arts 118S. SS. Life history interviews exploring personal and societal transformations with special attention to the antecedents to personal change leading to examined lives of commitment. commitment. CL: Cultural Anthropology 162S 164S. hope. One course. Instructor consent required. Student participation in. Consent of instructor required. Study of the documentary tradition and classic documentary books while emphasizing the photographs produced by the students. CCI. Visual Studies 103YS. Policy Journalism and Media Studies 177S. Selected topics in methodology. death. and pace images as exhibition quality inkjet prints. Research and study of the classic and contemporary masters of photography. Permission of instructor required. One course. Public Policy Studies 176S. CCI. C-L: Visual Arts 180S 190S. Advanced Documentary Photography. Visual Studies 103GS 176S. CZ Exploration of how religious communities interpret and live out such themes as sacred spaces. Policy Journalism and Media Studies 178S. 236 Courses and Academic Programs . One course. One course. Special Topics in Documentary Studies. Public Policy Studies 158S. ALP An advanced. power. or consent of instructor. field-based course on the theory and practice of color photography. and documentation of. civil rights. The Photographic Essay: Narratives Through Pictures. One course. Public Policy Studies 177S. sequence. Film/Video/ Digital.

Anthropology and Film 108. and web-based methods in order to complete a preliminary documentary project by the end of the semester.193S. or abroad. Learn current technologies and techniques for multimedia publications. Mass Media. African Americans Since the Civil War International Comparative Studies 101C. Consent of instructor required. Africans in America to the Civil War 145B. Multimedia Documentary: Editing. inkjet printing. 1839 to the Present Asian and African Languages and Literature 137. such as DukeEngage students. One course. Documentary Film/Video Theory and Practice 145A. Fantasy. Mass Media. and broadcast. ALP A production course for students who have undertaken a substantial documentary fieldwork project over the summer. African Americans Since the Civil War Art History 199. One course. books. Documentary Film/Video Theory and Practice Film/Video/Digital 138S. photography exhibits. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Africans in America to the Civil War 145B. ALP. World Music: Aesthetic and Anthropological Approaches Documentary Studies (DOCST) 237 . Students study documentary photographers while planning and refining their own documentary projects through which they will address societal issues locally. Instructor: Staff. Documentary Film/Video Theory and Practice 143S. Required participation in service learning. Visual Studies 131AS 196S. and Popular Culture 130A. and Publication. Fantasy. The Anthropology of Hinduism: From Encounter to Engagement English 101CS. Music. One course. or other students working on independent projects. Social Life. including participant observation. Production. Anthropology and Film 103E. and performances). Sound for Film and Video History 145A. and Scenes 164S. Edit and shape fieldwork material into a Web-based multimedia presentation. Culture and Politics in Latin America Music 136. Methods of documentary fieldwork. recipients of the John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Awards. Instructor: Harris. PROGRAM COURSES African and African American Studies 145A. Instructor: Sims. Capstone Seminar in Documentary Studies. ALP Documentary photography as a tool for social engagement in preparation for intensive field-based projects. Examine unique storytelling strategies for on-line presentations and compare this medium to traditional venues for documentary work such as exhibitions. C-L: Public Policy Studies 168S 194S. Prerequisite: Documentary Studies 101 and four Documentary Studies electives. Consent of instructor required. radio pieces. Documentary Engagement Through Field-Based Projects. Culture and Politics in Latin America 131S. and modes of arts and humanities interpretation through a variety of mediums (including papers. nationally. Students learn and refine valuable technical skills such as Photoshop. and Popular Culture 128. World Music: Aesthetic and Anthropological Approaches 145B. R Immersion in fieldworkbased inquiry and in-depth projects that serve as Certificate in Documentary Studies capstone experiences for students. Contemporary Culture in South Asia Cultural Anthropology 104. C-L: Visual Arts 194S. film. History of Photography.

Human Rights in Theory and Practice Public Policy Studies 123S. the internship is open only to students seeking the certificate. Human Rights in Theory and Practice Religion 164S. Music.137. child care service. Documentary Film/Video Theory and Practice 191. Social Life. Early Childhood Education Studies Adjunct Associate Professor Bryant. and policy issues will enhance their understanding of these areas through study in this program. child psychology. Mass Media. the second provides direct experience under supervision in an approved early childhood program combined with bi-weekly group discussions with a Duke internship supervisor. Infancy. Two required courses: 121S. Students with interests in social work. and by participating in a supervised internship experience with child care centers. and education. and current issues. Fantasy. Digital Imaging Ecology For courses in ecology. Photography Visual Studies 101G. and families. The program helps students to identify an area for postbaccalaureate study. Early Childhood. The first provides a comprehensive view of early childhood education. Education 160S. Anthropology and Film 110B. Watchdogs and Muckrakers: Investigative Journalism and Public Policy 125. sociology. education. The certificate in Early Childhood Education Studies will help qualify students to work in a variety of early childhood fields which may include research. Director A certificate. is available in this program. The Anthropology of Hinduism: From Encounter to Engagement 184. and environmental sciences and policy program. see biology. but not a major. History of Photography. and Educational Programs 160S. public policy. pediatrics. 1839 to the Present 110A. Early Childhood Internship 238 Courses and Academic Programs . and Popular Culture 117KS. No more than three courses that originate in a single academic unit may be taken. Religion and Film Visual Arts 116S. Candidates need six (6) courses. Human Rights in Theory and Practice Political Science 162. The six-course Early Childhood Education Studies Certificate Program allows students to develop a specialization in early childhood development and the conditions of early childhood by pursuing studies in psychology. its history. and providing leadership to raise standards in communities for improved early childhood programs. and Scenes Philosophy 162. The certificate requires two specific courses: Education 121 and the capstone internship seminar. News as Moral Battleground 162. programs. cultural anthropology. preschools. I. environment (Nicholas School). For additional information consult the Program in Education.

Associate Professors Murray.II. Boudreau. Infancy. hydrology. Jackson. Child Observation 205S. paleontology. Power. Early Childhood Internship Human Development 124. A Bachelor * Of the four elective courses. Schools and Society Psychology and Neuroscience 113B. Professors Emeriti Barber. Professors Baker. Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS) 239 . Kay. a limit of three courses may be taken from any one of the remaining departments. and Educational Programs 160S. Chair. Human Development 130. Director of Undergraduate Studies. Sex. and Lozier. Issues in Language Development Psychology and Neuroscience 97. Psychosocial Aspects of Human Development Linguistics 153S. Issues in Language Development 159S. environmental geology. only one may be a Program in Education course. Psychosocial Aspects of Human Development 215. Children. Klein. Schools and Society Sociology 111. Corliss. and Society 150. oceanography. Haff. Instructor Glass A major or a minor is available in this division. Psychological Anthropology Education 112S. Research Methods in Developmental Psychology 183BS. The Anthropology of Gender: Special Topics 165. Wealth. Livingstone. Psychological Anthropology Public Policy Studies 109S. Professor Corliss. Children. geomorphology. additionally. The Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences offers introductory and advanced courses in coastal geology. Conditions of Childhood: Cultural Anthropology 115S. Newell. geochemistry. and Vengosh. Biological Psychology of Human Development 183AS. Perkins. and Pilkey. Early Childhood. Psychosocial Aspects of Human Development 131. Human Development B. two in each area: * A. petrology. Four (4) elective courses. Childhood in Social Perspective 118. Pratson. Heron. and marine geology. sedimentology. Human Development 180. Social Development 153S. The Changing American Family 169. and Inequality 117. Developmental Psychology: Introduction and Survey 119B. Basic Demographic Methods Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS) Professor Lozier. Pediatric Psychology Sociology 124. Gender. Child Clinical Psychology 124. Children's Peer Relations 206S. Development of the Child: Education 121S.

rocks and geologic structures. Murray. Recommended: Earth and Ocean Sciences 11. NS. R Introduction to the dynamics of ocean and atmospheric circulations. with particular emphasis on the global climate cycle. One course. Volcanoes. One course. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Earth and Ocean Sciences. Climatic changes in both terrestrial and oceanic environments over time scales ranging from millions to hundreds of years. waves and beach erosion. NS. 12. marine hazards. society and economic roots of oceanography. landslides.duke. Beaches. Waves. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. hillslopes. Murray. Instructor: Baker. Instructor: Corliss. Humans as agents of landscape change. 100. Instructor: Staff. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Earth and Ocean Sciences. tides. One course. and for those who intend to work professionally in environmental sciences. NS Fundamental earth surface processes involving weathering. climate. Prerequisite: Earth and Ocean Sciences 11. The Fluid Earth. The future of landscape. Physics 53L or consent of instructor. Instructors: Corliss. A Bachelor of Arts degree is offered for those students who do not intend to pursue the earth sciences professionally. One course. NS Description and interpretation of minerals. STS The oceans and their impact on the Earth's surface. seashores and geohazards. fluid motions of many time scales in the nearshore environment. Emphasis on examining the lines of inductive and deductive reasoning. Topics vary each semester offered. 101L. the formulation and testing of hypotheses. and Coastline Dynamics. glaciers. Lectures on theoretical aspects. 50. but wish to understand more fully local and global environmental issues. 115. groundwater. Conceptual basis for models of how fluid motions interact with the shape of the beach and bed in the surf zone. First-Year Seminar. C-L: Visual Studies 111AS 107L. quantitative methods. 90FCS. Topics differ by section. and society. NS Study of the use of animal and plant fossils including geochemical analyses of fossils to understand past climates. marine life and ecosystems. Required fee for trip. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Rocks and Structural Geology. and tectonic activity. modes of inquiry. wind. and technological developments that lead to understanding of current and future societal issues involving the oceans. Instructor: Boudreau. NS. NS Evolution of the earth and life through time. STS Introduction to the dynamic processes that shape the Earth and the environment and their impact upon society. Topics differ by section.nicholas. Glass. Emphasis on the historical. STS Oceanographic and geologic processes responsible for the evolution of nearshore features. ocean currents and climate. 11. earthquakes. The Evolving Earth and Life. and technological developments that lead to understanding the Earth's dynamic systems. Instructor: Corliss. One course. seafloor spreading. One course. and marine resources. lab on practical applications and use of petrographic microscope. Glass. floods. 103S. review of invertebrate fossils in the laboratory. One course. Prerequisites: Mathematics 31 and 32. The Dynamic Earth. 102. Additional information about the division can be found on the divisional Web site: http://www. NS. including waves and currents. Topics include seafloor evolution. 240 Courses and Academic Programs . One course. The Dynamic Oceans. A three-day field trip to include fossil collecting on the North Carolina coastal plain and studying modern coastal environments and living invertebrates at the Duke University Marine Laboratory. Klein. The Solid Earth: Minerals. Fossils and Climate Change. One course. Instructor: Haff or Murray. soils. rivers. quantitative assessment of data. hurricanes/cyclones. Instructor: Lozier. Weekend field trip to Appalachian Mountains.edu/eos. C-L: Biology 53. One course. The Surface of the Earth.of Science degree is offered for those students wishing to pursue further studies in the earth and ocean sciences. Prerequisites: Earth and Ocean Sciences 11 or 12. Includes a field trip at the Duke University Marine Laboratory. Marine Science and Conservation 49S.

Fundamentals of GIS and Geospatial Analysis. Field Exploration of the Geology of North Carolina. prediction. soil chemistry and identification. QS One course. Environmental Geology. NS. STS Broad. space exploration. One course. water and carbon cycling. also C-L: Environment 168 172. Design of a field investigation. also C-L: Visual Studies 116B 168. Instructor consent required. Various attempted engineering and coastal management solutions to the global retreat of shorelines. Energy and the Environment. NS. robots and biotechnology and their effects in society. The quantitative and qualitative impact of rock type. EI. STS Introduction to the geological history of North Carolina with an emphasis on active learning and field-based Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS) 241 . One course. topographic and geologic mapping. and model projections for the twenty-first century and beyond. nanotechnology. and interpretation and reporting of the results. flooding. Instructor: Staff. Field investigations focus on topics such as groundwater and surface water movements. Biogeography in an Australian Context. its predicted impact. 159. One course. Examines ethical dilemmas encountered in communicating environmental analysis to the public. One course. One course. channels. One course. Instructor: Klein. Prerequisite: Mathematics 32 and Chemistry 22L or consent of the instructor. NS Topics in the seminar will include climate change. and through quantitative approaches. the atmosphere/soil interface. Topics include developments and trends in computation. C-L: see Environment 130 131. and human impact on coastal zone ecosystems. 125. One course. interdisciplinary course on the science of global warming. C-L: Earth and Ocean Sciences 224 123. Instructor: . QS. earth surface alteration. Instructor: Murray. STS One course. discussions on important greenhouse gas. STS A case history. and quantitative model approach to the role of geological materials and processes in environmental assessment studies. Global Warming. NS. NS. STS An overview of the hydrologic cycle and its impact on global climate and local environmental problems. Field Methods in Earth and Environmental Sciences. STS One course. Includes a short introduction to climate theory and models. C-L: see Biology 101. fossil fuels and energy resources. Prerequisite: Earth and Ocean Sciences 11 or 12. One course. and various policy and technology options that have been proposed to mitigate its effect. 119. NS. folding. the internet.giving rise to features such as beach cusps. EI. SS. Instructor: Haff. weathering. Instructor: Baker. R. NS. and plant identification and distributions. field and lab exercise. Instructor: Staff. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite: Earth and Ocean Sciences 11 or 12. C-L: see Environment 159. volcanism. C-L: Environment 126S 130. R Applications of the geosciences in the field and laboratory. collection of data to address a specific goal. erosion. bars. NS. biological. Hydrogeology. NS. soil fertility. W Introduction to basic field methods used in the earth and environmental sciences. biodiversity. Experiencing Geoscience. NS. STS One course. sea-level rise and coastal erosion. Emphasis on learning to report field results in the format of scientific publications. 155. NS. The Future. and technological evolution of the Earth. An introduction to quantitative probabilistic hazard analysis and its application to establishing monetary cost/benefit ratios. Instructor: Vengosh. water resources. The basics of engineering geology in environmental studies. SS. and underground fluid flow on the human environment. Cases taken from current and past geological studies of environmentally sensitive sites. Open only to juniors and seniors. Visits to five local field sites. and barrier islands. artificial intelligence. 120. 126S. World Trade In Energy and Mineral Resources. STS Introduction to the future as a continuation of the geological. C-L: see Environment 131 151S. faulting. Global Environmental Change.

Instructor: Staff. R Spatial and temporal analysis of geology of south Florida. NS Paleontology. Class time serves as preparation and background for two one-day and one overnight weekend field trips. Independent Study. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors by consent of director of undergraduate studies and supervising instructor. Prerequisite: recommended: Earth and Ocean Sciences 107L. Paleoclimate. Volcanology: Geology of Hawaii. Prerequisite: Earth and Ocean Sciences 11 recommended. One course. Individual research and reading in a field of special interest. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors by consent of director of undergraduate studies and supervising instructor. under the supervision of a faculty member. 187S. Half course. Instructor: Staff. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Topics in geology. 180S. Directed reading or individual projects. and Yellowstone National Park. the observational record of paleoclimate extending from the Precambrian through the Ice Ages and 242 Courses and Academic Programs . Marine Geology of South Florida. methodologies of reconstructing past climate variations. and Yellowstone. Instructor: Glass. Half course. Instructor: Staff. 189S. Prerequisites: Open only to senior Earth and Ocean Sciences majors. Topics include general theory of climate. Prerequisite: Earth and Ocean Sciences 11 or 12. Open to qualified juniors and seniors upon approval of the departmental faculty. hydrology. post-trip research paper. mudbanks. Senior Capstone Experience.inquiry. STS Senior capstone field trip course. Field location varies. R. or consent of instructor. R Geology of volcanic processes and the benefits and hazards they present to society. Research Independent Study. See Earth and Ocean Sciences 193. One course. R Nature and mechanisms of climate variability throughout Earth history. Prerequisite: Earth and Ocean Sciences 115/215 or consent of instructor. C-L: Marine Sciences 193. C-L: Marine Sciences 195. Instructor: Dwyer. Fossil Butte National Monument. Includes class discussions. Term paper required. and ecology of Dinosaur National Monument. especially human impact on the earth and the role of earth scientists as observers and teachers of earth-system change. Independent Study for Nonmajors. Fossil Fish. Required field trip to Hawaii during spring break. and other environmental subjects as appropriate for field area. One course. required spring break field trip to South Florida. 191. biology. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors by consent of director of undergraduate studies and supervising instructor. Dinosaurs. 173. One course. C-L: Marine Sciences 202. NS. C-L: Marine Sciences 194. geology. NS. One course. NS Field seminar on the evolution of beaches and barrier islands with emphasis on the interactions between nearshore processes and human development. Lectures. Department consent required. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Boudreau. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors by consent of director of undergraduate studies and supervising instructor. trip presentation. discussion and student presentations of independent research reports. resulting in a term paper containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic at end of semester. Course content partially determined by students. C-L: Marine Sciences 209S. Instructor: Staff. Independent Study. NS. One course. One course. R See Earth and Ocean Sciences 191. One course. Instructor: Staff. Consent of instructor required. NS. paleoclimate modeling and comparisons with observations. Instructor: Murray. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Corliss. Examination of shallow marine sedimentary environments including reefs. C-L: Marine Sciences 192. An introductory geology background is useful but not required. One course. Research Independent Study. and mangrove forests and islands. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. and their ancient counterparts in rock outcrops and sediment cores. Term paper required. Beach and Island Geological Processes. climate.

R. potential for sudden changes. and chemistry of the atmosphere. hydrogeology. Snowball Earth. Consent of instructor required. 242S. Also includes approaches to modeling paleoenvironmental data. Consent of instructor required. Greenhouse effect. R. Lithosphere Plate Boundaries. basic circulation of the atmosphere and ocean. Paleoenvironmental Analysis. One course. patterns of climate variability. twentieth. ice core studies. climate models. NS. Examples from different fields of geology. Contaminants produced by human interactions with the environment. and rocks. Formulation and solution of classical equations that express fundamental behaviors of fluids. One course. Consent of instructor required. The Climate System. NS Conservation equations for mass. STS Geochemistry of water contamination. and analyzing physical Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS) 243 . NS Nonlinear dynamics and related approaches to understanding. Some background in differential equations highly recommended. water management. 240. Paleozoic climates. New Perspectives and Methods in Surface Process Studies. land surface. biogeochemistry. NS. Water Contamination. One course. 214. One course. Simple modeling exercises. Instructor: Baker. Advanced Issues in Paleoclimatology. Various problems and possible solutions arising from human development of retreating shorelines. Introduction to Physical Coastal Processes. climate and extinctions. Murray. Prerequisite: Earth and Ocean Sciences 101L or consent of instructor. subduction zones. Instructor: Staff. One course. One course. Water Forum Speaker Series. modeling. sediments. Introduction to Fluid Dynamics. One course. carbon cycle. NS. Introduction to Modeling in the Earth Sciences. concept of energy balance. the deglaciation. 220. water treatment. water economy. ice age climates. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. rainfall. and Pratson.Holocene to present. One course. projections of future climate change due to greenhouse warming. Instructor: Staff. cryosphere (snow and ice). Instructor: Murray. NS. and environmental sciences. 236S. 225. climate change and uncertainty. Includes radiometric and other methods of dating. such as industry and construction. Instructor: Baker. trace elements. hydrology and environment of the past. NS.century climate change. Climate Change. 210S. NS. Salinization and desalinization. transform faults. Instructor: Vengosh. One course. QS Elementary methods for quantitatively modeling problems in the earth sciences. 211. climate extremes. focusing on behavior of inorganic constituents dissolved in rainwater. NS Major issues in paleoclimatology including: decadal-millennial climate variability. and water policy and law at both the national and international levels. introduction to climate models. Instructor: Staff. ecology. including a final project. carbon dioxide. volcanism. 212. sample applications of climate models. ocean changes. STS Seminar including visiting scholars covering a broad array of issues on water including water quality. momentum and heat. abrupt climate change. with an emphasis on large temporal and spatial scales. NS Plate tectonics and the geological and geophysical expression of orogenic belts. Aspects of changes include temperature. STS Nearshore physical processes responsible for the evolution of beaches and barrier islands. modeling studies. and sea level changes. Instructor: Vengosh. 215. Involves a field trip and research paper. patterns of variability. One course. paleobiotic and other methods of reconstructing climate. NS Methods of paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic analysis. Instructor: Lozier. other external influences on climate. Instructor: Staff. One course. interactions between the atmosphere/ocean/ and biosphere. STS The Climate system. Instructors: Haff. ocean. 226S. introduction to climate dynamics. nonglacial climates. stable isotopes. Prerequisites: Chemistry 22L. spreading centers. application to the earth. R Components of the climate system: observed climate change. and the impact paleoclimate on biotic evolution/paleogeography and human cultural history.

fluvial.B. For information on this area of concentration see the director of undergraduate studies. It is not intended for students who plan to pursue advanced education in the earth and ocean sciences. NS. biodiversity. zoology. with emphasis on applications in geomorphology. sea-level rise and coastal erosion.systems. Mineral Resources. Instructor: Baker. botany. phosphates. Thermodynamics of Geological Systems. 251S. Instructor: Boudreau. Prerequisites: Earth and Ocean Sciences 101L. Nature and mechanisms of climate variability in the tropics on time scales from daily to multimillennial.B. geological setting. intended for students interested in an integrative study of topics selected from ecology. diamonds. earth surface alteration. aluminum. soil fertility. Prerequisite: Earth and Ocean Sciences 11 or 12. 278. Effects of anthropogenic changes of the environment on future climatic change in the tropics and potential extratropical teleconnections. THE MAJOR The Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences offers one A. Concentration in Natural History. Includes methods of mineral exploration and exploitation. One course. The dynamics and mechanisms of earth surface processes underlying landscape change. as approved by the director of undergraduate studies. Global Environmental Change. For the A. One course. or to become professional geologists or environmental scientists. C-L: see Biology 272 273S. iron. degree in earth and ocean sciences is designed as a flexible major for those students interested in how the earth.B. An introductory geology course background useful but not required. Required courses include Earth and Ocean Sciences 11. NS How landscape changes with time.S. copper. STS One course. degree. NS Thermodynamics of tropical climate. Analytic Techniques. biological anthropology and anatomy. One course. history. Instructor: Baker. tectonic and aeolian processes. glacial. Instructor: Haff and Pratson. and the environment. Degree The A.). Prerequisite: Earth and Ocean Sciences 11 or consent of instructor.g. fossil fuels and energy resources. One course. One course. 272. gypsum. 269. human impact on coastal zone ecosystems. several field trips to Duke Forest. Landscape Dynamics. hydrology. Variable credit. 244 Courses and Academic Programs . anthropology. environment). The major is intended to provide a general knowledge of scientific issues that shape and control the environment in which we live. Instructor: Boudreau. Reading and discussion of primary literature. NS Introductory thermodynamics applied to geologic problems through understanding of phase equilibrium. prediction. degree and one B. plus any six earth and ocean sciences courses of which five must be 100 level or higher. NS. plus three additional 100-level or higher courses in either earth and ocean sciences or related fields (physics. marine. NS Introduction to the mineralogy. water resources. atmosphere and oceans work. biology. R Topics in the seminar will include climate change. Impact of climatic variability on the tropical biota. Students may elect to complete the requirements in the area of Natural History. and genesis of metallic and non-metallic deposits (gold. or 12. Hillslope. e. Instructor: Murray. Consent of instructor required. One course. Consent of instructor required. oceanography. and the environmental consequences of utilizing mineral resources. 275S. volcanic. 243S. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. electron microprobe analysis) and plasma emission/absorption spectroscopy. Instructors: Boudreau and Klein. NS An introduction to advanced analytic procedures used in the earth sciences: such as electron microbeam techniques (scanning electron microscopy. mathematics. Biogeochemistry. water and carbon cycling. and Mathematics 32 or consent of instructor. geology. Tropical Climate and Paleoclimate.

plus any four additional earth and ocean sciences courses.g. Degree The B. Graduation with Distinction may be awarded in three levels: distinction. high distinction. the requirements for the comprehensive science Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS) 245 . The decision on granting Graduation with Distinction will be made by a vote of the student's project committee. NC. Mathematics 31L and 32L. plus five additional earth and ocean sciences courses at the 100 level. Biological Oceanography. Marine Invertebrate Zoology (see full course listings at: www. Prerequisites. Bermuda). The student will also make an oral presentation to students and faculty of the division before the end of classes of the student's final semester. In addition to completion of any of the earth and ocean sciences major tracks as described above (the A. Up to two courses from a related field (biology.B. chemistry. A candidate for Graduation with Distinction in the earth and ocean sciences must have a divisional grade point average of 3. Analysis of Ocean Ecosystems. Majors in earth and ocean sciences may fulfill elective requirements with courses in marine science by studying at the Duke Marine Laboratory on the coast in Beaufort. Physics 53L (or Physics 51L). with a majority in favor needed for Graduation with Distinction. 12. degree provides a background for subsequent graduate work for those who wish to follow an academic or professional career track in the earth and ocean sciences.1 at the beginning of the project to qualify for nomination. The teaching certificate.edu/marinelab/programs). The project will consist of an original piece of scientific research which will be summarized by a written report in the style of a scientific publication. Marine Science An exciting area in earth and ocean sciences is the study of the marine realm.duke. option is particularly suited for those interested in a teaching certificate). TEACHER CERTIFICATION A major in the Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences who is interested in teaching in secondary schools is encouraged to earn a comprehensive science teaching certificate in addition to the bachelor's degree. is generally accepted in most of the fifty states by reciprocal agreement. Earth and Ocean Sciences 11. Major requirements. Earth and Ocean Sciences 11 and 12. THE MINOR The Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences offers an option for a minor in earth and ocean sciences. and 107. Earth and Ocean Sciences 101. 192). which is earned by fulfilling requirements prescribed by the state of North Carolina. of which three must be 100-level or higher.S. Biology 25L.S. Graduation with Distinction The Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences through Trinity College offers Graduation with Distinction through successful completion of a student research project. The decision on level of distinction will be made by majority vote of the student's project committee. 103.nicholas. and highest distinction. Trinidad. The student must solicit a committee of three faculty members who will review the student's record and decide to admit or reject the application and oversee the project. The student will normally do the work as part of an independent study course (Earth and Ocean Sciences 191.For the B. physics. Hawaii. Approved courses include: Marine Ecology. Singapore. Students typically also perform a research Independent Study project on a topic of interest supervised by a faculty member of the Marine Laboratory. The student will apply for consideration for Graduation with Distinction by the end of his or her junior academic year by writing a letter of intent to the director of undergraduate studies describing the project. Minor Requirements. which often includes fieldwork excursions to other areas of the world (e. environment. including one field-oriented class. 102. or mathematics) may be substituted with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies. Chemistry 21L and 22L..

Assistant Professors Ananat. Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies. De Marchi. Goodwin. Tauchen. SS Basic microeconomic concepts such as demand and supply. Timmins. One course. Instructor: Kelley or Leachman. economic growth and development. Introductory Macroeconomics. chemistry. Economic Principles. Sweeting. Cook. Inflation. Although no particular vocational or professional goal is emphasized. and several courses in education. Tower. and Toniolo. or Leachman. Smith. including two special. Kimbrough. Uribe. and Weintraub. Vernon and Wallace. in both their contemporary and historical settings. working with a certified teacher and with Duke faculty. Topics vary each semester offered. Conrad. Kreps. 246 Courses and Academic Programs . Bayer. Instructor: De Marchi. Chair. trade. Darity. Economics (ECON) Professor Nechyba. Hotz. market structures and pricing. The last semester of the senior year is devoted to the student-teaching block. Hamilton. One course. Kuran. Emphasis on public policy issues and the logic behind the economic way of thinking. One course. 49S. Bollerslev. 2A. Fullenkamp. Rubio-Ramirez. Credit for Advanced Placement on the basis of a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Microeconomics examination. Director of Undergraduate Studies. Conitzer. Associate Professors Abdulkadiroglu. Kelley. Burnside. Director of Economics Center for Teaching. Pfaff. economics. Munger. One course. Fang. Ridley. Nechyba. Khan. economic growth and development. Hoover. For freshmen. Kelley. Beresteanu. Viswanathan. Economic Principles. Grabowski. Clotfelter. Ladd. Bansal. Different macroeconomic perspectives on issues of monetary and fiscal policy. 131. and Weinke. an appropriate course in psychology. and for graduate study in business administration. Professors Emeriti Blackburn. for work in many branches of government service. 50. Darity. Economics courses develop the critical and analytical skills essential for understanding economics and institutions. Research Professors Becker. unemployment. 51D. One course. Sloan. SS Basic economic concepts such as demand and supply. Instructor: Staff. Thomas. Rigotti. Arcidiacono. Rossi. Instructor: Staff. CCI Topics differ by section. Bellemare. First-Year Seminar. market efficiency and equilibrium. accelerated courses and ten weeks of full-time teaching and observation in the schools. Kramer. Kranton. Associate Professor of the Practice Fullenkamp. McElroy. 1D. Professor of the Practice Leachman. unemployment. Assistant Professor of the Practice Rasiel. physics. and market failure. Graham. Ellickson. Schmitt-Grohé. Cohen. Associate Professor of the Practice Connolly. Lopomo. Students planning to do graduate work in economics are advised to take as many of the following courses in mathematics (listed in preferential order) as their schedules permit: Mathematics 103. One course. 104. Associate Professors of the Practice Connolly and Fullenkamp. Taylor. Gallant. equilibrium. for law school. Vigdor and Yildirim. and 139. Credit for Advanced Placement on the basis of a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Macroeconomics examination. Peretto. Treml. Tarozzi. Open to all students. Introductory Microeconomics. Leventoglu. Macroeconomic concepts such as inflation. markets and prices. these courses provide the academic background necessary for positions in industry. Lewis. trade. and the social sciences. Professors Anton. upperclassmen by consent of instructor. Khwaja. Assistant Professor of the Practice Rasiel A major or minor is available in this department. 1A.teaching certificate include coursework in biology. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Economics. Anyone considering secondary school teaching should contact the Program in Education as soon as possible. Emphasis on public policy issues and the logic behind the economic way of thinking. Different perspectives on issues of monetary and fiscal policy. Hsieh.

Instructor: Staff. C-N). Intermediate Economics II. public goods. Selected Topics In Economics. EI. Philosophy. Instructor: Hotz. 41. SS One course. ASEAN. C-L: see Political Science 103. 103 or higher level math. immigration. supply and competitive equilibrium from individual preferences and technologies. One course. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. Engineering Systems Optimization and Economics. Topics vary each semester offered. Focus Program Topics in Economics. Topics vary each semester offered. Topics differ by section. deregulation. Intended to replace Economics 149 beginning Spring 2003. (Taught only in the Duke-in-Berlin Program. CCI. Intermediate. or Mathematics 31. Tension between economic efficiency and different notions of equity. Philosophy. common welfare standards. One course. Connolly. 112. unemployment. QS. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. and Economics Capstone (A. also C-L: Philosophy 146. Introduction to game theory and strategic interaction.55D. Adverse selection. SS. Conditions under which government policy has the potential to increase efficiency. SS One course. Instructor: Lodewijks. non-calculus based development of the theory of demand. Mathematics 102 or Mathematics 103 or any higher-level mathematics course with Mathematics 103 as a prerequisite. Conditions under which competitive markets result in efficient outcomes. 102. Philosophy. One course. SS Implications of a common monetary policy. Income and substitution effects. Philosophy. C-N). Individual behavior in environments of risk and uncertainty. Rasiel. Australia and the Asia-Pacific Economies. SS Introduction of the concepts of preferences and technologies. One course. 103. Intended to replace Economics 154 beginning Fall 2003. externalities. may substitute successful completion (80%) of EcoTeach Center Math Test for Mathematics 102 or 103. 99FCS. and Economics 60. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. or Uribe. foreign investment. Nechyba. tax reform. Politics. SS One course. Instructor: Arcidiacono. and financial liberalization in Australia and the Asia-Pacific. 110D. One course. or Yildirim. R. CCI Seminar version of Economics 100. One course. privatization. Schmitt-Grohé. 100S. Instructor: Staff. moral hazard. and Economics 104. Taylor. C-L: Health Policy. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Economics. SS Economic growth. C-L: see Engineering 115 Economics (ECON) 247 . Politics. Available only in the Duke-inAustralia Program. development. Prerequisites: Economics 1A and 2A or Economics 1D or 51D. and Economics 105D may be taken as co-requisite. STS Intermediate level treatment of macroeconomic models. and Mathematics 25 and 26. Intermediate Economics III. Politics. Prerequisites: Economics 55D. non-competitive market structures. Prisoner's Dilemma and Distributive Justice (A. Fullenkamp. QS. inflation. and migration in the European Union. Intermediate Economics I. 32. or Timmins. Politics. One course. 100.) Instructor: Tolksdorf. CCI Topics differ by section. Students who matriculated prior to Fall 2007. and Economics 105D. Economics of a United Europe. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Economics. C-L: see Political Science 165. SS Calculus-based generalization of the theory of demand and supply developed in Economics 55D. Leventoglu. economic growth. uncompensated demand and marginal willingness to pay. Intended as replacement for Economics 2D and 52D. Instructor: Staff. also C-L: Philosophy 165. One course. One course. Instructor: Burnside. CCI. SS Open only to students in the Focus Program. fiscal and monetary policy. unemployment. Information Science and Information Studies. C-L: International Comparative Studies 95S. C-L: International Comparative Studies 69. Instructor: Staff.

exchange. and other limited dependent variables. C-L: History 130B 137. capital movements). Urban Economics. logit. R. and institutions. 32. The Art Market. non-durable). CZ. patterns of land values. One course. Introduction to Econometrics. American Business History. One course. QS. R. Instructor: Rossi or staff. simultaneous equation systems. Prerequisite: Economics 139D or 239D. Systems of cities and regional growth. CZ.) Prerequisites: Economics 55D or instructor's consent. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. SS A survey of Western economic history: population. production. Economics of Creative Goods. One course. the subsequent "globalization backlash" (war. institutions. One course. CZ. 143. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. estimation. their causes and impact. property prices. and hypothesis testing. and technology's effect on work patterns. 103 or higher level math. C-L: see History 158AD. Instructor: De Marchi. R. R Data collection. Sweeting. auctioneers. CCI. Tradeoffs between efficiency and fairness in housing resource allocation. 102. 102. C-L: see Philosophy 145 138. One course. ALP. great depression and war again). against the background of "modern economic growth. SS Introduction to urban and spatial economics. public economics. EI. 142.122D. R. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 141. Business location theory. and the regulatory environment in art markets. R Basic econometric methods useful in empirical economic research and forecasting. (Taught only in the Duke-in-Venice Program. SS One course. Comparative and longitudinal examinations of the evolution of practices. Instructor: Becker. and Mathematics 32. option contracts). impact of innovations in transportation. CCI. Focus on current empirical research in these areas and student independent analysis of current research using statistical software. C-L: Art History 157 145. the art of criticism and formation of preferences. from antiquity to the present. One course. Instructor: De Marchi. W One course. SS Empirical research in microeconomics. EI. also C-L: Markets and Management Studies 130S. or Tarozzi. 132. by special nature of financing and contracting (for example. Attention to the role of dealers. United States urban features: ethical and socio-economic effects of housing segregation and implications for discrimination. or higher. Philosophy of Economics. and basic models with panel data. 103. Instructor: Craig or staff. 104. Research report required. or 114 or Mathematics 135 or 136. entertainment) often distinguished by peculiarities of product (for example. Instructor: Beresteanu. count data. Applied Econometrics in Microeconomics. Prerequisites: Economics 55D. with emphasis on three main sub-fields: labor economics. and industrial organization. 248 Courses and Academic Programs . Comparison of the current second globalization with the first one that came to an abrupt end in August 1914. and the slow reconstruction of international economic networks since 1945. Macroeconomic applications. migrations. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. CCI. Peculiarities of the product. and innovation." The rapid integration of the Atlantic economy from the 1850s to the early 1910s. 1850-2000: From Globalization to Globalization. Neoclassical monocentric city spatial model. 41. One course. SS An historical and analytical study of the way art objects have been produced and marketed. SS Developments in the international economy (trade. Introduction to Economic History. One course. Applied Econometrics in Macroeconomics. Topics include multiple regression analysis under nonstandard conditions. and Mathematics 25 and 26. Prerequisite: Economics 139D or 239D. residential density and impact of distressed communities on broader development. Instructor: Toniolo. SS Creative industries (especially the arts. QS. Use of econometric models for analysis and policy. or Mathematics 31. applicable sales techniques. The International Economy. Prerequisites: Economics 1A and 2A or Economics 1D or 51D. Instructor: Ellickson. and by challenges they present to conventional analysis of pricing and consumption. 113. and pricing procedures. C-L: History 153B 139D. probit. QS. 41. R. role of cities in economic development. and Statistics 103.

Economics 151 is not open to students who have taken Economics 157. Hume. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. Prerequisites: Economics 105D.S. Hutcheson. or staff. traded. financing. C-L: History 146A. and selections from Mandeville. SS A survey of investments and corporate finance. R. and Statistics 103. economic growth. Situation of women in developing countries undergoing transition to market economies. Adam Smith. W The various ways economics is used in contemporary society: in the scholarly community. International Comparative Studies. C-L: Women's Studies 147 148. Women in the Economy. 114. 113. Instructor: Goodwin. cost of care. W Economic aspects of the production.146. SS. and evolution. relevance. The Uses of Economics. Quesnay. unions. SS Demand for and supply of labor. CCI. and/or 200ES. cash in advance models). Politics. Readings from Mun. Prerequisite: Economics 110D. Focus on eighteenth-century views on the nature of society and the origins of prosperity. C-L: History 141B. determination of monetary aggregates and interest rates. 113. STS. hours of work. Labor Economics: Analysis and Measurement. One course. CCI. 158. distribution. C-L: Markets and Management Studies. or Weinke. One course. emphasizing certain models and doctrines—their origins. and Economics 150. and priced. earned income tax credit) on labor supply and the distribution of income across families and individuals. The basic financial instruments. R. One course. Does not count for B. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. and the linkages from Federal Reserve actions to price level. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. taxes and transfers (welfare. the luxury debate. 151. ethical considerations of genderbased inequalities. QS. SS. Turgot. and balance of payments objectives. explanations and remedies for female/male occupational segregation and wage differentials. this course may yield a written product suitable for submission for graduation with distinction. including human fertility. Instructor: Leachman. human capital. R. History of Economic Thought. Basic Finance and Investments. Ricardo. or Mathematics 135 or 136. Instructor: De Marchi. Only Economics 151 or Economics 181 (not both) may be taken for credit within the major. Malthus. the financial impacts of Treasury operations. R. 156. private sector. CZ. government. and organization of health care services. SS. civil society. EI. The dynamics and real effects of inflation. SS. 104. and debt policy. Readings in original texts and interpretative commentaries. Politics. and moral philosophy. Walras. and their impact on the Economics (ECON) 249 . STS The writings of Adam Smith. Instructor: Fullenkamp. Health Economics. structure of markets. One course. employment. SchmittGrohé. and Bentham. pricing of services. Information Science and Information Studies 153. Effects of family structure. 114. gender-related measurements and indicators. 155. including close readings of The Wealth of Nations and The Theory of Moral Sentiments. Uribe. mechanisms. One course. Kimbrough. Veblen. such as measuring output. Quesnay. the financial decision-making processes of the firm: project selection. Economics 148 desirable prior to taking this course. or Mathematics 135 or 136. feminist economic theories. SS Economics of gender including the status of women in the labor market. SS. Monetary Economics. McElroy. Philosophy. degree. Labor market discrimination. 104. other disciplines. gendered division of labor within the family and between the household and labor market. Instructor: McElroy or Sloan. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. how they are used. One course. dividend. International Comparative Studies. Combined with Economics 148. Prerequisites: Economics 105D. and Economics 147. Instructor: Hagy. W Approaches to economic problems from Aristotle to Keynes. Philosophy. marriage laws. and popular culture. and links between natural philosophy (including medical thought). Coverage of models of monetary economics (for example the Cagan money demand function. demand for services. Adam Smith and the System of Natural Liberty. R. and labor force participation. One course. and Keynes. Instructor: Goodwin. and Statistics 103. Marx. STS The operations of commercial and central banking and non-banking financial institutions and instruments in the United States. 181.

SS. SS. Instructor: Timmins. the arbitrage pricing theory. 158D. 159. One course. sharper explanations of variation in market structure. tested with out-of-sample financial data. The History of Modern Macroeconomics from Keynes to the Present. One course. Topics include the theory of unemployment in the Great Depression. SS An exploration of leading issues in economic development. Prerequisites: Economics 105D. A "research mind set" based in part on critical analyses of exemplary empirical research.relevant markets. Applied Financial Economics. and industries. Instructor: Kelley. QS. SS The structure and workings of financial markets. along with the array of policies regulators used to correct those failures. Malthus and Schumpeter. C-L: Public Policy Studies 156. R. CL: Visual Studies 112A 158. calculus. Case studies of the evolution of macroeconomics in political and social context. growth theory and the rise of business cycle modeling in the aftermath of World War II. One course. or Mathematics 135 or 136. technological development and living standards observed across time. Economics of the Environment. 161. Modern growth theory and its implications. 113 114. the debate over monetarism in the age of stagflation. Health Policy 163S. Prerequisites: Economics 105D. particularly those confronting the developing world. SS Tools mastered in microeconomics. One course. CCI. Historical study of writings of Smith. or staff. Marx. 104. One course. Topics include risk-return relationships. 165. demographic change. Health Policy 157. or Mathematics 135 or 136. trade and economic relations with industrialized countries. QS. C-L: Environment 163. Instructor: Staff. Economic Growth. gender. QS. One course. the historical record. technical change. the trade-off between inflation and unemployment in the 1950s and 1960s. aspects of portfolio selection. emphasized throughout. Evidence and Policy. SS. the empirical techniques used by economists to put values on environmental commodities. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and 110D. industrialization. Economics 110D. 113 or 114. One course. Instructor: Falba. CCI. Economics of the Environment. Economics 110D. policies toward developing countries and 250 Courses and Academic Programs . fixed income analysis. SS. R. macroeconomics. Sloan. Applied Financial Economics. and an examination of questions related to everyday environmental issues. and country case studies. and Statistics 103. Prerequisite: Econ 105D or PubPol 110 or 128. STS. Eclectic empirical emphasis using cross national evidence. Instructor: Bollerslev. Application of asset pricing theories to control risks. and aspects of derivatives. CCI. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and 110D. R. One course. and Statistics 103. 163. W Examination of key developments in macroeconomics from the 1930s through the present. 164. One course. Prerequisite: Economics 105D. W Topics include United States trade policies and protectionism. American International Economic Policy. the North American Free Trade area. and urbanization. or staff. Topics include ways in which markets fail to efficiently allocate resources in the presence of pollution. and Statistics 103. Instructor: Hoover. R. Instructor: Peretto. W Seminar version of Economics 163. 104. Economics 110D. and international trade. Analysis of structural change including roles of agriculture. countries. Ricardo. and statistics applied to problems in financial economics and used to empirically investigate financial data using IBM-compatible PCs. health. Prerequisite: Economics 105D Instructor: Timmins. SS Developments in search of broader. 104. or Mathematics 135 or 136. Prerequisites: Economics 105D. Development Economics: Theory. the capital asset pricing model. Students working in teams develop their own portfolio management strategies for common stocks using various optimization techniques. algebra. SS Same as Economics 158 but has a discussion section. Policy examining roles of education. and the rise of the New Classical Macroeconomics in its aftermath. STS. Instructor: Staff. Financial Markets and Investment. Rasiel. STS The role of the environment in the theory and practice of economics. 113 114.

property. and legal environments on managerial issues. organizational form (for example. EI. Instructor: Rasiel. transaction analysis. and how different revenue and expense recognition practices affect this performance measure. One course. or staff. C-L: Markets and Management Studies 182. Instructor: Leachman or staff. Portfolio risk analysis. Instructor: Skender. R. and balance-of-payment crises. mergers and acquisitions). trade imbalances. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. Does not count for economics major or minor requirements. SS A qualitative and quantitative introduction to economic analysis of legal issues and legal reasoning. Introduction to financial markets: asset pricing. corporate finance. Intended for juniors and seniors interested in a career in financial markets. C-L: Public Policy Studies 165. SS Pricing models for major asset classes including bonds and equities. One course. QS. 183. research and wealth management. SS Economic aspects of the allocative and distributive role of government in the economy. such as the dynamics of the organization. Prerequisites: Economics 83 or 182. One course. (Taught only in Duke-In-France Program. Policy debates such as the foreign indebtedness of the United States. and shareholder rights. affirmative action. 170. income determination. Prerequisite: Economics 105D. dividend policy. or Mathematics 135 or 136.multilateral institutions. 181. cost behavior.) Prerequisite: Economics 105D. product liability. Law and Economics. QS. One course. Knoeber. coordination of employees. Consent of instructor required. 114. One course. Instructors: Schmitt-Grohé and Uribe. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and 110D. analyzing financial performance using relative value tools. 168. the effects of taxation Economics (ECON) 251 . The construction and interpretation of corporate financial reports. SS Impact of national economic. budgeting. currencies and commodities. Case studies in accident law. One course. and Statistics 103. emerging market debt crises. Public Finance. Advanced Financial and Managerial Accounting. Asset Pricing and Risk Management. administration. Other topics include contracts. Accounting and reporting problems of complex corporate structures. SS The accounting model of the firm. and the value of life. QS. Instructor: Rasiel. One course. One course. issuing stocks. 113. and options. SS. Prerequisites: Economics 105D. One course. SS Major corporate decisions from the perspective of the firm with an emphasis on the interaction of the firm with financial markets: quantitative project evaluation for investment. 104. Studies the assessment of past and future performance with an introduction to equity valuation. QS. the use of accounting information by management. Some models examined include a calculus-based approach. civil procedure. How a firm's performance is presented in the income statement. and nominal and real exchange rates. SS Problems of liability valuation and the related issues of income determination from the perspective of the financial analyst. and the economics of criminal behavior. Divisions and functions within investment banks: sales and trading. International Macroeconomics. Impact of current events on financial markets. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and Economics 139D. QS. choice between borrowing and issuing stock. Use of accounting information for internal purposes for planning and control. 180. QS. 167. and short-run decisions. W Financial markets and the role of investment banks as intermediaries. Global Capital Markets. Markets and Management Studies 166. speculation and hedging techniques. Topics include procedures to process accounting data. C-L: Markets and Management Studies 187. Multinational Management. SS Analysis of the determinants of international capital movements. exchange-rate-based inflation stabilization. political. Instructor: Graham. Economics majors may not count both Economics 165 and 167 or their crosslists toward major requirements. the incidence and efficiency of taxation. Instructor: Skender. and relations with Europe. CCI. as well as derivative securities including futures and options on equity indices. Financial Accounting. financial statement analysis. Instructor: Fullenkamp. Corporate Finance. macroeconomic policy coordination. Instructor: Staff.

Markets and Management Studies 190S. Independent Study. under the supervision of a faculty member. retail and airlines. Selected Topics in Economics. Consent of instructor may be required for specific section offerings. One course. STS. pricing and dynamic models. Selected Topics in Economics. One course. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. The economic basis for an evaluation of antitrust policy. Selected Topics in Economics. under the supervision of a faculty member. Khan. Instructor: Beresteanu. philosophy. Business and Government. and analysis of major government spending programs.on behavior. including the theory of the firm. One course. Consent of instructor may be required for specific section offerings. C-L: History 199A. Instructor: Staff. One course. Instructor: Staff. resulting in an academic product. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Politics. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Instructor: Staff. One course. resulting in an academic product. Instructor: Staff. C-L: Public Policy Studies 189. Emphasis on theory with support from specific industries. SS Public policies which most directly affect the operation of competition in the business world. QS. Seminar version of Economics 195. 194. Prerequisite: Economics 105D. R. C-L: Markets and Management Studies 189. One course. but for second-semester juniors and seniors. 195S. Instructor: Weintraub. 196. STS Application of techniques of science and technology studies to problems in the history. Instructor: Falba or staff. Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic. SS. Prerequisite: Economics 105D and Economics 110D. models of competition. Research papers required. Instructor: Staff. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and 110D. 195. Competitive Strategy and Industrial Organization. R Same as Economics 191. Topics vary by semester. market structure. One course. public utility regulation. and Economics 191. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Philosophy. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. 104. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and 110D. 197S. The Development of Modern Economic Thought. and sociology of economics. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. or Yildirim. Research Independent Study. with emphasis on the construction of economics as a science. What counts as ''fact'' in economics? Who decides. Research Independent Study. Instructor: Staff. QS. 113 or 114 or Mathematics 135 or 136 or consent of instructor. methodology. 196S. Addresses modern economics as an illustrative case of issues arising in Studies of Scientific Knowledge. One course. including telecommunications. and Statistics 103. SS Foundations of the field of industrial organization. Topics vary by semester. Consent of instructor may be required for specific section offerings. C-L: Public Policy Studies 186 188. Instructor: Staff. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. Instructor: Staff. and public enterprise. One course. 192. Independent Study. Consent of director of undergraduate studies required. Instructor: Staff. W Selective survey of the development of economic thinking in the twentieth century. and Economics 110D. Seminar version of Economics 196. Selected Topics in Economics. Prerequisite: Economics 105D. 193. Prerequisite: Economics 105D. One course. Economic Science Studies. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. and by what processes of negotiation? Does accepting that knowledge in economics is a construct reduce the usefulness of that knowledge and affect the notion of progress in economic science? Why 252 Courses and Academic Programs . SS. One course. One course. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. Consent of instructor may be required for specific section offerings. Individual non-research directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic.

C-L: see Visual Studies 252AS. SS Cooperative and non-cooperative game theory with applications to trading. CCI. and forecasting. imperfect competition. culminating in a research project. CZ. ALP. day care. child support and alimony. 1400 . Prerequisites: Economics 105D. EI. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 218 219S. Mathematical Finance.has mathematical economics enjoyed such success in recent decades? Close readings in texts across the sciences and in modern economics. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 251S. Consent of instructor required. Economics 139D. Evaluation of Public Expenditures. C-L: see Mathematics 215 244S. mortality. 113 or 114. Instructor: Rossi. QS. C-L: see History 221AS. 112. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. R. One course. the distribution of resources within families ('rotten kid theorems' and cooperative and noncooperative games).1700. CCI. Regulation of Vice and Substance Abuse. R One course. Children in Contemporary Society 209S. SS One course. 104. United States welfare policy. SS. Causes and impacts of population change. Applications to marriage and divorce law. and migration. 221S. SS One course. Economic Problems of Underdeveloped Areas. One course. 207S. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 261. W One course. Prerequisites: Economics 105D. Prerequisite: Economics 105D. SS. and voting. and Statistics 101. Instructor: Kelley. For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 207. QS One course. and Economics 110D. including economic models of fertility. labor supplies of women and men. SS Cooperative and noncooperative game theory with applications to trading. One course. W Assessment of the economic determinants of development with consideration given to demographic. and Economics 110D. also C-L: Health Policy 261. 103. C-L: International Comparative Studies 220. across countries and over time. Macroeconomic Policy and International Finance. marriage. One course. providing students with a series of econometric tools for empirical analysis of time-series and an introduction to the current empirical research in macroeconomics. SS Empirical research in macroeconomics and international finance. Economics of the Family. mortality. R. Instructor: Graham. Extensive use of quantitative models requiring familiarity with multivariate calculus. Models of Conflict and Cooperation. R. CCI. also C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 245S 251S. political. and the history of mathematics. imperfect competition. SS. SS Relationship of population growth to economic development and to natural resource and environmental pressures. Small project and simple empirical research required. C-L: Women's Studies 208S. QS. Prerequisite: Economics 105D. An overlay of comparative cultural factors that affect decision-making. international finance. SS One course. One course. also C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 220AS 225. also C-L: Environment 272. or Mathematics 135 or 136. Global Issues in Population and Development. and voting. the demand for children. 208S. Instructor: Weintraub. Research project required. and probability theory. Consent of instructor required. Emphasis on student-directed research that includes statistical data analysis and quantitative techniques to expose development issues. and public policy impacts. and consent of instructor required. The Society and Economy of Europe. Research project required. W Economic functions of families including home production gains from marriage. One course. marriage and divorce. C-L: Public Policy Studies 209S 218. QS. optimization. R. Instructor: Graham. One course. R. cost allocation. Time Series Econometrics. cost allocation. Instructor: Kelley. Art and Markets. Instructor: McElroy. Models of Conflict and Cooperation. Health Policy Economics (ECON) 253 . and farm efficiency in developing nations. Prerequisites: Economics 105D. with particular attention to impacts of gender.

SS Seminar version of Economics 295. R. 181 or consent of instructor. research. Honors Seminars Courses intended for students pursuing an honors thesis in economics and designed to provide exposure to current research in economics. Prerequisites: Economics 105D. and the political economy of trade. SS. also C-L: Public Policy Studies 272. and institutional factors which influenced that evolution and the theoretical implications for contemporary emerging markets. SS Seminar version of Economics 296. C-L: see Sociology 290S 268S. One course. International Trade. and Economics 110D. the standard-of-living debate. SS. and Economy in China. SS Instructor: Staff. One course. CL: International Comparative Studies 201BS. Prerequisites: Economics 105D. R. to active participation in. STS. Markets. fluctuations in the trade balance and current account. SS International trade. W One course. 286. patterns of European growth (with case studies of France. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 262S 265S. One course. CCI. SS Financial aspects of growth and income determination. and Economics 110D. Instructor: Tower. currency crises. Prerequisites: Economics 105D. One course. Instructor: Staff. CCI. Canadian Studies 269S. One course. C-L: Canadian Studies 266S. the economic consequences of World War II. CCI. International Monetary Economics. One course. and a deepening of a chosen line of research with the aim of shifting students from consumption of. 295S. SS One course. Economic Analysis of Resource and Environmental Policies. C-L: see Public Policy Studies 286. SS One course. The political. C-L: see Environment 270. and Russia). the role of politics in economic policy. Significant research component required. Topics include: modern economic growth in historical perspective. postwar reconstruction. Instructor: Kimbrough. multinational institutions. Prerequisite: Economics 151. Current Issues in International and Development Economics. R. Prerequisite: Economics 55D. the classical gold standard. One course. One course. also C-L: International Comparative Studies. regional development. Selected Topics in Economics. the industrial revolution. and Economics 110D. and monetary reform. Global Responses to the Rise of China. capital markets. Health Policy 272. Emphasis on individual research projects. and the European ''miracle'' of the 1950s and 1960s. and macroeconomic policy in open economies. Instructor: Kimbrough or Tower. Selected Topics in Economics. Selected Topics in Economics. SS Instructor: Staff. More information provided in Departmental Graduation with Distinction section after this economics courses listing. 296S. Resource and Environmental Economics. Applications to exchange rate determination. 267S. commercial policy. guidance toward independent research. SS One course.262S. 254 Courses and Academic Programs . One course. European Economic History. 295. Instructor: Toniolo. Germany. Crosscountry and cross-time comparisons. Selected Topics in Economics. the great depression. SS One course. monetary and fiscal policies in open economies. SS Covers period since the late eighteenth century. economic. vehicles for growth. Global Health 291. C-L: see Sociology 293S 270. Seminar in Applied Project Evaluation. SS One course. Instructor: Toniolo. SS Development of financial institutions and markets across civilizations and time. Financial Development and History. investment and migration. W Issues of income distribution within and between countries. Social Change. CCI. 296. C-L: see Environment 271 284S. Economic Growth and Development Policy. Italy.

and fundraising by charities. Consent of instructor required. One course. including: examination of archival materials. Honors Seminar I. Consent of instructor required. One course. Topics drawn from areas in macroeconomics and open economy macroeconomics including monetary policy. Honors Seminar II. Honors Junior Research Workshop in Macroeconomics. R. Instructor: Goodwin. Hagy. QS. 202AS. SS. Economics (ECON) 255 . SS Guided research in macroeconomics. the importance of macroeconomic news announcements. Instructor: Yildirim. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and 110D. Consent of instructor required. exchange rate behavior. QS. Economics 105D. One course. 139D and one finance course (Economics 157. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103. Statistics 103. 201AS. Honors Junior Research Workshop: History of Economics and Economic Thought. R. QS. Prerequisites: Economics 201AS and Mathematics 102 or 103 and Statistics 103. Economics 139D and finance may be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: Economics 201IS and Mathematics 103 or 105 and Statistics 103. One course. Instructors: Bollerslev and Tauchen. Instructor: Kimbrough. R. campaign strategies in elections. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and 110D. Nash's equilibrium) highly recommended. 110D. CZ. 181). government spending and debt policy. QS. Course requires completion of research proposal suitable for write-up as honors thesis in Economics 199S. SS Discussion of research in history of economic thought or economic history. and conduct a relevant literature review. W First course in two-semester honors sequence. 201IS. consumption and investment spending.g. Instructor: Connolly. 201FS. 158. Honors Senior Research Workshop in Macroeconomics. W Following Economics 198S. Hagy. Consent of instructor required. One course. One course. SS Continuation of Economics 201IS. R. Iterative presentations and writing assignments on current literature related to student-selected topics and of student-developed research proposals. biographical writings and oral testimony on the history of economics. W Continuation of Economics 201AS. Instructor: Kimbrough. current account dynamics. Honors Senior Workshop in Microeconomics. One course. Topics include testing for jumps in financial prices. incentive mechanisms in organizations. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and 110D. R. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and 110D. Instructor: Connolly. 202IS. Guided research on student-selected topics. relationship between macro and microeconomics and theoretical and empirical macroeconomics. the roles of various asymmetries such as volatility feedback. Research project analyzing large data samples. identify an adviser. Students specify a topic for thesis research. Familiarity with game theory (e. including literature review and building of theoretical model to capture salient aspects of relevant issue in microeconomics. iterative forum for conducting original research culminating in a substantive research project suitable for submission as an honors thesis. SS. Honors Junior Research Workshop in Microeconomics. 201HS. Development of substantive individual research proposal. SS Application of tools and techniques developed in statistics and economics to research into the structure of financial markets at the very high frequencies. 199S. Consent of instructor required. One course. Development of individual research topic from within three applied areas to vary with instructor's interest. SS Introduction to original research in microeconomic theory. QS. Topics may include competitive strategies by firms. R.198S. SS. or staff. R. the role of high frequency micro-structure noise that masks fundamental price. Requires substantive research project. and interactions across financial markets at the very high frequency. or Staff. interaction of economics with other disciplines and in the construction of public policy. collective decision-making in committees. Honors Junior Research Workshop in Finance. Consent of instructor required. A strong background in calculus and intermediate microeconomics required. Prerequisite: Economics 105D. R. Instructor: Yildirim.

Economics 110D. Economics 132/History 130B. with the exception of Economics 151. the central goal of which is the production of an honors thesis. SS Continuation of Economics 201HS. One course. Statistics 112. Economics 139D should be completed no later than the spring of sophomore year since most 100-level economics courses have Economics 139D as a prerequisite. 202HS. Statistics is a prerequisite for Economics 139D and many 100-level economics courses and therefore should be taken by the fall of sophomore year. Statistics 103. Consent of instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies required. Mathematics 32 and 102. may not be taken pass/fail. containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. 158. 110D. Economics 164. and Economics 888. Economics 55D. Consent of instructor required. or other courses with the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Statistics 112. Honors Senior Research Workshop in Finance. may not be taken pass/fail. and quantitative economics. and advanced calculus (Mathematics 139). 139D. or Weintraub. Statistics 104/Mathematics 135. Prerequisites for the major. Five electives chosen from any additional non-core economics courses at the 256 Courses and Academic Programs . Economics 110D and Economics 139D. philosophy or sociology of economics (Economics 122D/History 158AD. QS. or 1D or 51D. Economics 138/History 153B. Statistics 104/Mathematics 135. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. THE MAJOR For the A. Requirements: Three core courses: Economics 105D. 204. For the B. or 103 or any higher-level mathematics course with Mathematics 103 as a prerequisite. For students entering in Fall 2002 or later. Honors Senior Research Workshop: History of Economics and Economic Thought. R. Statistics is a prerequisite for Economics 139D and many other 100-level economics courses and therefore should be taken by the fall of sophomore year. Instructor: Bollerslev or Tauchen. Economics 130S. Degree Prerequisites: Economics 1A and 2A. R. Economics 55D. differential equations (Mathematics 131). Economics 139D should be completed no later than the spring of sophomore year since most 100-level economics courses have Economics 139D as a prerequisite. Statistics 113 or Statistics 114/Mathematics 136. Prerequisites: Economics 105D and Economics 110D. as well as requirements. or 103 or any higher-level mathematics course with Mathematics 103 as a prerequisite. Honors Research Independent Study.B. 181). or 1D or 51D. at least one of these five courses must be in either economic history or the history. Economics 190S or Economics 197S. as well as requirements. CZ. Statistics 103. and Economics 139D. Economics 182. Students who contemplate graduate study in economics are urged to develop skills in intermediate calculus (Mathematics 103). Requirements: Three core courses: Economics 105D. Economics 137/ Philosophy 145. Prerequisites for the major. Consent of instructor required. Statistics 103. SS Continuation of Economics 201FS. Five electives chosen from any additional non-core economics courses at the 100 level or above. Prerequisite: Economics 201HS. Economics 148/History 141B. One course. statistics. Economics 146/History 146A. linear algebra (Mathematics 104). Prerequisites: Economics 1A and 2A. Instructors: DeMarchi. Degree The Bachelor of Science degree in economics signifies achievement of proficiency in quantitative skills and experience in applying these to economics. and one finance course (Economics 157. Mathematics 32 and 102.S. One course. Students interested in graduate work in business administration may wish to focus less on mathematics and more on computer science. Economics 105D. Statistics 113 or Statistics 114/Mathematics 136. Pre-requisites include: Mathematics 103. Instructor: Staff. 201FS.202FS. Hoover. Goodwin. Economics 150.

1.S. They may then take. in the spring of their junior year. in the fall of their senior year. researched. Paths to the Honors Thesis An honors thesis is a research paper completed during the senior year of the economics major.edu/ecoteach/undergrad/ DEPARTMENTAL GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION Awarding of Distinction A student will be awarded Distinction upon graduation if he/she has satisfied all of the following requirements: 1. If taking paths 2 or 3. Still.duke. and Microeconomics). The thesis is planned. using research tools and techniques commensurate with an undergraduate B. drafted. Substitution of similar courses in other departments at Duke for courses in the Department of Economics used toward major requirements is not permitted. or B. These students will be recognized in the departmental graduation program.econ.Completion of five electives commensurate with an undergraduate A.S.3 in the major and 3. and Economics 888. To be considered for Graduation with Distinction in economics. (The only exception applies to study abroad credit from the full year program at the London School of Economics. Economics 182. This grade Economics (ECON) 257 . the Honors committee will determine if the honors thesis qualifies for graduation with distinction. and revised over the course of two to three semesters. nor will completion of these workshops guarantee Graduation with Distinction. through which they may complete their honors thesis. Students may take. 3. the workshops are selective and are a possible path to Graduation with Distinction or High Distinction if the honors thesis is awarded a minimum grade of B+. History.A minimum grade point average of 3. Macroeconomics.B.Completion of an honors paper with a minimum grade of B+ determined by the primary instructor and an outside reader if taking path 1 (see below). 2. students must pursue one of three paths outlined below. A maximum of two transfer and/or study abroad credits may be counted toward major requirements. It represents a degree of research and critical thinking sufficiently complex and sophisticated as to require two to three semesters' worth of work. an Honors Senior Research Workshop (Economics 202S) in their area of study. Students do not necessarily have to qualify for Graduation with Distinction in order to enroll in the Honors Research Workshops. Awarding of Research Distinction In recognition of the strong independent research dimension required of a successful honors thesis. from which a maximum of four transfer and/or study abroad credits may be counted toward major requirements. degree.) The Department of Economics maintains online resources to guide economics majors and minors: http://www. with the exception of Economics 151. degree. a student will be awarded Research Distinction upon graduation if the Honors committee determines his/her thesis qualifies for graduation with distinction regardless of whether or not the student meets the University and departmental GPA standards for graduation with distinction.100 level or above.3 overall. an Honors Junior Research Workshop (Economics 201S) in one of four areas of study (Finance. Awarding of High Distinction A student will be awarded High Distinction upon graduation if he/she has satisfied all of the requirements for Distinction and his/her honors thesis is selected by our Honors comittee from among nominated theses.

to allow students to continue their research over the summer of their junior year since they will already have completed a prospectus as part of the Honors Junior Research Workshop. This enables students to read and understand advanced empirical papers in their area of interest. Note: Should a problem arise that prevents a student from completing this sequence. The department determined that the best setting in which to foster the research process is a two-semester workshop. This concept is based on the idea that in a workshop setting. in turn. Path 1 is a new path designed to create more opportunities for students to experience research in Economics. Duke economics graduate students. the requirements for the new chosen path would need to be satisfied in order to receive honors. students may enroll in either Honors Research Independent Study (Economics 204) or Honors Seminar II (Economics 199S) with the signature of their faculty mentor and the approval of the 199S instructor (which is gained by submission of a satisfactory thesis proposal). they will have the tools with which to complete proper empirical analysis. In such a case. if students then choose to undertake a research project. students meet with their professor(s) and each other to observe advanced research (professors from outside the university. develop and later present their own research on a regular biweekly basis. they can switch to path 2 or 3. 258 Courses and Academic Programs . and Duke economics professors present their own research to the students).2. These research workshops begin in a student's junior year for two reasons: firstly. under the instruction of the mentoring faculty member. and secondly. Hence. the department now requires that all economics majors take econometrics before taking field courses in sub-disciplines. Students who do not enter one of the Honors Junior Research Workshops or have not developed a topic of interest with an individual faculty mentor may enroll in Honors Seminar I (Economics 198S) in the fall semester of their senior year and Honors Seminar II (Economics 199S) in the spring semester of their senior year. Students choosing this path enroll in a Research Independent Study (Economics 193) in the fall of their senior year. 3. continually receiving feedback from their peers and from professors and graduate students. and then. Students may also pursue Graduation with Distinction by enlisting the approval of a specific faculty member (through submission of an approval form to the Director of Undergraduate Studies) indicating that the faculty member is willing to work with the student in his/her senior year in an independent study format to produce an honors thesis. resembling graduate workshops. In the spring of their senior year. Davies Fellowships are available to sponsor some of these juniors (and their mentors) to enable them to do research full time under the supervision of their advisor. Further. It is because of this research initiative that the major has been restructured so as to provide the proper educational background and training for students to be able to undertake novel research. to initiate students into a culture of research earlier in their college careers so as to have a greater impact. will be determined by the instructor and confirmed by an outside reader.

Topics vary each semester. Adjunct Lecturers Chafe and Wasiolek. Associate Professor of the Practice Malone. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in Education. Director of the Program. Research Associate Stocking. Education (EDUC) Associate Professor of the Practice Riggsbee. Honors Senior Research Workshop OR PATH 2: Economics 198S.econ. Research Scholar Ewald. 49S. 50. Substitution of similar courses in other departments at Duke for courses in the Department of Economics used toward major requirements is not permitted. Adjunct Assistant Professor Crumley. Affiliated Faculty: Associate Professor of the Practice Bookman. Honors Seminar II) All honors theses are due April 15. Stephens. Professor of the Practice O’Barr. Professor Cooper. Adjunct Instructor Eidson A minor. Assistant Professor Linnenbrink-Garcia. Honors Seminar I Seminar II OR OR Spring Economics 55D Economics 110D Economics 139D PATH 1: Economics 201S. THE MINOR Requirements: Economics 1A and 2A. Assistant Professors of the Practice Jentleson. or 1A and 2A Economics 105D Statistics 103 Two Field Course Electives PATH 1: Economics 202S. Economics 55D. Adjunct Professor Eubanks. First-Year Seminar. Associate Professors of the Practice Malone and Riggsbee. Honors Independent Study Research Independent Study (or Economics 199S. Adjunct Associate Professors Airall. Adjunct Professor of the Practice Trask. One course.Proposed Flow of Courses for Economics Major Seeking to Graduate with Distinction Fall First-year Sophomore Junior Senior Economics 51D. and Wynn. but not a major. Education (EDUC) 259 . Bryant and Wilson. Honors PATH 2: Economics 199S. Director of Undergraduate Studies.edu/ecoteach/undergrad/writing. Adjunct Assistant Professors of the Practice Hammer. Research PATH 3: Economics 204. is available in this department. from research to final editing. Writing Assistance The EcoTeach Center’s Writing Consultant is available free of charge to all economics majors on an individual basis for assistance with all phases of writing. Instructors Carboni and Hill. Honors Junior Research Workshop PATH 3: Economics 193.php. Instructor: Staff. Three additional 100 level or above economics courses (excluding Economics 182 and 888). Associate Professor Di Bona. or 1D or 51D. Adjunct Associate Professor of the Practice Lattimore. Instructor: Staff. CCI Topics differ by section. and Teasley. Lecturing Fellow Ahern-Dodson. One course.duke. Information on services and a link for appointments can be found at: http://www.

Ethics. Evaluation of the appropriateness of these goals for schooling. EI. human-computer dialogue. role of teachers and schools in society. Instructor: Wynn. and cultural groups. relationship between theories of learning and instructional activities in technology. SS Civic engagement and service learning as pedagogical approaches in both K-12 and college settings. Instructor: Staff. and how the education policies that sanction these processes are formed. social studies. EI. Students participate in structured service learning experience in which they reflect on ethical issues related to schooling. R. Teaching Practices in Elementary Mathematics and Science. Schools and Society. One course. Required participation in service learning. Readings and field experience promoting critical analysis of ethical teaching practices. Instructor: Staff. SS. 96S. Topics vary each semester. Ways children acquire through schooling social skills. Analysis. Instructor: Riggsbee. philosophical. Readings and field experience on ethical teaching practices. One course. long-term research project focused on meeting the diverse needs of learners in the elementary classroom. Consent of instructor required. and technology in social issues and shaping teacher decision making about teaching and learning. CCI Topics differ by section. Elementary Curriculum. how schooling shapes children's development. CCI. and social perspectives. Consent of instructor required. STS Exploration of the history and theories of education in general and of educational technology in specific. Application of theory and research for solving complex societal problems that confront children. Emphasis on literacy development across grade levels and content areas. Consent of instructor required. One course. and impact of teacher affect on environment and student learning. One course. 107S. SS Research-based teaching practices in elementary language arts and social studies for culturally diverse populations. ''meaningful input. and communities. EI. and a sense of their role in society. One course. One course. CCI. Required participation in service learning. Instructor: Riggsbee. Children. Teaching Practices in Elementary Language Arts and Social Studies. Early Childhood Education. Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education. incorporating historical. 100. SS. Special Topics. CCI. moral values. Open only to students in the Focus Program.82FCS. students write comprehensive curriculum units that focus on meeting the needs of learners from diverse social. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in Education. mathematics. R. 110S. Systematic. or Wynn. 109S. role of teachers and schools in society. and Social Ideals. CCI. Education as a transformative experience. W The processes by which children are educated in the United States. Emphasis on the influence of science. Using Gardner's multiple intelligences model of learning. Instructor: Staff. Includes a service learning experience focused on literacy issues in K-12 schools in which students write reflections on ethical issues. W Classroom-based action research and structured reflection to promote the development of inquiry-oriented teachers. EI. STS Researchbased teaching practices in elementary mathematics and science for culturally diverse populations. schools. 112S. Children in Contemporary Society 113S. Educational Technology. C-L: Public Policy Studies 109S. political. SS. Instructor: Malone. SS Interdisciplinary examination of issues confronting American education. SS. Civic Engagement. 101. Instructor: Staff. and evaluation of elementary curriculum with emphasis on integrating the expressive arts with literacy. speech 260 Courses and Academic Programs . economical. 108S. Research/Reflective Practice Elementary Education. gender. The ways civic engagement experiences may impact students' perspectives of race. Instructor: Jentleson. Exploration of ways cultural influences and differences have shaped public schools. One course. mathematics. Consent of instructor required. class. One course.'' response analysis. development. ethnic. One course. Service. aesthetics of instructional and screen design. and science. and impact of teacher affect on environment and student learning.

social. CCI. students reflect through writing on ethical issues in teaching. Contemporary Issues In Education. trends. Legal Issues in Education. parents. One course. SS. Instructor: Staff. Involves structured service learning experiences in which students engage in comparative analysis of children of various cultures. Includes fieldwork in local public schools. regular online investigations. Instructor: Stephens. SS Investigation of society. SS Principles of developmental. SS One course. and academic development of the minority gifted child. EI Engagement. Children in Contemporary Society 123. STS An interdisciplinary examination of career choice and development with particular focus on ways work may change in the future. as part of a teaching internship in elementary schools. International Comparative Studies 140. CCI. Education (EDUC) 261 . CCI. R. History 186. Students also examine ethical issues encountered in early childhood programs. Includes multicultural issues in teaching at-risk students. Required service learning. Unrecognized Talent: Minority Children and Gifted Education. including a comparative analysis of cultural differences in American schools. Comparative analysis of work across cultures and within American society. with emphasis on developing aesthetic understanding. current. Examination of the impact on learning of race. class. strategies. Infancy. C-L: Psychology 108A. in active classroom research projects by designing. and emerging legal issues and theories in education. Early Childhood. ways of reversing under-representation of minority students in programs for the gifted. Instructor: Riggsbee. One course. emotional. D). text presentation. institutional liability and teacher's rights at the elementary and secondary levels and in the college setting. SS. gender. Educational Psychology (C. Marxism and Society. C-L: Children in Contemporary Society 139. Linnenbrink. final exercises: individual hardcopy research ''portfolios'' of the semester's work and team-built online course web site. SS A comprehensive introduction to the field of early childhood education and child development from infancy to age eight. and cognitive psychology as applied to education. Focus on cultural comparisons relating to the manifestation of giftedness. One course. Required participation in service learning. Children in Contemporary Society 120. Instructor: DiBona. CCI. CCI. Instructor: Wasiolek. Instructor: Staff. CCI. EI. Motivation and At-Risk Students. Through structured service learning experiences in local schools. Two courses. and Educational Programs. and methods that reflect current educational practice and research. Topics include students' rights (for example search and seizures. Creation of a portfolio of products to demonstrate technology competencies for teaching certification. due process). Elementary Education: Internship. Instructor: Staff. 125S. Instructor: Staff. and ethical issues relating to the use of tests in identifying giftedness as it relates to minority students. C-L: Early Childhood Education. gender. equity. teachers. One course. W A case analysis approach giving students an opportunity to identify and review past. Examines programs. EI. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 139. One course. 121S.recognition. EI. EI. One course. including the impact on work of major developments in science and technology. and evaluating units of instruction. One course. One course. Students also reflect and write on ethical issues involved in their service experiences in public schools. and educational policy. implementing. The Psychology of Work. 137. Consent of instructor required. C-L: Children in Contemporary Society 133S. or Malone. Instructor: Garcia. counselors. C-L: see Literature 181A. SS Explores current motivational theories and how these theories can be applied to motivating at-risk students. with a focus on how children learn. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 118. Examines issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. and self in the social. and ethnicity. Sociology 139. SS Investigation of current issues and problems in the field of education including areas of race.

152S. R. 151S. EI. student affairs. past. C-L: Sociology 130S 150S. and Higher Education. SS Community-based research including design. Early Childhood Internship. Instructor: O'Barr. Includes student participation in community-based service learning and research. Includes comparative analysis of childhood experiences in different cultures. Research paper integrating students' major. Consent of instructor required. CCI. implementation. EI. publics) as well as the dynamics in different sectors (academic. Consent of instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies required. CZ. W Interdisciplinary analysis of the history of ideas about women and the professions with emphasis on women's actions. One course. also C-L: Sociology 136. also C-L: Children in Contemporary Society 149S. 262 Courses and Academic Programs . and the organization of disciplines in the contemporary university. The roles of multiple actors (faculty. For Early Childhood Education Studies Certificate Students only. the demands of women for higher education access. Women and the Professions. fund raising). SS Recent research on the role of service learning in promoting literacy development in children. SS. 147. EI. Examination of existing models of collaboration on research projects between universities and communities. and school-based tutoring programs on students in K-12 schools. One course. reading learning disabilities. Literacy and Service Learning. present and future. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: O'Barr. with emphasis on gender differences in the University's culture and ideals. and ideas in education. and the impact of cultural diversity on literacy. Senior seminar open only to Baldwin Scholars. CCI. interviews with working women. SS One course. May be repeated. 160S. the impact of service learning. Effective models of collaboration between universities and their surrounding communities. Instructor: Malone. Learning to Read (C. SS Gender systems at Duke. CCI. R. Freshman-Sophomore Tutorials. D). Politics. R. EI Structured supervised internship in an early childhood program integrated with a reflective seminar in which students examine ethical issues in early childhood education. Research in Service Learning. Small group discussions of significant books. literacy issues such as phonics versus whole language. One course. SS One course. cognitive approaches to developing reading comprehension. Civic Engagement and the Duke-Durham Partnership. One course. Instructor: Stocking. C-L: see Documentary Studies 144S. Student research based on documents in University archives. Half course. R. One course. Gender. EI. Includes a service-learning component in which students turn in weekly reflections on the ethical issues and social justice concerns they encounter. C-L: see Psychology 145S. methods of teaching beginning reading. Required participation in service learning. One course. CCI. C-L: Early Childhood Education 162T. Whether university efforts to develop partnerships with local communities result in meaningful social change. also C-L: Visual Studies 103FS 146S. volunteering. SS The impact university-community partnerships have on the community and participating university students. students. Gender At Duke. CCI. Instructor: Chafe or staff. athletics. Children in Contemporary Society 148S. 153S. Children's Self Expression: Literacy Through Photography. authors. Historical examination of the ethical arguments about institutional policies.144S. The changing status of women in professional life. Instructor: Ahern-Dodson. CCI. administrators. C-L: see African and African American Studies 147. Consent of instructor required. evaluation of research in community settings. SS One course. writing about the ethical issues that emerge. ethical and political implications of public and personal decision-making. Includes a service-learning component in the local schools. R. EI. Study of research and writing by and about women in professional fields. Instructor: Staff. R. Urban Education. SS The evolution of North American colleges and universities as gendered institutions. One course. the internship experience and their future goals required. EI.

196S. Independent Study. Emphasis on ethical issues in teaching. CCI. 199S. STS Examination of schools and classrooms of the twenty-first century with focus on values. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or project on a previously approved topic. STS Major educational changes and reforms in selected countries designed to illustrate general similarities and differences in the policies of developing and industrialized societies. CCI. SS Secondary School curriculum and instruction with focus on teaching of Mathematics. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Junior-Senior Tutorials. authors. One course. Instructors: Staff. Directed readings in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. and impact of technology on schooling. SS Secondary School curriculum and instruction with focus on teaching of Science. Half course. Selected topics seminar. and school culture by viewing these constructs from divergent perspectives. Exploration of the ethical dimensions that decision makers must face in formulating policy. 197S. Consent of instructor required. One course. Teaching High School Social Studies. CCI. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. Investigation of the ways Education (EDUC) 263 . One course. special emphasis placed on meeting the needs of high school students from diverse cultural backgrounds. One course. Small group discussions of significant books. One course. Teaching High School Mathematics. SS. Half course. 198S. Instructor: Staff. One course. social. beliefs. The availability of tutorials. 209. Includes field-based experience with a focus on examining ethical teaching practices. Research Independent Study. Includes field-based experience with a focus on examining ethical teaching practices. Instructors: Staff. and the instructors will be announced before preregistration. One course. EI.170S. 171T. Instructor: Bookman. and ideas in education. special emphasis placed on meeting the needs of high school students from diverse cultural backgrounds. special emphasis placed on meeting the needs of high school students from diverse cultural backgrounds. educational philosophies. teacher leadership. 190S. R. 172T. One course. pedagogical and methodological practices. Small group discussions of significant authors and ideas in education. Includes field-based experience with a focus on examining ethical teaching practices. Instructor: Staff. SS Secondary School curriculum and instruction with focus on teaching of Social studies. Instructor: Eubanks. Teaching High School English. Instructor: Wynn. CCI. For Seniors and Graduates 205S. Culture. One course. Students complete an extensive research project based on fieldwork in a local high school. Junior-Senior Tutorials. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated. SS. cultural. Selected Topics. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Exploration of social fabric of schools as related to diversity. special emphasis placed on meeting the needs of high school students from diverse cultural backgrounds. Emphasis on American educational issues in the context of the emerging global economy with a focus on how policies affect various cultural groups due to economic. 192. Different courses indicated by letter. SS Secondary School curriculum and instruction with focus on teaching of English. EI. Consent of instructor required. CCI. and Methods. or gender diversity. and assumptions underlying teaching and learning in high school. Teaching High School Science. Instructor: Staff. their content. 191. Instructor: Staff. the central goal of which is a substantive research paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Selected Topics. Secondary School Issues: Pedagogy. Includes field-based experience with a focus on examining ethical teaching practices. Selected topics seminar. Global Education.

Technology. Designed to meet the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction technology requirements for teaching licensure. Requirements. Duke University is accredited by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (DPI) and the National Council For Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and has 264 Courses and Academic Programs . Secondary Education: Internship. THE MINOR The Minor in Education is designed to provide students who are majoring in Arts and Sciences disciplines with opportunities to combine coursework in their majors with academic and field-based experiences focused on the complex social. 214. 216. and involve a fieldbased experience in public schools). Half course. Includes elements of design through completion of online portfolio. web design. psychological. Seminar in Secondary School Teaching. The fourth and fifth courses are electives that must be Education courses at the 100 level or above. Consent of instructor required. they may also fulfill requirements of an approved Duke teacher preparation program and become licensed to teach. 270S.technological innovation is changing schools and the teaching/learning process. political. SS Role of technology in schools and society. and Schools. Society. Instructor: Staff. Licensure by the Duke-approved program is authorized through the State Board of Education in North Carolina and is reciprocal with most states. A common conceptual framework—preparing knowledgeable and skilled instructors who conduct themselves professionally and ethically as they practice reflective teaching—links the Teacher Preparation Programs. Only one of the five courses may be taken at an institution other than Duke. One course. Instructor: Wynn or Crumley. Instructor: Di Bona. and cultural issues that impact schools and school children. and a third required Education course chosen from a group of courses that address pedagogical theory and practice and the impact of individual differences and social diversity on teaching and learning. R Principles. this third required course must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Education. A total of five courses including three required courses (Education 100. One course. Emphasis on integrating technology into instruction and utilizing technology to become educational leaders. Two courses. For student teachers only. historical. and problems in secondary school instruction. practices. Consent of instructor required. 215S. The goals of and criteria for admission to any of these programs are available from the respective offices. Education 118. Consent of instructor required. UNIVERSITY PROGRAM FOR PREPARATION FOR TEACHING The Duke University Teacher Preparation Programs offer secondary teacher licensure programs at both the undergraduate and Master’s levels and an elementary licensure program at the undergraduate level. economic. Students also complete an action research project focused on an important issue in classroom teaching. Brief descriptions of two undergraduate programs based on Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees (secondary school teaching and elementary teaching) are followed by a description of a program for secondary teaching based on a Master of Arts in Teaching degree. One course. including a focus on values and ethics in teaching. Instructor: Wynn. R Supervised internship in a teaching center in a senior high school involving some full-time teaching. Instructor: Staff. Selected Topics Seminar. EI. SS May be repeated. carry the CCI code. A license to teach along with an undergraduate degree is required by most public school systems and is recommended by many independent schools. As students complete general education requirements of Trinity College and of a selected major. Consent of instructor required. and digital storytelling. Introduction for preservice teacher candidates to technology tools including Photoshop.

and reliable energy. affordable. Prospective teachers are advised to consult with the academic advisors in their majors and the secondary program director concerning their interest in teaching and in being accepted into this preparation program. social studies (open to majors in cultural anthropology. Upon completion of the senior year spring semester internship and the four-year Trinity College undergraduate degree. or B. and the four-year Trinity College undergraduate degree. public policy. chemistry. The normal sequence for MAT coursework may begin in the spring semester of the senior year. Electrical and Computer Engineering For courses in Electircal and Computer Engineering. environmental studies. An expertise in energy will Energy and the Environment 265 . Students selected for the elementary teaching program are placed as interns with mentor teachers in an elementary school and are also supervised by a Duke professor. Co-Directors A certificate. Upon completion of the senior year spring semester internship. B. Students are selected by competitive criteria for participation in the program. The Elementary Teacher Preparation Program includes education courses with field experiences in diverse classroom settings and an intensive senior spring semester internship. B. and independent directed research (four course credits). is available in this program. seminars. see “Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)” on page 602 Energy and the Environment Professor Laursen and Professor Klein. political science. psychology. Interested undergraduate students may apply to the elementary program beginning in the sophomore year. students may apply for licensure. This program is approved for teacher licensure by the State Board of Education in North Carolina and is reciprocal with most states. Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) in Secondary Schools The Master of Arts in Teaching Program is designed for students who wish to teach their discipline in secondary schools by completing a graduate degree. or B. Courses may not be double-counted toward both the bachelor's and MAT degrees. Title II data is available upon request. and an intensive senior spring semester teaching internship. or sociology) and science (open to majors in biological anthropology and anatomy. biology. During the internship students teach high school classes in their respective disciplines under the supervision of an experienced teacher and a university professor. degree) The Program in Education offers secondary school teacher licensure programs in English (open to English majors only). but not a major. history.reciprocal approval for initial licensure with most of the fifty states. Elementary School Teaching (A. S. Additional information is available from the MAT office. degree) Undergraduate students who plan to teach young children (kindergarten through grade six) may become eligible for licensure to teach while at Duke in addition to completing any academic major offered by Trinity College. S. geology. An intensive senior spring semester links together a teaching internship in a local public school. Students are accepted by competitive criteria into a program which includes education courses with field experiences in local schools. Interested undergraduate students may apply to the secondary school teaching program in the spring of their sophomore year or the fall of their junior year. mathematics (open to mathematics majors only). The undergraduate certificate in Energy and the Environment is designed to provide Duke undergraduates with an understanding of the breadth of issues that confront our society in its need for clean. economics. religion. students may apply for licensure. or physics). Secondary School Teaching (A.

and internships. Adjunct Professors Eble. 266 Courses and Academic Programs . Saldivar. Chair. Shannon. see page “Engineering (Interdepartmental) (EGR)” on page 581 English (ENGLISH) Professor Baucom. Aravamudan. 20.edu/programs/undergrad/energycert. Credit for Advanced Placement on the basis of the College Board examination in literature and composition. Associate Professor Sussman. Professors Aers. Prior to the drop/add period. Energy use is a multi-faceted problem. no more than three of which may originate in a single department. Pfau. One course. Ruderman. and academic sectors. Credit for Advanced Placement on the basis of the College Board examination in composition and language. Baucom. Studies in Literary Topics. this course is restricted to first-year students who have not fulfilled their seminar requirement. Psomiades. and Energy Technology) taken from a list that can be found on the Web site: http://www. Quilligan. Wallace. and Wald. Smith. Quilligan. and Willis. One course. Moi. Khanna. ALP. 49BS. the certificate in Energy and the Environment will offer a variety of activities intended to provide students with a real-world perspective and handson experiences. Beckwith. One course. Senior Lecturing Fellows Donahue and Gopen A major or minor is available in this department. Literature and Composition. Adjunct Assistant Professors Bolonyai. Applewhite. or other certificate program. Jones. Moses. markets. Lecturer Askounis. No more than two courses counted toward the certificate in Energy and the Environment may also satisfy the requirements of any major. Tetel. with one from each area (Markets & Policy. Price. In addition to integrative core and capstone courses. government. The certificate requires three integrative courses: two introductory courses (Environment 130 and Civil and Environmental Engineering 24L) and a Capstone Project Course (Environment 190L and Engineering 190L) in which teams of students explore the feasibility of a new or modified energy resources or technology. 26S. Somerset.duke. W May be taken twice. the certificate will expose students to the three key disciplines in the study of energy and the environment: markets and policy. Adjunct Associate Professors Thomas and Wittig.html Engineering For courses in Engineering. Assistant Professors Cohen and Metzger. Moten. and Wolfram. Pope. Composition and Language. Beyond traditional coursework. Instructor: Staff. One course. Davidson. The certificate in Energy and the Environment is therefore similarly interdisciplinary. and energy technology. Gaines.expand the students’ career options in the private. Torgovnick. Associate Professors Harris.nicholas. Sussman. which draws upon the perspectives and expertise of a variety of disciplines. Clum. Ferraro. guest speakers such as visiting executives and practitioners. Instructor: Staff. Additional information may be obtained from the Undergraduate Programs Office for the Nicholas School. First-Year Seminar on Literature. Porter. Three elective courses are also required. non-profit. Associate Professor of the Practice Malouf. minor. Mitchell. 29. ALP Topics vary each semester offered. research opportunities. and the environment. Kennedy. These include field trips. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS The certificate requires a total of six courses. The goal of the certificate is to develop innovative thinkers and leaders who understand the energy system as a whole and the important interconnections among policy. Environment. Holloway. Strandberg. Director of Undergraduate Studies. Assistant Professor of the Practice Hillard. and Weldon. technology. environmental impacts and resources.

ALP. W Selections and complete works. One course. ALP. One course. One course. Selected topics. Crane or Dreiser. One course. Singapore. Instructor: Staff. Melville. or 203S. 90AS. Writing: Fiction. Instructor: Staff. as well as secondary literature that theorizes on physical. Instructor: Staff. Introduction to Creative Writing. 100CS. One course. Whitman. ALP. O'Neill. Material can include eco-criticism/fiction on Marine Lab travel sites. Instructor: Staff. W One course. or on island shores. political. W Instructor: Staff. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Special Topics in English.51. W An introduction to the skills of critical reading and the vocabulary of critical analysis by close examination of poetry. focusing on exile. ALP. 90B. W A study of representative writings selected from a range of historical moments from the High Middle Ages to the present. ALP One course. 53. 94. Readings in Genre. One course. ALP One course. and drama (or other media such as film) from a range of historical periods. ALP Topics vary each semester offered. 89FCS. Poe. Instructor: Staff. Introduction to Cultural Studies (DS4). One course. Topics in Documentary Writing. Instructor: Staff. cultural. ALP. Selections and complete works. One course. Writing: Poetry. Frost or Robinson. Consent of instructor required. 202S. cultural. ALP One course. ALP. contextualized with the intellectual. and Twain. ALP. and tourism. 101A. Topics vary each semester offered. and others. C-L: see Literature 110. Emerson or Thoreau. Emphasis on the social. Visual Studies 121A. Hawaii. W Travel narratives. Film/Video/Digital 101. Film/Video/Digital 101CS. Hemingway. Documentary Writing: Creative Nonfiction Through Fieldwork. W Instruction in the writing and study of fiction. 104S. Instructor: Staff. Documentary Studies 101ES. fiction. and historical background of their times. epics. Given at Beaufort. One course. Reading Historically. Instructor: Staff. One course. C-L: see Literature 100. W Seminar version of 90B. imperial travel. Hawthorne. the Middle Passage. ALP. and political structures that function at sea. Focus Program Seminar on Writing or Language. Dickinson. ALP. C-L: Cultural Anthropology 131S. Recommended for students before they take English 105S or 106S. CCI One course. Introduction to Theater. also C-L: Theater Studies 171. ALP Topics in documentary writing. drama. and philosophical possibilities in supra. Carolina islands. Consent of instructor required. C-L: see Theater Studies 91 100AS. and historical background of their times. 81FCS. contextualized with the intellect. One course. Trinidad. 64S. Documentary Film/Video Theory and Practice (DS4). cosmopolitan journeys. Recommended for students before they take English 103S. ALP. Focus Program Seminar on Literature. novels. shipwreck. Instructor: Staff. W Continuation of English 51. and film that take place at sea. Reading Historically. C-L: see Documentary Studies 111S English (ENGLISH) 267 . Policy Journalism and Media Studies 101B. Faulkner. Film/Video/Digital 138S. CCI Topics differ by section. Visual Studies 117KS. A study of representative writings selected from a range of historical moments from the High Middle Ages to the present. cultural. W Instruction in the writing and study of poetry. One course. One course. R. Instructor: Staff. Literature of the Sea. Representative American Writers. 80FCS. Representative American Writers. 52. also C-L: Visual Studies 121E.and transnational spaces. poetry. Instructor: Staff. ALP. James. 90BS. Introduction to Film (DS4). Instructor: Staff. 201S. 63S.

recommended for. Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics. ALP. simple prose texts and poems and arriving at some of the most sophisticated and fascinating literary writing in the English language. 106S. but not limited to. One course. juniors. Open to sophomores. ethics. C-L: see Russian 174. 104S. Instructor: Somerset. Malouf. Advanced Dramatic Writing. One course. W One course. C-L: see Linguistics 104S. Open to sophomores. C-L: see Theater Studies 138S. also CL: Cultural Anthropology 174. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 114. Instructor: Applewhite or Pope. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 107. Instructor: Applewhite or Pope. CCI. students who have taken English 100A. recommended for. also C-L: Film/Video/Digital 116S 109S. One course. Women's Studies 174. 107S. Scientific Writing. C-L: see Theater Studies 137S. Languages of the World. but not limited to. One course. 268 Courses and Academic Programs . or Price. Transforming Fiction for Stage and Screen. Open to sophomores. and seniors. and dramatic organization in traditional and modern poems as a basis for original composition. juniors. DS2. taking into consideration questions of the aesthetics. Primary focus on learning to read the written language of this period. W Intensive writing of the short story. Pope. SS One course. C-L: Linguistics 112 113S. Introduction to Linguistics (DS4). Screenwriting. image. Discussion of students' manuscripts and individual conferences with the instructor. W Meter. International Comparative Studies 102E 115. International Comparative Studies 112. and morality of fiction. The Writing of Poetry. Consent of instructor required. C-L: see Linguistics 101. Instructor: Askounis. C-L: see Linguistics 102. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 106A 111. ALP. W One course. recommended for. W One course. Consent of instructor required. R Introduction to the literature and culture of England before 1100. ALP. The Writing of Poetry. ALP. juniors. tone. juniors. as exemplified by the history of the English language from Proto-Indo-European to the present. CCI. ALP. One course. Russian 117. English Historical Linguistics (DS1. Advanced Composition: Art of the Essay. 110A. students who have taken English 100C. Introduction to Old English (DS1). Porter. ALP. Open to sophomores. Dramatic Writing. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. W Prerequisite: Writing 20. or DS4. as well as procedures for its publication. DS3. ALP. W See English 105S. Porter. SS Introduction to methods and principles of historical linguistics. One course. ALP. students who have taken English 100C. SS One course. One course. students who have taken English 100A. ALP. W Consent of instructor required. SS One course. also C-L: Film and Video 108BS. Linguistics 174 116AS. W See English 103S. Writing: Short Stories. W One course. Not open to students who have taken English 208. R. Instructor: Staff. One course. One course. Malouf. also C-L: Film/ Video/Digital 131S 103S. R. CCI. 117AS. but not limited to. as determined by instructor). ALP. Special Topics in Writing. and seniors. Instructor: Applewhite. ALP. Pope. but not limited to. Consent of instructor required. CZ. C-L: see Theater Studies 136S. SS One course. beginning with short. with students completing a minimal of thirty pages of finished and presumably publishable fiction. recommended for. or Price. CCI. and seniors. W Prerequisite: Writing 20. Writing: Short Stories. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 102S 114. Instructor: Butters or Tetel. Instructor: Applewhite. C-L: see Theater Studies 135S. also C-L: Film and Video 108AS. 105S. Gender and Language (DS4). and seniors.102S.

CZ One course. EI. in prose on Sidney and Sir Thomas More. Advanced Composition: Writing Humor. Gray. 119S. Quilligan. also C-L: Art History 139S. C-L: see Literature 115S. One course. International Comparative Studies. Visual Studies 110E. R. CZ One course. Donne and the metaphysicals. Swift. write weekly responses to readings. Blake. STS One course. and Shakespeare. also C-L: Art History 152 124S. and Browne. Instructor: Askounis. ALP Major genres and authors such as Dryden. One course. W An exploration of narratives from diverse traditions and periods. Film/Video/Digital 112 123A. C-L: Policy Journalism and Media 117ES. CCI. C-L: see Medieval and Renaissance Studies 114S. ALP One course. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 110D. CCI. English Literature: 1600 to 1660 (DS2). Women Writers of the Renaissance: Spain and England. Spenser. C-L: see Spanish 152. Film and Video. W Prerequisite: Writing 20. Advanced Composition: Spiritual Autobiography. The Living Middle Ages. R The principal forms and examples of English prose. Webster. Current Topics in Linguistics. One course. 119. Instructor: Aravamudan or Sussman. ALP. in prose on character writers. CZ One course. poetry. ALP Emphasis in poetry on Wyatt. Sixteenth-Century English Literature (DS2). Students maintain a daily journal. CCI. One course. and Ford. Simone Weil. Pope. also C-L: Sociology 160. SS One course. ALP. Canadian Studies. ALP. 117CS. 117FS. Burton. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 121A 121B. One course. Markets and Management Studies. CCI. Aspects of Medieval Culture (DS1). CCI. Special Topics in Linguistics. also C-L: German 156. Instructor: Gopen.117BS. SS Instructor: Staff. Advanced Composition: Stylistic Imitation. Sidney. English Literature: 1660 to 1800 (DS3). Classical Studies 139S. Linguistics 120D. Instructor: Askounis. One course. W Prerequisite: Writing 20. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective (DS4). Markets and Management Studies 121A. and drama of the Anglo-Saxon and Middle English periods (excluding Chaucer). also C-L: Sociology 160D. 123C. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 110. Medieval English Literature to 1500 (DS1). One course. C-L: see Medieval and Renaissance Studies 114. Bacon. Gandhi. CZ One course. Women's Studies 120D. ALP. W Includes analysis of works of humorous writers from several centuries. also C-L: Art History 149. CZ. Raleigh. Movies of the World/The World of Movies. and embark on their own narratives. Addison. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 123A 123B. Sexualities in Film and Video (DS4). CCI. Instructor: DeNeef or Quilligan. Policy Journalism and Media Studies. Italian 134 123F. Tourneur. History 116 123CS. Advanced Composition: Writing for Publication. ALP. Creation of original essays. ALP. Aspects of Renaissance Culture (DS2). Instructor: Aers. CCI. also C-L: Film/Video/Digital 115S. Instructor: DeNeef. Congreve. SS One course. Linguistics 120. ALP. 120. study of various comic forms and techniques. and Defoe or Fielding. History 148A. R. One course. CCI. Visual Studies 121CS. ALP. ALP Emphasis in poetry on Jonson and the cavaliers. C-L: see Medieval and Renaissance Studies 115. or Somerset. Classical Studies 139. Thomas Merton. or Shannon. Malcolm X and others. Writers may include Augustine. Beckwith. One course. Study of Sexualities English (ENGLISH) 269 . C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 121B 122. One course. SS Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Askounis. History 116S 123E. Advertising and Society: Global Perspective (DS4). Donne. In translation. Prerequisite: Writing 20. Prerequisite: Writing 20. ALP. Russian 113. C-L: see Literature 113. Johnson. CCI. in drama on Marlowe. ALP. in drama on Jonson. also C-L: Art History 139. Gopen.

Lawrence (DS4). Instructor: Quilligan. One course. the Bront's. Dickens. Moses. ALP. C-L: see Theater Studies 107S. or Pfau. ALP A generic approach to twelve short plays by Shakespeare in the genres of comedy and romance. ALP One course. One course. Auden. 126B. Criminality of Art. ALP One course. ALP (Taught in the Oxford Summer Program. Keats. 126A. One course. philosophy. Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances (DS2). Dickens. or Torgovnick. or DS4. Carlyle. Studies in a Single British Author (DS1. Psomiades. One course. Instructor: Moses. Visual Studies 128F 136. stories. George Eliot. Fielding. One course. and others. Mitchell. ALP. Pope. One course. ALP Major writers and genres. with special emphasis on the Brontës. CCI Nineteenth and early twentieth-century fiction. 1819-2000 (DS3). Shaw. Literature 151G 134AS. Butler. Nineteenth-Century British Novel (DS3). Instructor: Ruderman. Instructor: Pfau. Morris. and poetry such as Yeats. Trollope. D. poetry. and Ruskin. also C-L: Music 122S. Instructor: Baucom. and film as these formalize the psychological effects of history change. One course. 131AS. 132CS. Two courses. or Sussman. Literature 132AS 134B. ALP One course. C-L: see Theater Studies 113 133B. Thackeray. Lawrence. Special Topics in British Literature since 1945 (DS4). One course. essays. Austen. Two courses. political. One course. Richardson. and letters. 127. Browning. Eighteenth-Century British Novel (DS3). ALP Instructor: Staff. One course. ALP. Instructor: Aravamudan. Coleridge. 129C.125. Instructor: Psomiades. Tennyson. One course. the Rossettis. British and Irish Drama: 1890-1950 (DS4). ALP Principal writers of fiction. English Literature of the Romantic Period (DS3). Woolf. C-L: see Theater Studies 176. Arnold. Studies in a Single British Author (DS1. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 132AS 132ES. Mitchell. W Defoe. Hardy. as determined by instructor). 131S. drama. and others. Hardy. CZ One course. Arnold. British Literature: 1900 to 1945 (DS4). 133A. DS3. ALP. the Gothic novel. W Exploration of Lawrence's representative novels. Swinburne. Instructor: Applewhite. Radio: The Theater of the Mind. C-L: see Theater Studies 114 134.) Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. H. Instructor: Psomiades. DS2. Shelley. Eliot. One course. and intellectual currents of his time. Conrad. as determined by instructor). C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 129C 131. Joyce. 128. Topics in Renaissance British Literature (DS2). 137. also C-L: Literature 131C. or DS4. DS2. ALP Scott. ALP Wordsworth. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 139AS 270 Courses and Academic Programs . Browning. English Literature: 1832 to 1900 (DS3). and others. Meredith. ALP (Taught in the Oxford Summer Program. After the Fall of the Empire: British and Irish Drama 1945 to the Present (DS4). Smollett. Instructor: Staff. One course. C-L: German 174. Byron. ALP Instructor: Staff. DS3. Barrett Browning. Special Topics in British Literature I (DS1). 139AS. or Torgovnick. Topics in Nineteenth-Century British Literature (DS3 or DS4). ALP Can be counted as a pre-1500 course for the diversified requirement. The Melancholy of Art: Passages of Time in European Literature and Cinema. and Sterne. With emphasis on the development of themes and techniques and his relationship to the social. ALP Seminar version of English 131.) Instructor: Staff. Victorian Poetry (DS3). ALP Tennyson.

and how they have served (and continue to serve) as keys to the relations between Western and other cultures. English (ENGLISH) 271 . ALP Can be counted as a 1860Present course for the diversified study requirement. CZ. Jones. Shakespeare before 1600 (DS2). Cotton Mather. through a focus on a range of naturalist and realist authors. ALP. One course. especially Troilus and Criseyde. CZ One course. Porter. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 140BS 141. 140S. One course. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 141B 142. Romantic Fairy Tales: Literary and Folk Fairy Tales from Grimms to Disney (DS3) (DS4). Taylor. One course. ethically. C-L: see Literature 155. Ethics 150A. ALP. also C-L: Literature 163F. Hawthorne. C. ALP. Instructor: Cohen. CCI Topics differ by section. convergences. C-L: see German 173. One course. ALP Prose and poetry of American romanticism: Emerson. Instructor: Staff. One course. Duke-Administered Study Abroad: Advanced Special Topics in English. Instructor: Price or Quilligan. morally formative and transformative. literatures. ALP. of the social and political issues of their day through archival and literary research and readings. or Somerset. American Literature: 1820 to 1860 (DS3). One course. DeNeef. also C-L: History 179A. Instructor: Matt Cohen. Medieval and Renaissance Studies 182 144. Political Science 134. or Shannon. 152. ALP. Edwards. Gopen. Medieval and Renaissance Studies 183 145. ALP. W A study. C-L: see German 182. Ethics: Conflicted Middle-Class Subjectivity in the Novel 1800-1924 (DS3). or Jones. C-L: see German 185. ALP Can be counted as a 1500-1660 course for the diversified study requirement. Milton (DS2). also C-L: Literature 151E. R Poetry and its literary and social background. and Franklin. Gopen. CCI. Special Topics in British Literature IV (DS4). Instructor: DeNeef. DeNeef. Beckwith. American Literature to 1820 (DS2 ). C-L: Theater Studies 109. Davidson. C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 150 151. Poe. Instructor: Staff. B. and authors of the early Republic such as Tyler. Instructor: Aers. CCI. CZ One course. R The first two-thirds of his career. Vocation. EI One course. or Somerset. Gopen. One course. ALP. Beckwith. Freneau. Byrd. ALP.139BS. ALP. 143. Jones. Continuities. Professionalism. One course. One course. One course. R Usually ten plays after 1600. Brown. Chaucer (DS1). Instructors: Cohen. American Literature: 1860 to 1915 (DS4). Not open to students who have taken Drama 116. and confrontations between digital and textual cultures. ALP. C. CCI. ALP. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 145A 146. CCI Colonial authors such as Bradford. or Shannon. ALP. Strandberg. International Comparative Studies 183A 147. R The Canterbury Tales. Instructor: DeNeef. Chaucer (DS1). Authors include Cather. EI. Instructor: Staff. CCI One course. Instructor: Staff. STS Literature in the digital age. C-L: Theater Studies 110. Thoreau. Literature 163B 149. Special Topics in British Literature II (DS2). or Wald. Melville. Modernist Classics (DS4). Jones. Porter. Examination of these central Western cultural texts with respect to how they prove and have proved aesthetically. R. Shakespeare after 1600 (DS2). R Twelve plays before 1600. ALP Can be counted as a 16601860 course for the diversified study requirement. CCI. Instructor: Aers. Chesnutt. and practices. One course. CCI. Special Topics in British Literature III (DS3). 153. Gopen. 139ES. One course. and C. 1750-1930 (DS3). also C-L: Theater Studies 124 148. Classics of Western Civilization: The German Tradition. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 139BS 139CS. Davidson. EI. Digital Textuality: Theory and Practice of Digital Editing in the Humanities (DS4). and Whitman.

Pope. ALP Instructor: Staff. Moses. Studies in an Individual African American Author (DS4). or DS4. James Baldwin B. C. Film and hypertext. Studies in American Women Poets (DS4). Studies in a Single American Author (DS1. C-L: Theater Studies 132A 158BS. Moten. Readings in Frost. 162B. C-L: African and African American Studies 181 166. Instructor: Clum. including spiritual as lyric poetry and the slave narrative as autobiography. and sexuality. ALP. Modern American Poets (DS4). Autobiography B. Not open to students who have taken the former English 167. Hemingway. 155. CCI Asian American theatre and performance traditions. Dickinson. Critical framework for discussing race. Instructor: C. CCI. DS2. DuBois C. diversity of representation. ALP Novelists and poets prominent since 1960. American Literature: 1915 to 1960 (DS4). Moten. Crane. The Essay Instructor: Holloway. Asian American Literature (DS4). James. One course. or Wallace. or Strandberg. also C-L: Visual Studies 128C 163AS. Ethics 158. Contemporary American Writers (DS4). African American Literary Genres (DS3 or DS4). Instructor: Clum. and impact of critical methodologies on shaping American poetic literature. as determined by instructor). Jewett. Saldivar. EI One course. DuBois. Ferraro. ALP Continuation of English 164A. ALP. One course. A-E. Fitzgerald. One course. ALP. fiction and non-fiction. Twain. The late nineteenth century to contemporary writers. ALP One course. ALP. or Wallace. Pope. Davidson. including major dramatic texts and canon formation. One course. Instructor: Pope. ALP Covers a range of women poets with emphasis on modern and contemporary writers. drama. One course. CZ Asian/ American Cultural production from the late nineteenth century read in the context of United States colonialism and Asia/ Pacific wars and resultant migrations. E. ALP. The Novel F. and others. R A. Torgovnick. B. Wharton. Faulkner. Wald. Gayle Jones. C-L: African and African American Studies 174 165. subject. Instructor: Holloway. C-L: see Theater Studies 103. 157. Moses. Drama C. 163CD. 161. Instructor: Applewhite. Instructor: Metzger. Jones. CCI. shaping of critical reputation. Saldivar. 154. Washington. Includes such areas as methods of interpretation. Wald or Wallace. gender. lyrics (from poetry to rap). One course. Ferraro. Instructor: Holloway. Rich and others. American Drama and Film Since 1960 (DS4). ALP.Chopin. Types of Recent Fiction. or Willis. One course. One course. Poetry E. C-L: see German 170. Gilman. A-F. R Focus on twentieth century poets. R Oral and literary traditions from the American colonial period into the nineteenth century. Wald. Toni Morrison F. American Drama and Film: 1945-1960 (DS4). Moten. Freeman. W. Instructor: Holloway. also C-L: Visual Studies 128B 162C. CCI. ethnicity. ALP Eliot. One course. One course. Instructor: Metzger. C-L: African and African American Studies 173 164B. 163BS. C-L: see Theater Studies 102. R A. Rukeyser. developments in style. Not open to students who have taken the former English 168. C-L: African and African American Studies 182 272 Courses and Academic Programs . ALP One course. or Wallace. or Wallace. C-L: see Literature 151HD 164A. DS3. The Devil's Pact: Faust and the Faust Tradition. Ralph Ellison E. ALP One course. voice. Lentricchia. Not open to students who have taken this course as English 179ES. Davidson. Strandberg. Wallace. African American Literature (DS3). African American Literature (DS4). Strandberg. CCI. also C-L: Literature 163G. Hughes. One course. Asian American Theatre (DS4). ALP. CCI. and impact of cultural movements on development of voice and literary approaches. Wallace. One course. or Willis. Stevens. Moten.

sexuality. Marxist Criticism. Amy Tan. Readings from the United States and from Great Britain. One course. The Human Genome in Literature. Wallace. One course. Joyce Carol Oates. One course. Instructor: Holloway. C-L: Literature 151C 171BS. Women's Studies 176 173. Special Topics in Language and Literature (DS1. Global Performance from late 1950s to the Present. Instructor: Torgovnick. Margaret Atwood. C-L: see Literature 182AS 172AS. and Arundati Roy. or DS4. ALP Topics in the history of theory of aesthetics. as determined by instructor). Instructor: Staff. Special Topics in American Literature IV (DS4). CCI. literary criticism. EI One course. One course. ALP Instructor: Staff. South Africa. and more. ALP. Poetry and Medicine (DS4). CZ. with a primary focus on materials prior to the mid-twentieth century. Popular Fictions (DS4). One course. EI One course. Theater Studies 175A. 172C. ALP Can be counted as a 16601860 course for the diversified study requirement. Frank McCourt. One course. ALP Lecture version of 169CS. DS3. genrebending. Mario Puzo. Literature 133C. and the Caribbean. ALP Topics included: theory of film and the image. as determined by instructor). and the News (DS4). Seminar in African-American Literary Studies (DS3 or DS4. M. EI. 171A. C-L: see Literature 151BS. Caryl Phillips. ethnicity and ethnic identity. Can be counted as 1860--Present course for the diversified study requirement. Toni Morrison. Selected Topics in Feminist Studies (DS4). Contemporary Fiction (DS4). Special Topics in American Literature IV (DS4). 171ES. DS2. ALP. ALP Can be counted as 1860Present course for the diversified study requirement. and developing coping skills for healers and healed alike. One course. 170. India. Moten. DS2. Philip Roth. stories. Coctzee. theory of race. 169E. empathy and ethics training. CCI. John Barth. Special attention to how language. theory of drama. ALP. Instructor: Staff. or DS4. Instructor: Staff. ALP Instructor: Staff. CZ. ALP Can be counted as a 15001660 course for the diversified study requirement. or Willis. One course. 170S. Existentialism Between Cultures. English (ENGLISH) 273 . ALP. philosophy of language. Canada. 169BS. and the growing use of poetry in medical curricula for diagnosis. Instructor: Pope. One course. ALP. ALP Instructor: Staff. pictures and visual technologies structure our experiences. Special Topics in the History of Theory (CTM). as determined by instructor). postcoloniality.168S. Film. W Major trends in fiction since 1950: modernism/postmodernism. gender. One course. from representations of the body. its role in mediating personal and cultural trauma. Special Topics in Genre (DS1. 171GS. J. Instructor: Wald. to the power of poetry to console. R The multiple historical and contemporary relationships between the expressive and the healing arts. Special Topics in American Literature II (DS2). also C-L: Women's Studies 172S 171C. Writers may include: Vladimir Nabokov. Special Topics in Contemporary Theory (CTM). One course. ALP One course. Study how popular culture and mass media register and shape the public's response to social and cultural change. with a concentration on materials since 1945. the neuroscience of emotions. Kasuo Ishiguro. 169CS. Performance Studies. EI Structured around the challenges to the collective sense of what it means to be human posed by the genome sciences. One course. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. C-L: see Visual Studies 181. 169AS. feminism. ALP. also C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 175. CCI Topics may change each semester. DS3. One course. Special Topics in American Literature III (DS3). Instructor: Staff. 172BS. Michael Ondaatjc.

Open only to students admitted to 274 Courses and Academic Programs . Instructor: Torgovnick. 179ES. and subsequent seminar discussion of. One course. ALP Seminar version of English 173. DS2. 181BS. Theater in London: Text (DS2. C-L: International Comparative Studies 102B 178. performances. ALP. Postcolonial Fiction (DS4). Masculine Anxiety and Male-Male Desire in Drama and Film Since 1950. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 136. as determined by instructor). 180. Research or critical paper required. DS3. Instructor: Gopen or Khanna. films. as determined by instructor. the system of production and consumption surrounding that art form or activity. films. 179CS. and political context. C-L: see Theater Studies 116S 176C. Moses. STS The changes experienced by print and visual media (book publishing. One course. R. One course. The Arts in New York: A Thematic Approach (DS4). ALP One course. One course. CZ One course. and lectures. Political Science 174 181AS. Special Topics in Criticism. DS4. Theory. One course. Visual Studies 128GS 176B. History 115C. 179AS. CCI Comparative study of representative contemporary fiction from Africa. Special Topics in a Literary Genre I (DS1). One course. the Middle East. ALP One course. Students spend fifteen hours per week at the internship and write a substantive paper containing significant analysis and interpretation of the relation of the students' sponsoring institution to the art form of activity as a whole. exhibitions. Theater in London: Performance (DS4). such as music and painting. ALP Selected topics in the study of the interrelation of literature and other art forms. Latin America. C-L: see Theater Studies 116 176BS. historical. CCI. Torgovnick. ALP Can be counted as a pre-1500 course for the diversified study requirement. or DS4. also C-L: Literature 125AS. Theater in London: Performance. Special Topics in Literary Genre III (DS3). C-L: see Theater Studies 179S. each within its appropriate cultural. Special Topics in Language and Literature (DS1. All readings in English. One course. Introduction to African Studies (DS3 or DS4). Open only to students admitted to the Duke in New York Arts Program. DS3. ALP. newspapers. C-L: Theater Studies 128S 181C. Instructor: Staff. and the sponsor's organizational framework. Special Topics in Literary Genre IV (DS4). advertising) in the twenty-first century in how art and business can. Literature and the Other Arts (DS2. New Zealand. C-L: see African and African American Studies 107. ALP Instructor: Staff. Immersion in the professional art world through apprenticeship to a sponsoring artist or organization. One course. be done and in how they interact with society. or Wallace. DS3. or Methodology (DS1/ DS2/ DS3/ DS4. Theater in London: Text. and role in the creation. W Various topics dealing with the arts in New York. TV. Instructor: Staff. or DS4). preservation. operating mechanics. Khanna. theatre. C-L: see Theater Studies 151S 177. ALP One course. magazines. ALP Can be counted as a 1860Present course for the diversified study requirement. Instructor: Staff. ALP Can be counted as a 1500-1660 course for the diversified study requirement.173S. India. ALP One course. 179FS. Examinations through readings (including selected case histories) and guest speakers of how technology and technological change affect art and society today. Group attendance at. ALP. Instructor: Staff. and often must. C-L: see Theater Studies 151 176CS. One course. as determined by instructor). CCI One course. Australia. ALP. ALP. and the Caribbean. Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. 175S. Instructor: Baucom. 179BS. Internship in New York. Making Media (DS4). ALP Can be counted as a 1660-1860 course for the diversified study requirement. Special Topics in Literary Genre II (DS2). or interpretation of the art form or activity. One course.

Open only to students in the Duke in New York: Summer Internships in the City program. and other cultural venues in Durham and their interaction with the Research Triangle Park area more widely. Instructor: Staff. Introduction to Production. Visual Studies 117H 186B. or Moses. C-L: see Linguistics 187. Lincoln Square. Gaines. or directore. Information Science and Information Studies 184. C-L: Theater Studies 126A 181F. SS. Does not count toward the major. Consent of Instructor required. ALP One course. Cultural Policy (Core Cultural Theorists series). Variety in Language: English in the United States. Literature 116. SS One course. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 142S. guest speakers from the Durham area on campus. Downtown Development Plan. The Business of City Life. Publishing. Coordinated cultural events scheduled during evening hours. CCI. Public Policy Studies 172. selected site visits. One course. Conflict Resolution. and Film. Special Topics in Film (DS4). C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 106. CCI. Studies in Film History (DS4). One course. Topics to include global Chinese identity in Chinatown. Instructor: Torgovnick . Film/Video/Digital 105. C-L: see Film/ Video/Digital 108. and Selections from Critical Cultural Policy Studies: A Reader. media.the Duke in New York Arts Program. C-L: see Film/Video/ Digital 150S. ALP. EI. non-profits and conservancies in Lincoln Square/Central Park. also C-L: Literature 120G. under the supervision of a Duke faculty member. also C-L: Visual Arts 150S 187. national cinema. Special Topics in Film (DS4). also C-L: Literature 120F. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 107. SS One course. also C-L: Film/Video/Digital 109 185. also C-L: Theater Studies 173S. Individual non-research directed study on a previously approved topic. Intermediate Narrative Production. Open only to students in the Duke in New York Arts and Media Program. also C-L: Visual Arts 146S 186FS. STS One course. American Film Comedy. Instructor: Staff. or Jameson. Instructor: Clum. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 187. One course. Readings such as Cultural Master Plan for Durham. Disney in Times Square and Hell's Kitchen. ALP. Media. ALP One course. Comparisons to New York and to European models. Arts Management. Instructor: Torgovnick. 183S. Harlem. and Cultural Policy in Durham and Research Triangle. Experimental Filmmaking. Art History 136. Gaines. or director. A half-credit course to help place your internship in the business of city life. R Arts. period. ALP One course. C-L: Theater Studies 172. 181GS. Film Genres. ALP. C-L: Film and Video English (ENGLISH) 275 . resulting in a substantive paper containing significant analysis and interpretation. Saturday tours of city neighborhoods (Chinatown. Consent of instructor required. a few. One course. publication. C-L: Theater Studies 126 181E. One course. or technological development. Central Park) that have been visibly and dramatically impacted by developments in the city's economic life and in cultural or public policy. Visual Studies 115A 186A. and discussion. Duke in New York Arts and Media Independent Stud. Visual Studies 117F 186C. One course. Half course. C-L: see Literature 117. STS One course. CCI. also C-L: Political Science 156. ALP One course. period. C-L: see Film/Video/Digital 130S. lectures. International Comparative Studies 151C 189. ALP Close examination of a particular issue. Instructor: Staff. Visual Studies 117AS. with coordinated readings. ALP A major genre. period. Conflict. 189S. gentrification in Harlem. Instructor: Clum. ALP A major genre. Visual Studies 117G 186ES. Literature 120C. Political Economy of the Global Image.

Open to those whose thesis will be in the field of creative writing. Consent of instructor required. 197BS. memoirs. ALP. DS4. Instructor: Staff. Tutorials for two or more students working on related independent projects. CCI. R. resulting in an academic and/or artistic product. Instructor: Applewhite. One course. Instructor: Somerset. with readings in representative prose and poetry. Seniors. R Individual research in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member. Tutorials under the supervision of a faculty member for two or more students working on related independent projects. ALP. 202S. Research Independent Study. ALP. ALP. also C-L: Film/Video/Digital 121S 197A. Consent of both the instructor and the director of undergraduate studies required. DS2. Instructor: Porter or Price. ALP Continuation of English 197B. Semiotics of Culture (DS4). Introduction to Old English (DS1). Instructor: Staff. and Graduates 201S. Individual non-research creative writing project directed study in a field of special interest on a previously approved topic. ALP. Special Topics in the United States Culture Industries. Consent of instructor required. Consent of instructor required. Distinction Critical Independent Study. One course. For Juniors. personal aesthetic and creative process. One course. Open to juniors and seniors. as determined by instructor). C-L: see Literature 197S. Group discussion of technique. 276 Courses and Academic Programs . Narrative Writing. 198B. Instructor: Staff. 192. Half course. Distinction Program Sequence: Independent Study. ALP. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Instructor: Staff. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 202 207A.S. to illuminate the freedom and form of all poetry. Tutorial (DS1. Consent of both the instructor and the director of undergraduate studies required. the central goal of which is a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. W Open to those whose thesis will be a critical paper or piece of other research (for example. SS One course. One course. 196S. also C-L: Linguistics 205 206. Distinction Program Sequence. and rhyme with free verse. stanza. Consent of instructor required. Application and consent of Program Director/instructor required. Narrative and conceptual content considered within the poem's emotive. One course. R. Tutorial. musical dynamic. ALP An introduction to the language of the Anglo-Saxon period (700-1100). Not open to students who have taken 113A or the equivalent. in linguistics). One course. Close discussion of frequent submissions by class members. Instructor: Staff.191. revisions of poems. Readings from ancient and modern narrative. C-L: see Russian 202. ALP Open to those whose thesis will be a critical paper or piece of other research (for example. W Open to those whose thesis will be in the field of creative writing. DS3. 205. ALP. in linguistics). One course. R. under the supervision of a faculty member. 198A. Instructor: Staff. 194T. Critical Independent Study. Open to juniors and seniors. 195T. W One course. W A workshop comparing meter. C-L: see Russian 205. Pass/Fail grading only. CZ. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. One course. R One course. Pope. Semiotics and Linguistics (DS4). One course. May not be counted among the courses required for completion of the English major. tales. Instructor: Staff. CCI. Independent Study. and other narrations. W The writing of short stories. Instructor: Staff. Writing Poetry: Formal and Dramatic Approaches. One course. Consent of instructor required.

262. Shakespeare: Selected Topics (DS2). Instructor: DeNeef. ALP Selected topics. ALP Seminar version of 288. or Methodology (DS1. 271CS. Beckwith. Jones. Quilligan. Mitchell. ALP. R Selected topics. or DS4). C-L: see Linguistics 213S. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 221BS 231S. DS2. technology. Special Topics Seminar II (DS2). ALP Selected topics. SS One course. One course. One course. ALP Seminar version of English 235. or Somerset. R. Subjects. One course. Subjects. Instructor: Staff. ALP Selected topics. Victorian Literature: 1830 to 1900 (DS3). Subjects. Instructor: Cohen. or Wald. 245S. ALP. British Literature since 1900 (DS4). areas or themes that cut across historical eras. One course. Instructor: Aravamudan or Mitchell. One course. 251. 280. also C-L: Cultural Anthropology 213S 220S. One course. ALP. Can be counted as a 1860-Present course for the diversified study requirement. ALP Post-1968 film theory—Brechtian aesthetics. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 209S 213S. One course. 271BS. C-L: see Theater Studies 231S 235. cinema semiotics. Renaissance Prose and Poetry: 1500 to 1660 (DS2). One course. Can be counted as a 1660-1860 course for the diversified study requirement. R Topics vary be semester. or Somerset. R The first two-thirds of his career. several national literatures. Davidson. One course. Middle English Literature: 1100 to 1500 (DS1). STS One course. One course. Selected Topics in Feminist Studies (DS3 or DS4 as determined by instructor). also C-L: Information Science and Information Studies 284. Instructor: Staff. and English (ENGLISH) 277 . areas or themes that cut across historical eras. Theory. Selected Topics Centered on the Seventeenth Century (DS2). ALP Seminar version of 288. or Torgovnick. Instructor: Staff. or Pfau. C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 220S 221S. R Instructor: Porter or Shannon. Instructor: Aers. DS3. One course. One course. 271C. Instructor: Baucom. Instructor: Aers. One course. ALP Seminar version of 288. Instructor: Psomiades. 235S. Domesticity. ALP. 245. ALP Selected topics. W Seminar version of English 245. areas or themes that cut across historical eras. ALP Instructor: Staff. ALP One course. or Shannon. psychoanalytic film theory. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: 1660 to 1800 (DS3). or genres. Gender and Realism in the Twentieth Century American Drama. Contemporary Film Theory (DS4). ALP. Victorian Literature: 1830 to 1900 (DS3). 215S. American Literature to 1820 (DS3). CCI. R Selected topics. 271FS. 241S. Beckwith. 271ES. several national literatures. or genres. Instructor: Applewhite.212S. ALP. several national literatures. One course. Special Topics Seminar in Criticism. ALP Selected topics. ALP Seminar version of 288. One course. feminist theory. or genres. Instructor: Aers. Special Topics Seminar IV (DS4). Chaucer and His Contexts (DS1). Instructor: Staff. Instructor: Staff. especially Troilus and Criseyde. One course. Twentieth-Century Reconceptions of Knowledge and Science (DS4). Moses. Romantic Literature: 1790 to 1830 (DS3). Can be counted as a 1500-1660 course for the diversified study requirement. CCI. Linguistics and Law (DS4). C-L: Medieval and Renaissance Studies 213S 214S. Instructor: Staff. ALP. Special Topics Seminar III (DS3). C-L: see Literature 260. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: 1660 to 1800 (DS3). One course.

English 101B (Introduction to Cultural Studies): English 111 (Introduction to Linguistics): English 112 (Historical Linguistsics): English 115 (Gender and Language): English 172 (Literary Theory). areas or themes that cut across historical eras. and the ability to pose questions and organize knowledge in productive and original ways. Instructor: Gaines. Readings in Genre B. CCI. the major also seeks to encourage students to assume an enduring habit of questioning and intellectual self-articulation.Literary and Cultural Study 1860 to the present B. Can be counted as a 1500-1660 course for the diversified study requirement. While offering students clear direction on how to profit most from their study within the English department. and Anglophone literature.English 90B. One course. DS1. or genres.English 90AS. Instructor: Staff. Can be counted as a 1860-Present course for the diversified study requirement. Instructor: Staff. challenging. 288E. and intellectually distinctive plan of study. 288C. a sophisticated habit of critically engaging literary and cultural texts.Literary and Cultural Study 1660-1860 DS4. 288B. a shared understanding of major problems. SS Instructor: Staff. Special Topics III (DS3).Literary and Cultural Study 1500-1660 DS3. Special Topics in Criticism (DS3 or DS4).) Diversified Study Students must select at least one course in each of the following areas. For students matriculating in the fall 2003 semester and thereafter. One course. ALP Subjects. areas or themes that cut across historical eras. One course. areas or themes that cut across historical eras. the requirements for the major are as follows: Gateway Course. Students must select one of the following three courses. Special Topics II (DS2). ALP Subjects. theory. 288F.Literary and Cultural Study pre-1500 DS2. Film/Video/ Digital 288A. The following courses satisfy this requirement: English 101A (Introduction to Film). or genres. Reading Historically Seminar Each student must take at least nine additional courses at the 100 level or above. and complete it by or before the end of the junior year: A. Courses that appear in more than one area of study may only count for one designated area as determined by instructor. Each of the four areas of requirement for completion of the major thus invites students. or genres. THE MAJOR The English major is designed to convey to students a broad knowledge of English. or genres. ALP Subjects. One course. Methodology Students must select one course on criticism. Can be counted as a pre-1500 course for the diversified study requirement. several national literatures.Third World cinema. Courses must be chosen from more than one national literature. areas. 299S. and methods of literary and cultural analysis.English 90BS. Special Topics IV (DS4). trends. Reading Historically C. several national literatures. One course. several national literatures. in consultation with their advisor. One course. Instructor: Staff. Theory. American. Special Topics I (DS1). Instructor: Staff. ALP Instructor: Staff. C-L: Literature 282.) Criticism. One course. ALP Subjects. or methodology. Can be counted as a 1660-1860 course for the diversified study requirement. several national literatures. Special Topics in Linguistics. 278 Courses and Academic Programs . to devise a coherent. Five of these courses must satisfy the following requirements: A. or themes that cut across historical eras.

Home Seminar. 208. whose coursework and achievements have prepared them for a sustained and significant writing project. they should also apply for the Distinction Program. 90BS. working with a mentor-teacher and with Duke faculty. students pursuing honors in English will take nine courses plus two independent studies/seminars for the honors thesis. As an alternative to the independent study. One of the 100-level courses must be a designated seminar. and several courses in education. Among the requirements are one course in linguistics (English 111. This experience leads to an English-teaching certificate to accompany the bachelor's degree. Departmental Graduation with Distinction The graduation with distinction program is designed for the department's most serious students. or English 90AS. Anyone considering secondary school English teaching should confer with the director of secondary school teacher preparation in the Program in Education as soon as possible. Teacher Certification Each year a number of Duke English majors earn certificates as secondary school teachers. accelerated courses and ten weeks of full-time teaching and observation in the schools. Foreign Languages The department recommends that students majoring in English complete at least two years of college-level study. well-researched. since most private or parochial schools would prefer candidates who have earned teaching certificates. The department encourages students to commence with an honors project in the spring term of their junior year. Students contemplating graduate work in English should note that many master's programs require examination in one foreign language and that doctoral programs commonly require examination in two. Whereas the standard major in English asks for a total of ten courses. The program consists of two courses—either independent studies taken over successive terms or a “home seminar” (see below) to be followed by an independent study. Alternatively. an appropriate course in psychology. 119. these majors are essentially certified for other states as well. Five courses at or above the 100 level. If eligible. Candidates should have a solid background in both American and British literature. While licensed by the state of North Carolina. 112. Also. or the equivalent. 205. also helpful are courses in composition and cultural studies. students wanting to write an honors thesis should consider approaching a faculty teaching a seminar (100-level or higher) on a topic that is clearly related to their proposed thesis project. The completed honors thesis is typically a sustained. of a foreign language. Students beginning during the spring semester of their junior year will conclude their thesis project by the end of the fall term of their senior year. Students interested in linguistics are strongly urged to study at least one non-Indo-European language. and carefully revised piece of writing (approximately 70 pages or more). or 90B four of which must be at or above the 100 level. Advanced Placement credits and pass/fail courses may not be used. THE MINOR Requirements. Aspiring graduate students should consult their advisor. such training is urged for those who consider teaching in independent schools. The last semester of the senior year is devoted to the student-teaching block. or 209). Research and mentoring support may be available through the department and